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From humble beginnings to this year’s silver anniversary blowout, Grand River Raceway’s premier event has become one of the great days on the Canadian racing calendar. It began on a meagre budget as a way to help a struggling racetrack build an identity. Twenty-five years later, Industry Day has grown into one of the best events on the Canadian horse-racing calendar. The annual fete that has been instrumental in helping put Grand River Raceway on the map. On Monday, Aug. 3, the Elora, Ont. track will mark the silver anniversary of Industry Day, a celebration of the business of harness racing that began in 1990 at the track’s predecessor, Elmira Raceway. Dr. Ted Clarke, general manager of Grand River Raceway, said Industry Day was the brainchild of the late Ken Middleton, Sr., Elmira Raceway’s former race secretary, who “was instrumental in those early discussions.” At the time, Elmira Raceway was just three years removed from shutting down because it didn’t have enough money to operate. Clarke said Industry Day would never have happened without what was then a controversial decision in January of 1990 to begin taking the simulcast signal for one race program a week from Greenwood Raceway in Toronto. “It was the first time there had been common pool wagering in the province,” Clarke said. “Greenwood sent its signal in January on Saturday afternoons. We only ran one program a week, but it was extremely successful and it changed the menu that was before us, so to speak. We had to opportunity to take some of the revenue gained from that and try to do things that would build the success of that operation. So, one of the things that came up was, ‘We really need a day that identifies Elmira Raceway that can be that signature event.’” Clarke said Industry Day, “started with a cost structure that wasn’t too extravagant but depended, largely, on people who volunteered their activities.” Early Industry Days featured well-attended seminars on a variety of important industry topics. Clarke remembers breeder Jack McNiven of Killean Acres giving a talk on how to prepare yearlings for the auction ring. Trainer Doug Arthur spoke about selecting yearlings at a sale. “At that time many people hadn’t spent a lot of time associating with the best practices of the industry. In some cases, if you had a bit of an advantage in your ability to select a yearling over somebody else, it wasn’t exactly knowledge that you might willingly share, because it was your advantage. So, we sort of went out on a limb a little bit and had, what I thought were pretty good, semi-educational seminars and certainly knowledge sharing,” Clarke said. In 1998, Elmira Raceway launched the Battle of Waterloo, and added it to the Industry Day celebration. The track’s marquee stakes race proved to be an instant hit. It’s estimated 8,000 people were at Industry Day that year to see Distinctiv Seelster and trainer/driver Carl Jamieson win the inaugural Battle. The race for two-year-old Ontario-sired pacing colts will have its 18th edition on Aug. 3, along with a companion race for two-year-old Ontario-sired pacing fillies called the Battle of the Belles that was added to Industry Day in 2009. Clarke said Industry Day even had an influence on the design of Grand River Raceway, which opened in 2003. “As part of the design, there was a lot of topsoil on this site that had to be stripped when we started into the redevelopment. Rather than truck it away, we simply piled it in piles around the track and created the berms on which people now can sit and watch the races. It was, again, making use of what we had and it created a circumstance that at least for that day is the right venue,” said Clarke, who was also a proponent of keeping Grand River a smaller, half-mile oval like Elmira Raceway that is more fan friendly. In time, the seminars faded from the lineup and the Battle of Waterloo and Battle of the Belles became the main attraction to Industry Day, which has always been an afternoon card held on the Civic Holiday Monday in August. Over time, Industry Day became a family friendly day complete with a long list of activities for kids, which has proven especially popular in recent years since the Grand River Agricultural Society that owns and operates the track no longer holds a fall fair. This year, Industry Day will feature the usual face painting, balloon artists, bouncy castles and pony rides for the kids and two backstretch beer tents for the adults. Kelly Spencer, Grand River’s manager of marketing and communications, has a range of fun activities and special giveaways planned to celebrate the 25th anniversary, including $5,000 in prizes such as Callaway Golf Clubs, Kate Spade and Tony Burch purses, a barbecue and a lawn mower. This year will also mark the 11th edition of the popular Bouncy Pony Stakes where trainers and drivers race each other by bouncing down the track on inflatable ponies. Eliminations for the two Battle races, will be held the evening of Monday, July 27, with two eliminations needed to determine the eight finalists for the $207,397 final of the Battle of Waterloo and three required to whittle the field to eight for the $140,246 final of the Battle of the Belles. Post time is 1:30 p.m. for the 12-race Industry Day card that also features Ontario Sires Stakes Gold Series legs for three-year-old pacing fillies and a Racing Under Saddle event. Clarke, who was part of the management team in 1990 at Elmira Raceway when Industry Day started, said he can’t believe how much the harness racing industry has changed in a quarter century. Twenty-five years ago, even beaming in one card of racing a week from another track was considered controversial. Today, patrons can easily wager on horse racing from around the world by using their smart phones. “I had a birthday yesterday, so I’m aware of the time that’s passed,” Clarke said last week. “The time has gone very quickly and I’m sure everybody else my age would say the same thing. But, it’s been fun.” For more information on Industry Day, please visit: www.grandriverraceway.com Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing

Ownerr Marvin Katz said no one should count out his star colt Artspeak on Saturday night in the Meadowlands Pace, one of harness racing's great races. "He's a superb horse. He's nearly at $1 million already in earnings. He started the year off spectacularly," the Toronto owner said Wednesday. Artspeak, the fourth betting choice in the morning line at 6-1, is one of the few Ontario-connected horses to make the $706,000 final of the 39th edition of the race contested at the Meadowlands Racetrack in New Jersey (30-1 longshot Revenge Shark owned, in part, by Bradley Grant of Milton is the other). Artspeak will be driven by Oakville native Scott Zeron. "I would be happy to wave the flag on Saturday night," Katz said. "It would make me very happy." In 2014, Artspeak was honoured as the two-year-old pacing colt of the year in both Canada and the United States after he won some $800,000 with eight wins in 10 races, including the $667,000 Metro Pace at Mohawk Racetrack in Campbellville and the $565,000 Governor's Cup at Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto. Though, Meadowlands Pace favourite Wiggle It Jiggleit and Pepsi North America Cup champion Wakizashi Hanover have proven to be slightly ahead of Artspeak this year, so far, Artspeak has been first or second five times out of seven starts. And he already has a 1:48.4 mile, which means he can't be discounted in Saturday's big race, especially after drawing the three-hole on the starting gate in the field of 10. "He won in 1:48.4 in New Jersey and we thought we were good to go for Canada." "When we shipped him to Canada, his blood work wasn't right." "We almost scratched him from the (Pepsi North America Cup) eliminations." "His blood work was really messed up when he arrived and he still was just beaten by Wakizashi Hanover." "He raced really big, but I think (the sickness) bit him." "Then we drew the 10-hole (for the final) and it was just a no-shot situation, absolutely no shot," Katz said. "Then we went right to the (Max) Hempt (at Pocono) and he won his elimination and, again, he was spectacular." He had horses all over him and he just refused to lose." "He was second in the final to Wiggle It Jiggleit, who on the day was a better horse." Katz, who owns Artspeak in partnership with a group of Americans, is racing a number of top young stakes horses Friday and Saturday at the Meadowlands, most of them trotters. He said he would dearly love to win his third Meadowlands Pace. n 2013, Katz was part of a group that won with Captaintreacherous for U.S.-based trainer Tony Alagna, who also conditions Artspeak. Eighteen years ago, Katz had what he calls one of his greatest victories in the sport when a colt named Dream Away won the $1-million Meadowlands Pace for him and his longtime ownership partners Sam Goldband and Al Libfeld — all of the Toronto area. In the winner's circle, the Canadians exhibited tremendous emotion. "It's still a very vivid memory to me," Katz said. "It is, without question, one of the highlights of everything we've done in the business." "It was the first really big one we enjoyed." "It was exhilarating." "The race, the experience of it and even the after-experience." "At the time ESPN carried the race." "I had people for about a year, perhaps even longer, coming up to me in airports and commenting that they saw me and mentioned the jubilation that we experienced." "We were over the moon." Saturday, Katz would gladly be the recipient of another moon shot. Dave Briggs Dave Briggs is the president of the Canadian chapter of the United States Harness Writers Association. He can be reached by email at dbriggs1969@ymail.com

Former Toronto Blue Jays slugger Jesse Barfield admits he doesn’t have any experience with horses, but he’s looking forward to meeting harness racing fans Sunday (July 12) at Clinton Raceway in support of Clinton Minor Baseball. Barfield played 14 years in the Major Leagues for Toronto (1981 to ’89) and the New York Yankees (’89 to ’92). While with the Jays, Barfield won gold gloves in 1986 and 1987 and was also an all-star in ’86, the same year he won the American League home run title and the Silver Slugger award. “Most fans want to know what it was like playing in Toronto versus New York and I tell them I thoroughly enjoyed playing in both cities and for both teams,” Barfield said. “Both cities are culturally diverse and are great baseball towns with a good fan base. Of course, the Yankees have such a rich history, and it was exciting wearing the pin stripes. And with the Blue Jays it was nice going from worst to first with mostly homegrown players. Barfield, known for his great arm in the outfield, said he likes to teach young outfielders to, “stay focused on defense when you are in the field and anticipate the ball being hit to you that way your reaction time is sharper and you get a better jump on the ball.” The rise of the Blue Jays in the 1980s and 1990s is believed to have had a positive impact on Canadian youth baseball, particularly in Ontario. Barfield said Canadian kids are “very eager to learn and get better” and “are fundamentally sound because of the quality of coaches that they have access to.” Barfield will appear at Clinton from 3:30-5:30 p.m. The races start at 1:30 p.m. A silent auction will include two tickets anywhere Air Canada flies. The Pineridge Barbecue Company will serve a chicken dinner under the grandstand from 4-5 p.m. for $15 per person. Takeout will be available. The former Toronto Blue Jays all-star slugger will be available for photos and autographs from 3:30-5:30 in support of Clinton Minor Baseball. For more information, please visit: www.clintonraceway.com Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing

Five years after harness racing trainer Casie Coleman won the $1.5 million Pepsi North America Cup and set Sportswriter on track to become the leading stallion in the Ontario Sires Stakes program, the trainer is back in the NA Cup with Arque Hanover. Casie Coleman of Cambridge remembers Sportswriter’s 2010 victory in the $1.5 million Pepsi North America Cup at Mohawk Racetrack as if it was yesterday, not five years ago. “Saying that, I’ve got three-year-olds of his in the barn,” she said, laughing. “Time flies.” Sportswriter, now based at Tara Hills Stud in Port Perry, ON, is the leading stallion in the Ontario Sires Stakes program. Coleman said it all started with his Pepsi North America Cup win. “We had a rough Cup week with Sportswriter. I wasn’t even sure we were going to be able to race in the final that week (due to serious feet problems). He ended up winning it and it was pretty special,” Coleman said. “Obviously that sealed the deal to take him to stud which was going to be a huge stepping stone. So far, he’s proven himself as a sire.” Saturday night, Coleman will try to win the NA Cup for the second time in her career. She sends out Arque Hanover from post seven with Hall of Famer John Campbell in the bike on behalf of part-owner and fellow trainer Jeff Gillis of Hillsburgh, ON. Earlier this year, Gillis sent Arque Hanover to Coleman’s U.S. stable to race in a stakes event at Yonkers Raceway in New York City. Coleman maintains stables in Canada and New Jersey. When Arque Hanover returned to Canada, Gillis and fellow owners Mac Nichol of Burlington, ON, Big Als Stable of Woodbridge, ON and Gerald Stay of Buffalo, NY opted to keep the son of Rock N Roll Heaven with Coleman for the North America Cup run. “Switching barns back and forth so many times wasn’t going to make much sense for the horse. So, they just decided they would keep him with me for the Cup. Then after the Cup he’s going back to the States and he’s pretty fully staked through the summer in the U.S.” Coleman said she was impressed with Arque Hanover’s second-place finish in his NA Cup elimination on June 13, despite finishing six lengths behind morning line Cup favourite Wiggle It Jiggleit, an opponent Coleman calls “an absolute creature. No one’s beaten him, yet, and he’s just been awesome.” Arque Hanover, winless in five starts this year, has been pegged at 25-1 in the morning line. “Hopefully, they can go some speed duels up front. I don’t believe mine will be part of the speed duel, but you never know. He can leave lots if (John) Campbell decides to do that. But, in a perfect world, I’d love to somehow be second over. That would be sweet, but I’m a realist… Not many people can beat Wiggle It Jiggleit, especially the way he looked last week. But, it’s a horse race. You never know and I think my horse is as good as any of the other ones.” “He’s just a sweetheart. He’s good-gaited, he’s a nice horse in the barn. Everything we’ve asked of him, he does it. He just wants to do his job. He digs hard right to the wire and he definitely doesn’t want to be beaten. We’ve only had the horse about a month or so, but, so far, I haven’t found many bad qualities on him.” The $1 million Pepsi North America Cup is race 12 on a gangbusters 15-race, stakes-rich Mohawk card that starts with a 6:30 p.m. first-race post. The Pepsi North America Cup will also be televised live on TSN. The show begins at 10 p.m. For more information about the Pepsi North America Cup, including a long list of fan promotions, please visit: www.northamericacup.com Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing

Hanover Raceway kicks off its 51st pari-mutuel season of grassroots harness racing Saturday (June 6) with a free Hanover Raceway ball cap giveaway to the first 250 patrons to buy a program. It’s all part of a jam-packed summer of promotions that are part of the 150th anniversary celebrations of the track’s operators, the Hanover Bentinck and Brant Agricultural Society. The track will race on 16 Saturday nights this summer through the Sept. 26 closing card (excluding Aug. 8 when the track is dark to prepare for the annual Hanover Fair to be held Aug. 15-17). This Saturday, doors open at 6 p.m. The first-race post time is 7:15 p.m., the same time it will be for Hanover Raceway’s whole season, except for the Aug. 1 card featuring the Dream of Glory stakes final and the Ontario Sires Stakes (OSS) Grassroots event for three-year-old pacing fillies. That card starts an hour early at 6:15 p.m. (doors open at 5 p.m.) and will feature a barbeque, live band, carriage rides, a celebrity horse and a fireworks display after the races. Other notable promotions include: • the Balanced Image stakes on Aug. 29 featuring a live band and numerous prize giveaways. • OSS Grassroots event for three-year-old filly trotters on Sept. 5. • a Molson Men’s day on June 20 (Father’s Day eve) in which dads have a chance to win up to $2,000 in prizes, including barbeques, golf clubs and more. • Racing Under Saddle on July 4. • The Country 93 Survivor Contest through the month of July. • A big closing card on Sept. 26 featuring prizes and season-ending awards honouring the track’s top horse and horsepeople for 2015. For more information, check out Hanover Raceway’s OHR page:                or the track’s website: Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing

The fun, family-friendly Elora, ON track opens its 12th season of live harness racing with cosmetic improvements and a goal to improve its already exceptional customer service. Grand River Raceway in Elora, ON will open its 12th season of live harness racing on Monday with some cosmetic improvements, a refreshed website and a mission to improve on customer service that already well exceeds industry standards. Renovations to the track began last month and will be finished this fall. Improvements include painting, lighting, flooring and new furniture to the Simulcast Lounge, upper lobby, Wellington Room, Board Room, Captain’s Quarters Dining Room, and Lighthouse Restaurant. Working to improve customer service at a track already known for a fun, fan-friendly atmosphere has involved extensive staff training. Nearly 100 Grand River employees will have eight hours of customer care training and also receive additional training that gives them first-hand exposure to horses. “Every staff person will get their hands on the horses and actually get to drive a horse, so they have an understanding of our product — at least a very basic understanding of our product,” said marketing director Kelly Spencer. “We’ve created a set of principles and a whole manual for both the staff and the managers. We’re making fairly significant changes even in just our language in how we talk to each other about the customers. How we address customers and how we address each other. We’re trying to really not just improve the customer care, but really change the whole underpinning of how we think about the customer.” The goal is for all Grand River Raceway employees to be able to answer any customer question. For patrons, it all begins when they walk through the door. Grand River Raceway has set up a customer care counter in the lobby to act as a hub for first-time or infrequent patrons, or anyone that needs particular attention. Improving customer service might be a tall order considering Grand River Raceway already received extremely high marks for how it treats its guest in a multi-year market research study the track commissioned. Spencer is particularly proud the track already has scored well in dealing with customers, but said, “to move the needle up another notch sort of requires this kind of transformative change. “It’s a very big undertaking. It’s very ambitious. I’m certainly not going to promise that people will notice a marked shift in a couple weeks. It’s a process, but it’s one of the most important initiatives that we’ve done, to date.” Still, it’s a change Spencer said is a necessity in today’s competitive marketplace. “We’re really striving to be a customer care organization that also features live entertainment,” Spencer said. “It’s really a customer care organization first. Which, from a racing perspective, when you look at a history of harness racing, I think it’s safe to say that, unfortunately, that has not been a priority for most racing enterprises for many, many years.” Grand River will feature 49 cards of live racing this summer. The track will race Monday and Wednesday nights from June 1 through Sept. 30. Its signature Fun & Frivolity Friday night cards will run June 5 through Sept. 4. Post time is 6:30 p.m., except for the annual Industry Day / Battle of Waterloo card that starts at 1:30 p.m. on the Aug. 3 Civic Holiday Monday. There is no live racing at the Elora track on Aug. 21. Monday’s Opening Night card will also mark the sixth annual Local Biz Night event in co-operation with the Centre Wellington Chamber of Commerce. More than 100 local business people will be paired with a horse in the Local Biz Night Race. Prior to the dash, guests are treated to a cocktail reception hosted by the OLG Slots At Grand River Raceway, followed by dinner and a trip to the paddock to meet their horse. For more information, check out Grand River’s OHR page: http://ontariohorseracing.ca/Find-Your-Track/Ontario-Racetracks/Grand-River.aspx or the track’s recently-refreshed website: www.grandriverraceway.com For more information please contact: Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing standardbrednews@ontariohorseracing.ca Please visit: www.ontariohorseracing.ca

London, May 12, 2015 -- Camluck left an indelible mark on the standardbred breed, but the impact the super harness racing sire had on Seelster Farms is immeasurable. "Camluck made Seelster Farms. Without a hesitation I say that. Without him we wouldn't be where we are today. He put us on the map," said Ann Straatman, the reproduction manager at the Lucan, Ont. farm where the 28-year-old stallion stood for 25 years before being retired from active duty in October of 2014. Friday night, Camluck will become the first horse and 35th inductee overall to the Wall of Fame at The Raceway at The Western Fair District in London, Ont. "Being the first horse ever is quite an honour. It caught me off guard, but he had a big impact on Western Fair," said trainer Bob McIntosh, the man who trained Camluck and was one of the owners of the pacer that spring-boarded from a million-dollar racing career to become the number one stallion in harness racing history in North America by total progeny earnings. Camluck's progeny have earned just shy of $220 million in total. The late, great Western Hanover is second on the list. His offspring have earned approximately $211 million combined. Camluck was inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame in 2003. Straatman said Camluck not only was the most fertile stallion Seelster has ever stood, he also consistently passed on his "drive and intelligence" to his progeny. "He is, by far, the smartest horse we've ever had, and that's a lot of horses," Straatman said. "There isn't a smarter horse than he is. He's that smart. He puts that attitude into his foals. We notice it with his yearlings when we go to video them. They video terribly... They won't be chased. They're too smart to be chased. They'll turn around and look at you and wonder, 'What are you chasing me for?' It is absolutely an intelligence that comes right from (Camluck)." McIntosh said he trained a lot of horses sired by Camluck and a common trait was their ability to race tough. "I think most of them, even when they aren't 100 per cent, suck it up and give 110 per cent. That's rare amongst sires," McIntosh said. "Another thing, too, I noticed about them. When you breed to some sires, if you don't get a stakes horse, you don't even have a horse. Camluck sired horses of any class. You could get a good hard-hitting racehorse or you could get a stakes horse. You didn't have to worry about getting a filly or getting a colt, because they were both good." Camluck will join Seelster Farms' late owner Chris Van Bussel on The Raceway's Wall of Fame. Van Bussel was inducted in 2004. "I was glad that Chris Van Bussel had (Camluck)," McIntosh said. "I can remember having a meeting to send (Camluck to Seelster) and Chris was just a real gentleman. His handshake was as good as a contract. He was one of the nicest, most honourable men I've ever met." Friday's Wall of Fame Night card begins at 7:15 p.m. and will also feature the first race in this year's Racing Under Saddle (RUS) series in Ontario. Fans will have a chance to watch and wager on the event as well as meet and greet the riders. The RUS series is in its second full season in Ontario and has been growing in popularity. Visit rusontario.com for more details. There will also be a number of fan promotions throughout the night and a pair of mini races scheduled as part of the fun. Though, honouring Camluck will be the main event. "It is such an honour to be recognized," Straatman said, "especially at our home track." Straatman said Camluck's "nose is a little out of joint" that he doesn't get to breed anymore, but otherwise, the senior equine is "fantastic", "in good health" and is enjoying living out his days in his private paddock with special lawn as pristine as one might find on a golf course. "Whatever Camluck wants, Camluck gets," Straatman said. By Dave Briggs for The Raceway  

Harness racing announcer Evan Loucks will have his head shaved in Peterborough to raise money for children with cancer. FRASERVILLE, Ontario . . . Kawartha Downs' race announcer Evan Loucks will help try to carve out a new Guinness World Record by having his head shaved May 16 at the Peterborough airport. All donations to the attempt to break the record for the most heads shaved simultaneously will support the Cops For Cancer Pedal For Hope charity that benefits children suffering from cancer. To donate in Loucks' name, visit: www.cancer.ca/headshaverecord and select his name in the "find a participant" link. People may also sign up on the website to participate in the world record attempt. They will need a partner to shave their head. The Guinness World Records website says the current record for most heads shaved simultaneously is 210 set in Mason, Ohio in August of 2014. A few years ago, Loucks participated in Movember to raise awareness for prostate cancer. At the end of the month, he participated in a fundraising night at Kawartha Downs where his mustache was shaved off by staff. Kawartha Downs (http://ontariohorseracing.ca/Find-Your-Track/Ontario-Racetracks/Kawartha-Downs.aspx) will open its 18-card 2015 harness racing meet on May 30 and race live every Saturday night at 7 p.m. (except Sept. 19) through Oct. 3. The opening night card will feature a ball cap giveaway honouring leading driver Gord Brown. Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing

The president of the Dresden Agricultural Society says the historic track will be ready for the May 31st opener. Lucille Laprise said there was a buoyant atmosphere at Dresden Raceway on Monday when word came that the harness racing track had been granted an 11-race summer meet by the Ontario Racing Commission. "Everybody's been anxiously waiting to see what was going to happen. Now that it's official that we're getting our 11 race days, we are very enthused and we're good to go," said Laprise, the president of the Dresden Agricultural Society that revived the track in 2014. "Dresden Raceway is back on track." Dresden will race predominantly on Sunday afternoons at 1 p.m. and also include special cards on Canada Day (Wed., July 1) and will close its meet on the Civic Holiday Monday in August (Aug. 3). The 11-race season is the same number of race cards the track had in 2014, though, this year, the season is starting much sooner. "We really have to start spreading the word," Laprise said. "May 31st is going to be here sooner than we think." Harness racing has been conducted in Dresden for over 140 years. The Dresden Exhibition will celebrate its 140th anniversary this summer and harness racing has been conducted there longer than that. In the late-1800s, the Dresden Driving Club organized trials of speed at the track. In the early 1900s, locals gathered in the winter to watch races over the icy Sydenham River. This summer, Dresden Raceway will be part of a southwestern Ontario circuit of small tracks that includes Sarnia's Hiawatha Horse Park and Leamington Raceway. Greg Blanchard will be returning as Dresden Raceway's general manager and Gary Patterson will be back calling the races. "We've got some really good ideas," Laprise said. "We're going to have special race days like we did last year and give-aways and fan appreciation events. We certainly want to invite the people to come back. We've got some great horses, a great track, a great grandstand and we're going to be ready for them." Dave Briggs Standardbred Communications Ontario Horse Racing www.ontariohorseracing.ca        

ELORA, ON - Monday (September 29) marks the final live race card of the year at Grand River Raceway, but it's already proven to be a successful year at the track. Despite fewer races and fewer cards, the average bet per race jumped 10.5 per cent in 2014 compared to 2013 and total wagering on Grand River is up 4.8 per cent from just under $6.5 million in 2013 to nearly $6,786,149 this year through Wenesday's card. All this despite a decrease in the number of races per card of nearly 10 per cent. On the track, nothing topped Hall of Fame driver John Campbell and Hall of Fame trainer Bob McIntosh teaming up to win the $217,140 Battle of Waterloo Aug. 4 with McIntosh's two-year-old homebred pacing colt Go Daddy Go. It was the first Battle of Waterloo victory for both men. "I haven't started that many in it, but it feels tremendous," McIntosh said in the winner's circle. "It's a real thrill." Campbell said the victory felt great. "It's been a fun day for me and it's capped off extremely well," he said. This year also marked Campbell's first trip to Grand River and he liked what he saw. "I got a tour before the races started here and it's very efficient and very convenient for fans. It looks like a very nice plant," Campbell said. The Grand River meet also saw rising star James MacDonald win his first premier stakes race at the track when he drove 20-1 longshot Win The Gold to victory in the Battle of the Belles for trainer Tony O'Sullivan. In August, Grand River's general manager Dr. Ted Clarke was inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame in the builders' category. That same month, Jet Airway set a track record for three-year-old pacing colts when he buzzed the Grand River oval in 1:51.1. Five other horses also set Canadian seasonal records at the track. On the drivers' side, Trevor Henry was again crowned the top Grand River driver for both wins and money. Casie Coleman was Grand River's top money-winning trainer and Richard Moreau led all trainers in wins at the track by a wide margin. And this year, we also learned important information such as what three people driver Scott Coulter would enlist to thwart a zombie apocalypse. "I'm going to take Clint Eastwood," Coulter said, "Superman and throw Sly Stallone in there, too. Why not?" We also discovered what Randy Waples would be doing if he wasn't driving horses for a living -"At one time, being a surfer sounded pretty good. I likead the idea of that." - what music trainer Casie Coleman thinks Satan has playing on repeat in her version of hell - "Anything country, probably." - and what James MacDonald does better than his two famous driving brothers, Anthony and Mark - "Golf, that's for sure, because they're both horrible." To hear our conversation with some of the most prominent drivers and trainers in the game, check out our weekly podcast, the Harness Racing Report, produced for Grand River Raceway by award-winning journalist Dave Briggs, at https://soundcloud.com/grandriverraceway Final Training Day at Grand River Raceway  Grand River Raceway will remain open for training every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to noon, with all horses vacated by 1:00 p.m. This schedule will remain in effect until the final training day on October 9. by Kelly Spencer, for Grand River Raceway  

London, September 26, 2014 -- A long list of Opening Night promotions will be on tap Friday, Oct. 3 when The Raceway at The Western Fair District in London, Ont. opens its 2014-15 live harness racing season. Fans can take a spin around the half-mile oval in a double-seated jog cart with the Wanna Ride team, take part in a Survivor Handicapping Challenge, catch the Racing Under Saddle 2014 finale, take advantage of special Opening Night pricing in the Top of the Fair restaurant and even get their first bet for free thanks to the First Bet Is On Us promotion. There will also be prize giveaways and the track's regular Friday promotions such as Deal or no Deal, The Fun Wheel and Trivia. Raceway Manager Greg Blanchard said he can't wait to get the meet started. "We've gone through a turbulent couple of years, but I think we've weathered the storm well and we're really excited to be back in action this year," Blanchard said. The Raceway at The Western Fair District will race on Mondays and Tuesdays at 6:15 p.m. and Fridays at 7:05 p.m. this fall and will add Wednesdays to the schedule in the new year. Track announcer Shannon "Sugar" Doyle is back calling the action at The Raceway. He moved to London at the start of the 2013-14 meet after calling races in Alberta for many years. "I'm looking forward to it," Doyle said. "Coming into last season it was a whole new venue, new horses and names and drivers and everything else. Everything was new. I've got a handle on it now going into this meet and I'm feeling good. I know what to expect this time around. I'm hoping to be sharp right out of the gate." New this year is a Pick-3 wager on the first three races of every card in addition to two, Pick-4 wagers guaranteed at $5,000 apiece and two Super Hi-5 bets. All of those wagers have a takeout rate of 15 per cent. At the start of its 2012-13 meet, Western Fair became the first Ontario track to introduce the Super Hi-5 bet, a wager that has proven popular there, at Toronto's Woodbine Entertainment Group (WEG) and elsewhere. "Last year on at least a couple of occasions we generated pools in excess of $30,000 of new money. For a track of our size that's a big pool. With that new money, a couple of times we had total pools of $40,000 and $50,000. So, when we get that carryover, it generates a lot of excitement and a lot of buzz," Blanchard said, adding WEG did a lot of the legal legwork to get the Super Hi-5 wager - which WEG calls the Jackpot Hi-5 - approved in the first place. WEG launched the bet in October of 2013. As for other improvements to The Raceway at The Western Fair District, Blanchard said fans will receive a warm welcome in the lobby thanks to an improved customer service area designed to be a strong initial point of contact with patrons, including the addition of a betting terminal right next to the customer service desk. Gone is the old infield tote board and concrete stage, which was replaced by a winner's circle near the end of the 2013-14 meet. "Initially, we'll have large flat-screened TVs placed outside in the grandstand so people can access odds," Blanchard said. "We have two digital countdown clocks so people will be able to track minutes to post." Betting customers making their first trip to the track since the last live meet ended in May will also see a marked improvement in The Raceway at The Western Fair District's tote system. As a member of the eight-track Ontario Standardbred Alliance, the London track received an upgrade in June to the same AmTote system used by WEG. "We were overdue for an upgrade to a newer operating system. When we became part of the Alliance, by default we received an upgrade," Blanchard said. "We're getting good feedback early on from our customers on that." He said there have been other advantages to being part of the Standardbred Alliance, especially with WEG at the helm. "Woodbine's been great to help all of our tracks promote our events. When we did the Molson Pace they did a lot of promotion throughout their various platforms. On Opening Night they're going to be heavily involved again and one of the initiatives is the First Bet Is On Us program. They've done that at Grand River on their big day, they did it at Georgian recently. It's really popular and it's really slick, so that's going to be a nice addition for Opening Night." Overall, Blanchard said he's hoping for a safe meet for the track's participants and growth in both handle and attendance on the business side. "We'd like to see some new faces out at the track this year. That's one of the goals, certainly, of the Alliance," Blanchard said. By Dave Briggs, for The Raceway

ELORA, ON - The most important job at Grand River Raceway in Elora may just belong to the harness racing track veterinarian Dr. Pat Meyers. "Essentially, you're looking after the welfare of the horse, but in addition to that you're also making sure the betting public is not betting on any lame horses, said Meyers, 59, who has been the track vet at Grand River Raceway since the track opened in 2003. Before that he was the vet at Elmira Raceway and Hanover Raceway going back to 1998. On a wet Wednesday night, Meyers was busy carefully watching a group of three-year-old pacing fillies warm up for an Ontario Sires Stakes (OSS) Grassroots event that was subsequently postponed due to the monsoon causing unsafe track conditions. The vet said one of his jobs on race nights is to watch every horse warm up. "You're looking for any possible signs of lameness," he said. "Then if you have one that is slightly off, you go and talk to the trainer and make sure that he's not racing a horse that's going to be lame." Meyers is also on hand to help horses injured while racing. "Usually if there is an accident on the track you have to make sure you take care of any horses that are injured at least from a remedial standpoint or from a first aid standpoint," he said. After races, Meyers also helps trainers determine why a horse may not have raced well by inserting a small camera called an endoscope into a horse's air passage to check their lungs. He also helps out, when necessary, to take blood samples of horses for testing. Though Meyers isn't in charge of the testing protocol, racehorses in Ontario undergo some of the strictest pre- and post-race testing in the world for performance enhancing drugs. "The only time I get involved in any of those things is, for instance, if a person has difficulty taking a blood sample from a particular horse, then I would go and assist or at the end of the night if there's no veterinary technician to take blood," Meyers said. "So, I'm not intimately involved in it, but I do on the periphery." Other than the small number of times he's had to deal with a catastrophic injury to a horse in his 26 years as a track vet, Meyers said he enjoys his work and being at Grand River Raceway. "The job is pretty fun because you get to talk to a lot of interesting people at the track and find out what's going on in the industry," he said. Meyers, who runs Emerald Ridge Farm in Rockwood, ON with his wife, Anna, hasn't bred any horses the last two years, but he's been in the breeding business for a long time. He said the horse that changed his life was Emerald Whisper, an Earl mare out of Royal Design he produced with Terry Devos. "She made about $180,000 for us as a two- and three-year-old and she almost won the (OSS) Grassroots Final for two-year-old trotting fillies (in 2007). That was the one that changed it for me personally." To hear our conversation with Dr. Pat Meyers - including his pick for the greatest fictional character in history - check out our weekly podcast, the Harness Racing Report, produced for Grand River Raceway by award-winning journalist Dave Briggs, at https://soundcloud.com/grandriverraceway  

The retired harness racing trainer reflects on learning to communicate with horses and what it feels like drive them to victory in the sport’s biggest races. ELORA, ON — What does it feel like to drive a horse to victory in a major stakes race? Dr. John Hayes said coming from 10th at the top of the stretch to win the 1981 Meadowlands Pace with Conquered is a feeling he can only compare with finishing his first Boston Marathon. “It was totally emotionally impacting. It was so overwhelming I had trouble controlling it,” he said Wednesday, referring to the marathon he completed on his first attempt in 2007. As for that equally overwhelming Meadowlands Pace victory, Hayes said, “At the head of the stretch I was out of it. Halfway through the stretch it was evident I was going to be in the hunt for a cheque. Down near the wire, the cheque was going to be pretty good and at the wire, holy f---. “It was that first 30 seconds from the horse crossing the finish line until you get down into the turn and the horse gets pulled up; that feeling I never experienced it to that extent before in my life.” Hayes has done it all in harness racing. He’s a veterinarian that has owned, trained and driven horses all of his adult life. While he’s retired from training and his farm on the shore of Lake Ontario in Beamsville is for sale, it is still home to Canadian Pacing Derby champion Modern Legend trained by Dave Drew. Hayes has long been one of the sport’s most respected, most articulate participants. When asked to describe the sensation of driving horses, he said it doesn’t feel like you might expect. “Something you’re acutely aware of is how fast the ground is going underneath you when you’re driving a horse,” he said. “That sense is, of course, nothing you can compare to because it is being in the car without the floorboards. “Lots of times there is that addition of physiology of the horse that impacts on you. You smell the horse. There’s sweat involved. You’re getting that added sensory input that doesn’t come from another moving-over-the-ground experience.” Nearly 50 years of experience has taught Hayes to understand the language horses speak. “Although horses don’t talk, they certainly communicate. I became much better at speaking horse speak incrementally as time went on,” he said. “The language is in their response to the inputs that are from your end. In other words, you just get more comfortable in identifying the feedback and what it probably means.” As for people he admires in the game, Hayes said he’s a big fan of fellow veterinarian Dr. Ted Clarke, the general manager of Grand River Raceway in Elora. Clarke was inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame in August. “If Ted Clarke had a greater responsibility for the direction of Canadian racing, we would be way, way down the road to optimal opportunity,” Hayes said. “He has the ability to create consensus like nobody I’ve seen. He does not make vested interest his primary objective. He makes the interest of everybody his primary objective with the assumption that vested interest will be best served.” Hayes no longer owns any horses, but he was quick to name the one that changed his life. “The horse’s name is Decked. Let’s just say it was a father-son relationship thing,” he said of the late John Hayes, Sr., who is enshrined in the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. “Father was cutting back, phasing out and I was taking over the operation … Of course, I was young and wanting to expand my wings and there was no opportunity to do it with a trotter. So, we had this two-year-old who was by the first crop of Penn Hanover called Decked. His mother was an Adios mare. She was from the last crop of Adios. He was made to pace, but he loved to trot. “Father said, ‘You can hold him together in 2:20, but he’s bred to pace and he’ll switch over to the pace as soon as you chirp to him going some speed …’ The bottom line is he won his first pari-mutuel start, in London, in a sires stakes on the trot in 2:09 in October. That was the day that I somewhat gained a level of independence from my father where I was able to make a decision and he didn’t have to tell me I was full of (it).” In six years on the track, Decked earned more than $140,000 on the trot and just $4,000 on the pace. To hear our conversation with Dr. John Hayes — including what his personal heaven is like — check out our weekly podcast, the Harness Racing Report, produced for Grand River Raceway by award-winning journalist Dave Briggs, at https://soundcloud.com/grandriverraceway

ELORA, ON - There's a reason Trevor Henry is the leading harness driver in Canada by more than 100 wins over the next closest driver. He almost never misses a day driving at Ontario's smaller tracks. "You go every day, pretty much," Henry said. "You get used to it, but you sure appreciate when you get a day off." Henry isn't just leading Canada in wins, he's the leading driver at four different tracks - Grand River, Clinton, Western Fair and Georgian Downs - sits second and third in the standings at two others and is third in the driver standings on the Ontario Sires Stakes circuit. He is particularly dominant at Grand River Raceway where he has double the number of wins (75) than second-ranked driver Scott Coulter (37). Henry's $400,000 in Grand River earnings is almost $100,000 more than the next closest driver, Jody Jamieson. "(At Grand River) the front-end speed holds up pretty good. I like being close to the front and it seems to hold up well there," Henry said. It is a bonus that Grand River Raceway is just 20 minutes from Henry's house in Arthur, ON. "It's awesome when they race there. I wish they raced there year-round," Henry said. Henry is up at dawn seven days a week to help train the five horses he owns with his wife. He doesn't hit the bed most nights until midnight. The 43-year-old said he's had success on smaller tracks because he's been driving on them most of his adult life. "Experience has a lot to do with it. I've been doing it a long time. It helps," he said. "Guys see you do good, so they put you down to drive their horses. Horses are a big part of it." Though Henry has long been the king of Ontario's smaller tracks - putting some 80,000 kilometers on his truck every year in the process - he said he might take a shot at driving regularly at the top Woodbine Entertainment Group circuit in the fall. "I might give it a try and just do that and take a little break." For the time being, though, Henry will continue to plug away every night of the week at any track he can. "You can drive every night of the week. Before, I used to have, maybe, a couple days off a week ... Right now it's so busy. They put the stakes schedule closer together. It's not as spread out. There's stakes pretty well every other night of the week somewhere. So, you've got to go to them." To hear our conversation with Trevor Henry - including what horse changed his life and what is on his bucket list - check out our weekly podcast, the Harness Racing Report, produced for Grand River Raceway by award-winning journalist Dave Briggs, at https://soundcloud.com/grandriverraceway by Dave Briggs, for Grand River Raceway

CAMPBELLVILLE, August 28 - When John Campbell turns Go Daddy Go to the gate in the $667,000 Metro Pace final Saturday at Mohawk Racetrack, he's hoping it will prove to be another successful chapter in a partnership with trainer Bob McIntosh of LaSalle, Ont. that goes back nearly 40 years. A week after winning his Metro elimination by one-and-a-quarter lengths over Lyons Levi Lewis in a career-best 1:52.4, Go Daddy Go will leave from the two hole in an effort to deliver the first Metro title to McIntosh and the fifth for Campbell. The Metro is race 7 on a card that kicks off at 7:25 p.m. "He's a tough guy," McIntosh said of Go Daddy Go. "He doesn't mind being first up. He's versatile that way. He's maybe not the best on the front end, yet. He's a little green. But, coming at horses he's awfully impressive. He reminds me a lot of his dad, Ponder. There wasn't a tougher horse around. He was as game as they came." Go Daddy Go, who is also owned by Dave Boyle of Bowmanville, hasn't been off the board in his seven lifetime starts. He sports a 3-3-1 record, with wins in the $200,000 Battle of Waterloo at Grand River Raceway and a strong second in his $90,000 Nassagaweya test on Aug. 14 at Mohawk that convinced McIntosh to take a shot at the Metro. "He hasn't gone a bad race," Campbell said. "He's figuring it out as he goes. He's got the desire part. You can't teach that... He keeps improving and doing his work. He's just a very solid colt." Campbell, 59, and McIntosh, 62, are both Hall of Famers in Canada and the United States that have teamed up on innumerable champions. "The oldtimers are still at it - him and I," McIntosh said, laughing. "Over the years we've had some good ones. It's been a great run and John's still driving like a young guy. He's still the best. He hasn't lost a beat." Saturday, Campbell will drive all four of the horses McIntosh has entered on the stakes-rich card. He'll pilot Lasting Appeal in the $207,689 Simcoe, Thinking Out Loud in the $634,000 Canadian Pacing Derby and Dapper Dude in the $34,000 Preferred. The first horse Campbell drove for McIntosh was a $5,000 claiming mare named Brilliant Bonnie in 1977 at Windsor Raceway. "She was an orangutan," McIntosh said. "She was no fun to drive. I do remember that," Campbell said. "She was no Go Daddy Go." Go Daddy Go is a homebred colt out of McIntosh's mare San Francine. She has also produced Daddy Mac ($600,000), Change Your Luck ($180,000) and Miss Maverick ($230,000). "She'd made me a lot more money breeding than racing," McIntosh said of San Francine. McIntosh also bred San Francine, a mare sired by Artsplace, who, in 1990, became the first of Campbell's four Metro winners. At the time, Artsplace was trained by Gene Riegle. Later in the colt's career, McIntosh trained Artsplace. In 1999, Campbell won the Metro with The Firepan and denied McIntosh his first Metro victory. The trainer was a close second and third that year with Intrepid Seelster and Richess Hanover. Two years later, Campbell and McIntosh were on the verge of winning the Metro together with Western Shooter when the talented colt made a late break in deep stretch. "That was my fault. That was a whip break," Campbell said. Further tragedy struck when Western Shooter died before he could begin a promising sophomore campaign. "Yeah, we've had a lot of success over the years and some really good horses, but I think the first one that would come to (McIntosh's) mind and mine as well is Western Shooter," Campbell said. "He passed away between his two- and three-year-old year, but that might have been the best horse we had and we never got to prove it. He was just tremendous, just so strong. He just kept getting better all year. We really had high hopes for him." Go Daddy Go might not be in Western Shooter's class just yet, but John Campbell would dearly love to win the Metro for Bob McIntosh. "I know Artspeak will be the huge favourite," McIntosh said. "But there's a reason they hook them up and race them because anything can happen." by Dave Briggs, for WEG

ELORA, ON - In just his sixth year as a professional driver, James MacDonald of Guelph ranks among the best in Canada. He sits second in the nation in wins, is a close third in money and is on the verge of surpassing his best money year ever, the $2.9 million he earned in 2012. One of his biggest career victories came earlier this month when he won the Battle of the Belles at Grand River Raceway with a 20-1 longshot named Win The Gold. "I've had a lot of good horses and a lot of good trainers use me, so that makes it easier." MacDonald is on an incredible roll in 2014. He kicked off the year getting married to Jenna MacDonell. Jenna is the daughter of veteran reinsman Paul Macdonell, the man best known for driving the incredible Somebeachsomewhere. "Paul's great and Jenna's even better," MacDonald said, laughing. A few months after getting married, James MacDonald surpassed $10 million in lifetime earnings and recorded his 1,000th career win. "It means quite a bit. I've been watching it for awhile," MacDonald said of the wins milestone. "You try and win as much as you can, but it's hard. There's nine, 10 people in every race trying to win and in Ontario it's not easy to win races. There are so many good drivers around. Just to know that you've been able to achieve 1,000 is kind of special." James is the third MacDonald brother to reach the upper echelons of the sport. James, Anthony and Mark MacDonald have won more than 9,000 races and $100 million combined. Mark MacDonald is a two-time Canadian driver of the year. James said it all starts with their parents, Fred and Gail MacDonald, back in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. "Our family's great. Dad and mom, they watch every race and they call after," James said. "Whether you're up the track or win, you're the best driver in the world. They're great and Mark and Anthony they're great, too. All our brothers. They all watch, they all call. "Mark, if he sees me do something, or Anthony sees me do something they're the first people to give good constructive criticism, so it makes it that much easier, for sure." Constructive? Brothers are able to do constructive? "Somewhat. It starts off as constructive and usually ends up in a fight," James said, laughing. "But, deep down I know it was meant well." James said the Ontario track that most reminds him of home is Grand River Raceway in Elora. "It's a great track to race at. The grandstand sits right on the track. The fans are lined up at the fence to watch. It's just a really friendly place to race at." To hear our conversation with James MacDonald - including what sport he beats his brothers at every time - check out our weekly podcast, the Harness Racing Report, produced for Grand River Raceway by award-winning journalist Dave Briggs, at https://soundcloud.com/grandriverraceway by Dave Briggs for Grand River Raceway  

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