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All racing regulatory commissions have been put on notice that the banning of voluntary race day furosemide administrations by some US racetracks or lawmakers is expected to encourage a return to practices deemed cruel, inhumane, or potentially dangerous to the health and welfare of a horse. Regulatory policy permitting race day furosemide was developed decades ago to end such practices and permit a treatment deemed helpful to the health of the horse. The Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) has long maintained their international standard permitting such use is more considerate of the health or the horse than the standards of other organizations that disallow it. Last Friday, the RCI advised Regulatory Commissions to be on the lookout for horses being given intravenous formaldehyde to combat potential incidents of bleeding. The advisory noted that Formaldehyde use is already being investigated in at least one US jurisdiction, and the RCI investigatory intelligence network is reporting that if furosemide is banned in the US, illegal formaldehyde use as an alternative may become common. "This poses an inherent danger to the horse and can be potentially fatal." the advisory read, noting that Racing Victoria, which does not permit race day furosemide, has been dealing with the formaldehyde alternative for several years. The ARCI also advised commissions that it is anticipated that some horsemen will return to a practice known as "Drawing and Muzzling". This practice, common in Europe where race day furosemide treatments are also not permitted, denies a horse food and water for twenty-four to thirty six hours prior to a race. "The denial of water or food to a horse for an extended period of time should be regarded as cruel and inhumane by regulatory authorities," the advisory read. The advisory suggested that any commissions considering requests to suspend current regulatory policy permitting race day furosemide treatments at racetracks or during select races are being advised to consider a corresponding prohibition on "Drawing and Muzzling". This is the second Equine Welfare advisory circulated to commissions in recent days. On April 30th the ARCI warned commissions to be on the lookout for an herbal drug called Kratom that has been linked to almost 100 overdose deaths in humans. Kratom is marketed as a health supplement and treatment for common maladies, but the FDA and DEA have warned against its use. Kratom has been found in racehorses in New York. Commissions were also reminded to alert investigators that some racehorses may be given treatments of nickel to boost performance in much the same way cobalt has been used. Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

The 2018 Anti-Doping and Drug Testing Program conducted by US racing regulatory bodies found continued substantial compliance with racing’s medication and anti-doping rules and little support for claims that the use of drugs to mask pain when horses race is rampant. As it does each year the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) released a summary of the collective results of the individual state programs conducted in 2018. In 2018 horses competing in 95,618 individual races were tested, 43,574 flat races (quarter horse and thoroughbred combined) and 52,044 standardbred races. This represents a reduction from the previous year when horses from 98,883 races were tested. On average 3.2 horses were tested in each flat race and 2.26 horses tested in each standardbred contest. In 2018, there were 1,561 violations of the medication rules out of 258,920 samples tested, meaning that 99.4% of all tests found the horse to be compliant with the rules. It also means that the facts do not support claims that a substantial number of horses are racing under the influence of pain masking medications as all testing labs routinely screen for the presence of such drugs. Such instances do occasionally occur and are reflected in the violations that are found and prosecuted. The ARCI has described violations involving Class 1 or Class 2 substances as instances of “doping”. Violations involving substances of a lesser class often involve overages of medications deemed therapeutic or authorized by US federal law for veterinary use. There was a dramatic drop in doping instances from 2017 to 2018. In 2017, 11% of all violations found were for Class 1 or 2 substances. In 2018, that number dropped to 6.8% of all violations. In 2018, there were 107 findings out of 258,920 samples tested for these substances deemed to have the greatest effect on performance, or 0.04% of all samples tested. In 2017, there were 169 findings out of 293,704 samples, or 0.06% of those tested. Violations involving Class 3 substances were 26.2% of all adverse analytical findings in 2018, a slight increase over the 24.5% detected in 2017. There were 409 Class 3 AAF’s in 2018 - 0.16% of all tested - compared to 376 in 2017 - 0.13% tested. Violations involving substances deemed least likely to affect performance - Class 4 and 5 substances - accounted for 66.9% of the adverse analytical findings in 2018, slightly up from the 64.5% of AAF’s in 2017. Clear Rate: In 2018, 99.4% of all samples tested were determined to be clear of any substance that would trigger an adverse analytical finding (AAF). In 2017, the clear rate for all US horse racing was 99.5%. For Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse races, the clear rate in 2018 was 99.13% and the rate for Standardbred races that year was 99.71%. By comparison, the 2017 Annual Report of the US Anti Doping Agency indicates that their clear rate for human sport was 99.12% for Olympic, Paralympic and Global Service Testing. The 2019 World Anti-Doping Agency’s Testing Report shows that their “clear rate” is 98.57%. “Horse racing and human sport share the same challenges in combatting those who cheat. While the overall clear rate is comparable, I do not believe anyone is under the illusion in either human sport or horse racing that we are catching everyone who will attempt to cheat,” said Ed Martin, President of the Association of Racing Commissioners International. “Industry investments in anti-doping research and a greater emphasis on expanded investigatory staff at the regulatory agencies and racetracks is essential if we are to effectively combat this threat,” he said. Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

There are three organizations that set “international standards” concerning equine races: the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) Recent press releases and political advocacy campaigns in the US have made reference to the need to adopt “international standards”.   The implied standards referenced are those of the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities, embodied in 87 pages of an International Agreement. No racing regulatory authority empowered to make or enforce rules anywhere in North America is allowed to vote on adoption of those standards, although individual members of the European Union may.     By contrast, the ARCI standards are the result of cooperative discussions between all aspects of the racing industry and are adopted upon the votes of the actual racing regulatory authorities who have been given the statutory ability to adopt and enforce such policies.    The ARCI does not limit those regulatory authorities allowed to vote. The standards of all three organizations are substantially similar, although the ARCI Model Rules are more exhaustive with regard to many matters.   One major difference deals with whether to permit the controlled and disclosed administration of furosemide on race day, an equine welfare program adopted decades ago designed to mitigate or prevent EIPH, exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage.   The ARCI has been setting international standards for 85 years.  Those standards are embodied in the ARCI Model Rules of Racing of which all but 53 of its 468 pages apply to equine races and associated wagering. Rebecca Shoemaker

The Drug Testing Standards and Practices (DTSP) Committee of the Association of Racing Commissions International (ARCI) is considering a major change to the recommended penalties for violations of the association's drug rules to dramatically increase sanctions on those violations that can be considered "doping" or "equine endangerment". An ARCI workgroup has been quietly working for the past year to put together a system to increase penalties for violations categorized as "Doping of Equine Endangerment". Penalties for such violations would be effectively doubled from the existing Class A penalties, with a first violation requiring a two to five-year suspension of the trainer and a minimum $50,000 fine which could be increased to $100,000 with aggravating circumstances. A second violation in any jurisdiction would trigger a license revocation. The proposal would also impose a $25,000 fine on an owner if there is a second lifetime offense in the owner's stable in any jurisdiction. A third offense would suspend the owner for a minimum of thirty days to as much as a year and impose a minimum fine of $50,000 which could be increased to $100,000. Because of the seriousness of these violations a summary suspension would be required, pending any appeal. Existing penalties for medication overages would remain the same and many would be re-categorized as a "Treatment Misapplication & Mismanagement". If the substance or the quantity of a substance found in horse would warrant an equine endangerment charge it would be the commission's equine medical director or regulatory veterinarian who would have to recommend such to the Stewards. The proposal also contains a minimum $500 fine for a first-time failure to keep or report required treatment records. A second offense would bring a $2,500 fine, a third offense a $5,000 fine plus a referral to the commission for possible license review. In August, 2017, the RCI Board tasked the DTSP Committee with performing a review of the current penalty guidelines and structure with an eye toward differentiating between violations that could clearly be called "doping" or "equine endangerment" from those that were overages of therapeutic medications with less of an impact on performance by virtual of being classified as a Class 4 or 5 drug. Following that meeting an online survey was conducted of DTSP Committee members and a similar survey was conducted of interested industry contacts. A conference call was held to discuss the project and a smaller group provided subsequent input. Recognizing that the task was a potentially enormous undertaking, Committee Chair Duncan Patterson, the Chair of the Delaware Thoroughbred Commission, asked former RCI Chair Dan Hartman to coordinate a workgroup to flesh out what a modified penalty guideline system might look like. The following individuals agreed to serve on the workgroup and literally spent countless hours discussing almost every substance contained on the RCI Classification Document. Those who worked on the project were:   Dr. Kathy Anderson, DVM - past AAEP President; Dr. Charles Vail, DVM - past AAEP President, former Colorado Racing Commissioner; Mr. John Ward - former regulator and lifelong horseman; Rick Baedeker - former track operator and current regulator; Mike Hopkins - former horseman and lifelong regulator, and; Dan Hartman, current regulator.   At last week's committee meeting at the ARCI Annual Conference in Arcadia, California, the draft proposal was presented along with a request that it be circulated for industry review, comment, and potential modification where appropriate. The draft documents are posted online and anyone interesting in commenting or making a related proposal may do so by emailing comments or documents to rules@arci.com The draft penalty matrix for "Doping and Equine Endangerment" can be downloaded here or at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RnoaRh8DqUSsyQfzoeihAbSYPQfJuhEF/view. The draft modified Classification schedule along with suggested penalty categories can be downloaded here or at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rtaiT7YmgMhV7xkDIfZfKSyaMDBzKzgF/view. (Please note the tabs at the bottom of the page on the Classification schedule which organizes substances by Class.) It is anticipated that this proposal will be a discussion item during the ARCI summer meetings in Saratoga, details of which are posted on the ARCI website www.arci.com .   Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

The Scientific Advisory Group of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) has reported that there is no current science linking furosemide treatments to muscular skeletal issues that may be a contributing cause of equine breakdowns in racing. The group reported to a meeting of the RCI’s Drug Testing Standards and Practices Committee that they discussed the issue at their meeting on April 2, 2019 and were not aware of any published studies or papers providing any evidence of such a link. The Scientific Advisory Group members participating in the meeting were:  Dr. Scot Stanley, Dr. Heather Kynch, Dr. George Maylin, Dr. Ken McKeever, Dr. Cynthia Cole, Dr. Mary Robinson, Dr. Rick Sams, and Dr. Thomas Tobin. “There remains an attempt on the part of some organizations and individuals to leave the impression that the current equine welfare policy of permitting the voluntary race day use of furosemide under controlled and transparent circumstances is somehow tied to the tragic equine deaths that have occurred at Santa Anita and elsewhere,” said ARCI President Ed Martin in a statement. “The ARCI is never averse to examining an existing policy and we were concerned that such statements might be based upon solid scientific information we have yet been able to analyze.   Apparently, they are not.  Our science advisors were asked to review this matter and make us aware of any new information that might be relevant to the equine tragedies that have occurred,” he said.   In 2011, after two RCI officers called for the phase out of race day furosemide treatments, an industry debate on the issue was reignited.  The Drug Testing Standards and Practices Committee conducted a review of the existing policy and held a public hearing during the Saratoga meet.   Input was received from a variety of experts, including Dr. N. Edward Robinson from the Center for Integrative Toxicology at the Veterinary Medical Center at Michigan State University.   Dr. Robinson is a recognized expert in the study of animal lung dysfunction, particularly equine airway disease.   He directs the Equine Pulmonary Research Laboratory at MSU which is dedicated to studying the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases of the air passages (airways) of the horse. After completion of that review, the committee decided that there was insufficient science to justify change to not change the current policy. The rationale for current furosemide policy was strengthened by a 2014 Consensus statement from the independent American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine entitled Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses.   Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

ARCADIA, CA - Noted equine health researcher and Pennsylvania Racing Commissioner Dr. Corrine Sweeney, DVM, is the new Chair of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI). In addition to serving on the commission since 2008, Dr. Sweeney is Associate Dean at the New Bolton Center at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and one of the authors of the 2014 Consensus Statement of the independent American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine entitled "Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses". During her remarks last week at the ARCI annual meeting on equine welfare and racing integrity, Dr. Sweeney stated "Caring for and advocating for horses and doing research on how to improve the health of horses has been my life's work. The concept that any of us would support a sport that would be detrimental to the horse dismays me." Dr. Corrine Sweeney Tom Sage, the Executive Director of the Nebraska State Racing Commission and former Chair of the Organization of Racing Investigators was elected Chair-elect/ Secretary. Commissioner Robert Lopez of the Washington State Horse Racing Commission was named Treasurer. Outgoing Chair Maryland Executive Director Mike Hopkins remains on the Board and Executive Committee. Elected to the ARCI Board of Directors were: Rick Baedeker, executive director of the California Horse Racing Board, Charles Gardiner, executive director of the Louisiana State Racing Commission, Charles Moore, Executive Director of the Wyoming Pari-Mutuel Commission, Edward Menton, Chair of the Mobile County (Alabama) Racing Commission, Marc Guilfoil, director of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, Judy Nason, director of the New Jersey Racing Commission, John Wayne, director of the Delaware Thoroughbred Racing Commission, Tom Di Pasquale, executive director of the Minnesota Racing Commission, Dave Lermond, director of the Virginia Racing Commission, and Kelly Cathay, director of the Oklahoma Racing Commission. Those elected at the meeting will join West Virginia Assistant Attorney General Kelli Talbot, New York Gaming Commission Director Rob Williams, Director Louis Trombetta of the Florida Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering, and Brent Stone, Director of Regulatory Compliance at the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario. The ARCI Board also voted unanimously to extend the employment contract of the Association's President, Ed Martin, for another three years upon expiration this August.   Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

Lexington, KY - The Association of Racing Commissioners International issued the following notice regarding the use of bisphosphonate drugs on race horses or horses intended to be raced: Bisphosphonate use in a racing environment is already prohibited and, if found, the trainer is subject to significant fine and suspension and the horse will be excluded from competition for at least thirty days to one year. The extra label use in any horse younger than four years of age of any bisphosphonate is prohibited. The ARCI is considering and accepting input from the industry on adoption and implementation of a Regulatory Policy that would disallow any horse from being entered in a race that has been treated with bisphosphonates prior to age four or for reasons not specifically cited by the US Food and Drug Administration as appropriate use. Owners and potential buyers of young horses are advised to insist on complete disclosure of any bisphosphonate treatments administered to horses they are considering for purchase. Comments on this issue may be submitted to rules@arci.com .   Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

REACTION AND STATEMENT OF ARCI PRESIDENT ED MARTIN ON REINTRODUCTION OF THE BARR-TONKO LEGISLATION: The Association of Racing Commissioners International is disappointed that the sponsors of the re-introduced federal legislation have totally ignored the needs articulated on behalf of those responsible for policing the sport of horse racing. The sponsors of this legislation have proposed nothing to address the significant part of the race horse industry that is totally unregulated. This bill will do nothing to protect horses. It is shocking that the use of bisphosphonates on young horses is not addressed given the significant concern that they adversely affect bone development in young horses and contribute to stress fractures as they do in other mammals. We already know stress fractures can be a precursor to increased risk of a catastrophic breakdown. This issue was presented to lawmakers at the public hearing on this proposal in the last Congress, yet they continue to focus on repealing a long standing equine welfare program permitting a controlled furosemide administration on race day proven to be helpful to the health of the horse and recently affirmed by a consensus statement from the independent American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Unfortunately, the constructive suggestions of what the federal government could do to safeguard horses and help integrity efforts in racing continue to be ignored. Here are the suggestions that were presented in my testimony last year. The federal government could - Require all horses bred to be racehorses be registered with and come under the jurisdiction of the Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) which would have the ARCI maintain this data for use jointly by APHIS and the state racing commissions; Empower APHIS to make rules affecting young horses not yet under the jurisdiction of a state racing commission; Direct APHIS to contract with state racing commissions for the purpose of out-of-competition equine welfare examinations to determine adherence to the APHIS rules; Authorize APHIS to recover costs for such inspections from the owners of any horse inspected, consistent with state racing commission contracts entered into for this purpose;   Require that a portion of the existing funds - $9.5 million - appropriated by Congress each year for anti-doping programs through the White House Office of National Drug Policy be available to fund anti-doping research of the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium consistent with anti-doping needs identified by the Organization of Racing Investigators or the ARCI;   Adopt the ARCI Model Rules affecting equine welfare and medication by reference, thereby achieving universal uniformity in regulation;   Require the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to each dedicate at least one agent for the sole purpose of assisting state racing commissions in the conduct of investigations, particularly those that cross jurisdictional lines. Note: The FDA already has such an investigator assigned.   Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International

Saratoga Springs, NY - Proposals to modify the regulatory policy concerning clenbuterol and betamethasone use in Standardbred harness racing will be one of the major topics considered at the upcoming meeting of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) when it meets April 3-5, 2019 in Arcadia, California. The proposed changes were submitted late last year to standardbred regulatory commissions directly from the Harness Racing Medication Collaborative (HRMC), a subcommittee of the United States Trotting Association (USTA), chaired by Joe Faraldo of New York. Several commissions have deferred action on the proposed change pending a recommendation from the ARCI, the umbrella group of the racing regulatory authorities throughout North America and parts of the Caribbean. The ARCI racing regulatory standards are embodied in its Model Rules of Racing, which form the foundation for the regulation of horse and greyhound racing in North America and, in some cases, beyond. Several ARCI Committees will consider the proposal, which would liberalize the current policy for these two drugs if adopted. The current policy was adopted by the ARCI upon recommendations that had come from the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium several years ago. The proposals to change the point at which a violation occurs for each of these drugs if found in a standardbred horse post race will be reviewed by the RCI Scientific Advisory Group, the RCI Standardbred Committee, the Drug Testing Standards and Practices Committee, the Model Rules Committee, and ultimately the entire Membership at the April meeting. Representatives from the USTA as well as Mr. Faraldo have been invited to attend and have been included on the various agendas to afford them the opportunity to make the case for the proposed policy changes, which would represent breed specific rules for standardbred races. In the past the ARCI has adopted more stringent breed specific policies for quarter horse races where clenbuterol and albuterol are both considered prohibited at any level. The USTA is requesting a more lenient approach for clenbuterol and betamethasone than what currently exists in the Model Rules. "The regulators are very interested in hearing what they have to say, including why this policy change is necessary and in the best interest of the horse as well as ensuring the integrity of the race," said RCI President Ed Martin. "I think it important to note that standardbred races in Indiana, New Jersey, California, Kentucky, Minnesota, Maryland, and Florida occur consistent with the current Model Rules while other jurisdictions have made exceptions, which is their right. In those jurisdictions that have adopted the Model Rules or are required by statute or rule to implement the Model Rules, compliance has not posed a problem to those who race. That being said, we continually strive to consider any and all information in assessing the appropriateness and applicability of the standards we embody in the Model Rules and are never adverse to modifying a standard if the facts warrant it," he said. Information concerning the proposals are posted online at www.arcimodelrules.online. From the ARCI                        

The 85th annual ARCI Conference on Racing Integrity and Animal Welfare will be held in Arcadia, California on April 2, 2019 - April 5, 2019. Registration is now open on Eventbrite. For those of you who need to pay by check, please contact me for an invoice. I will register you for the conference once payment is received in the ARCI office. The event hotel will be the Embassy Suites in Arcadia. We have once again arranged a room block at the area per diem of $173 per night (not including tax.) Embassy offers free parking, a complimentary shuttle that will travel within a seven mile radius of the hotel, free breakfast, and a complimentary evening beer and wine reception. The room block is primarily set for Tuesday through Friday evening. If you attempt to book earlier and run into issues, please contact me and I'll assist you with making a reservation. Embassy Suites by Hilton Arcadia Pasadena Area 211 East Huntington Drive, Arcadia, California, 91006, USA TEL: +1-626-445-8525 FAX: +1-626-445-8548 The reservation link for the ARCI rate is below: https://secure3.hilton.com/en_US/es/reservation/book.htm?inputModule=HOTEL&ctyhocn=LAXHDES&spec_plan=CESXAR&arrival=20190331&departure=20190406&cid=OM,WW,HILTONLINK,EN,DirectLink&fromId=HILTONLINKDIRECT by Rebecca Shoemaker, for the ARCI  

Beginning in the third quarter of 2019, the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) and the University of Arizona's Racetrack Industry Program (RTIP) will launch an educational program for horse racing investigators employed by racing commissions and tracks. No such program currently exists, and the effort will complement the work of the Organization of Racing Investigators and the Racing Officials Accreditation Program. Modeled after the ROAP accreditation program, it is anticipated that racing commissions will phase in a requirement that racing investigators complete the course as a condition of employment and be required to participate in continuing education programs like the annual ORI conference. "The RTIP welcomes the opportunity to partner with the ARCI in ensuring that those seeking employment as racing investigators have the necessary educational foundation to perform effectively," said Wendy Davis, Director of the Racetrack Industry Program. "As one who recruited and built a staff of effective racing investigators, I can attest that a good investigator not only must have investigatory and interrogation skills but also have a keen understanding of how racing works as well as a feel for the backstretch community and what to take notice of," said Ed Martin, ARCI President. The program's steering committee consists of Ms. Davis and RCI Board Members Tom Sage and John Wayne, both seasoned investigators. The date for the first certificate program has yet to be finalized, but it is being planned for the third quarter of 2019. Further information will be disseminated as it becomes available. The Race Track Industry Program offers Bachelor's and Master's degrees centered on the racing industry. It offers two paths of study; one preparing students for race track management, regulation or pari-mutuel racing organizations, the other preparing students for employment in areas dealing with racing and breeding animals. The ARCI is the umbrella group of the official racing regulatory authorities that enact and enforce the rules and are ultimately responsible for detecting and prosecuting those who violate the rules of racing. Rebecca Shoemaker

The 85th annual ARCI Conference on Racing Integrity and Animal Welfare will be held in Arcadia, California on April 2, 2019 - April 5, 2019. Registration is now open on Eventbrite. For those of you who need to pay by check, please contact me for an invoice. I will register you for the conference once payment is received in the ARCI office. Register on Eventbrite The event hotel will be the Embassy Suites in Arcadia. We have once again arranged a room block at the area per diem of $173 per night (not including tax.) Embassy offers free parking, a complimentary shuttle that will travel within a seven mile radius of the hotel, free breakfast, and a complimentary evening beer and wine reception. The room block is primarily set for Tuesday through Friday evening. If you attempt to book earlier and run into issues, please contact me and I'll assist you with making a reservation. Embassy Suites by Hilton Arcadia Pasadena Area 211 East Huntington Drive, Arcadia, California, 91006, USA TEL: +1-626-445-8525 FAX: +1-626-445-8548 The reservation link for the ARCI rate is below: https://secure3.hilton.com/en_US/es/reservation/book.htm?execution=e1s1 The preliminary agenda for the meeting is attached. Please contact me with any questions you have. We're looking forward to seeing you again at this year's conference! Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International  

New racing regulatory standards have just been published by the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) as part of a continuing process to adapt standards to current integrity threats as well as new technologies and innovation.   The standards are embodied in the almost 500 pages of the ARCI’s Model Rules of Racing and can be downloaded using the link below. In addition more than 70 previously unclassified substances were added to the ARCI Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances, the guiding document for horse racing’s anti-doping and drug testing program, providing guidance to regulatory authorities and labs as to the potential threat posed by the substance if found.   Unclassified substances, if found, remain a violation and are treated severely if found absent mitigating circumstances. The ARCI increased recommended penalties for clenbuterol and albuterol violations in Quarter Horse contests, recommending a one-year and $10,000 fine for a first violation involving either drug if found at any level.     This change, requested by the AQHA, is designed to combat the abuse and misuse of these otherwise legal medications in quarter horse contests.   In an effort to protect horsemen, new screening limits developed by the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) for testosterone (in fillies, mares, and geldings) and morphine (as a potential contaminant) were also adopted.   “The ARCI is appreciative for the work of those organizations that participate in the Model Rules process and propose changes to what has been an effective and universally accepted foundation for racing regulation,” said Ed Martin, the group’s President.  “We are particularly grateful for the contributions made by the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium, the Racing Officials Accreditation Program, the Stronach Group, and the American Quarter Horse Association for their work on many of the standards that have been adopted.”     The updated standards also include: a change in the condition eligibility determination for horses which are placed first due to an adverse laboratory finding against the winning horse (ARCI-006-020);  modifications to the coupled entries rule (ARCI-010-010);  a description of the duties and authorities of outriders (ARCI-006-077);  an addition to the recently adopted concussion protocol which requires jockeys to provide the results of an annual baseline concussion assessment test as a condition of licensure (ARCI-008-030), and;  a set of guidelines for single pool (also known as merged pool) pari-mutuel calculations. The guidelines will be published as an industry advisory on the ARCI website.  Updates to the regulatory standards are considered three times each year and pending matters are posted at www.arcimodelrules.online .     In some jurisdictions, portions of the ARCI standards are incorporated by reference in rule or statute, affording them the force of law in that jurisdiction and advancing regulatory uniformity.  The ARCI is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making authorities for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America and parts of the Caribbean.  ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, and racetrack operation and security, as well as for off-track wagering entities.   Access or Download the Lastest Versions of the ARCI Standards. Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International (859) 224-7070   Ext 4001   MODEL RULES OF RACING - Version 8.5 Access Online Version (PDF) Download MS Word File.     Uniform Classification of (Prohibited) Foreign Substances - V.14 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)   ARCI Endogenous, Dietary, or Environmental Substances Schedule - V.4 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.)     The ARCI (RCI) is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making bodies for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America, Mexico, parts of the Caribbean, and Riyad, Saudi Arabia.     ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, racetrack operation and security, as well as off-track wagering entities. ARCI's members are the only independent entities recognized to license, enforce, and adjudicate matters pertaining to racing. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARCI.  

A modified agenda and supporting materials for the upcoming ARCI Model Rules Committee meeting are now available. Use the button below to access the committee's website: arcimodelrules.online. PLEASE NOTE THE NEW TIME FOR THE MEETING. The ARCI Model Rules Committee meeting will take place at the Omni Tucson National Resort, Tucson, Arizona, USA on Sunday, December 2, 2018 at 1:30pm. To make a no-cost registration for the meeting use the link below. Prior to the meeting there will be a briefing by Hawk Eye Innovations demonstrating their technology to assist and enhance the decision making of Stewards. That will take place at 10am at the Omni hotel. Please note that the meeting agenda is subject to modification. Additional notifications will be made as necessary. ARCI MODEL RULE SITE: AGENDA & MATERIALS REGISTER (no cost) FOR THE MEETING   From Ed Martin for the ARCI

In an ongoing effort to provide best practices for the regulation of racing and wagering, The Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) reviews and updates its Model Rules of Racing (v8.4) as well as the Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances And Recommended Penalties Model Rule (v13.4.1). Reliance on these documents to form the foundation of the regulatory scheme is universal, although some relatively minor differences exist due to jurisdictional limitations or needs.. The ARCI standards are recommended as "best practices" and we encourage their universal adoption while realizing that alternative approaches may exist to achieve the same ends. The updates contained in the new versions are: A modification of the horse identification requirements for flat racing contained in ARCI-006-020 (B)(5) and ARCI-010-030 (2) to deal with digital tattoos and electronic foal certificates; A clarification of the concussion protocols contained in ARCI-007-020 (A)(10); Addition of a footnote in the Uniform Cassification Guideline document to clarify that the classification/penalty recommendations for Altrenogest apply for geldings, colts, adult intact males only. Access or Download the Lastest Versions of the ARCI Standards. MODEL RULES OF RACING - Version 8.4 Access Online Version (PDF) Download MS Word File. Uniform Classification of (Prohibited) Foreign Substances - V.13.4.1 Access Online Version (PDF) (PDF only available.) The ARCI (RCI) is the only umbrella organization of the official governing rule making bodies for professional horse and greyhound racing in North America, Mexico, parts of the Caribbean, and Riyad, Saudi Arabia. ARCI sets standards for racing regulation, medication policy, drug testing laboratories, totalizator systems, racetrack operation and security, as well as off-track wagering entities. ARCI's members are the only independent entities recognized to license, enforce, and adjudicate matters pertaining to racing. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARCI.   by Ed Martin, for the ARCI  

The ARCI Model Rules Committee Agenda and Materials are now available. The agenda and supporting materials for the upcoming ARCI Model Rules Committee meeting are now available. Use the button below to access the committee's website: arcimodelrules.online. The ARCI summer meetings will take place at the Omaha Marriott Downtown at the Capitol District Hotel, 222 North 10th Street, Omaha, NE., USA on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2018. To make a no-cost registration for the meeting use the link below. The schedule for the meetings is as follows: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm Model Rules Committee Meeting Wednesday, July 11, 2018 8:30am - 12:00pm Model Rules Committee Meeting -part 2. 1:00pm - 4:30pm ARCI Board of Directors Meeting (Regulatory Members only)upcoming ARCI MODEL RULE SITE: AGENDA & MATERIALS REGISTER (no cost) FOR THE MEETING   by Ed Martin, for the ARCI  

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