Day At The Track
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History likely to repeat itself

All-conquering trainers Greg and Skye Bond are full of hope that history will repeat itself when they send Saying Grace, Our Jimmy Johnstone and Our Max Phactor out to do battle in the $25,000 Glenroy Chaff Ray Duffy Memorial over 2536m at Gloucester Park on Friday night. They are hoping that they will get a trifecta result to replicate their performance when they last had three runners in the Duffy Memorial in April 2013 when Russley Rascal, the 9/4 favourite from the No. 1 barrier and driven by Morgan Woodley, set the pace and won from stablemates Can Return Fire (Nathan Turvey) and Ima Rocket Star (Ryan Warwick).    This week the Bonds have excellent prospects of a 1-2-3 finish with Warwick in the sulky behind Saying Grace, Dylan Egerton-Green driving veteran Our Jimmy Johnstone from the No. 2 barrier and Colin Brown handling Our Max Phactor from an ideal draw at No. 2 on the back line. The New Zealand-bred Saying Grace is the least experienced runner in the field, with a record of 11 wins and five placings from 27 starts. He drops considerably in class after stout-hearted efforts in the Fremantle Cup and WA Pacing Cup on the past two Fridays and he should be capable of setting the pace and notching another victory. Saying Grace raced in seventh position in the one-wide line for much of the way in the 21936m Pacing Cup and battled on gamely to finish seventh, less than three lengths from the winner Rocknroll Lincoln. In the 2536m Fremantle Cup the previous week, he trailed the pacemaker My Field Marshal and was hopelessly blocked for a clear passage when a close and unlucky fourth being My Field Marshal. Our Jimmy Johnstone impressed in the Pacing Cup when he ran home solidly from last at the bell to finish fifth, while Our Max Phactor was always at the rear and was forced to cover a lot of extra ground in the final circuit. Our Max Phactor gave a sample of his class three starts ago when he raced wide early and then in the breeze before finishing second to My Field Marshal in the 1730m Village Kid Sprint. His previous 13 starts in Western Australia resulted in 12 wins and one second placing. Trainer Ross Olivieri and reinsman Chris Lewis combined to win the Duffy Memorial with Sensational Gabby in 2014 and Flaming Flutter in 2017 and they will be looking for Mr Mojito to cause an upset from barrier five. Olivieri will also be represented by Itz Bettor To Win, who will start from barrier six with Mitch Miller in the sulky. Handsandwheels, Vultan Tin and Runrunjimmydunn are racing with plenty of spirit, but will need luck from wide barriers. Handsandwheels warmed up for the race by starting from 60 metres over 2503m at Bunbury last Saturday night. He sustained a spirited burst, out wide, from the rear to win by a half-length from Attack On Command. He is a noted frontrunner, but reinsman Aiden de Campo contends that the powerful five-year-old will develop into a strong sit-sprinter. The Matt Scott-trained Always Arjay steps up in class, but has place prospects from the inside of the back line. The seven-year-old won for the fifth time this season when he started from 20m, raced three wide early and then without cover before finishing determinedly to snatch victory from Carrera Mach last Friday night.   Ken Casellas

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Gee Jay Kay is a bargain buy

Ron Huston made a wise decision when he outlaid $12,000 to purchase a Western Terror colt at the APG yearling sale in Perth two years ago. Now a three-year-old gelding by the name of Gee Jay Kay, he looks destined for an extremely bright career and he should resume after a two-month absence on a winning note. Trained at Byford by Vicki Lea, Gee Jay Kay will start from the coveted No. 1 barrier in the $18,000 Retravision Pace and Shannon Suvaljko’s intentions will be to set a solid pace over the 1730m sprint journey. Gee Jay Kay is the first foal out of the unraced Artistic Fella mare Case of Bubbly and the champagne should be flowing when Lea celebrates her 41st birthday next Thursday. Gee Jay Kay, who has raced six times for two wins and two seconds for earnings of $13,668, showed that he was ready for a powerful first-up performance with an outstanding trial over 2150m at Byford on Sunday morning when he dashed to an early lead and sprinted over the final quarters in 28.9sec. and 28.5sec. to win by seven lengths from Robbie Easton. Robbie Easton followed his trial effort with an easy four-length victory over Fulfil The Dream at Narrogin on Tuesday night when he finished strongly from sixth at the bell. Gee Jay Kay’s chief rival this week is sure to be the talented Ryan Bell-trained Shockwave, who has earned $86,990 from five wins, five seconds and three thirds from 15 starts. Shockwave will start from the No. 5 barrier with Gary Hall Jnr in the sulky. Gee Jay Kay has not raced since contesting a 2130m event at Gloucester Park on November 23 when he began speedily from barrier four and worked hard in the breeze before surging to the front 500m from home. He was still in front when challenged by Shockwave 250m later, but he then broke into a fierce gallop, losing about four lengths. He recovered and finished second, more than six lengths behind Shockwave. Shockwave covered a lot of extra ground before winning easily in moderate company at Bunbury two starts ago. He then raced at Gloucester Park a month ago when he raced in the breeze for much of the way before finishing third behind smart three-year-olds Patrickthepiranha and Its Rock And Roll. Ace trainer Gary Hall Snr has two runners in Friday night’s race, last-start winners Eloquent Mach (Stuart McDonald) and Major Survivor (Lauren Jones). But they will be tested from difficult draws, with Eloquent Mach starting from barrier six and Major Survivor from the outside (No. 9). Eloquent Mach has won at three of his past four starts and impressed at Pinjarra on Monday afternoon when he was sixth at the bell before finishing full of running to win from Galante and Bettor Be Oscar. Eloquent Mach covered a lot of extra ground before winning from Extradite at Pinjarra the previous Monday. Oakford trainer Ross Olivieri will be represented by Morant (Chris Voak) and Babyface Adda (Chris Lewis), but they will be tested from wide draws. Wanneroo trainer Debbie Padberg’s runners Antagonistic (Mark Reed) and Amadeo (Luke Edwards) have place prospects from barriers two and three, respectively.   Ken Casellas

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Bonds aiming for third Thunder victory

Champion trainers Greg and Skye Bond are poised to set a record by preparing the first horse to win the $50,000 The West Australian Nights of Thunder at Gloucester Park on Friday night from the outside barrier. They are pinning their hopes on classy four-year-old Bettor Aim, the least experienced runner in the Group 2 feature event whose prospects diminished slightly when he drew the outside (No. 9) barrier. No pacer has been successful from either barrier eight or nine in the 12-year history of the 1730m event but Bettor Aim was so dominant in winning one of the three qualifying heats last Friday night that he should be able to overcome the significant disadvantage of the wide draw. Bettor Aim started from the No. 2 barrier, dashed to the front after 200m and gave his rivals little chance when he set a scorching pace in his heat in which he won by just over three lengths from Bettor Be Lively, rating 1.52.4, a time faster than that recorded by the winner of the 12 finals. The 400m sections of the heat whizzed by in 27.6sec., 27.8sec., 27.9sec. and 29.3sec. The race record rate of 1.53 was set by Mohegan Sun when he enjoyed the one-out, one-back trail and finished strongly to beat the pacemaker Ti Amo Franco three years ago. The Bonds have an excellent record in the Nights of Thunder, winning the race from awkward draws with Quick Draw McCaw from barrier five in 2008 and with Ohokas Bondy from barrier seven in 2012. Both those winners started at 13/2 and were driven by Colin Brown.   Quick Draw McCaw, trained by Greg Bond, began speedily and set the pace before winning by a neck from Glitzy Miss. Four years later, Ohokas Bondy, trained by Greg and Skye Bond, was restrained at the start, was seventh with 600m to travel and fifth on the home turn before finishing powerfully to win by a half-length from stablemate Dundee Three, with other stablemates Seel N Print (barrier four) and Nimrod (barrier three) finishing eighth and ninth, respectively. Bettor Aim, to be driven by leading reinsman Ryan Warwick, raced four times in New Zealand for one win. That victory was as a three-year-old in his final appearance in New Zealand when he revealed his undoubted ability as a sprinter when he led early from barrier one, then raced three back on the pegs and moved to the breeze with 900m to travel before bursting to the front at the 150m mark and easily beating the favourite Ohanzee, rating 1.56.7 over 1950m at Addington in April of last year, with a final quarter in 27.9sec. He boasts an outstanding record in Western Australia seven wins, one second and one fifth (behind stablemate Ana Malak in the Golden Nugget championship last month). A wide barrier in the Nights of Thunder in 2015 contributed to the disappointment for the Bond camp when Our Jimmy Johnstone started favourite at 6/4 from barrier No. 6 and finished sixth behind Soho Lennon after racing four wide early and then in the breeze. In the final the following year, the Bond-trained Phoenix Warrior was a 2/1 favourite from the No. 1 barrier. But he broke in the early stages and finished last. The stable also has had two third placegetters in the Nights of Thunder final --- Pablito in 2009 and Bettor Offer in 2017. One of Bettor Aim’s toughest opponents on Friday night is likely to be Benhope Rulz, the only other four-year-old in the race. Benhope Rulz, prepared by Hall of Fame trainer Gary Hall Snr, has won at nine of his 24 starts and impressed in a qualifying heat last week when he began out wide at barrier seven, raced wide early and then in the one-out, one-back position before finishing strongly to be second to Mattjestic Star. Benhope Rulz will be handled by Gary Hall Jnr who is in dazzling form and has driven ten winners in the past week. Hall Snr will also be represented by Bettor Vision (Stuart McDonald) who led early and then trailed the pacemaker when a fighting third to Bettor Aim last Friday night. The five-year-old boasts a fine record of 30 starts for nine wins, seven seconds and five thirds.           The master trainer has a wonderful record in the Nights of Thunder with four winners (Tealsby Karita, Hokonui Ben, Soho Lennon and Mohegan Sun) as well as two second and three third placegetters. The oldest and most experienced runner in Friday night’s final is the Julie O’Neill-trained eight-year-old Mattjestic Star, who notched his 17th victory from 127 starts when he charged home from fifth at the 100m mark to win convincingly from Benhope Rulz and As Happy As Larry in the opening qualifying heat, rating 1.53.4. Mattjestic Star will begin from the No. 6 barrier and Darren Kerr will employ similar sit-sprint tactics on Friday night. Kerr has happy memories of driving Scan Air to a thrilling victory over hot favourite Scruncher in the 2010 Nights of Thunder final. Scan Air was eighth at the bell and flew home to overhaul the pacemaking Scruncher in the final 25 metres. Henley Brook trainer-reinsman Robbie Williams has high hopes of winning with As Happy As Larry, who has drawn the prized No. 1 barrier. As Happy As Larry revealed great gate speed from barrier three last week before setting a scorching pace and wilting only over the final stages. Williams is sure to take full advantage of the inside draw and As Happy As Larry will take plenty of catching.   Ken Casellas

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The 35 horses are safe

Cream Ridge, NJ - 1/23/19 - The 35 harness racing trotters and pacers at risk to ship to the Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses received enough support to by-pass a horrific end.   The Standardbred Retirement Foundation, (SRF) has either already moved most to safety or are scheduled to in the next 2 days. Those in need of veterinary care have received it already. The mare in foal has a wonderful offer from Fair Winds Farm in NJ to take her on to foal her, both mom and baby will then need homes.   Offers have been received and are being screened for experience, but this is a difficult match to make, therefore, other offers are appreciated.   Fair Winds will also take home the mare they had bred, Speed Week. They already have a few that were in trouble before and are now safe with them.   Morrisville College has reached out to help Sparkling Credit, the Celii family is helping the two they had bred, and Newhart will return to his family in Canada. A couple of other past owners have helped by paying to release the horses, but are unable to take them.   The greatest gifts have come from wonderful people who have offered homes and sponsorship, a long list that will be noted in the year end recognition.   Unfortunately, the youngest one, just 6, had suffered a fractured hip among other injuries and was humanely put at peace.   Home offers may fall through, and others, once screened, may not have enough experience, that will leave SRF in a bind, why more home offers and sponsorships are needed.   Thank you to all who have helped these vulnerable, needy horses.   You have changed their lives.   All 34 horses will be in quarantine for 30 days, in NJ, VA, and PA.   The facilities SRF uses have an open-door policy. Visitors are welcome.   Please email SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com or call Tammy at 609-738-3255 to offer help with fostering or homing, to make a donation or visit AdoptaHorse.org.   Please email SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com or call Tammy at 609-738-3255 to offer help with fostering or homing, to make a donation or visit AdoptaHorse.org.                               ‌             About Standardbred Retirement Foundation       Standardbred Retirement Foundation provides human care and services for horse in need of lifetime homes, and in crisis, through rehabilitation, training, adoption, life-long follow--up or life time sanctuary and offering therapeutic equine opportunities for children and adults.   Tammy Cailliau  

The U.S. Harness Writers Association's (USHWA) annual Dan Patch Awards banquet on Sunday, Feb. 24, is nearing and if you are planning to attend the gala festivities that will honor the best harness racing equines and humans in the sport in 2018, room reservations at the luxurious host site of the Rosen Shingle Creek resort in Orlando must be made by Saturday, Feb. 2. Rooms are nearly sold out so make sure you don't get shut out! Rosen Shingle Creek hosted last year's Dan Patch Awards banquet for the first time and the weekend was such a resounding success it was an easy decision for USHWA to return in 2019. This year's banquet, which will be held in the Gaitlin B ballroom, gets underway with the Red Carpet at 6 p.m., with the awards ceremony starting promptly at 7 p.m. Be on hand when the Pacer of the Year, Trotter of the Year and Horse of the Year are announced. The USHWA rate for a standard room at Rosen Shingle Creek is $199 (plus tax). For a direct link to the Rosen Shingle Creek special page to make USHWA room reservations, please click here. Tickets for the Dan Patch Awards banquet are $175, with a filet mignon dinner featured. Tickets can be ordered until Feb. 15 by contacting Judy Davis-Wilson at zoe8874@aol.com or 302-359-3630. Remember, all attendees will receive a 10-percent discount at all of the hotel's restaurants, a 10-percent discount at the Spa at Shingle Creek, and a green fees discount at the Shingle Creek Golf Club. There is still limited space available in the USHWA journal. The deadline is Friday, Feb. 1. To take out a congratulatory ad please contact Kim Rinker at trotrink@aol.com or 708-557-2790. U.S. Harness Writers Association

Don’t be fooled into thinking a change of drivers signals On The Cards as the clear horse to beat in the $50,000 JLT Futurity at Cambridge tonight.  Because while top horseman Zac Butcher hopes he has pulled the right rein he can’t be sure.  Butcher has been the long-time driver for Jack’s Legend, the former NZ Cup runner-up to Lazarus who was a sound fourth in the Auckland Cup two starts ago.  Back in a moderate four and five-year-old race he surely looks the horse to beat, especially as the small field could see him use his gate speed.  But Butcher will partner the less-credentialed Barry Purdon stablemate On The Cards, who has yet to mix it at the open class group company that Jack’s Legend has. Scott Phelan will partner Jack’s Legend.  “Ultimately the driver’s decision was up to Barry but, given the choice, I probably would have chosen On The Cards.  “Jack’s Legend is very fast, faster than On The Cards, but I thought On The Cards was super running second to Elle Mac in that 1:51 mile rate for 1700m last start.  “I could be wrong and either of them could win without surprising me but I am happy to be on On The Cards.”  Butcher admits Jack’s Legend may have more gate speed than On The Cards and could jump in front of him at the start and that, coupled with the small field being dominated by two stables (Purdon and Steve Telfer) could make for a tactical affair.  The race almost feels like an afterthought at the end of a busy northern summer but at $50,000 with group two status it is going to be a profitable afterthought for somebody.  It is also a leg of the $50,000 Pick6, with a jackpot from last week making this week’s pool more attractive than some of the lukewarm Thursday night Pick6 offerings. That starts on race five where the draw of Trojan Banner (1) and the talent of Eastanbull (11) suggest you only need that pair on your ticket.  The second leg has a hot favourite in Cowgirls N Angels (2) and her only real danger looks to be Phil Bromac (7). The third leg is a horror show that you could make a case for taking the field before the Futurity as the fourth leg.  Rock N Shard (5) is favoured over Afortunado (4) and Chosen Major (1) in the fifth leg while the trot always requires a few in the last leg and if you get that far you will want at least Malabar Spur (2), Caitlin’s Surprise (4), Grenado (5), Primus Inter Paris (6) and Luck Of The Moment (7).   Michael Guerin

ANDY Gath openly admits this is by far Tornado Valley’s biggest test. There’s no question the line-up Tornado Valley faces in Saturday night’s $250,000 Group 1 Great Southern Star is significantly strongly than the rivals he beat to snare the Inter Dominion crown last month at Melton. And that’s largely because of the presence of NZ’s best trotters, Marcoola. “Marcoola may simply be a better horse than Tornado Valley, at the very least I’d have to say he’s on par on what I’ve seen him do in NZ,” a frank Gath admitted. “He’s a seriously good trotter and when you throw in Temporale along with Speeding Spur, Tough Monarch and others, this is certainly the biggest test Tornado Valley’s had. “But we’re looking forward to it, especially now he’s drawn well. “I think he’ll lead, but we’re expecting pressure and I think he’s up to it. “We think he’s clearly better than Glenferrie Typhoon, who copped pressure all the way and still won a Great Southern Star. Tornado Valley is stronger and a much better racehorse.” But Gath admits to being surprised at how short Tornado Valley is in Aussie TAB markets at $1.50. “It’s hard to see why he should be shorter than the Inter Dominion when he’s only won his past two starts by a metre and this is such a stronger field,” he said. “If the best Marcoola turns up, I’m sure the fans are in for a fantastic contest and there’s certainly enough other really good horses in the race to come and beat us both if the race is run to suit them.” Gath sharpened-up Tornado Valley with a Melton trial on Tuesday. “We skipped the race at Ballarat last week and decided to go to the trial instead. He hit the line well and it’s right where we want him,” he said.   Adam Hamilton

New racing regulatory standards have just been published by the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) as part of a continuing process to adapt standards to current integrity threats as well as new technologies and innovation.   The standards are embodied in the almost 500 pages of the ARCI’s Model Rules of Racing and can be downloaded using the link below. In addition more than 70 previously unclassified substances were added to the ARCI Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances, the guiding document for horse racing’s anti-doping and drug testing program, providing guidance to regulatory authorities and labs as to the potential threat posed by the substance if found.   Unclassified substances, if found, remain a violation and are treated severely if found absent mitigating circumstances. The ARCI increased recommended penalties for clenbuterol and albuterol violations in Quarter Horse contests, recommending a one-year and $10,000 fine for a first violation involving either drug if found at any level.     This change, requested by the AQHA, is designed to combat the abuse and misuse of these otherwise legal medications in quarter horse contests.   In an effort to protect horsemen, new screening limits developed by the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) for testosterone (in fillies, mares, and geldings) and morphine (as a potential contaminant) were also adopted.   “The ARCI is appreciative for the work of those organizations that participate in the Model Rules process and propose changes to what has been an effective and universally accepted foundation for racing regulation,” said Ed Martin, the group’s President.  “We are particularly grateful for the contributions made by the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium, the Racing Officials Accreditation Program, the Stronach Group, and the American Quarter Horse Association for their work on many of the standards that have been adopted.”     The updated standards also include: a change in the condition eligibility determination for horses which are placed first due to an adverse laboratory finding against the winning horse (ARCI-006-020);  modifications to the coupled entries rule (ARCI-010-010);  a description of the duties and authorities of outriders (ARCI-006-077);  an addition to the recently adopted concussion protocol which requires jockeys to provide the results of an annual baseline concussion assessment test as a condition of licensure (ARCI-008-030), and;  a set of guidelines for single pool (also known as merged pool) pari-mutuel calculations. The guidelines will be published as an industry advisory on the ARCI website.  Updates to the regulatory standards are considered three times each year and pending matters are posted at www.arcimodelrules.online .     In some jurisdictions, portions of the ARCI standards are incorporated by reference in rule or statute, affording them the force of law in that jurisdiction and advancing regulatory uniformity.  The ARCI is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making authorities for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America and parts of the Caribbean.  ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, and racetrack operation and security, as well as for off-track wagering entities.   Access or Download the Lastest Versions of the ARCI Standards. Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International (859) 224-7070   Ext 4001   MODEL RULES OF RACING - Version 8.5 Access Online Version (PDF) Download MS Word File.     Uniform Classification of (Prohibited) Foreign Substances - V.14 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)   ARCI Endogenous, Dietary, or Environmental Substances Schedule - V.4 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)     The ARCI (RCI) is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making bodies for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America, Mexico, parts of the Caribbean, and Riyad, Saudi Arabia.     ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, racetrack operation and security, as well as off-track wagering entities. ARCI's members are the only independent entities recognized to license, enforce, and adjudicate matters pertaining to racing. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARCI.  

YONKERS, N.Y. – Although Troy Beyer grew up around Standardbreds, it was a singular moment in his adolescent years that ultimately pushed him down the path of becoming a harness racing horseman. At just 23 years old, Beyer has already worked among some great horses in the stables of Nancy Johansson and Noel Daley. The Illinois native now plies his trade in the barn of Brett Pelling with the goal of becoming a catch driver.  Beyer made his first pari-mutuel start in 2013 and spent the next three years driving in Illinois with some success. 2018 proved to be the young reinsman’s breakout year however, as he teamed up with Ricky Bucci to compete for the rich purses at Yonkers Raceway. Beyer drove 16 winners last year and another 50 in the money to purses of $305,308.  Although he is still searching for his first win in the new year, Beyer already has six top three finishes at the Hilltop and has his sights set on a big year. Beyer has first call on all of Bucci’s starters, including distaffer Made Of Jewels As and open trotter Mostinterestingman, who regularly compete in the track’s $44,000 features.  Beyer took the time to chat with the SOA of NY’s Brandon Valvo about his career so far and his aspirations in the sport. BV: How did you first get involved in harness racing? TB: My dad used to train horses several years ago; that’s how I got into it. I really didn’t get into it until I was probably around 13 or so. I really started to get into it and it just kind of took off from there. It got into my blood and ever since I’ve been right into it. I was out jogging, I just never knew what it was for when I was really young. It just wasn’t something I wanted to go do or anything. I just didn’t realize what it was for.  BV: What was the moment when it clicked that made you realize this was for you? TB: Probably when I was 13 my dad wanted me to go train one for him at the little farm we were at in Illinois and I think ever since that day, I did it once and I was hooked. It was just that easy. The horse was Casino Comp. At the time, she was just very young. I don’t even think she had raced yet. It might have even been her first time training. She turned out to be an alright condition horse at Balmoral and just raced through the conditions, basically. She was an alright horse, made a little money for us.  BV: And when did you first start driving in races? TB: At 16 I started driving qualifiers. I schooled one first for a friend of ours at Balmoral. I schooled a trotter and I just loved that. As soon as I did it, I wanted to just do it all the time. Just the adrenaline rush was awesome.   BV: You mention you’ve worked with some big stables already. Who are some of the nicer horses you’ve gotten to work with so far? TB: When I came to the east coast, I worked with Nancy Johansson. When I came in, JK She’salady was there, but it was at the end of her career. But getting to be around a horse like that, she was a cool horse to see and it was exciting to have a horse like that in the barn. I looked after a horse called Wicked Little Minx. She was a nice little mare, she made a little bit of money for Nancy. Another good little horse we had at the time was Cruzado Dela Noche, who won the International last year. Really cool little horse. Really awesome personality.  BV: Were you there at Yonkers when he won the International Trot? TB: Yes, I was. That was exciting. I’m not a gambling kind of person, but a buddy of mine that was down watching the race, I told him, ‘you know what, I bet this horse will win because he’s a cool little horse, he’s a nice horse, and I know they’ve been prepping him for this race for a long time.’ And sure enough he went out and won.  BV: It looks like this past year, you really started to ramp up the number of starts you were making. TB: Yeah it picked up really well for me, especially the last three months of the year, it picked up really strong at Yonkers. The last couple years, I’ve been working for Noel Daley and just had one or two of my own in the winter time. Noel helped me a ton. He got me a lot of drives for him and for people who saw me drive for him. He gave me a shot in stakes races, too and people saw that and they gave me a shot, too. I would go and drive one or two a week at Yonkers and really just always show up and it’s worked out well for me. A snowball effect happened where it just picked up stronger and stronger and then I picked up Ricky Bucci as a big account and there’s a couple other little guys and it’s just really worked out well. We had a lot of luck and made a lot of good money at the end of the year there. BV: How did you team up with Ricky and get first call on all his horses here at Yonkers? TB: I’m driving all of them now and that’s awesome. I drove one for him and won straight away. He gave me a shot, put me up on a few and we did really well right away and it’s just taken off from there. I listen to what he has to say about them and how he wants to race them. He gives me a lot of freedom to let me do what I want with them. It’s just worked out really well. BV: Do you tend to be on the aggressive side? Do you try to be a little more patient? What’s your style like? TB: It just really depends on the horse and it depends a lot on the draw at Yonkers. If they have the inside, I’m more inclined to be aggressive with them and if they’re mid-pack, it just depends on the horse and what class it is.  BV: Yonkers is not an easy place to break into when you consider the driving colony here. Were you surprised to get such a big account relatively quickly? TB: Honestly, yeah, I was really surprised. It was almost like night and day. Ettore (Annunziata) told him to give me a shot. He came and asked me one night and said, ‘I have a friend of mine who needs a driver, he wants to put you down on a couple.’ I thought I was going to drive maybe one or two for the guy, I didn’t even know who it was. The sheet came out and I was down on three. It was just like a light switch. From that moment, I was driving a bunch really quick after. BV: And even getting drives in the Open Handicaps. Talk a little about Made Of Jewels As and what she’s like to drive and to work with. TB: I really, really love driving that mare. She’s classy and she likes to race from off the pace, which I like to, too a lot of times in the upper conditions. They kind of beat themselves up early and then usually you can sit back and come at the end of it. They pop up and win every once in a while for good money. She’s just a lovely horse to drive, she runs in a little bit, but you just help her through the turns and wait on her and she’ll give you everything. She’ll just fly home. She can fly. You can do whatever you want with her. BV: And what about Mostinterestingman? TB: He is awesome. I really love driving that horse, too. The pair of those two horses are really nice to drive. Mostinterestingman, he’s really nice to drive. He doesn’t really get on a line or anything like that. You can do whatever you want with him. If you want to leave out of there with him, you can and he has no problem with it. If you want to duck and race him off a helmet, he does that just as good. He doesn’t get grabby in a hole or grabby up front. Just two fingers, a really good horse to drive at any time, no matter where you are. BV: You’re a young guy, just getting started. What are your goals for your career? Do you aspire to be a catch driver? A trainer? What path do you see yourself pursuing? TB: I like doing both. I like training and driving. I would like to eventually just catch drive. That’s what I really love to do. But I don’t mind training either. I really enjoy training babies down. I might keep doing that, just have a couple of my own in the winter time and just work with babies. But my main goal is catch driving for sure. That’s what I really love to do and want to do. If you love what you do, you never work a day in your life. Live harness racing is featured at Yonkers Raceway every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night. First post time is 6:50 p.m. For entries to the races, click here. By Brandon Valvo for the SOA of NY

Trenton, NJ — For harness racing driver Dakota Jackson, ignorance may not have been bliss, but it sure was advantageous. On Nov. 21, the 20-year-old recorded his first driving win when he guided Dontcallme Dude to victory at Ohio’s Northfield Park. What Jackson did not know when the race started, is that his horse went off at odds of 6-5, making him the favorite for the first time in his young career. “If I knew I was the favorite, I probably would have found some way to mess up the race and mess up my drive,” Jackson said with a laugh. “I thought I expected to be maybe third or fourth choice. I didn’t expect to be 6-5 and have everybody putting their money on me.” Sitting in third after the opening quarter-mile, Jackson decided to make his move.   Dakota Jackson recorded his first driving win when he guided Dontcallme Dude to victory on Nov. 21 at Northfield Park. JJ Zamaiko photo.   “I was kind of hesitant to pull,” he said. “I thought, ‘I’m going to pull this horse too early and I’m going to get beat.’ I looked over and thought ‘If I don’t get out now I don’t know if I’ll ever get out.’ At about the half-mile pole I kicked the plugs on him and going past the paddock, my dad and my brother and everyone was standing there, and I just let out the biggest holler I could let off. As soon as I did that the horse pinned his ears back and just went. It was exciting.” Dontcallme Dude won by 3-1/2 lengths, leading to a feeling Jackson never had before. “When I came across the line I was shaking,” Jackson said. “I didn’t really think I had it won. I could still hear everyone behind me so I wasn’t going to count it until I got across the line. When I did I thought ‘Aw gee, this is nice.’” Jackson has not won since then, although he has barely raced since he does not have winter colors. He is anxiously awaiting the start of the season while he works as a trainer for James Stiltner in Ohio. Dakota and his twin brother, Zachary, have wanted to drive and train ever since they were boys growing up in Monroe, Mich. Their parents, Kelly and Charles, met at the Indiana State fairgrounds in Indianapolis. Charles is also in the business, which is one of the reasons he wanted his boys to stay out of it. “My dad wanted me and my brother to go into the military,” Jackson said. “He knew how hard it was. He wanted us boys to have good financial stability. My mom was kind of a little hesitant, but if we wanted to drive or train horses or be a blacksmith, my mom was always kind of ‘Go ahead do what you want, I’ll be supporting you the whole way.’” Pretty much everyone in Monroe who knew the Jackson twins knew where their hearts lied. “A lot of people will tell you, when Raceway Park was opening up, every morning and every afternoon before the races, me and my brother would actually hook race bikes to the fence at Raceway Park and we’d actually pretend we were driving,” Dakota said. “We kind of had a gist that we wanted to be drivers and trainers for a long time.” Jackson jogged his first horse at age 6 and trained his first at age 12. “My dad was jogging one on the track, he told me not to go do it; I went ahead and did it anyway,” he said. “It was at the Red Mile where I trained my first horse. We didn’t go very fast, it was like 2:45 or something.” At age 12, the boys moved with their mom to Mentor On The Lake, Ohio, a town on Lake Erie just northeast of Cleveland. Jackson continued to learn the business and at age 18 he got his driving license. He also bought his first horse — which he still owns — an 11-year-old by the name of Milliondollardad. He purchased him for $2,500 from David McNeight III and feels it was a successful purchase despite limited monetary success. “He hasn’t made me a whole lot of money but he’s taught me how to drive, he’s taught me patience and taught me a lot of respect for a horse,” Jackson said. “I would never have had the chance to even start driving without him. I owe big things to Davey McNeight and that horse.” Asked how the horse helped him so much, Jackson said Milliondollardad did things he never thought a horse could teach a person. “At first a lot of people said he was dangerous,” Dakota said. “In my eyes he was never really dangerous. He was more or less a real finicky horse. You can’t fight with him, you can’t be hard on his mouth. You’ve got to learn patience with him, you’ve got to do it his way. You’ve got to work with him instead of against him. “Me being 18 years old, I was eager to drive, I wanted to have a horse with a lot of gate speed. He could leave a little but he could never really leave a whole bunch. The guys here (at Northfield) are seasoned drivers, they want you to earn your respect as much as they want to give you your respect. So I kind of got stuck toward the back a little bit and picked up a lot of thirds, fourths and fifths with him. Aaron Merriman drove him on Jug Week in Delaware. He ended up fifth. That was my first Jug Week as a trainer so the horse raced huge, I thought.” With the support of his girlfriend, Lexi Chadbourne, Jackson plans on claiming a horse or two, and also wants to start driving Milliondollardad more frequently. “Lexi really gives me confidence,” Dakota said. “She has a horse too and I drove her horse (Three New Dawns). She does a lot for me when it comes to getting confidence. If I have a bad race, she’ll still come up and tell me ‘Hey, you drove him fine.’” While he is both a trainer and driver, Jackson’s ultimate goal is to be a catch driver. “I want to have a couple horses on my own and I want to be able to catch drive for other people,” he said. “I’m just not getting a lot of chances. But my mom said ‘Sooner or later it will come, you’ve just got to wait.’” Jackson is willing to wait for as long as it takes, considering he never wanted anything else. “My sister, Hillary Miller, will tell you she doesn’t know why we want to do it, she just knows we want to do it and she’ll support us 100 percent,” Jackson said. “My brother and I have always wanted to be in this business our whole life. There was never a question about it.” by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent

January 22, 2019 - Snow appeared in the Paris-Vincennes region this day and harness racing took place on a muddy racecourse. The featured Prix de Port-Audemer (purse 56,000€, 2100 meters autostart) with victory earned by the 7.1/1 Four Your Madrik (4m Up And Quick-Quelea Madrik) handled by J. Ph. Monclin for trainer J.L. Bigeon and owner Joel Seche. Far West du Rib (4m Memphis du Rib-Unopaline du Rib) was second at 50/1 with J.L.Cl. Dersoir driving for Ecurie Rib and trainer Joel Hallais. 14/1 Facetieux (4m Niky-Shustina) was third for J-M Bazire. Race time was 1.13.kr over the off going. Four You Madrik The Prix de Lamballe (purse 31,000€, 2700 meters) capped the card and produced a 1.16.4kr timed victory for 11/1 Elite de Duffel (5f Ready Cash-Reine de Duffel) and reinsman Christophe Martens, trainer Vincent Martens and owner Mme. Ingrid Vonckx. 10/1 Enigme des Andiers (5f Sun Ceravin) was second with trainer Jeremy Koubiche at the lines. Third was 4.4/1 Emba du Vivier (5f Riseaide Jeux) with Jean Michel Bazire driving. Elite de Duffel At Mons Ghlin the featured Prix Bresil (purse 7,200€, 1750 meters autostart, nine European starters) went to the veteran class-master and 2.2/1 second choice Truman Dairpet (12g Biesolo-Heloise Poterie) timed in 1.13.7kr and reined by Piet Va Pollaert. The Union stable owned performer won for the 31st time in 131 career outings now for 691,548€ earned. 4.3/1 Gossip Sidney (9g SJs Photo-Super Sidney) was second for Marc Huygens and 17/1 Va Zizou (10g L’ecu du Verney) took third with trainer Mathieu Brun at the lines. The 8/10 favorite As Dore was a dq. Truman Dairpet The region’s snowfall covered Grosbois as well, ahead of the world’s greatest trotting race on Sunday.  The pre-weekend festivities also feature the 32nd Edition of the Prix d’Amerique Mixed Sale conducted by Arqana Trot and the Etalons Expo with over 100 vendors, farms and association represented. The catalog link “smart format” and the listing follow: Smart Catalogue Arqana Trot Prix d’Amerique Sale click on this link Listing Catalog click on this link A directory of the presenters may be found on the Arqana-Trot website (www.arqana-trot.com). Thomas H. Hicks  

The depth of quality in this year’s yearling draft is reflected in the record number of harness racing trainers and owners who have registered to attend Southern Bred Southern Reared’s Yearling Tour in February. Included in this year’s draft are some of the big names in the industry and in addition there’s going to be a sprinkling of new faces. Michael House and Ken Barron have been on all previous Tours and many other prominent potential buyers have been regulars, including Robert Dunn, Brent Mangos, Ray Green, John Dunn, Phil Kennard, Ken and Karen Breckon, Greg Payne, Trevor Casey, Ken Barron, Grant Payne, Tony Herlihy, Michael Purdon, Cran Dalgety, Bunty Hughes, Gavin Smith and Peter Blanchard. The Tour is into its seventeenth year and regular visitor Michael House says as a buyer/trainer it’s a great opportunity to see what’s available and replenish racing stock. “There’s often a good horse hiding amongst them and its wonderful comradery with the boys. It’s good to get it out of the way because there are some horses you don’t have to see later on and you can focus,” he said. The Tour, particularly in recent years has produced some high priced graduates. One of these is Chicago Cub, a full brother to millionaire pacer Chicago Blues. Chicago Cub topped the Christchurch Sales last year selling to Emilio and Mary Rosati for $190,000. The second highest yearling was another SBSR colt bred by Arden Lodge’s John and Judy Stiven - Arden Roanoke, which sold for $155,000. In 2016 The SBSR group produced the top two lots in Mach Shard ($200,000) and Honor And Glory ($170,000) whilst further back Bollinger sold for $200,000 in 2015. His half brother Titanium was the top lot in 2013 at $170,000, and Beaudiene Beaufighter was a sales topper in 2014.  When Michael House was on the Tour in 2007 he spotted a diminutive black Bettor’s Delight colt named Highview Tommy at Highview Stud in Riverton. “I’ll never forget that day. There was quite a bus load of us. He was a small horse but he was very strong in stature. At Dave Clarks he was standing in the middle of the courtyard and everyone was walking around him. He was so relaxed. I was taken by him and I had to have him after that. Smiling Shard was another horse I really loved. Every year there seems to be a good horse.” Highview Tommy House bought Highview Tommy for $40,000 before selling him at the Ready To Run Sales to Hazel van Opzeeland and Glenys and Phil Kennard for $200,000. He ultimately won seventeen races and $1,021,904. This year sees some of the younger trainers coming on the Tour with the likes of John Dunn, Mitchell Kerr, Michael Purdon, Bob Butt and Regan Todd all confirmed visitors. “The trick to yearling sales and my advice to anyone wanting to start out is that you’re buying the horse that is in front of you not its relative. That’s a quote from Michael House. The page (in the catalogue) is only a guide,” he advises. Ken Barron has also attended all seventeen Tours and has seen it develop in that time. “It’s a very well run tour and it’s had a bit of fine tuning over the years. To fly to Invercargill and out of Dunedin has streamlined it a bit,” he said. Barron says that because the three major yearling areas – Auckland, Canterbury and Southland/Otago all have to fit their yearling tours in post-Christmas the schedule has got tighter. “It used to be good to see them early on and then later, see how they’d developed. Now it’s so close to the sale it’s about eliminating the ones you don’t want or seeing the ones you like, to save you time on the day.” He says SBSR has tried to work through this issue but everyone has accepted that the tours are difficult to programme now. “You can’t do it pre-Christmas and there’s very little time between Auckland, Canterbury and Southern. John Stiven has worked very closely with the buyers and tried to appease us all. It’s the only thing we can’t do anything about.” One of the first time visitors on the tour in February is young Canterbury trainer Michael Purdon whose uncle Grant Payne recommended that he should come south. “He said it’s quite a good tour and worth checking out. As a young trainer I’m building up a bit of a client base so you can do these sorts of things. It’s a good chance to look at them while they’re still relaxed and they’re not worried about anything that’s going on around them. You can go up to them and have a good look at them,” Purdon said. He bought three yearlings from last year’s Sale of the Stars; Ringo’s A Star (Bettor’s Delight-Blackbird Fly) for $23,000, Willie Go West (Auckland Reactor – Bettor Go) for $20,000 and One Guz Hall (Angus Hall – Landora’s Pearl – passed in at $35,000. “They’ve turned out pretty good so far. The Angus Hall trotter is on a deal.”  One Guz Hall carries the ownership of breeders Heather and Lex Williams and Michael and his brother Nathan while Ringo’s A Star is owned by Michael Purdon. Willie Go West is also owned by Michael and his mother Vicky. The SBSR Tour will be held over two days - Monday 11th and Tuesday 12th February. On Day One the Tour will visit Price Bloodstock and Julie Baynes in Winton and then Dave and Dawn Kennedy at Bayswater. Day Two features yearlings at Shard Farm, Arden and Macca Lodge combined, Tuapeka Lodge and Wingatui. Southern Bred Southern Reared looks forward to presenting an excellent group of horses for perusal and sale. Bruce Stewart

Don’t be surprised to see the trotting ranks bolstered at the APG Yearling Sales in Brisbane in the next few years. In 2018 Racing Queensland and international breeders, Haras de Trotteurs, have joined forces to stimulate the breeding of trotters in Queensland. Haras de Trotteurs and Yabby Dam Farms principal, Pat Driscoll, said the partnership gave participants the chance to win and take ownership of one of 14 well-bred broodmares.  “The offer was open to breeders, trainers, owners and trotting enthusiasts, who wanted to includes the ownership of a mare, with a free service to one of Haras des Trotteurs’ stallions for the first year. “The winners could have gone to any stallion but we were offering the free service to Used To Me, Dream Catcher, and En Solitaire,” Driscoll said. One such new owner(s) was delighted couple Brian McCall and Rachel Beaton. “This is a fantastic concept and those who organised it need to be applauded. We drew out Madam Commander (Majestic Son – Commander Jewel, NZ) and she is a lovely mare. “When the idea was first mooted we thought the mares would be old horses coming to the end of their breeding careers, but this couldn’t be further from the truth,” McCall said. “Madam Commander is just four and has huge breeding potential,” added the Queensland trainer and APG auction spotter. He said he put the mare to Haras de Trotteur's French stallion, Used To Me (Nuage De Lait – North Lane) twice this breeding season, but her cycles weren’t compatible. He said he would keep her fit until the next breeding season and likely head back to Used To Me again. “I liked the pedigree match-up,” McCall said. Driscoll said the concept was a ‘no brainer’. “I personally love trotters and wanted to provide a more solid base for them here in Queensland. They are a much more majestic animal than pacers. “Trotting is international whereas pacing seems to only be run in Australasia and North America. There is huge potential to be had here in Queensland,” Driscoll said. He said each mare that was offered must remain in Queensland for at least the initial breeding season to ensure offspring are QBRED eligible - with a minimum expectation that the foal’s first race start be in Queensland. “The new owner must also fund transport costs to Queensland for both the mare and semen,” Driscoll said. He also paid a tribute to fellow supporters of the concept - prominent trotting owner Jeroen Nieuwenburg and Racing Queensland. Racing Queensland Harness Development Strategy Manager, David Brick, said the generous offer would be a major stimulant to the local ranks. “Many thanks must go to Pat for this generous offer to help stimulate breeding in Queensland, and to Jeroen, who has been pivotal in helping to get it off the ground,” he said. Mr Driscoll said he was a passionate supporter of the trotting gait and hoped the initiative will kick start the breeding of trotters in Queensland and lead to the introduction of two-year-old trotting races in the state. Brick said the trotting gait had experienced a resurgence in recent years, driven largely by international wagering returns, and Australian breeders being able to access the best international breeding lines. He added a number of initiatives will be introduced in the coming season to grow racing opportunities for trotters, including enhancements to last year’s Winter Carnival program through the $20,000 Haras des Trotteurs Marathon and the $15,000 Haras des Trotteurs Mobile joining the $30,000 Seelite Windows and Doors Queensland Trotters Cup. “There will also be the new QBRED trotters features in 2018/19, and the introduction of a juvenile trotters series similar to the Foundation Series established in New South Wales,” Brick said. The ballot was drawn publically at Albion Park on Saturday July 7. The 14 new owners (with mares) are: John Edmunds (Bartali), Alex Cain (Bella Sorella), Gerard Maloney (Bigonluck), Gary and Jodey Whittaker (Calder Luck), Graydon McCoombes (Ella Galleon), Ken Wills (Eilish Monarch), Paul Morris (Fiona Jay),  Anthony Perkins (Lucky Love), Rachel Beaton (Madam Commander), Heather Warl (Majestic Elsa), Colin Knox (Mya Grace), Gary Chequer (My Dreamweaver), Rob Plunkett and Shane McConnell (Parisian Dancer), and Shane McConnell (Yankee Duchess).   By Duane Ranger for Racing Queensland

Kiwi horseman Clint Ford was too angry to enjoy the fact his trotting star drew well in the A$250,000 Great Southern Star on Saturday.  Because he believes he and father Ken have been robbed of having two horses in the group one race at Melton on Saturday night and it is hard to argue with him.  Ford is the unofficial trainer and driver of Marcoola and took him to Australia for Saturday’s race along with stablemate Amaretto Sun.  But he was stunned on Tuesday morning when Harness Racing Victoria officials rang to inform him Amaretto Sun was only first emergency for the Great Southern Star and will need a scratching to make the field.  “I couldn’t believe it,” says Ford.  “I went online as soon as I could to look at what got in before him but the noms were taken down.  “But now I have seen the field I am sure he should be in there in front of at least three or four of the others.  “So I was pretty annoyed and all we can do now is hope for a scratching.”  Ford’s annoyance is understandable as 14 months ago Amaretto Sun won Australasia’s equal richest trotting race the Dominion at Addington, arguably the strongest trotting race in the Southern Hemisphere.  He suffered from soreness soon after and raced only twice more last season then struggled upon his return this season before bouncing back to form with a win in the Green Mile at Methven and more importantly a third in the group two Lyell Creek at Alexandra Park last.  But that has been rated inferior form to Victorian locals like Pizza Queen and Dance Craze, who have never won a major open class race, and while recent winners they were in inferior Victorian trot fields away from GSS favourite Tornado Valley and the Inter Dominions.  While Marcoola’s draw at barrier three for the Great Southern Star looks good the major problem is local champ and brilliant beginner Tornado Valley being drawn two, from where he looks a certain leader and clearly the horse to beat.  The news was a lot better for a host of other Kiwi reps, none more so than Another Masterpiece who looks to have the A$200,000 Victoria Derby at his mercy.  He has drawn to find the front and after an effortless heat win at Ballarat last Saturday is rated a $1.65 chance by Aussie bookies to win the classic.  Pat’s Delight has barrier two in the A$100,000 Bonanza, a big advantage over fellow NZ pacer Spankem, who has drawn the outside of the front line.  And Pukekohe trainer Steven Reid has fared well with Star Galleria (barrier three in the pacing free-for-all) and Utmost Delight (barrier four) in the A$100,000 Ladyship Cup.  Tony Herlihy, who will be at Melton to partner Temporale in the Great Southern Star, will drive Star Galleria while Greg Sugars has been engaged for Utmost Delight.   Michael Guerin

Champion jockey Christophe Soumillon issued another reminder of his natural talents as a horseman by winning a harness racing race in France on Sunday. Soumillon edged closer to becoming the most successful jockey in French history after winning his 10th Golden Whip ('Cravache d'Or) last month, ahead of Pierre-Charles Boudot. And the 37-year-old maintained his superiority on the shell grit, steering six-year-old mare Dignite to win a trot race over 2150 metres at Cagnes-Sur-Mer. The trotting event was restricted to drivers who hold a training or riding licence by France Galop. And thus Soumillon once again shaded Boudot, and also early 2019 French premiership leader Maxime Guyon, as both their horses galloped and were disqualified. Both Boudot and Guyon were having just their second drive under race conditions. Boudot's first drive came in the corresponding race in 2016, finishing sixth, while Guyon jumped into the cart for the first time since April 14, 1996. Soumillon is more experienced driving trotters compared to Boudot and Guyon. Whilst his last drive came at Vincennes in June 2010, Soumillon has driven in 32 races for seven wins and has unsuccessfully ridden in four montes (saddle trot races). The Belgian-born rider has also experienced success as a jumps jockey, contesting four races since 2010. He's had three rides in Group 1 hurdling races at Auteuil, the home of French jumps racing, during that period for two wins. Cagnes-Sur-Mer is the home of French racing, both gallops and harness, through January. The Côte d'Azur racetrack hosts 13 gallops meetings and 10 harness meetings during the month. By Carl Di Iorio Reprinted with permission of the racing.com site

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Elkton, MD -- Post Time with Mike and Mike presented by the USTA/BetAmerica, is excited to announce the harness racing line-up for Thursday morning (Jan. 24) at 10:30 a.m. They will be joined by Sheila Napier, the 2018 USHWA Caretaker of the Year, presented by Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park; California Harness Racing Hall of Fame inductee, Robin Burns; USTA Handicapper, Bob Pandolfo; and Peter Kleinhans. Napier, who scored the 2018 USWHA Caretaker of the Year, presented by Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park, has shown a strong presence in Ohio throughout her career.  Currently working for Chris Beaver, Napier has a passion and excitement that she brings to the sport of harness racing and what a regular day is like for her. Burns, who was inducted into the California Harness Racing Hall of Fame, joins the program for the first time this week to discuss his illustrious career. To his estimate he has called about 80,000 races and is currently the announcer at Presque Isle Downs in Erie, PA. Pandolfo, who writes a weekly handicapping column for the USTA, also makes his Post Time debut to discuss his handicapping habits and how he puts together some of his plays. The pair will also find out how Pandolfo got into the sport of harness racing and where he received his handicapping knowledge. Kleinhans, the first announcer at Hoosier Park, will highlight his career which has been full of different aspects of not only this business, but also the music industry. Kleinhans is the backup announcer at Yonkers and is a musical artist on the side. Post Time with Mike and Mike presented by USTA/BetAmerica can be heard live every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. via their website www.posttimewithmikeandmike.com or on the archive at www.betamerica.com/BARN.           Michael Carter   Social Media and Publicity Coordinator       U.S. Trotting Association | 6130 S. Sunbury Rd. | Westerville, OH 43081-3909   Phone: 877.800.8782 ext. 3215 | 614.224.2291 ext. 3215 | Cell: 601.543.6213   Fax: 844.229.1338 | 614.224.4575   www.ustrotting.com | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube      
Cream Ridge, NJ - 1/23/19 - The 35 harness racing trotters and pacers at risk to ship to the Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses received enough support to by-pass a horrific end.   The Standardbred Retirement Foundation, (SRF) has either already moved most to safety or are scheduled to in the next 2 days. Those in need of veterinary care have received it already. The mare in foal has a wonderful offer from Fair Winds Farm in NJ to take her on to foal her, both mom and baby will then need homes.   Offers have been received and are being screened for experience, but this is a difficult match to make, therefore, other offers are appreciated.   Fair Winds will also take home the mare they had bred, Speed Week. They already have a few that were in trouble before and are now safe with them.   Morrisville College has reached out to help Sparkling Credit, the Celii family is helping the two they had bred, and Newhart will return to his family in Canada. A couple of other past owners have helped by paying to release the horses, but are unable to take them.   The greatest gifts have come from wonderful people who have offered homes and sponsorship, a long list that will be noted in the year end recognition.   Unfortunately, the youngest one, just 6, had suffered a fractured hip among other injuries and was humanely put at peace.   Home offers may fall through, and others, once screened, may not have enough experience, that will leave SRF in a bind, why more home offers and sponsorships are needed.   Thank you to all who have helped these vulnerable, needy horses.   You have changed their lives.   All 34 horses will be in quarantine for 30 days, in NJ, VA, and PA.   The facilities SRF uses have an open-door policy. Visitors are welcome.   Please email SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com or call Tammy at 609-738-3255 to offer help with fostering or homing, to make a donation or visit AdoptaHorse.org.   Please email SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com or call Tammy at 609-738-3255 to offer help with fostering or homing, to make a donation or visit AdoptaHorse.org.                               ‌             About Standardbred Retirement Foundation       Standardbred Retirement Foundation provides human care and services for horse in need of lifetime homes, and in crisis, through rehabilitation, training, adoption, life-long follow--up or life time sanctuary and offering therapeutic equine opportunities for children and adults.   Tammy Cailliau  
The U.S. Harness Writers Association's (USHWA) annual Dan Patch Awards banquet on Sunday, Feb. 24, is nearing and if you are planning to attend the gala festivities that will honor the best harness racing equines and humans in the sport in 2018, room reservations at the luxurious host site of the Rosen Shingle Creek resort in Orlando must be made by Saturday, Feb. 2. Rooms are nearly sold out so make sure you don't get shut out! Rosen Shingle Creek hosted last year's Dan Patch Awards banquet for the first time and the weekend was such a resounding success it was an easy decision for USHWA to return in 2019. This year's banquet, which will be held in the Gaitlin B ballroom, gets underway with the Red Carpet at 6 p.m., with the awards ceremony starting promptly at 7 p.m. Be on hand when the Pacer of the Year, Trotter of the Year and Horse of the Year are announced. The USHWA rate for a standard room at Rosen Shingle Creek is $199 (plus tax). For a direct link to the Rosen Shingle Creek special page to make USHWA room reservations, please click here. Tickets for the Dan Patch Awards banquet are $175, with a filet mignon dinner featured. Tickets can be ordered until Feb. 15 by contacting Judy Davis-Wilson at zoe8874@aol.com or 302-359-3630. Remember, all attendees will receive a 10-percent discount at all of the hotel's restaurants, a 10-percent discount at the Spa at Shingle Creek, and a green fees discount at the Shingle Creek Golf Club. There is still limited space available in the USHWA journal. The deadline is Friday, Feb. 1. To take out a congratulatory ad please contact Kim Rinker at trotrink@aol.com or 708-557-2790. U.S. Harness Writers Association
New racing regulatory standards have just been published by the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) as part of a continuing process to adapt standards to current integrity threats as well as new technologies and innovation.   The standards are embodied in the almost 500 pages of the ARCI’s Model Rules of Racing and can be downloaded using the link below. In addition more than 70 previously unclassified substances were added to the ARCI Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances, the guiding document for horse racing’s anti-doping and drug testing program, providing guidance to regulatory authorities and labs as to the potential threat posed by the substance if found.   Unclassified substances, if found, remain a violation and are treated severely if found absent mitigating circumstances. The ARCI increased recommended penalties for clenbuterol and albuterol violations in Quarter Horse contests, recommending a one-year and $10,000 fine for a first violation involving either drug if found at any level.     This change, requested by the AQHA, is designed to combat the abuse and misuse of these otherwise legal medications in quarter horse contests.   In an effort to protect horsemen, new screening limits developed by the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) for testosterone (in fillies, mares, and geldings) and morphine (as a potential contaminant) were also adopted.   “The ARCI is appreciative for the work of those organizations that participate in the Model Rules process and propose changes to what has been an effective and universally accepted foundation for racing regulation,” said Ed Martin, the group’s President.  “We are particularly grateful for the contributions made by the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium, the Racing Officials Accreditation Program, the Stronach Group, and the American Quarter Horse Association for their work on many of the standards that have been adopted.”     The updated standards also include: a change in the condition eligibility determination for horses which are placed first due to an adverse laboratory finding against the winning horse (ARCI-006-020);  modifications to the coupled entries rule (ARCI-010-010);  a description of the duties and authorities of outriders (ARCI-006-077);  an addition to the recently adopted concussion protocol which requires jockeys to provide the results of an annual baseline concussion assessment test as a condition of licensure (ARCI-008-030), and;  a set of guidelines for single pool (also known as merged pool) pari-mutuel calculations. The guidelines will be published as an industry advisory on the ARCI website.  Updates to the regulatory standards are considered three times each year and pending matters are posted at www.arcimodelrules.online .     In some jurisdictions, portions of the ARCI standards are incorporated by reference in rule or statute, affording them the force of law in that jurisdiction and advancing regulatory uniformity.  The ARCI is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making authorities for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America and parts of the Caribbean.  ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, and racetrack operation and security, as well as for off-track wagering entities.   Access or Download the Lastest Versions of the ARCI Standards. Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International (859) 224-7070   Ext 4001   MODEL RULES OF RACING - Version 8.5 Access Online Version (PDF) Download MS Word File.     Uniform Classification of (Prohibited) Foreign Substances - V.14 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)   ARCI Endogenous, Dietary, or Environmental Substances Schedule - V.4 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)     The ARCI (RCI) is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making bodies for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America, Mexico, parts of the Caribbean, and Riyad, Saudi Arabia.     ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, racetrack operation and security, as well as off-track wagering entities. ARCI's members are the only independent entities recognized to license, enforce, and adjudicate matters pertaining to racing. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARCI.  
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