Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 5 of 5
1

BJ Lorado (Andy Santeramo) took the featured trot ($9,000) at Tioga Downs on Saturday (August 18). BJ Lorado ($9.90) went to the front and led to a first quarter of :28.0 and the half of :57.2. Freddie Mac (Mike Merton) would go first over and claim the lead at the three-quarter mark of 1:25.4. The two horses would then battle their way around the final turn together. BJ Lorado would dig down deep and re-claim the lead in the stretch to win in 1:55.0. Rose Run Rudi (Aaron Byron) came up to finish second. Freddie Mac settled for third. BJ Lorado is a 4-year-old gelding by Bo W. It was his sixth win of the season and it was career victory number 10. Trained by Marc Major for two of the the nicest owners you would ever want to meet in Diane and Michael Norcross. The lovely couple can be seen here almost every night at the finish line rooting their horses on. Mike Merton and Jim Taggart Jr. each won three races on the night. Merton got his wins with Gifted George ($6.30), Vicki All ($9.50), and Mr Carrotts ($6.10). Taggart Jr, won with Pinstripe Pride ($13.80), Celebrity Lover ($15.80), and Master Of Puppets ($5.30). Uriel (Annie Stoebe) wins the Billings Amateur race ($6,000). Uriel ($13.80) charged to the front and went gate-to-wire (:28.1, :59.3, 1:27.3, 1:56.4). Owned and trained by Stoebe, he had to hold off the late rush of second place finisher Celebrity Bluechip (Jennifer Lappe). Connie Keeper (Bob Davis) was third best. Uriel is a 7-year-old gelding by Explosive Matter. It was his fourth win this season and career victory number 27. Tioga Downs returns to live racing on Sunday (August 19) with their biggest card of the year. Sunday will feature Empires Breeders Classic (EBC) final for 3-year-old pacing fillies ($270,425) and the EBC Classic Final for 3-year-old colts and geldings ($272,025). Also on the card is the Roll WIth Joe Open Pace ($143,000) and the Artiscape Open Mares Pace ($161,000). As well as 2 divisions of the Ms Versatility for Open Mares trotters (leg 3). The 13 race card starts at 1 p.m. For more information go to www.tiogadowns.com by John Horne, for Tioga Downs

Nichols, NY--The ever-traveling CKG Billings Amateur Driving Series moved on to Tioga Downs for a trotting contest and it turned out to be ladies night when Annie "Get Your Gun" Stoebe used the front-end route with Uriel to hold off "Lady Jennifer" Lappe and Celebrity Blue Chip for a 1:56.4 victory which marked the first time this season--maybe ever-- that women finished one-two in a Billings event. When the wings of the mobile gate folded Stoebe wasted no time sending Uriel to the front and they had a two-length lead on Celebrity Blue Chip at the first quarter which was trotted in :281. When Stoebe began to slow the pace "Buffalo Bob" Davis , who was sitting third, was out and going with Connie Keeper and they ranged alongside Uriel but as they did Miss Annie stepped on the gas and Uriel trotted the third quarter in :28.0 which not only put away Connie Keeper but opened daylight on Lappe's charge as the timer flashed 1:27.3. When the field headed down the lane Uriel had two lengths on Celebrity Blue Chip as Connie Keeper faded. At the wire Uriel was one-length winner. Celebrity Blue Chip held second and Connie Keeper finished third, seven lengths behind the winner. It was the fourth victory of the season for Uriel, a 7-year-old Explosive Matter gelding who returned a $13.40 mutuel. He's owned and trained by Stoebe who scored her fourth seasonal driving victory. by John Manzi, for the Billings Series      

Harness racing's greatest traveling roadshow, the CKG Billings Harness Driving Series, moved on to Yonkers Raceway where two solid six-horse trots were presented in the series eastern region prior to the betting card getting underway. When the judges posted the official signs "Yankee Joe" Lee and "Annie Get Your Gun" Stoebe were victorious in their respective $6000 splits. Lee was a convincing winner behind Soul Train in 1:58.3 while Miss Annie was home free with Uriel in a 1:59 clocking. Both horses used the front-end route to victory. Named the sports Amateur Driver of the Year last season Lee, the New York Yankees' locker room manager, has been heating up recently now with three wins and a second in his last five starts. Tonight he gunned Soul Train to the lead from post six and they made every pole winning one en route to turning back Evore Hanover and driver David "Poppa" Glasser by some 3-1/4 lengths. When the wings of the mobile gate folded "Yankee Joe" had his trotter in high gear from post six and they had six lengths on the field as they passed the first stanza. From there they were comfortably in front until they crossed the finish line. Third place went to Time Will Tell All in rein to"Mighty Matt" Zuccarello. Soul Train, is owned by Blindswitch Racing, Good Friends Stable, Santo Farina and Joseph Lee, and is trained by Jose Godinez. It was the second victory this season for the 7-year-old Trainforthefuture gelding. In her division Ms Stoebe started from the pole position, took no prisoners and used the front-end route as she and her veteran trotter passed the first stanza is a soft :29.4. Although they rebuffed a few challengers along the way Miss Annie and Uriel were easily in command all the way to the wire. Despite a garden trip in the two-hole No Recess and driver Bob "the Headhunter" Hechkoff couldn't make up any ground in the deep stretch and had to settle for second money. "Coach Paul" Minore and his old warhorse Wygant Prince made a run at the leaders at the halfway point but soon settled back along the pylons and sauntered home in third place some three lengths behind the winner. Uriel, a 7-year-old Explosive Matter gelding gave Ms Stoebe her second Billings victory of the fledgling season. Next Billings action will be at Saratoga Raceway on Friday, June 15. by John Manzi for, the Billings Series    

FREEHOLD, NJ--Harness racing's greatest traveling roadshow, the CKG Billings Harness Driving Series, is on the move again today (May 26) featuring a trot at Freehold Raceway and for the third time in amateur contests over the past week once again a lady is the champ. Emulating previous amateur winners, Jennifer Lappe and Monica Banca, this time Annie "Get Your Gun" Stoebe turned the tables on the boys when she went down the road unchallenged and coasted home an easy three-length winner with Uriel in a time of 1:58.3. A member of multiple amateur driving clubs this season marks the first time that the talented miss is participating in the sport's oldest and longest running amateur organization. After seven trotters had lined-up behind the mobile starting gate Stoebe gunned her charge to the front from the two-hole and they were four lengths ahead of the field when the quarter pole timer flashed :28.4. Still leading the way by the half , albeit by only two lengths, that margin was dramatically increased to eight lengths as she led Orange Biji and driver "Mighty Matt" Zuccarello into the final turn. Still six lengths to the good at the top lane the announcer told fans holding mutuel tickets with Uriel's number to get on line to collect. Orange Biji made up some ground in the stretch but at the finish it was Uriel and "Annie Get Your Gun" by a solid three lengths. After he recovered from going offstride early in the mile Evore Hanover, with David "Poppa" Glasser at the controls, garnered the show dough. Miss Annie owns the winner, a 7-year-old Explosive Matter gelding, who paid $8.80 to his backers. It was the third seasonal and fourth lifetime driving victory for Ms Stobe who began her career in the sulky just last season. Over the Memorial Day weekend the international Billings Harness Driving Series will have contests in Canada-Sunday at Flamboro Downs and Monday at Woodbine Mohawk Park. by John Manzi, for the CKG Billings Series

Hightstown, NJ --- It was only three years ago that Montana native Annie Stoebe first heard of harness racing. It did not take her long to determine the sport was for her. The 30-year-old Stoebe was no stranger to horses. She grew up on a farm near Great Falls and spent much of her life barrel racing, which enabled her to get a rodeo scholarship to a college in Texas. Two-and-a-half years ago, Stoebe began working for trainer Brett Bittle and the idea of climbing into the sulky and racing became entirely enthralling. “Once I started in this industry, I thought this is really cool,” Stoebe said. “I thought it would be so different than racing against the time clock; you actually see your competition. I sold my barrel horse and I was fully invested. “There are not many sports where you can own the animal, train the animal, sit behind him, and take him to the races. It doesn’t matter if you’re 30 or 60, anyone can sit behind a racehorse, at least jogging or to some extent. I’m telling everyone back home they should look into this.” Once Stoebe decided to get more involved, she spent several months looking for a horse of her own. Five months ago, she got her man when she claimed a trotter named Uriel. The now 7-year-old gelding makes up her stable. And on Dec. 28, Uriel delivered Stoebe her first win as both a driver and trainer in an amateur race at the Meadowlands. “It was pretty exhilarating,” Stoebe said. “To be honest, it took until I’d turned around and was heading back (to the winner’s circle) to even believe it happened and was real.” Stoebe and Uriel were never threatened in the race, winning by 7-3/4 lengths at odds of 64-1. The margin of victory contributed to Stoebe questioning whether it was real. “I kept looking back, wondering where everybody else was,” Stoebe said, laughing. “I was up by like five (lengths) at the half and I got to three-quarters and they were still back there. I crossed the finish line and I looked back and everyone was way back there. I thought, did I miss something? Was there a recall? What happened? Is this real?” Stoebe and Uriel have yet to add to their win total since that night, but have finished off the board only twice in six races this year. Stoebe plans to continue racing in amateur events, but might cut back when Bittle’s stable begins racing its six 2-year-olds later this season. “I’m looking forward to the summer with them,” Stoebe said. “I love driving and I love my horse, but my driving might take a backseat a little then. “I love driving, but I love training and seeing how the (young horses) go from not knowing anything to the racetrack. That’s why I love horses; you get to see them learn things every single day. You get to see your work shine through them. They pay you for your time. It’s a very rewarding job.” by Ken Weingartner, USTA Media Relations Manager

1 to 5 of 5
1