Day At The Track
Alan Galloway Snr

The Legend who lived life to the end

Word came today that one of the real pioneers of the Harness Racing Breeding Industry in Australia had passed away. Alan Playford Galloway died suddenly on Thursday 23rd January at his home in Coffs Harbour , NSW at the age of 92. It was Alan [Snr] and his wife Barbara that commenced the now famous world wide Breeding name of ALABAR  [a combination of the first three letters of their Christian names]. Alan was a rugged Aussie Rules footballer in his younger days in Adelaide playing at the highest level in the SANFL and representing his State. He also served in the SA Mounted Police Force for a number of years before taking early retirement and purchasing a dairy farm at Mt Barker in the Adelaide hills in the 1950’s. Along with the farm came a Standardbred broodmare, Stormy Princess and so Alan and Barbara quickly became Harness Racing participants. Stepping Chief, Trainer Hanover and Golden Adios were the first three stallions that Alan took under his wing and during this time three children arrived to join the Galloway clan  -  Julie [now deceased], Alan Jnr and Greer. Alan Jnr relocated the Alabar home to Echuca, Victoria in 1979 and the rest is history, as they say, with the ALABAR name and brand at the forefront of Standardbred breeding worldwide. Alan [Snr] never let his age slow him down  -  he loved fast cars , yachts , planes and had an uncanny knack of reading Harness Racing pedigrees. It was just two days before his passing that he circulated a list of Yearlings, recommending that his son Alan purchase at the Melbourne Yearling Sales on 2nd February. He was also planning on flying to Melbourne to watch the ALABAR syndicated horse Chase Auckland take on his rivals in the prestigious Hunter Cup. Alan was preceded in death by his daughter Julie and is survived by his wife Barbara , children Alan and Greer and grandchildren  Thomas and Brooke. A full obituary will follow next week. John Coffey

Bo Mach and Corey Callahan

Bo Mach shocks in the Open Pace

Eddard Hanover blasted out of the gate and Bo Mach was allowed to gain the pocket at the quarter pole.  Harness racing driver Tony Morgan and Bo Mach set fractions of 27 55.3 1:23. Nearing the half, the 8/5 race favorite, Slick Tony, pulled in hopes of finding cover, but Larry Karr went back to the rail.  Slick Tony was then forced to grind 1st up and coverless.  Eddard Hanover remained stubborn and would not let Slick Tony clear. Bo Mach and Corey Callahan drove a perfectly as the pocket rocket.  They were able to sneak along the rail and won by a length in 1:50.4.The performance was a lifetime mark and went off at odds of 25-1. Bo Mach is owned by Howard Taylor and trained by Dylan Davis. Eddard Hanover cut the mile and finished 2nd for trainer Jeff Cullipher and driver Tony Morgan. Rock the Nite was forced three wide in the stretch and finished 3rd. Dexter Dunn drove for trainer Andrew Harris. Bo Mach ...................................................................................... Hallie’s Comet wins the Blue Hen Pace at Dover Downs on Thursday night. Late Mail N. left quickly, but allowed Grantmeawish an opportunity to control the race fractions. Dexter Dunn and Grantmeawish cut fractions of 26.3  55 1:22.1 Hallies Comet pulled at the half and pressured Grantmeawish through a 27.1 third quarter. Late Mail N remained in the pocket. Beach Art was towed into a 2nd over journey, then tipped three wide entering the stretch. Little Ben the 6/5 race favorite, was forced 4 wide in the stretch and closed to finish 2nd for trainer Jim King Jr. and driver Tim Tetrick. Beach Art, last week’s winner, finished third for trainer Arty Foster Jr. and driver Russell Foster. Hallie’s Comet held on to win the race by a neck in 1:51. Race odds were 6-1. The winning owners are Burke Racing Stable and Weaver Bruscemi. Ron Burke was the trainer and Yannick Gingras was the winning driver. Racing resumes at Dover Downs on Monday Post Time is 4:30 pm   Alex Kraszewski  

Garrards Horse And Hound.JPG

Weekly Spotlight on Breeding

Breeding authority Peter Wharton presents all the harness racing news on breeding from Australia, New Zealand and North American every Friday brought to you by Garrard’s Horse & Hound.   Third WA Cup winner by American Ideal   Mighty Conqueror, winner of the $450,000 Western Australian Pacing Cup at Gloucester Park, is the third winner of WA’s premier race sired by the Western Ideal horse American Ideal. Earlier winners by him were Soho Tribeca (2018) and My Hard Copy (2015 and 2016). A five-year-old gelding, Mighty Conqueror has developed some good form since being shipped from NZ at the outset of his four-year-old campaign. He has won 13 races in WA including the WA 4YO Championship, Easter Cup and the Pat Cranley Memorial.   He has a good deal in his favour on the score of blood. Apart from being by American Ideal, Mighty Conqueror is out of the Presidential Ball mare Ballroom Babe (1:56.2), whose dam, Soky’s Lass (by Soky’s Atom), was a half-sister to the Franklin Cup winner Vance Glory 1:54 ($218,844), Star Motoring (Cambridge Cup), Star Glory 1:54.2 ($128,329) and to Shardon’s Lass, the dam of the Fremantle Cup winner Shardons Aflyin ($500,651).   Mighty Conqueror                                            --Hamilton Content Creators photo   Ballroom Babe, the dam of Mighty Conqueror, won seven races and at the stud left five winners including Beckinsale (10 wins) and Young Conqueror (7 wins) and is the grand-dam of the promising Victorian three-year-old filly She Will Rock, a winner of three of her six starts to date.   Other top pacers further back in this pedigree were Christopher Vance, Luxury Liner, Surprise Package and Napoleon.     Close relatives win at Melton   Mota Mate and The Fortunate Son, who won consecutive races at Melton last Friday, both belong to the same family.   Mota Mate, the winner of the Vicbred Platinum Country Series Final, is a four-year-old Bettor’s Delight gelding out of the noted producer Gemfire, by Torado Hanover from Gold Mistress, by Golden Money Maker from Madame Han.   While The Fortunate Son is a six-year-old gelding by Roll With Joe from Island Dreamer, by Island Fantasy from Dream Chaser, by Classic Garry from Dreamwood, a Lumber Dream half sister to Gold Mistress, the grand-dam of Mota Mate.   This line has been bred from extensively by Goulburn Valley breeder Helen Head and her late husband, Graham, and includes the ‘Cups King’ Safari, the sire of crack racemare Berisari, who won on the same night at Melton.       Sub 1:50 double for Bettor’s Delight   Bettor’s Delight was credited with two new sub 1:50 winners on the same night at Menangle. Wrangler NZ, a six-year-old gelding, won in 1:48.8, while Bettor Enforce NZ, a seven-year-old mare, scored in 1:48.9.   Wrangler, who was bred by Ken and Anne-Maree Spicer, ranks as a brother to the NZ Derby winner Sheriff, being out of Jen Marie (2:01.2), by Christian Cullen from the Falcon Seelster mare Inspiring Dash (1:59), the dam of the outstanding racemare Venus Serena 1:52.1 ($796,397), the Group 1 winner Rona Lorraine ($133,268) and Cracka Stride 1:52.4 ($112,036).   Bred by Ben and Karen Calder, Bettor Enforce, who has won 12 races and almost $140,000 in stakes, is the first produce of Their Excuse (TT1:59), by Falcon Seelster from the Live Or Die mare Last Excuse, a sister to the dual N Z Cup winner Just An Excuse.     APG Brisbane sale on Sunday   The Australian Pacing Gold Brisbane Sale will be held at Albion Park on Sunday. The entry totals 41 yearlings and breeders from Queensland and NSW are represented.   The yearlings include some royally bred youngsters with some top class racemares such as Forever Gold, Courageous Annie, October Original, Catwalk Beauty, Dont Break My Ark, Pacific Jaccka, Victree Bonita, Paris Pepperell, and others.   There’s half-brothers to a host of smart performers including Colt Thirty One, Sally Fletcher, Forever Gold, Pinup Boy and Sheeza GNP and half-sisters to Rock With Sam, Clintal Do and Hedges Avenue.   A feature of the sale will be the first crop of well credentialled sires Betting Line, Always B Miki, Racing Hill and trotter Sebastian K.       Double for NZ broodmare   The In The Pocket mare Tricky Woman left winners in both hemispheres on the same day last week.   Bettor Trix, a five-year-old Bettor’s Delight mare, won a $US16,000 race in a career-best 1:51.6 at Dover Downs, Delaware, while her younger brother Copperfield posted his second win from only seven starts at Timaru.     A smart racemare in her own right, Tricky Woman has left other winners in Bettor To Be Tricky (1:56), a winner of 11 races and $86,315, and Wat A Woman (1:59.4).   Tricky Woman ranks as a half-sister to Scuse Me (1:53.5), the Group winning dam of Adore Me, Have Faith In Me, Imagine Me, and so on.     Eye-catching win   The highlight of the Geelong midweek meeting was turned in by the three-year-old debutant Private Eye, who broke stride in the last lap and gave the leaders a tidy start.   With 400 metres to run he was still 15 metres from the leaders, and his chance could have been written off. But Private Eye, after recovering his gait, was switched to the outside and stormed home to win by almost a length.   Watch the replay here!   Private Eye’s performance was an amazing one in every respect. He is a son of the American Ideal horse He’s Watching, a top colt pacer and who now stands at Alabar Bloodstock in NZ.   Oh Eye See (1:54.5), the dam of Private Eye, was Armbro Operative mare from Grace Robinson, who proved a great broodmare. She left nine sub 2:00 winners, four $100,000 earners and three Group 1 winners from 10 foals to race.       Won SA St Leger   When he won the $14,000 St Leger at Globe Derby Park on Saturday, Hesashark scored his fourth success on end, and he is entitled to be rated as this season’s top three-year-old in South Australia.   From 12 lifetime starts he has won seven times and been three times placed for $30,000 in stakes.   Hesashark is a gelding sired by the Cam’s Card Shark horse Shadyshark Hanover, who is now standing in North America. He is out of Goodtime Katie, an unraced mare by Grinfromeartoear from the Life Sign mare Lifes Just Magic, the dam of the cup class pacer Idealsomemagic and the Menangle winner Goodtime Slater ($103,888).   Hesashark was bred by Ian and Judi Slater, of the Goodtime Lodge stud, near Colac (Vic.) and was sold as a yearling at the South Australian sales.     By Soho Valencia   Soho Valencia, a well performed Art Major horse from a top broodmare in Benelise, by Vintner, and who is now at the stud in NSW, was represented by his first winner recently in the three-year-old filly Trioli.   She led all the way at Dubbo and has won two of her four starts.   Soho Valencia has been only lightly patronised at the stud and from nine foals in his first crop he has produced a winner and a placegetter from three starters.   Trioli, who is the first foal of the Julius Caesar mare Lily Rapido, belongs to the same family as Royal Three and Mister Langus, two of NSW’s most outstanding colt pacers of the 1980’s.       A real Doozzie!   Doolittle Doozzie, who won her third race for the season at Redcliffe and has now won six races, is one of the best four-year-old mares in Queensland at present.   A product of the Redcliffe Yearling Sale, she has earned $23,280 from only 19 starts. By the Rocknroll Hanover horse Pet Rock and one of his first crop, she is out of the classics winner Cha Ching Chaching (1:56.2), a half-sister to four winners including Irockmyworld 1:57 ($91,881) and the good Tasmanian pacer Vander Jenkins.   Doolittle Doozzie was bred by Burwood Stud, one of Queensland’s leading nurseries who stand Cha Ching Chaching’s sire, Cammibest, and the former NZ superstar Changeover, now making his mark as a sire.     Promising three-year-old trotter   Elite Stride, a runaway winner on debut at the midweek Melton meeting, is a three-year-old trotting colt of all-American parentage.   Bred and raced by Emilio and Mary Rosati, he was got by Muscle Hill from Real Babe, an American bred mare by the Andover Hall horse Donato Hanover. Real Babe, who took a record of 1:52.4 as a five-year-old, was bought by the Rosati’s for $200,000 at a Harrisburg mixed sale in 2013.   She finished up with a stake tally of $386,103.   Real Babe’s dam, Housethatruthbuilt (by Muscles Yankee), won 13 races including the Breeders Crown and Kentucky Futurity and $1.1 million in stakes and was the top three year-old filly of her year.   Elite Stride promises to do this fine family further credit.     Top racemare remembered   Memories of the top racemare of the 2010’s, Shake It Mama, came flooding back with the runaway win of the three-year-old Cool Rocking Daddy at Cobram.   Shake It Mama   A gelding by A Rocknroll Dance, he is the second produce of Shake It Mama, a Mach Three mare whose first offspring, Mamas New Dude (by Western Terror) won twice in December.   Shake It Mama, who was bred and raced by David Sheppard, won 15 races including the Bathurst Gold Tiara and Australian Oaks and $257,588 in stakes. She was a half-sister to the Group winner Fususi 1:59.2 ($180,305) and the Fake Left mare Pyrites (1:57.9), the dam of the Breeders Crown Silver winner Bettor Be Gold (1:52.8) and the Albion Park winner Golden Year (1:54.7).       by Peter Wharton

Grosbois, harness racing

Grosbois is not your everyday training facility

Grosbois, France – Growing up in New Jersey in the USA and getting into the harness racing industry, I was around when they broke ground and built exquisite training facilities at Showplace and Gaitway Farms. But they are not that exquisite when compared to Grosbois, just outside of Paris, France. In fact, there may not be another harness racing training facility in world that could be compared to Grosbois. Upon entering the grounds, the entrance way features wrought-iron 20-foot gates attached to 12-foot walls that encompass the entire facility, which is just over 1,000 acres in size. In the far distance you can see a huge Manor House and green grass and dirt roads, also paths that lead to wooded areas with harness racing trotters galore jogging about. We were greeted at the horsemen’s entrance by Damien Beau, who is with the International Department of LeTROT, that oversees all of trotting in France. He was our guide for the private tour. We first went to the home of renowned Swedish and French trainer Anders Lindqvst, who was so kind to show us his home, his office, and his attached courtyard with maybe 40 stalls filled with trotters. There are no pacers in Europe except for Ireland and England. Linqvist first became interested in harness racing at the age of 14. “I wanted to be a professional soccer player,” Linqvist said. “But someone took me on a jog with a horse and I really liked that. My father wanted me in the family business,” Lindqvist added. “but after I worked with the horses a little, I trained a fast mile and that feeling convinced me to go into harness racing. “My first good horse I got I was age 22,” Lindqvist recalled. “And it was at that point that I said goodbye to working for my father part-time and took up harness racing full time. This horse, which gave me many wins, was at the time, sadly named Mr. Nixon. But despite his name he was my foundation horse. Mr. Nixon raced for me 431 times. That is the all-time record still in Sweden. “Then I was once racing in the Elitloppet in 1985,” Lindqvist said. “And after the race with Viroid (finished 5th) I was contacted by Mr. Lew Barash in the USA, asking me to come and race in the International Trot at Roosevelt Raceway and then I was hooked on international racing. “From there I was on my own for ten years,” Lindqvist explained. Until the great trainer/driver Jean-Pierre Dubois asked me to work for him in France. It was like being invited to be part of the Dream Team in basketball and I have been here ever since.” Lindqvist has driven in 19 countries, even twice in Russia. “When I won my first race in Russia,” Lindqvist said. “I got towards the winner’s enclosure, they stopped me and said they had to take my whip away. This was some security people and I did not understand why. Then I saw that the trophy was going to be presented to me by President Valdimir Putin and realized security would not let anyone get near him with a whip. That was something very special in my life.” Anders home has four bedrooms in addition to the attached 40 horse stalls and he said he pays around $8,000 per month rent for everything. That might seem a lot, but he also rents his spare bedrooms and most of his stalls to other trainers for their horses. He said it is like that throughout Grosbois, although some of the beautiful homes and barn areas are leased by horse owners, who turn around and rent or trade rooms/stalls for trainers and grooms to take care of their horses. Lindqvist also has a coffee vending machine in his office. Why one might ask and Anders jokingly said because during the winter season he has so many visitors he gives away around 4,000 cups of coffee. There are over five miles of just jogging tracks at Grosbois. It also has two tracks that horses can fast work on, a five-eighths mile track and a 15th/16th mile track, where horses can qualify to race at nearby Vincennes Racetrack. They also have an equine hospital on the grounds that is used by some 15 veterinarians. That many vets are needed for the 1,500 racehorses that call Grosbois home throughout the winter season. There are also numerous blacksmith shops on the grounds. At Grosbois, there are about 60 people that work in track maintenance to keep the large grounds clean and the track surfaces in prime shape. They use three different materials that are used on the jogging tracks and horseman use certain courses depending if they want a deep cushion, harder or softer surfaces for the horse’s hooves. You will also see many trotters being ridden at Grosbois as in France they have many trotting races under saddle. This past weekend the richest monte race (monte means under saddle) in the world took place at the Vincennes track with 15 horses racing for a purse of 650,000 euros. There is also a very nice horseman’s cafeteria and a party room on the grounds, tennis courts and soccer fields. The jogging trails also cut through the massive wooded area of Grosbois where people jogging horses have come across wild boar, reindeer, foxes and many birds of prey. The entire area was purchased and developed into the training facility in 1962 and continues to grow. It is 11 miles from the outskirts of Paris and only six miles away from the Vincennes Racetrack. And what if the weather is raining but you still need to work your horse. Then you just head over to the covered training track or perhaps lunge-line your horse at the indoor arena. It’s all at Grosbois. Coming up on Thursday, it’s back to Grosbois we go, this time to visit the special Manor House that is home to the French Trotting Museum and more. by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

It took lively Victorian trainer-driver Richie Caruana only 84.3 seconds to recently tick a big item off his harness racing bucket list. After 30 years in the sport, Caruana's handy pacer Off The Radar (Grinfromeartoear-Mattsbabe (Safely Kept) became his first metropolitan-class winner, and the Rockbank horseman couldn't have been happier. Off The Radar took out the $20,000 third heat of Harness Racing Victoria's summer feature the Mercury 80 - a series (formerly known as the Stampede) run over the super sprint distance of 1200 metres. Now on Saturday night at Melton, the pair have drawn the three alley (out of two with the scratching of the emergency) in the G2 $50,000 final. Caruana can't wait to be part of the action, and it will undoubtedly be a high-point of his harness racing career. "I became a trainer in my own right after my Uncle Grazio passed away in 1988 and I just love the horses, but it is becoming harder. Everything is dearer, especially the feed and management, but I just love it, and this is a real kick-along," he said. "I like the sport, but I really just have a passion for being around horses and I'm looking forward to the final bit time - what he's done for us here has just been a bonus. "I thought he was a bit of a chance, because he had been going along OK, but things panned out in the heat for us and he did the job. "We won't look past the final just yet, but whatever happens, he's probably earned himself a short let-up. He's a bit of a fat horse though, so I won't give him too long!" The helter-skelter format isn't necessarily to purists' liking, but it certainly suited Caruana and his seven-year-old stallion. Starting from barrier five, Caruana eased Off The Radar out of the early contest, then enjoyed a nice run in transit in the one-out-two-back position. Caruana moved out on the corner for a run three and four wide, and Off The Radar did the rest, scoring by three metres over race favorite Call Me Hector, who also qualifies for the final. Caruana always has a "few in work", but with youngsters and a couple of "project horses" in the team, Off The Radar is currently his only horse at the races. "I've trained a lot of horses over the years, but he's definitely the best one I've had so far - tracks are quicker now days of course, but he's certainly given me one of the biggest thrills I've had in racing," the elated trainer said. "He's a bit of a hard horse to work out. He's a stallion, but a gentle horse, and if you had to work him you wouldn't want to, he's just so lazy and laid back," he said. "He loves what he's doing at the races, but to work him at home, you'd really never have any idea what he's capable of." Off The Radar is a winner of 10 races from his 62 starts and was bred by the late Dennis Offer. The pacer's former trainer Frank Offer handed training responsibilities to Caruana just over six months ago.   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

The latest gavelhouse.com Standardbred auction is online now with 28 Lots on offer including a quality selection of 11 foals from Woodlands Stud. The catalogue also boasts tried and untried racing stock as well as four broodmares.  Bidding is set to close, starting with Lot 1, from 7pm on Wednesday 29 January. Bidding tips Make sure you're registered and your account is set up properly well before the auction is set to close.  Each auction will auto-extend by adding extra time on if a bid is placed in the final 30 seconds. This will happen indefinitely until no further bids are placed and will also add more time onto each of the subsequent Lots.  Use auto-bids to take the stress out of the final countdown and use the refresh button to make sure your page is keeping up with the live auction. If you have any questions about the bidding process please call 09 296 4436 VIEW FULL CATALOGUE Featured Lots Lot 1 DOWNBY THESEASIDE colt Colt out of the American Ideal mare American Grace, making him closely related to Pacing Grace, Jessie's Cullen, Pacing Major, All U Need Is Faith, Linda Lovegrace, Im A Gigolo and many more. This colt is by the newest sire to the join the Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: American Grace Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 4 DOWNBY THESEASIDE filly This filly is by the newest sire to join the Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Divine Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 6 DOWNBY THESEASIDE filly Filly out of a six-win American Ideal mare and by the newest sire to stand at Woodlands Stud, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Idealistic Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 7 WHAT THE HILL filly This filly is by the newest trotting sire at Woodlands Stud, What The Hill. He is a champion son of trotting sensation Muscle Hill, out of a full-sister to Majestic Son. He earned $1.34 million in stakes and took a 1.51.4 record and was the 3YO of his year after defeating the older horses in the TVG including millionaire Crazy Wow. He has served a number of quality mares down under in the last two seasons.  Sire: What The Hill Dam: Miss Continental Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 10 DOWNBYTHE SEASIDE colt Colt out of a Bettor's Delight mare and by the newest sire to the World Class Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Supreme Brigade Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE   gavelhouse.com

By Jonny Turner    All Stars trotter Kings Landing will need to call on his class when steps out for the first time this season at Addington on Friday night. Each of his rivals will have a significant race fitness edge over the 5yr-old, when he starts for in a competitive 1980m feature trot. Kings Landing has looked to have thrived since his last start at the Harness Jewels when winning two trials and a workout ahead of his return from a decent winter spell. But, driver Tim Williams is weary that nothing quite gets a horse ready to take on a smart field like the benefit of race fitness. “His class is going to take him a wee way, but it is definitely not going to be easy taking on some of those seasoned horses first up.” “That would be the only concern.” “The way the draws have fallen, being preferential, that is in his favour.” “It won’t be easy, but if he got the right run and the race unfolded to suit, him he is definitely good enough.” The three horses drawn on the outside of the front line bring both class and race fitness to Friday night’s race. Pres The Belle will be looking to replicate the emphatic win she produced under the same conditions as her 1980m mobile victory in her first run after the Interdominions at Addington, last month. Destiny Jones drops massively in grade after producing a sound fifth in the group 1 National Trot at Alexandra Park in her last start. The 8yr-old has a slight draw advantage in barrier 7 over both Pres The Belle (8) and Great Things Happen (9). Great Things Happen should relish a return to mobile racing despite his draw. The 8yr-old was forced to chase from massive 60m handicaps in his two starts at the recent Nelson meeting. Tailored Elegance is in a similar position to Kings Landing – starting fresh up against race-hardened opposition in race 2 with Williams in the sulky. Though, it is not the class of her opposition that is the main concern ahead of her first start as a 3yr-old. It is how she will be able to negotiate a capacity field from barrier 7. “She has come back well, but being drawn out a little bit wide in a full field probably won’t make things easy,” Williams said. “She is another one that her class should take her a long way in there.” “She generally has good manners, so there is no reason why she shouldn’t go a really good race.” Williams will also combine with another fresh All Stars runner at Addington on Friday night in race 4. First starter Picture Me faces a similar assignment to his stablemate Tailored Elegance when he starts from barrier 12. “He is a little bit the same as Tailored Elegance – he is in a full field and has a tricky enough draw,” Williams said. “He is going to need the right suck in to it or to make a move.” “It is just going to depend on how the race is run from that draw.” “On his trials, he keeps putting his hand up, so on that he is a good chance.” Picture Me has won two Rangiora trials ahead of his debut and beat rival Chubby Checker in the latest of those. Williams has a standout book of drives at Friday night’s Addington meeting that includes strong eachway chances Cheezel (race 5) and Szybka Lane (race 8). The reinsman also combines with Lets Hustle (race 3), Red Hot Poker (race 9) and Peraki Reactor (race 10).  Reprinted with permission of HRNZ

By Garrick Knight    Pukekohe mare Best Western is booked to fly to Christchurch next week for two black-type features but first she’ll head to Alexandra Park on Friday night. Her trainer, Jeremy Young, says last season’s Northern Oaks winner is nearing “cherry-ripe” status. “I’m happy with her; she’s working really well and seems very bright,” he said. “I want to have her cherry-ripe for the two Addington races, but she’s pretty close to the mark.” Best Western was an unlucky fourth last week after being held up before the passing lane when trailing a tiring leader. “She just got held up a little bit and there was a very slight snotty nose after the race. “But that’s cleared up now and isn’t a concern. “It had been 17 days since her New Years’ Eve run and I feel like last week has sharpened her up even more.” Complicating matters this week is a wide draw plus the fact her stablemate, On A Roll, is in the same race and has drawn decidedly better. “The stablemate will be going forward so I guess that means we’ll have to look to go back with Best Western.” On A Roll has been a bit of a surprise package for Young since coming north in the early spring. She was effectively ‘sacked’ by previous trainers, Mark Purdon and Natalie Rasmussen, and arrived at Young’s with no great ambitions. “When we first got her up here from Mark’s, I thought she would be a C2 or C3 horse, maybe. “If we were lucky, we’d be able to get a bit of money for the owners. “But she ran second to Lulu Le Mans, then won one, and then placed a few more times. “So, I threw her in the Group races before Christmas against the best fillies and I thought the second run, especially, was excellent. “She was four-wide down the back and had no right to run fifth, but still battled on well.” It also gave Young and driver, Sailesh Abernethy, an insight in to how she is best driven. “Sailesh and I thought we’d try something different last week and let her roll along in front.” The result? A five-length win in a sensational 2.39.4 (1.56.6 MR). “She’s a funny horse in that she won’t outsprint anything, you’ve got to let her run the whole way. “I had Stylish Memphis here at the same time and she would beat On A Roll off her back every time because she had so much speed. “On A Roll is better off leading and rolling along or even sitting parked, so that’s how we intend to drive her this week and in the future. “More aggressively.” The Oaks races are now firmly in the plans for On A Roll. Rounding out Young’s team this week is Tommy Tukaa, who returns to Alexandra Park from back-to-back wins at Cambridge over the holiday period. “I know he only won at Cambridge, but I think he’s an ‘Auckland horse’ all the same. “Those wins will have given him a bit of confidence and his work has been a lot better since. “The draw is awkward this week but I would expect, just being on the fence the whole way, that he should be able to run in the first three.” Reprinted with permission of HRNZ

Growing up together in southeastern Illinois, Jazmin Arnold and Alesha Binkley were inseparable during their summers off from school. "If you saw me, you saw her; if you saw her, you saw me," Arnold said, laughing. "We were together so much that we would take turns staying at each other's house," Binkley said. "Our parents were good friends and we ran around together at all the county fairs while they were racing. We would go to the carnivals, ride rides, go swimming, hang out all summer long. That way our parents didn't have to worry about us too much." After graduating from their respective high schools, Arnold and Binkley went their separate ways. But last year, the two friends, now both living in central Ohio, reunited on harness racing's amateur driving circuits. Arnold, in her first full season, won 23 of 59 races in 2019 and was named the National Amateur of the Year by the U.S. Harness Writers Association. Binkley won eight of 38 races. On Saturday, the 25-year-olds both have multiple drives in the Great Lakes Amateur Driving Series at Northfield Park. The series, which began Dec. 7, concludes a week from Saturday. "We would have never thought when we were younger that we would be doing this," Arnold said. "I trained my first horse at 8 years old. She played a lot of sports. I played sports, too, but I was more into the horses. When her dad got her into the horses, she would jog a little bit, but she was never gung-ho about it like I was." Binkley, who played on high school and travel teams for softball, volleyball and basketball, agreed she had little interest in racing at that time. But after high school, she discovered she enjoyed going to the races and working around the horses. "I always kind of thought about driving," Binkley said, adding with a laugh, "I'm a professional sideline driver, I will say that. I critique everybody from the sidelines. So, I thought maybe I should try it myself." Binkley has worked for trainer Trent Stohler for six years. In 2018, Stohler encouraged Binkley to give driving a shot in the Ohio Ladies Pacing Series. Binkley won her debut and never looked back. Alesha Binkley "I was hooked," said Binkley, who won 10 of 20 starts her first year. "I was like, I want to do this all the time. I really love the adrenaline rush. A bunch of people say I'm so serious on the racetrack. At that point, I'm just trying to contain my excitement. I get so excited, I don't want to overdo it, overdrive, or drive bad. "Leaving the gate is probably my favorite thing. I just love flying out of the gate." Arnold was encouraged to begin driving by her boyfriend, trainer Adam Short, and given an additional boost from trainer Herman Hagerman. She was pleasantly surprised by her success. "I didn't expect it at all," said Arnold, who competed at 26 different tracks last year. "It was fun for me at first and then it became very competitive. Once I got kind of rolling, I had a goal and I just kept on going. It was tough, it was tiring, but it was worth every minute of it. "We'll see where it goes. It was a goal of mine to win an award for driving, but I never knew how it was going to go or when it would happen. I don't really have a plan for this year. I would like to succeed and go forward, but everybody would like to have everything." Arnold works with Short and also trains a 5-year-old female pacer, Knockout Queen, that she owns. Knockout Queen races Friday in the fillies-and-mares open handicap at Miami Valley Raceway. "I'm happy having one horse," Arnold said. "If I can have one and I can train her to my best ability and take care of her the best I can, that's enough." As close as Arnold and Binkley are as friends, they are equally competitive when it comes to facing each other on the racetrack. "We have to do what's best for us to win," Binkley said. "But if I get beat by her, I'm OK with it. Anyone else, and I'm kind of mad at myself." Said Arnold, "If I'm going to get beat by anybody, I'd rather get beat by her." On five occasions, Arnold and Binkley have finished 1-2 in races. Only a dead heat for win might be a more fitting outcome. Inseparable, again. Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association

January 23, 2019 They shone in the 2019 edition The magical trio of Jean-Michel Bazire Belina Josselyn, Looking Superb and Davidson du Pont, respectively 1st, 2nd and 4th of the 2019 edition (review the race) are again in the running this year. The ambitions are the same but the distribution of forces is quite different, in particular by the rise in power of Davidson du Pont, qualified from the first race of winter and superb finisher in the recent Grand Prix de Belgique. To do better than last year Bold Eagle and Propulsion had to be content with small places in 2019 but are at the head of exceptional prize lists which give them again this year a leading role in the context of the race. Bold Eagle will participate in his fifth Grand Prix d’Amérique, a race which he has twice pinned down: in 2017 and 2018. He is the most active French trotter and can even pass Timoko to this classification in case of good weather. performance Sunday. Eric Raffin, Gold Sulky in 2019, will be associated with him: together they have two successes in four joint attempts. Twelve months ago, Bold Eagle finished 6th just behind the Swedish Propulsion, which will race the Grand Prix d’Amérique for the fourth time. He never won it but was there. In Scandinavia, it is the absolute benchmark in age horses and even more since the retirement of Readly Express. His bank account proves it: with more than 3 million euros in earnings, he is the second richest horse at the start. Three mares have shone in Europe in recent months and will also try to do better than in 2019. Uza Josselyn (7th) was crowned European Champion of Mares last summer (see article), Billie de Montfort (No Placed) won the European Tour of the French Trotter and Bahia Quesnot (Not Placed) lived an incredible 2019 season all over the planet-races (see article). Add to this beautiful skewer of champions, Délia du Pommereux (Disqualified) who arrives in much better shape than last year and pleased observers in the Grand Prix de Belgique. Finally, Valko Jenilat (Not Placed) will be the dean of the race from the age of 11, the maximum age newly authorized to participate in the race. We remember his prestigious success this summer at La Capelle (review the race). Qualified newcomers If all the aforementioned trotters can count on their experience to achieve the best possible performance, it will however be a great first for those featured in this chapter. Another common point: they and she all won their place by qualifying in one of the qualifying races. First of all, the very popular Chica de Joudes, who won her ticket at the British Grand Prix de Bretagne. Vivid Wise As achieved its goals in the Grand Prix de Bourgogne while Enino du Pommereux had to wait for the Grand Prix de Belgique (2nd) to secure his place on the starting grid. In the Prix Tenor de Baune and Critérium Continental, there was only one qualifying ticket, so you shouldn’t miss it. The displays of strength and speed of Excellent and Face Time Bourbon convinced their supporters and perhaps even converted some of them. The foreign coalition Three trotters from Europe complete this peloton of eighteen units: the Swedish Milligan’s School presented by Stefan Melander, the Italian Vitruvio and Ringostarr Treb, winner in 2018 of the Elitloppet and 7th in the 2018 edition of the Grand Prix d’Amérique. For the full field click here Reprinted with permission of Le Trot    

January 23., 2020 - Today’s Quinte+ race of the day was the Prix de la Semaine Intertnational (purse 50,000€, 2850 meters, European eligibles) at Paris-Vincennes with the 1.17.1kr timed victory earned by 14/1 odds Docteur d’Erable (7g Ganymede-Rue d’Erable). David Thomain teamed the J.P. Thomain trainee for Ecurie du Haras d’Erable. His life earnings are now 234,490€. 10/1 Champion Dore (8g Prince Gede) was second for Matthieu Abrivard with 14/1 Dandy de Godrel (7m Timoko) third for Alexandre Abrivard. 8.5/1 Moni Viking (7m Maharajah) with Pierre Vercruysse up and 159/1 Chistera (8f Qwerty) handled by J.Ph. Monclin completed the top five and set up an exact order Q+ payoff of 353,865.60€. The Q+ pool was 3,064,804€ and over 6,732,000€ was wagered on the race. Yesterday the Q+ race was at Cagnes sur Mer in the Prix Une de Mai (purse 44,000€, 2925 meters) with the 1.13.4kr timed victory going to 7/10 favorite Elsa de Belfonds (6f Tornado Bello-Taifa). Nicolas Ensch teamed and trains this now 12 time winner for owner Thomas Levesque. Elsa has career earnings of 353,690€. She scored by less than a length over 23/1 Creature Castelets (8f Pomerol de Laumac) with J.Ch. Feron at the lines. Nicolas Ensch also trains this one. The other top five finishers were 89/1 Baronne de Bapre, 7.8/1 Christo and 147/1 Balthazar Maza and these longshots created a Q+ exact order payoff of 26,005.80€. The Q+ pool was 3,313,927€ and over 7,274,000 was wagered on the race. Elda e Belfonds Groupe Contests at Vincennes (plus amateur classic), listed below, will make the upcoming weekend very special. January 25: Prix de Luxembourg (100,000€, Gr. III International, 2100 meters autostart) Coupe d’Europe des Amateurs (14,000€, 2100 meters autostart, International)   January 26 Prix Harley-Davidson (Prix Camille Blaisot) Gr. II monte, 100,000€, 2850 meters Prix Case IH (Prix Jacques Andrieul) Gr. II monte, 100,000€, 2850 meters, International Prix RMC (Prix Charles Tiercelin) Gr. II, 100,000€, 2100 meters autostart, European Prix d’Amerique, Gr. I, 900,000€, 2700 meters, International Prix Gras Savoye Willis Towers Watson, Gr. III, 80,000€, 2100 meters autostart, European Prix Lenotre (Prix Helen Johansson), Gr. III, 80,000€, 2100 meters autostart, European Prix Fondation Pour la Rechache Medicale, Gr. III, 60,000€, 2100 meters autostart, European In addition, certain races are named for other sponsors Lalique, Printemps Nation and 20 Minutes. Thomas H. Hicks  

RACING REGULATORY LAB FIRST TO UNCOVER MAJOR DOPING THREAT TO BOTH RACING AND HUMAN SPORT The New York Equine Drug Testing Programs Director Dr. George Maylin has confirmed the presence of a major doping threat to both human and equine sport in two standardbred horses racing at Yonkers Raceway. The New York horseracing lab is believed to be the first laboratory, in either horse racing or the worldwide WADA network of human testing labs, to screen for and confirm the presence of IOX-2.    IOX-2 is both a blood and gene doping agent that is the type of emerging small molecule synthetic doping agent that Dr. Maylin warned about at last year’s ARCI annual conference in Arcadia, California. Dr. Maylin, a member of the ARCI Scientific Advisory Group, has stressed that the more serious threat to the integrity of the sport lies in these types of doping agents rather than the misuse of therapeutic medications which have commanded the majority of attention by racing industry organizations and represent the majority of drug violations detected by racing commissions. In human sport, athletes can receive permission to compete with substances in their system that are banned in horse racing. All RCI member jurisdictions have been put on notice of the details of this development. IOX-2 is an HIF stabilizer that can trigger EPO like effects as well as overall stimulation of an athlete. “The New York Gaming Commission and Dr. Maylin specifically, should be commended for their work and focus on finding new and emerging threats to clean sport.   Dr. Maylin has worked long and hard looking for these type of substances and his work will benefit all ARCI member jurisdictions. “Unfortunately IOX-2 is just one doping agent and we are not naive to believe that others are not finding their way into professional sport.  Whether it be a racing lab or a WADA lab, we share a common mission and can never let our guard down.  Today, it’s IOX-2, tomorrow it’s going to be something else,” said Ed Martin, ARCI President.  “Horse racing is blessed to have experts like Dr. Maylin in our regulatory network.” Regulatory actions taken by the New York Gaming Commission are posted online at https://rulings.gaming.ny.gov #### For additional information on IOX2 click on this link. CONTACT: Ed Martin 859-224-7070. ASSOCIATION OF RACING COMMISSIONERS INTERNATIONAL  

January 23, 2019 - Today begins the annual Arqana-Trot mixed sale at Paris-Vincennes. This attractive sales includes stallion shares, season 2020 breedings, broodmares and racing stock. There are three sessions, 7:00pm today local time and 11:00am and 7:00pm tomorrow with the last two sessions sharing the stage with the Etalons Expo. Dinner is served in the sale facility. The Expo hosts many exhibits by stud farms, stallion owners, equipment and feed suppliers. The sale and Expo draw a huge audience from throughout Europe. For the Catalogue click here. Thomas H. Hicks

WASHINGTON, PA, Jan. 23, 2020 -- Heavenly Knox has known more adversity than most harness racing horses. Confusion surrounding his registration kept him from racing until 4. Last summer, he was so sore that his connections retired him . . . not for the first time. But the old warhorse loves competing so much that he refused to stay retired. Now, at 9, he's back at it, adding to his $124,750 bankroll and defying Father Time. Heavenly Knox will go from post 2 with Dan Charlino aboard in Friday's seventh race at The Meadows. First post Friday is 1:05 PM. His career began in uncertainty. The son of The Panderosa-Mystical Shark trained down well in Illinois for John Zawistowski -- known as Johnny Z on the backside -- who has conditioned Heavenly Knox for most of the gelding's career. But the horse's owner, awash in financial difficulties, somehow never managed to get Heavenly Knox properly registered. Thus, he missed his entire 2- and 3-year-old seasons, and it was only when he was acquired thereafter by George Bonomo's Wolf Creek Farm that Heavenly Knox was made eligible to compete. Because he was unregistered, he remained unnamed. An opportunity for a name arose in the worst way imaginable when the son of Zawistowski's daughter, Ashley Mitchell, and her husband, Marty Mitchell, died at birth. The baby was named Knox, and to honor his memory, the unraced horse was called Heavenly Knox. Despite his star-crossed beginnings, Heavenly Knox began to show promise, winning his first four starts and taking his mark of 1:51.3 as a 4-year-old. While on his streak, he provided reinsman Dave Magee with the final winning drive of his Hall of Fame career. Zawistowski shifted his late bloomer to The Meadows, where he won the championship of the 2015 Walter Russell Memorial Pace and headed east for further conquests. But the rigors of racing left him with breathing issues and frequent soreness. Zawistowski and Wolf Creek decided to retire him. And again. And again. "He came back like a cat from three or four different shutdowns," the trainer says. "He has some kind of heart. I always thought that had something to do with my grandson." By the summer of 2019, though, Zawistowski had seen enough. "I said 'that's it, he's done. He'll never have a harness on again.' We decided to retire him for good and keep him as a family pet. But out in the field, he was racing dogs and everything that came by. All he wanted to do was race." So Zawistowski brought him back again, and the old boy responded well, collecting a win and a pair of place finishes since his most recent "unretirement." He hasn't earned as much as he might have because his connections -- understandably, given his meaning to them -- won't put him in a claimer; he's usually in with tough conditioned types a little beyond his reach. But Zawistowski has learned not to mention the "r" word around Heavenly Knox. "If he had been able to stay sound, he'd probably have a record of 1:48 or 1:49," Johnny Z. says. "Even now, you can't really jog him; he wants to go by everything. That's what makes him a great race horse." By Evan Pattak for The Meadows Standardbred Owners Association  

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - The Meadowlands is known as a track with a driver colony that's got big-time talent from top to bottom, but last weekend, two harness racing standouts stood far above the rest of the crowd. Over the course of the two-day race week at the Big M on Jan. 17-18, Dexter Dunn and Yannick Gingras were both at the top of their respective games, to say the least. Of the 28 races contested, the prolific pair won 18 times, with each pilot hitting the winner's circle four times Friday and five times Saturday. Dunn, a 30-year-old New Zealand native, took both features with Down Under breds, winning Friday with Major Occasion A and then Saturday with Franco Totem N. His fans were especially thrilled with Dunn's Friday success as the United States Harness Writers Association's Driver of the Year scored with longshots Bold Goddess ($43.80) and Auteur Hanover ($54.60). In addition, DD swept the $348.20 daily double that covered races seven and eight. Gingras, whose $13.4 million in earnings was good for second in North America during 2019, maintained his place as one of the most popular drivers at the Big M by scoring a half-dozen times over the weekend with non-favorites as both he and Dunn - not surprisingly - showed a flat-bet profit by the time the dust cleared Saturday night. Racing fans won't get the chance to play Gingras or Dunn this weekend, however, as neither is listed to drive. Gingras will be in France attending - not participating in - the Prix d'Amerique while Dunn has a previous commitment. Racing fans can look forward to another ace being in the fold, however, as Tim Tetrick, the leading money-earning driver from 2019 with over $15.6 million, will be in the sulky at the Big M this Friday and Saturday night. Post time is the usual 7:15 p.m. PICK-4 REPORT: The Meadowlands' signature wager, the 50-cent Pick-4, saw its usual big play last weekend, as a total of $81,661 was bet Friday and $91,480 was in the pool Saturday. Friday's final leg saw a 25-1 shot score, leading to a payoff of $3,155.05. Chalk players hit the $55.85 return Saturday as Dunn and Gingras each won twice during the sequence. FREE PPs: When it comes to the 50-cent Pick-4, the Late 20-cent Jackpot Super High-Five and the 20-cent Can-Am Pick-4, if you want to play, but prefer not to pay for past performances, all you have to do is go to playmeadowlands.com or ustrotting.com where you can access them for free. GIANT SCORE: One sharp handicapper made the score a lifetime Friday. Betting into the Oregon Express hub, that player held the only 20-cent Jackpot Super High-Five ticket with the winning combination of 1-7-3-6-4 and cashed in for $118,148.72. The race was won by 2-1 favorite Lily Hammer and driver Corey Callahan. Finishing second through fifth, respectively, were Northern Swift (25-1), Moonshinecharleigh (8-1), Manhattan Play (3-1) and Justabitofcharm (30-1). MARK YOUR CALENDARS On Jan. 24, card players who are 21 or older can play Texas Hold'em on "Free Poker Friday", hosted by World Free Poker. On Jan. 25, the Big M hosts it's annual "Chili Cook Off", which will have its usual "Homestyle Chili" division. This year, a "Chili Verde" contest has been added to the festivities. In addition, there will also be a competition for the best salsa. For complete information and registration, go to https://chilicookoff.com/cookoffs/list. On Feb. 2, professional football's championship game - that pits the Kansas City Chiefs against the San Francisco 49ers - kicks off at 6:30 p.m. Be sure to watch and wager in the Big M's FanDuel Sportsbook. On Feb. 7, come to the track and enjoy a "Brunch for Love" from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. The event benefits non-profits from the Meadowlands Chamber. On Feb. 14, bring your sweetheart to the races and enjoy a fabulous Valentine's Day dinner in the Big M's Pink Restaurant. You might be one of three couples to win a gift certificate for a bed and breakfast in Cape May, NJ. For reservations, call 201-THE-BIGM. Meadowlands Media Relations  

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Eddard Hanover blasted out of the gate and Bo Mach was allowed to gain the pocket at the quarter pole.  Harness racing driver Tony Morgan and Bo Mach set fractions of 27 55.3 1:23. Nearing the half, the 8/5 race favorite, Slick Tony, pulled in hopes of finding cover, but Larry Karr went back to the rail.  Slick Tony was then forced to grind 1st up and coverless.  Eddard Hanover remained stubborn and would not let Slick Tony clear. Bo Mach and Corey Callahan drove a perfectly as the pocket rocket.  They were able to sneak along the rail and won by a length in 1:50.4.The performance was a lifetime mark and went off at odds of 25-1. Bo Mach is owned by Howard Taylor and trained by Dylan Davis. Eddard Hanover cut the mile and finished 2nd for trainer Jeff Cullipher and driver Tony Morgan. Rock the Nite was forced three wide in the stretch and finished 3rd. Dexter Dunn drove for trainer Andrew Harris. Bo Mach ...................................................................................... Hallie’s Comet wins the Blue Hen Pace at Dover Downs on Thursday night. Late Mail N. left quickly, but allowed Grantmeawish an opportunity to control the race fractions. Dexter Dunn and Grantmeawish cut fractions of 26.3  55 1:22.1 Hallies Comet pulled at the half and pressured Grantmeawish through a 27.1 third quarter. Late Mail N remained in the pocket. Beach Art was towed into a 2nd over journey, then tipped three wide entering the stretch. Little Ben the 6/5 race favorite, was forced 4 wide in the stretch and closed to finish 2nd for trainer Jim King Jr. and driver Tim Tetrick. Beach Art, last week’s winner, finished third for trainer Arty Foster Jr. and driver Russell Foster. Hallie’s Comet held on to win the race by a neck in 1:51. Race odds were 6-1. The winning owners are Burke Racing Stable and Weaver Bruscemi. Ron Burke was the trainer and Yannick Gingras was the winning driver. Racing resumes at Dover Downs on Monday Post Time is 4:30 pm   Alex Kraszewski  
Growing up together in southeastern Illinois, Jazmin Arnold and Alesha Binkley were inseparable during their summers off from school. "If you saw me, you saw her; if you saw her, you saw me," Arnold said, laughing. "We were together so much that we would take turns staying at each other's house," Binkley said. "Our parents were good friends and we ran around together at all the county fairs while they were racing. We would go to the carnivals, ride rides, go swimming, hang out all summer long. That way our parents didn't have to worry about us too much." After graduating from their respective high schools, Arnold and Binkley went their separate ways. But last year, the two friends, now both living in central Ohio, reunited on harness racing's amateur driving circuits. Arnold, in her first full season, won 23 of 59 races in 2019 and was named the National Amateur of the Year by the U.S. Harness Writers Association. Binkley won eight of 38 races. On Saturday, the 25-year-olds both have multiple drives in the Great Lakes Amateur Driving Series at Northfield Park. The series, which began Dec. 7, concludes a week from Saturday. "We would have never thought when we were younger that we would be doing this," Arnold said. "I trained my first horse at 8 years old. She played a lot of sports. I played sports, too, but I was more into the horses. When her dad got her into the horses, she would jog a little bit, but she was never gung-ho about it like I was." Binkley, who played on high school and travel teams for softball, volleyball and basketball, agreed she had little interest in racing at that time. But after high school, she discovered she enjoyed going to the races and working around the horses. "I always kind of thought about driving," Binkley said, adding with a laugh, "I'm a professional sideline driver, I will say that. I critique everybody from the sidelines. So, I thought maybe I should try it myself." Binkley has worked for trainer Trent Stohler for six years. In 2018, Stohler encouraged Binkley to give driving a shot in the Ohio Ladies Pacing Series. Binkley won her debut and never looked back. Alesha Binkley "I was hooked," said Binkley, who won 10 of 20 starts her first year. "I was like, I want to do this all the time. I really love the adrenaline rush. A bunch of people say I'm so serious on the racetrack. At that point, I'm just trying to contain my excitement. I get so excited, I don't want to overdo it, overdrive, or drive bad. "Leaving the gate is probably my favorite thing. I just love flying out of the gate." Arnold was encouraged to begin driving by her boyfriend, trainer Adam Short, and given an additional boost from trainer Herman Hagerman. She was pleasantly surprised by her success. "I didn't expect it at all," said Arnold, who competed at 26 different tracks last year. "It was fun for me at first and then it became very competitive. Once I got kind of rolling, I had a goal and I just kept on going. It was tough, it was tiring, but it was worth every minute of it. "We'll see where it goes. It was a goal of mine to win an award for driving, but I never knew how it was going to go or when it would happen. I don't really have a plan for this year. I would like to succeed and go forward, but everybody would like to have everything." Arnold works with Short and also trains a 5-year-old female pacer, Knockout Queen, that she owns. Knockout Queen races Friday in the fillies-and-mares open handicap at Miami Valley Raceway. "I'm happy having one horse," Arnold said. "If I can have one and I can train her to my best ability and take care of her the best I can, that's enough." As close as Arnold and Binkley are as friends, they are equally competitive when it comes to facing each other on the racetrack. "We have to do what's best for us to win," Binkley said. "But if I get beat by her, I'm OK with it. Anyone else, and I'm kind of mad at myself." Said Arnold, "If I'm going to get beat by anybody, I'd rather get beat by her." On five occasions, Arnold and Binkley have finished 1-2 in races. Only a dead heat for win might be a more fitting outcome. Inseparable, again. Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association
RACING REGULATORY LAB FIRST TO UNCOVER MAJOR DOPING THREAT TO BOTH RACING AND HUMAN SPORT The New York Equine Drug Testing Programs Director Dr. George Maylin has confirmed the presence of a major doping threat to both human and equine sport in two standardbred horses racing at Yonkers Raceway. The New York horseracing lab is believed to be the first laboratory, in either horse racing or the worldwide WADA network of human testing labs, to screen for and confirm the presence of IOX-2.    IOX-2 is both a blood and gene doping agent that is the type of emerging small molecule synthetic doping agent that Dr. Maylin warned about at last year’s ARCI annual conference in Arcadia, California. Dr. Maylin, a member of the ARCI Scientific Advisory Group, has stressed that the more serious threat to the integrity of the sport lies in these types of doping agents rather than the misuse of therapeutic medications which have commanded the majority of attention by racing industry organizations and represent the majority of drug violations detected by racing commissions. In human sport, athletes can receive permission to compete with substances in their system that are banned in horse racing. All RCI member jurisdictions have been put on notice of the details of this development. IOX-2 is an HIF stabilizer that can trigger EPO like effects as well as overall stimulation of an athlete. “The New York Gaming Commission and Dr. Maylin specifically, should be commended for their work and focus on finding new and emerging threats to clean sport.   Dr. Maylin has worked long and hard looking for these type of substances and his work will benefit all ARCI member jurisdictions. “Unfortunately IOX-2 is just one doping agent and we are not naive to believe that others are not finding their way into professional sport.  Whether it be a racing lab or a WADA lab, we share a common mission and can never let our guard down.  Today, it’s IOX-2, tomorrow it’s going to be something else,” said Ed Martin, ARCI President.  “Horse racing is blessed to have experts like Dr. Maylin in our regulatory network.” Regulatory actions taken by the New York Gaming Commission are posted online at https://rulings.gaming.ny.gov #### For additional information on IOX2 click on this link. CONTACT: Ed Martin 859-224-7070. ASSOCIATION OF RACING COMMISSIONERS INTERNATIONAL  
With no winning tickets last Saturday night, there will be a carryover of $6,146 in Friday night's harness racing 20-cent Hi-Five with a $20,000-guaranteed gross pool. In addition, a reminder that both the 20-cent Pick 4 and 20-cent Pick 5 come with a reduced 16 percent takeout rate each night. On Saturdays there is a $30,000-guaranteed gross pool, with a $40,000 guarantee on Fridays. There are 12 races on tap Friday night under the Watch and Wager LLC banner with first post set for 6:10 p.m. The main event is the $8,100 Open Trot headed by Mandeville and Its a Horse. Mandeville is an 8-year-old son of Majestic Son who is owned, trained and driven by Gerry Longo. He comes into this assignment with 23 wins from his 120 lifetime appearances with $219,000 in the bank and a 1:54 2/5 standard. After encountering tough journeys in his previous three outings, including the Joe Lighthill Trot, Mandeville had smoother sailing in the most recent mile and one-half clash at the top rung as he prevailed by a length over favored Its A Horse, who was doing his work from the demanding No. 10 slot. Its A Horse is having an outstanding meet for owner Ray Alan Miller, trainer Marco Rios and pilot Dean Magee. He recorded a three-bagger between November 23 and December 13, including a convincing victory in the Lighthill and is always reliable for a strong finish. Horsemen remember Shelly Goudreau Saturday evening's Shelly Goudreau Pace is named for one of the most talented drivers to ever ply the trade. He passed away in a racing accident at Hollywood Park in 1982 at the age of 34. Steve Desomer drove with Goudreau during the six years that he raced in California and was competing with him in that fateful race at Hollywood Park. "I had the utmost respect for Shelly as both a great driver and a kind and personable man," Desomer said. "His brilliant career was cut way too short." Trainer George Reider will send out likely favorite Bunkerhill Bill in Saturday's headliner and recalls being impressed with Shelly Goudreau. "I was just a groom back then, but Shelly was a true gentleman and treated me as an equal. "He drove one horse I was taking care of by the name of Dalmead who was trained by Chip Lackey, and he beat the best horses on the grounds by open lengths." George also has another story to tell that still brings tears to his eyes all these years later. "The night before that terrible race, I had a horse racing named Kiwi Jane and I borrowed a piece of equipment from Joe Anderson called a jawbreaker, which goes through the bridle to help control the horse. "After the race, I gave it back to Joe. It turns out (trainer) Frank Ferrante borrowed the same bit the next night and used it for Reagan's Lad, which is the horse Shelly was driving. It broke and he fell off the back of the cart. It was so sad for everybody." By Mark Ratzky, publicity - Cal Expo Harness  
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