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The Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) reminds Ohio harness racing horsemen that the new therapeutic medication resolution for regulatory thresholds takes effect on Jan. 1, 2020. The resolution and OSRC regulatory thresholds list can be found at the OSRC website (www.racingohio.net) under Licenses, Laws & Rules. OSRC Commissioner Beth Hansen, chair of the OSRC Medication Committee (OSRC-MC), presented the resolution at the Sept. 23, 2019 OSCR Meeting where it was unanimously approved. For questions, please contact William Crawford, OSRC Executive Director at 614-466-2758 or at bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov. OHIO STATE RACING COMMISSION RESOLUTION 2019-07 WHEREAS, The Ohio State Racing Commission ("Commission") has the authority under Ohio Revised Code 3769.03 to prescribe rules and conditions under which horse racing may be conducted; WHEREAS, Ohio Administrative Code sections 3769-8-01 (A)(2) and 3769-18- 01 (A)(2) state the Commission may, by order, establish a system of classification of prohibited foreign substances, to include methods of detection and/or regulatory thresholds recommended penalties and disciplinary measures for the presence of said substances in test samples; WHEREAS, Ohio Administrative Code sections 3769-8-01 (A)(2) and 3769-18- 01 (A)(2) further state in determining the substances to be classified the Commission shall give due consideration to the uniform classification guidelines of foreign substances and recommended penalties and model rules revised by the association of racing commissioners international; WHEREAS, The Commission has established a medication committee which has reviewed industry therapeutic medication thresholds and the Commission's current list of Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances; WHEREAS, The medication committee received industry input regarding the misuse and/or abuse of these therapeutic medications and the detrimental effect on the equine athlete and to all of horse racing; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the following substances are approved as the Commission's Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances: Substance Threshold Matrix Acepromazine HEPS 10 ng/ml urine Albuterol 1 ng/ml urine Betamethasone 10 pg/ml blood Butorphanol 10 ng/ml urine   .   Cetirizine 6 ng/ml blood Cimetidine 400 ng/ml Blood     Clenbuterol   Dantrolene 25 pg/ml   5-OH dantrolene blood   blood   0.1 ng/ml   Detomidine 1 ng/ml blood Dexamethasone 5 pg/ml blood Diclofenac 5 ng/ml blood DMSO 10 ug/ml blood Firocoxib 20 ng/ml blood Flunixin 20 ng/ml blood Furosemide 100 ng/ml blood Glycopyrrolate 3 pg/ml blood Guaifenesin 12 ng/ml blood Isoflupredone 100 pg/ml blood Isoxuprine 1 ug/ml urine Ketoprofen 2 ng/ml blood Lidocaine 20 pg/ml of total 3-OH Lidocaine blood Mepivacaine 10 ng/ml of 3-OH Mepivacaine    urine Limit of Detection urine   blood Methocarbamol 1 ug/ml urine Methylprednisolone 100 pg/ml blood Omeprazole 10 ng/ml blood Omeprazole Sulfide   Phenylbutazone 2 ug/ml blood Prednisolone 1 ng/ml blood Procaine Penicillin 25 ng/ml blood Ranitidine 40 ng/ml blood Triamcinolone Acetonide 100 pg/ml blood Xylazine 200 pg/ml blood     NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the following substances are removed from the Commission's Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances and are now prohibited substances: Substance Threshold Matrix Pentazocine 50 ng/ml urine Promazine 50 ng/ml urine 3-OH promazine Pyrilamine 100 pg/ml blood O-desmethylpyrilamine Stanozolol 1 ng/ml urine 16 B-hydroxystanozolol   NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the effective implementation date of the above Orders is January 1, 2020. Adopted: September 23, 2019 by Kimberly Rinker, for the Ohio Sires Stakes  

The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) is pleased to provide the Canadian horse racing industry with the following new elimination guidelines. The information published in the 2016 Elimination Guidelines book continues to be valid. There is no date for publication of a new edition of the book. Dosage Regimen and Elimination Guideline (EG)   # Horses Drug Product Dose/Route Administration EG 4 Cetirizine1 Reactine 200 mg PO Single 72 hours 5 Clodronate2 Osphos 720 mg IM Single 30 days 4 Dexamethasone Dexamethasone 5 20 mg IM Single 48 hours 5 Fluticasone Flovent 2 mg AER Twice daily for 7 days 24 hours 5 Triamcinolone acetonide Viaderm KC 10 mg TOP Single 24 hours   1 Note that concurrent administration of cetirizine and oral ivermectin will significantly increase the elimination time of cetirizine. 2 Applies to horses 4 years of age and older. For more details, see CPMA Industry Notification dated May 31, 2018, “Addition of clodronate and tiludronate to the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations.” AER        Aerosol IA            Intra-articular IM          Intramuscular PO          Per os (oral) TOP        Topical It is stressed that these results are presented as guidelines only and should not be construed as absolute for every horse to which this drug is administered. The guidelines in this notice should not be applied to a compounded product and may not be consistent with foreign regulations and laboratory methods. As always, the CPMA strongly recommends that your veterinarian be consulted on any decision to administer any supplement or product to a horse. Should you have any questions or concerns regarding this matter, please do not hesitate to contact CPMA at cpmawebacpm@agr.gc.ca or by calling 1-800-268-8835. From the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Heather Morrissey under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) which states: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. It is alleged that the horse ‘Tryncatchme’ was presented to race at St Arnaud on 31 December 2017 by Mrs Morrissey when not free of the prohibited substance dexamethasone. HRV Stewards also issued a further charge under AHRR 190B which requires trainers to keep and maintain a logbook listing all therapeutic substances in their possession and recording all treatments administered to horses in their care. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing South Australia stewards today suspended the trainers licence of Mario Borg, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. This action was taken after receiving a report from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from ITS BEDLAM after it competed in Race 8, Book a Xmas Night At Globe Derby Pace, at Globe Derby on 12 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample was sent to the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in Sydney and has been confirmed. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including submissions provided by Mr Borg as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates from  approved drug testing laboratories have been received which confirmed the presence of dexamethasone; the nature of the substance; the absolute nature of Rule 190 offences; the obligation of HRSA to protect the harness racing industry. Mr Borg has not been charged with any offence and has been advised of his appeal rights against the imposition of Rule 183. No date for the inquiry has been set. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Francesca Carbone pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from PROMINENT ART following its first placing in Race 1, Jubilee Room New Menu Pace at Globe Derby on 5 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample has been confirmed by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in New South Wales. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Ms Carbone as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates had been received from approved drug testing laboratories confirming the presence of dexamethasone which is conclusive evidence of the presence of a prohibited substance. the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Ms Carbone has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today concluded the inquiry opened on 2 November 2106 into the analysts finding of Dexamethasone in the urine samples taken from the registered Standardbred Plain Dream from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016. Plain Dream was trained for these events by John Edmunds. Dexamethasone is a potent synthetic member of the glucocorticoid class of steroid hormones that acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant. After considering the evidence presented Stewards charged John Edmunds with two (2) breaches of Australian Harness Racing Rule 190(1) which reads: 190      (1)        A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances Charge 1 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Charge 2 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Mr Edmunds pleaded guilty to both charges.   In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Mr Edmund’s previous record relating to this type of matter; Ms Edmund’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of this case; The guilty plea entered The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards deemed that in relation to Charge 1 a fine of $5,000 be imposed and in relation to Charge 2 a fine of $5,000 be imposed. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 190(5) Plain Dream was disqualified from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 and the placings amended accordingly. Mr Edmunds was advised of his rights of an Internal Review. Stewards’ Report – Harness Trainer – John Edmunds Date – 22 December 2016 Panel – N. Torpey; L. Wilson & E. Little

As a result of a hearing held on Nov. 30, the New Jersey Racing Commission has suspended harness racing trainer Ake Svanstedt 15 days and fined him $500 as a result of a positive test on Resolve in the $273,600 John Cashman Jr. Memorial Trot on Aug. 6 at the Meadowlands. Svanstedt also received a second positive on his trotter Blue Muse, who won an $8,000 amateur race on Aug. 5 at the Meadowlands with his wife, Sarah, driving, and received the same penalties. The positives were for Dexamethasone, which is a Class C violation as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International. With Ake Svanstedt driving, Resolve won the Cashman in a career-best 1:50.2, besting Obrigado by 1-1/4 lengths. As a result of the positive test and subsequent disqualification of Resolve, Obrigado is now the official winner of the race. According to the New Jersey ruling, Svanstedt's two 15-day suspensions will be served consecutively, starting on Jan. 2, 2017, and continuing through and including Jan. 31, 2017. The ruling also states that "in addition to the penalty issued, a total of two Multiple Medication Violation points, as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International, shall be assigned as a result of these Class C violations."   Resolve (Ake Svanstedt) John Cashman Memorial TVG FFA Trot     Courtesy of harnessracing.com 

Office Of Racing Integrity Stewards have conducted an Inquiry into the results of analysis on urine samples taken from GLAMOUR ART, following its second placing in Race 11- “ The Luxbet For Those That Know Racing Pace” at the Launceston Pacing Club race meeting on 28 August 2016. Analysis of the samples indicated the presence of the Prohibited Substance DEXAMETHASONE.  Evidence was heard from representatives of Racing Analytical Services Limited and The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory, Consultant Veterinarian Dr. Peter Horridge and from trainer Dylan Ford as well as veterinary evidence on behalf of Mr Ford. Mr Ford pleaded guilty to three charges as follows.  1. AHRR 190B(1) – A Trainer shall at all times keep and maintain a log book recording all details of treatment administered to any horse in his or her care. 2. AHRR 190(1) – A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. 3. AHRR 196A(1)- A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance (ii) which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of any race. After hearing submissions on penalty and taking into account all relevant factors the following penalties were imposed.  Charge 1. A fine of $200 Charge 2. A disqualification for five months. Charge 3. A disqualification for five months. Stewards ordered that the two periods of disqualification be served concurrently, commencing immediately and expiring at midnight on 22 April 2017. Mr Ford was given until 5 p.m. on 25 November to remove from his training property any horses in his care. In accordance with AHRR 195 GLAMOUR ART was disqualified from its second placing with the race results to be amended accordingly. Mr Ford was advised of his rights of Appeal.  Adrian Crowther Chairman of Stewards (Harness) (03) 6777 1900

Stewards’ Report for Harness Racing Trainer Paul Matis Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding of Dexamethasone in the pre-race urine sample taken from Sir Semper Fidelis NZ prior to the horse competing in Race 6, Qld Four-Year-Old Championship at Albion Park on 2 July 2016. Sir Semper Fidelis was trained for this event by Paul Matis. Dexamethasone is a synthetic member of the glucocorticoid class of steroid hormone that acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant. After taking evidence from Mr Matis, Dr K. Caldwell, Manager, Veterinary Services at the Racing Science Centre and Ms S. Nelis, Principal Analyst at the Racing Science Centre Stewards charged Paul Matis with the contravention of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) which reads: “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances.” Mr Matis pleaded not guilty to the charge. However, after careful consideration of the evidence by the Stewards, was found guilty as charged. In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards weighed up all the circumstances relating to the commission of the particular offence and the individual circumstances of Mr Matis as well as the provisions of AHRR. 190(2) and (4). Stewards are of the view that the rules are concerned with the maintenance of the formulation of a proper standard of conduct to be expected of members of the racing fraternity and also to act as a form of discipline for members of that racing fraternity. Further Stewards believe that any penalty is applied to enforce compliance to the rules and is done by the imposition of a punishment which includes aspects of deterrents. Not only to that particular licensee but also as a deterrent to like-minded members of the racing community who may feel obliged to commit similar like conduct. After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards fined Paul Matis the sum of $6,000. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195 Sir Semper Fidelis NZ was disqualified from Race 6 at Albion Park on 2 July 2016 and the placings were amended accordingly. Mr Matis was advised of his rights of an Internal Review   Date – 11 October 2016 Panel – N. Torpey; L. Wilson & A. Reardon

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards today concluded an inquiry which was opened and adjourned on 29 September 2016 into the circumstances surrounding the analysts’ findings in respect to a post race urine sample taken from Oozinville following its winning harness racing performance in Race 7 at Redcliffe on 11 May 2016. The Queensland Government Racing Science Centre (RSC) reported a level of Cobalt in the sample in excess of the threshold as prescribed by the Australian Harness Racing Rules and also the presence of the prohibited substance Dexamethasone. Stewards also concluded their investigations into the pre race urine sample taken from Ashleys Angel prior to it competing at Redcliffe on 26 May 2016, and a pre race urine taken from Zac Mac (NZ) prior to it competing at Albion Park on 4 June 2016. The Queensland Government Racing Science Centre (RSC) reported a level of Cobalt in both samples in excess of the threshold as prescribed by the Australian Harness Racing Rules. On 6 October 2016, Stewards issued charges against Mr Darren Hooper as follows: Charge 1 – Rule 190(1)            “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances” The particulars of the charge being that Mr Hooper presented Oozinville to race in Race 7 at Redcliffe on 11 May 2016 when a sample taken from that gelding was found, upon analysis, to contain the prohibited substance Cobalt above the prescribed threshold and also the prohibited substance Dexamethasone. Charge 2 – Rule 190(1) “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances” The particulars of the charge being that Mr Hooper presented Ashleys Angel in Race 1 at Redcliffe on 26 May 2016 when a sample taken from that mare was found, upon analysis, to contain the prohibited substance Cobalt above the prescribed threshold. Charge 3 – Rule 190(1) “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances” The particulars of the charge being that Mr Hooper presented Zac Mac NZ in Race 3 at Albion Park on 4 June 2016 when a pre race urine sample taken from that gelding was found, upon analysis, to contain the prohibited substance Cobalt above the prescribed threshold. After due consideration Stewards were of the view that all charges could be sustained as issued and formally found Mr Hooper guilty. When assessing the matter of penalty Stewards gave consideration to the following: The serious nature of the substance concerned and the levels of Cobalt recorded (339Ug/l, 475Ug/l, and 584 Ug/l); Mr Hooper’s licence history and previous offence under this rule; Mr Hooper’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of the case; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; Penalty precedents. Charge 1 Mr Hooper was disqualified for a period of 12 months effective immediately. Charge 2 Mr Hooper was disqualified for a period of 12 months effective immediately. Charge 3 Mr Hooper was disqualified for a period of 12 months effective immediately. Stewards directed that all three periods of disqualification be served cumulatively. Acting under Australian Harness Racing Rule 195 Oozinville was disqualified from its win in Race 7 at Redcliffe on 11 May 2016, Ashleys Angel was disqualified from its performance at Redcliffe on 26 May 2016, and Zac Mac NZ was disqualified from its winning performance at Albion Park on 4 June 2016 with all other placegetters to be amended accordingly. Mr Hooper was advised of his rights to internal review. Inquiry: Darren Hooper -  Panel: D Farquharson, N Torpey, P Gillard

Harness racing followers should be interested in this.   It follows a litany of other cases where trainers have been burned based upon arbitrary thresholds and no one stands up against the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium and guidelines not science based.   There is but one organization that has withdrawn funding for RMTC and correctly so as it seeks to do independent research that can be peer reviewed.   That entity is the United States Trotting Association.    Commissions calling false positives does not help individuals who follow published rules and is that very harmful to the individuals and industry itself. The RMTC data used to formulate the withdrawal times and threshold levels established for the substance Betamethasone and Dexamethasone by either the American Racing Commission‘s International and/or the National Uniform Medication Program that many, but not all, US Racing Commissions have  adopted,  and are promulgated,are  based upon allegedly data which has not been made available to scientific publications or  Peer Reviewed. Consider the Delaware Ruling regarding Todd Pletcher for the therapeutic medication - Betamethasone. Click here: Uncertainty as Delaware Drops Pletcher Case | BloodHorse.com RMTC not only has failed to correct  for the erroneous data that it has reported in any timely fashion before horsemen were penalized but has done so long after the erroneous  threshold and withdrawal times led many Commissions to mete out penalties to trainers who followed administration guidelines including days, fines, loss of purse as well as damage to their reputations. By way of additional documented examples, in 2013, RMTC adopted a threshold for Xylazine (Rompun) that was too low. That reportedly resulted in the disqualification and penalization of over thirty (30) horses and trainers.  In 2016, after those horsemen were penalized, RMTC increased the threshold 20 times higher than that used as the basis to penalize innocent horsemen and tarnish the sport. Little  good that did for those Florida horsemen who saw a spike in drug positives or for the sport.  Florida was one of twenty states adopting the much heralded National Uniform Medication Program.  Uniform rule recommendations not based upon scientific fact present a horrible scenario for individual horsemen, as well as for the industry.  Just this year, two more threshold changes occurred; one for the analgesic detomidine, the other for omeprazole (ulcer medicine).   The originally published RMTC thresholds are apparently not based on actual science at all, tantamount to perhaps being pulled out of a hat.  Lastly, the New York State Gaming Commission  considered  that the RMTC recommended threshold and withdrawal guidelines for Flunixin ( Banamine)  were erroneous and refused to adopt them and also the faulty withdrawal time for use of Clenbuteral in the harness industry. Had NY not done its homework the RMTC erroneous withdrawal times would have caused unnecessary or false positives in an estimated twenty (20%) of the race horses on that medication. The most recent evidence of the damage bad science can lead to is reprinted here with the kind permission of the Thoroughbred Daily News. Motion Responds to KHRC Ruling By Graham Motion Editor’s Note: Trainer H. Graham Motion has penned the following response to a KHRC ruling Tuesday fining him for a Robaxin positive with last year’s GIII Bewitch S. winner Kitten’s Point (Kitten’s Joy). Click here to read a TDN article on his initial appeal to the suspension and fine. After over 11,000 starters and more than 2,000 winners over the course of more than 20 years, [Tuesday] I was fined by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission for the first positive in my career and Kitten’s Point was disqualified from her win in the 2015 GIII Bewitch S. at Keeneland. This hearing took place in a meeting where I was denied the opportunity to address the commission. Of course I wanted to defend myself, but moreover I wanted to address some of my concerns with this medication and how it was handled. The entire process has been extremely disappointing and troubling to me. I always felt that if the day ever came where, by some unforeseen circumstance, I was charged with a drug violation I would not lawyer up to defend myself, but rather would take my punishment and move on. It would upset me to see trainers go to such great lengths to defend themselves. But, when I found myself in that position I felt differently. I felt that my staff and I had gone to extraordinary lengths to protect myself and my clients. When I was made aware of a withdrawal time I would add plenty of cushion as was the case with Kittens Point. The last time she was treated with Robaxin was seven days before the race, more than double a recommended withdrawal guideline published by the KHRC. After all, if we as trainers can not rely on the guidelines that are given to us, how on earth can we be expected to operate within the rules? More over, I was troubled to learn that the current threshold for Robaxin as set by the RMTC and adopted by the KHRC was not supported by good science, including going completely against the recommendation set by the head of the KHRC’s testing lab Dr. Sams. Unfortunately in my case I was not allowed to defend myself based on the science, including a recently approved paper published by Heather Knych which clearly states that the RMTC guidelines for Robaxin are misguided. In my opinion this is information that should be turned over to horseman as quickly as possible. Surely the KHRC are not looking to trip up horseman with unsupported thresholds and guidelines? In a time of ever changing restrictions on certain medications it should be imperative that horsemen are kept informed. Equally as important to me is the way in which our samples are handled. I strongly believe that it is a good thing that post race testing has become increasingly more sensitive, but shouldn’t there be a responsibility with the commission that our samples are handled with the utmost of care. We are now being tested for nanograms, that is a billionth of a gram. It is disturbing to me that the samples are frequently collected and handled in unsecure environments, very little has changed with regard to this process over the years considering the technology and sensitivity of the testing process. So there, I have said it. All I was asking for was two minutes, it didn’t seem like an unreasonable demand. By all means we need to keep our game honest, but at what cost to the guys that are trying to play by the rules. Ends Harnesslink Media

The Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards today conducted an inquiry into a report received from the Queensland Government Racing Science Centre (RSC) that Dexamethasone was detected in a pre race urine sample taken from Arctic prior to it competing in Race 3 at Albion Park on Friday, 6 May 2016. Evidence was provided by licensed trainer Matthew Purcell, via telephone, regarding the presentation of Arctic for racing at Albion Park on 6 May 2016. Evidence was also provided by Dr Karen Caldwell, Acting Manager Veterinary Services and Samantha Nelis, Acting Manager Analytical Services from the Racing Science Centre. After consideration Mr Purcell was charged pursuant to Australian Harness Racing (AHR) Rule 190 (1) which reads: 190. (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances.  (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence.  (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse.   The particulars of the charge being that Mr Purcell did present Arctic for racing at Albion Park on Friday, 6 May 2016 when the subsequent analysis of a urine sample obtained from that horse detected the presence of the prohibited substance Dexamethasone. Mr Purcell was found guilty of the charge and fined the sum of $6000. When assessing the matter of penalty Stewards gave consideration to the following: Mr Purcell’s licence history of 18 years and his personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of the case; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; Penalty precedents. Stewards further directed that under Rule 195 Arctic be disqualified from its placing in Race 3 at Albion Park on 6 May 2016 and all other placegetters be amended accordingly. Mr Purcell was advised of his rights to internal review. Stewards’ Report – Matthew Purcell Date – 15 September 2016 Panel – D Farquharson, K Wolsey, N Torpey

The Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards have received notification from the Queensland Government Racing Science Centre that Dexamethasone has been detected in a pre-race urine sample taken from SIR SEMPER FIDELIS NZ prior to it competing in race 6 at Albion Park on 2 July 2016.Trainer Paul Matis has been notified of the discrepancy and the reserve portion of the sample has been referred for confirmatory analysis. The Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards have received notification from the Queensland Government Racing Science Centre that Heptaminol has been detected in a pre-race urine sample taken from MISHANI JEWEL prior to it competing in race 5 at Redcliffe on 14 July 2016.Trainer Martine Dwyer has been notified of the discrepancy and the reserve portion of the sample has been referred for confirmatory analysis. The Queensland Racing Integrity Commission

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards has received notification from the Queensland Racing Science Centre that Cobalt in excess of the permitted threshold has been confirmed in a urine sample taken from ASHLEYS ANGEL which competed at Redcliffe on 26 May 2016.Acting under the provisions of AHR 183(a) it has been determined that ASHLEYS ANGEL shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the inquiry has been concluded, and the trainer Darren Hooper has been advised accordingly. Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards has received notification from the Queensland Racing Science Centre that Cobalt in excess of the permitted threshold has been confirmed in a urine sample taken from ZAC MAC NZ which competed at Albion Park 4 June 2016.Acting under the provisions of AHR 183(a) it has been determined that ZAC MAC NZ shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the inquiry has been concluded, and the trainer Darren Hooper has been advised accordingly. Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards has received notification from the Queensland Racing Science Centre that Dexamethasone has been confirmed in a urine sample taken from ROARN which competed at Albion Park 28 May 2016.Acting under the provisions of AHR 183(a) it has been determined that ROARN shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the inquiry has been concluded, and the trainer Kristin Cunningham has been advised accordingly. Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards has received notification from the Queensland Racing Science Centre that Dexamethasone has been confirmed in a urine sample taken from ROARN which competed at Redcliffe on 3 June 2016.Acting under the provisions of AHR 183(a) it has been determined that ROARN shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the inquiry has been concluded, and the trainer Kristin Cunningham has been advised accordingly. For details on Dexamethasone For details on Cobalt

Four veterinarians entered guilty pleas for their illegal doping of thoroughbred race horses at Penn National Race Track in Grantville, Pennsylvania. The United States Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania announced that Dr. Kevin Brophy, age 60, Florida, Dr. Fernando Motta, age 44, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Dr. Christopher Korte, age 43, Pueblo, Colorado, pleaded guilty today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan E. Schwab in Harrisburg. Dr. Renee Nodine, age 52, Annville, pleaded guilty yesterday afternoon. Each defendant is charged with allegedly administering drugs to horses within 24 hours of when the horse was entered to race. This conduct was in violation of the state law prohibiting the rigging of publicly exhibited contests and regulations prohibiting the administration of drugs to horses within 24 hours of when they are entered to race. Additionally, because the administering of the drugs was in violation of the state criminal laws, rules and regulations governing thoroughbred racing, they were not dispensed in the course of the defendants’ professional practice. At the guilty plea proceedings before Magistrate Judge Schwab, Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe explained that the drugs were not administered to treat the horses but to enhance the horses’ performance in the race or to give it an edge over other horses. According to Behe this constituted misbranding of the prescription animal drugs in violation of federal law. The alleged activity took place at various times beginning as early as 1986 and continuing up to August 2014. The Informations also allege that the defendants conspired with horse trainers, whose identities are “known to the United States”, to administer the drugs in violation of the laws, rules and regulations governing the conduct of thoroughbred racing. The guilty pleas this week were pursuant to plea agreements in which the defendants agreed to plead guilty and cooperate with the United States in the continuing investigation. At the guilty plea proceedings Behe informed the court that cooperation by the defendants was an essential part of the plea agreement and that the defendants had already identified for the United States the many trainers with whom the defendants conspired with to illegally administer drugs to the horses. Behe identified for the court the drugs that were administered to include, among others, Kentucky Red, Carolina Gold, Bute, Dexamethasone, Banamine, Stop2, Estrogen, L-Arginine, and ACTH. According to the charges, trainers allegedly placed orders for drugs and the defendants, after administering the drugs, backdated the billing records to avoid detection. The defendants allegedly submitted false veterinarian treatment reports to the State Horse Racing Commission, omitting from those reports any reference to the drugs administered to horses at the track on race day. The filing of these reports and the backdating of billing records were, allegedly, to further the conspiracy by concealing the illegal activity. These acts had the potential to defraud other owners and trainers whose horses were entered in the same race and defrauded the betting public as well. The matter is being investigated by the Harrisburg Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Pennsylvania State Horse Racing Commission, U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Criminal Investigations, and the Pennsylvania State Police. Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe is prosecuting the cases for the United States. Indictments and criminal Informations are only allegations. All persons charged are presumed to be innocent unless and until found guilty in court. A sentence following a finding of guilty is imposed by the Judge after consideration of the applicable federal sentencing statutes and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. The maximum penalty in these cases under the federal statute is 2 years imprisonment, a term of supervised release following imprisonment, and a $200,000 fine. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the Judge is also required to consider and weigh a number of factors, including the nature, circumstances and seriousness of the offense; the history and characteristics of the defendant; and the need to punish the defendant, protect the public and provide for the defendant’s educational, vocational and medical needs. For these reasons, the statutory maximum penalty for the offense is not an accurate indicator of the potential sentence for a specific defendant. By Paul Smith Reprinted with permission of Fox43.com

On Thursday 14 August 2014 Harness Racing SA stewards conducted an inquiry into a report from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) in relation to a urine sample taken from KING GALLEON followings its trial at Betezy Park, Globe Derby on Sunday 15 June 2014, after analysis of the sample detected the presence of the prohibited substance DEXAMETHASONE.  This finding was confirmed by the Racing Science Centre in Queensland. Evidence was taken from Trainer Scott Forby and RASL Scientific Manager Paul Zahra. Scott Forby provided his log book of treatments which showed KING GALLEON had been treated with Ilium Dexapent on Friday 13th June 2014.  After hearing the relative evidence Scott Forby pleaded guilty to a charge under Rule 190(1), (2) & (4) in that as the trainer of KING GALLEON he presented that gelding to trial on 15 June 2014 not free of the prohibited substance DEXAMETHASONE. Further Scott Forby was found guilty of a charge under Rule 196A (1) in that he administered to KING GALLEON a prohibited substance which was detected in the urine sample taken from that horse following the running of the trial on 15 June 2014. In assessing penalty, the panel took into account: The circumstances of the case Mr. Forby’s guilty plea Mr. Forby’s personal circumstances The need to provide both a specific and general deterrent in relation to prohibited substance offences. The negative affect a prohibited substance offence has on the confidence of the harness racing industry and the wider community. Scott Forby was disqualified for a period of 9 months, effective immediately. BARBARA SCOTT Chair of Stewards. 15 August 2014.  

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