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WILKES-BARRE PA – Classic Belisima was the easiest of winners in the $30,000 Bobby Weiss Series Championship for trotting females Wednesday night at The Downs at Mohegan Sun Pocono, guided by harness racing Hall of Famer David Miller to her fifth straight triumph, this one in 1:54.1.   Hopes for a showdown between Classic Belisima, who had won all three of her Weiss preliminary starts, and Dress For Success, who had won in all four weeks of the prelims, lasted only a few feet after the start of the race, as Dress For Success made a break, taking her out of the race. Miller handled the victorious daughter of Crazed with patience, going up towards the lead past the 27.4 opening quarter, taking command in front of the stands, and then posting splits of 57 and 1:25.2 en route to a 4¾-length victory over Passing Jetta, with Never Ever Clever third; Dress For Success could never repair her early mistake and was last in the field of seven.   Classic Belisima has now been victorious 9 times in but 11 seasonal starts, and the Weiss Championship triumph pushed the John Cabot-trained mare’s lifetime bankroll to $113,055 for owner William Cantrell.   Another winning streak continued in a $25,000 mares handicap pace, as Show Runner is now 6 for 6 in 2015 after a 1:52.3 victory over Ooh Bad Shark, with 2014 Breeders Crown 3YO champion Sayitall BB third after closing from the back. Show Runner is acquiring the nickname “Picket Fence”, as her last five wins show nothing but “1”s all the way across the line, including tonight’s triumph, where she came home in 55 for driver George Napolitano Jr., trainer Lou Pena and owners A Piece Of The Action LLC.   ********** He’s better than The Six Million Dollar Man, because his lifetime bankroll now stands at $6,923,781, making him the richest racing harness horse of all time. And The $6+-Million Dollar Horse, Foiled Again, will return to the scene of his 2013 Breeders Crown triumph on Saturday at The Downs, heading a field of six in a $25,000 winners-over pace. Last time Foiled Again raced locally, the Franklin Final last year, he finished third, beaten only a length and a half, in Sweet Lou’s victory in 1:47 – the fastest time ever over a 5/8-mile track. Matt Kakaley has been tapped for Saturday sulky duty as Foiled Again’s saddle pad will match his lifetime bankroll status – 1.   PHHA / Pocono

Trenton, NJ --- Sometimes it’s pretty amazing what an extra $1,000 can buy. William “Don” Cantrell has discovered that over the past five months after purchasing Classic Belisima at the harness racing Blooded Horse Sale in November. With trainer John Cabot surveying the horses, Cantrell called a friend who was there and asked him to bid up to $15,000. Cabot saw several pacers he really liked, but the more he looked at Classic Belisima, the more he liked her. “I called back and said ‘Go $16,000 because a lot of people stop at 15,” Cantrell said. “I was sitting in my living room watching the sale and the board rolled up at $17,000 and I said ‘Well we didn’t get her.’ And about that time the phone rang and he said ‘We got her, the board rolled back to $16,000.’ “So that extra thousand I told him to bid ended up getting us the horse.” And what a horse she has been. Classic Belisima enters Wednesday night’s (April 22) $30,000 Bobby Weiss Series final for 3- and 4-year-old female trotters at The Downs at Mohegan Sun Pocono as the 2-1 morning line favorite. She has won eight of her 10 races this year and has won four straight, including all three Weiss Series preliminary rounds in which she competed. “There was just something about her we liked,” Cantrell said. “We’ve had a lot of luck racing fillies over the years; I’ve raced a lot of fillies. Before (Cabot) even looked at her, he knew the guy that had her and he was a real good horseman, so you knew you didn’t have to worry about anything and we decided to take a shot on her.” In her first race for her new connections at Dover Downs, Classic Belisima was driven by Corey Callahan, who sat in the back of the pack until the three-quarters mark and got beat by a nose. “That first night I knew we had a good horse,” Cantrell said. “She can race any way,” he added. “She’s been on the front end up there, and Corey Callahan says she’s awesome off a helmet. If you want to race her from behind, you can race her anyway you want to and you can drive her with two fingers.” David Miller will drive her in the Weiss final, where she will face off against Dress For Success, who has also won four straight. “That’s amazing,” Cantrell said. “We’ve been there three times, they’ve been there four, we never drew in the same heat. But we’re in it together (Wednesday). We feel good about it and I’m sure they feel good about it. We’ll just see what happens.” The owner feels Dress For Success will not be Classic Belisima’s biggest test of the year, if only because she has been predominantly racing against males at Dover. “It’s tough when girls race against boys,” Cantrell said. “That’s the bad thing about racing trotting fillies on the East Coast; you never get a race against the girls. All the races we won in Dover were against big, strong boys. “You never know about a horse race. It looks like a two-horse race (Wednesday) and somebody else may come out of the woodwork. That’s why a horse race is the way it is.” And Cantrell loves every minute of it. A retired basketball/football coach and athletic director from Johnson Central High School in Eastern Kentucky, Don got started “about 15, 20 years ago buying cheap claimers.” “It’s just a hobby for me,” he said. “I love a nice horse. I’m a retired teacher, I’m not looking to get rich. I just love to play with a nice horse.” He has a nice filly trotter named Golden Big Stick, who he owns with Mike Hollenback. Last season as a 2-year-old, Golden Big Stick won $172,120 on the Indiana Sire Stakes circuit. But of the eight horses he owns, Cantrell considers Classic Belisima the best so far. “I’ve had some nice horses, but I’ve never had one trot 1:53.3 before,” he said. “I really think this is the best horse I’ve ever owned.” He and Cabot have no solid schedule for Classic Belisima for the upcoming months. “Nah, we’re just going to sit down and take a look at it,” Cantrell said. “If there are some nice races out there we’ll give it a shot. We don’t have anything planned now, maybe take a couple weeks off after this. We’re just going to race through the summer.” And he hopes to watch that extra $1,000 investment continue to grow. by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent 

EAST RUTHERFORD, (April 17, 2015) - Whom Shall I Fear, the full-brother to Father Patrick and a $475,000 yearling, served notice that he is a three year old trotter to watch in 2015 with a compelling harness racing performance in his 2015 debut at The Meadowlands. Released from the gate as the 1/5 prohibitive favorite, Yannick Gingras guided Whom Shall I Fear towards the rear of the field while following what would turn out to be a live outer flow. Danish Durango would establish the early lead through a 28.2 opening quarter, but quickly felt a challenge from Clifton Beach who he released going past the three-eighths marker. But, Whom Shall I Fear was tracking that trotter every step of the early stages and Gingras guided his three year old to the lead past the half-mile in 57.3. From there, the race was over as Whom Shall I Fear created separation on Clifton Beach and all the rest, gliding past three quarters in 1:26.2. The lead would expand from that point with the final margin listed as 10 lengths in the end. The final time was an impressive 1:53.3, including a 27.1 final quarter under no pressure. Starzinner was a distant second with Madman Hall third. Whom Shall I Fear is trained by Jimmy Takter for Whom Shall I Fear Stable. He is eligible to both The Hambletonian and The Stanley Dancer Memorial at The Meadowlands. There is a new kid on the block when it comes to the open trotters at The Meadowlands and his name is Wind Of The North.  The Daryl Bier trainee has gone back to back at the top trotting level after his win Friday night. Surprisingly dismissed at 5-1, Wind Of The North left for position and sat third on the pylons early in the mile as Lindy’s Tru Grit, the overwhelming 1/5 favorite (coupled with Master Of Law) established a rapid 26.2 opening quarter.  The favorite would continue to dictate the tempo through fractions of 55.4 and 1:24.3 while turning for home with a diminishing lead.  Appomattox mounted a challenge from out of the pocket while Master Of Law ranged up off a live cover trip.  As Lindy’s Tru Grit tired, Wind Of The North quietly began to rally up the pylons and he powered through the stretch to grab the victory in the final strides in 1:52.  Appomattox finished second with Master Of Law third. Wind Of The North was driven to victory again by Dave Miller for Daryl Bier and Joann Dombeck. There was no single winner in the fifth race Jackpot Super Hi-5, that carryover has grown to $83,210.  The last race Jackpot Hi-5 also went unclaimed and that carryover will be $52,142 into the last race on Saturday. The 13-race Saturday program will feature the opening round of the Whata Baron series.  In addition the Spring Preview debuts for the pacing colts and fillies.  Post time is 7:15 P.M.   Darin Zoccali

When owner Michael White first met harness racing trainer Dan Daley there was a horse in Daley's stable named Life Sizzles. White so admired the hard-knocking pacer, who raced through age 11 and amassed nearly $930,000 in purses despite never winning a race worth more than $40,000, he decided to buy one of the stallion's first-sired sons. White admits it was a decision fueled by emotion, but it has resulted in more excitement than he could have ever imagined. And who knows, the best might be yet to come. On Thursday night, White's purchase - Sonofa Sizzle - will try to win the $100,000 Delaware Standardbred Breeders Fund championship for 3-year-old male pacers at Dover Downs. The colt brings a three-race win streak into the final, a streak that includes his victory in December's $100,000 DSBF championship for 2-year-olds. For his career, Sonofa Sizzle has won six of 12 races and earned $135,516. All six of his victories have come in his most recent nine starts, with the remaining three races during that span resulting in second-place finishes. In January, he was honored by the Delaware Standardbred Owners Association as the best 2-year-old male pacer of 2014. "We've been absolutely thrilled," said White, who purchased Sonofa Sizzle privately from breeders Charles and Diane Coursey. "Just to get to the races is an accomplishment. To get to the races and compete at this level, it's unbelievable. You don't get this a lot. "This horse doesn't have to do anything else to make me very proud and very happy that I made the decision I did. Not that I don't want him to go on, and he has the ability to do great things. He'll get a chance to compete and see how far he can go. Every time you ask him to do something, he does it. It's been a very enjoyable journey." It is a journey that began with Life Sizzles and includes the family of 2014 Horse of the Year winner JK She'salady, although there was no way for White to know how all the pieces would fall into place when he acquired Sonofa Sizzle in February 2013. "I never owned him, but I really appreciated him," White said about Life Sizzles, who as a 3-year-old prior to joining Daley's stable beat Real Desire in an elimination of the 2001 North America Cup and bested Peruvian Hanover in a Progress Pace elim. "He was a classy veteran who would try every week. He never wanted to go on vacation. If you turned him out, he would just roll around for five minutes and want to come back in to work. The horse lived to race. I just thought he was so special I wanted to give him a shot (as a sire)." It's proved to be a shot well worth taking. Sonofa Sizzle is out of the mare JK Lady Like and his second dam is Presidential Lady, the mother of JK She'salady as well as now 4-year-old stakes-star JK Endofanera. Daley broke Sonofa Sizzle and trained him through the early part of his 2-year-old campaign before the horse was shipped from New York to Delaware for the DSBF series. He finished second in the $100,000 final at Harrington in October and won the championship at Dover in December. The Dover victory is White's favorite race so far. Sonofa Sizzle was seventh, trailing the leader by eight lengths, after three-quarters of a mile. David Miller moved the colt on the final turn and Sonofa Sizzle responded with a :27.2 final quarter to win by three-quarters of a length in 1:52.1. "When I'm tired or feeling down or depressed I'll pull that race up," White said. "I still don't know how he wins from where he was in that final turn. David Miller told me he thought he waited too long and was too far away. To me, that last three-eighths of a mile, I'm amazed at how much ground he covered. "I never thought he was going to get there. To have seen that was phenomenal." The race was special for another reason as White's older brother, Jerry, who introduced him to harness racing in his youth while living on Long Island, was in attendance. "There was no happier moment in horse racing than to have my horse win the final and have my brother in the picture with me," White said. "It kind of was a full circle. He got me started and I got to pay him back by getting him a winner's circle photo of the Delaware final. It's pretty cool. It was a very happy picture to send him." Sonofa Sizzle, racing in the stable of trainer Josh Green this year, is 2-for-2 in 2015 with both wins coming in preliminary rounds of the DSBF series. His most recent triumph came in a career-best 1:51.2. Following the DSBF at Dover, the colt is staked to a number of top races including the Art Rooney Pace in late May, Messenger Stakes in early September and Little Brown Jug in mid-September. He also has the Progress Pace on his schedule in November. "We have to be careful with not overdoing it," White said. "He's going to be on a 'show us' schedule, if you know what I'm talking about. He's going to finish and stay in Delaware for a few weeks and train back calmly. Dan's moving the barn from Florida to New York at the end of April, beginning of May. We'll ship him from Delaware to New York and get him prepared for the Rooney. "If he trains well and looks like he's ready to go, we'll enter him in the Rooney. But this horse owes me absolutely nothing. I just look forward to every time he goes out there." For now, White is focused on the eight-horse DSBF final, which also includes Smoking Joey (2-1 morning line), K J Ben (6-1), Seboomook Katahdin (8-1), and Byby Landon (9-1). Sonofa Sizzle and driver Vic Kirby will start from post five. "The horses this year in this division are phenomenal," White said. "I think it says a lot for Delaware breeding that so many of them are doing really well. You can't take anything away from his competition. The Delaware breeders should be very proud of their product. I hope all the sires get more breedings and the breeders do even better. "You look across those eight horses that are starting and you could be proud of every one of them. And I am. I'm proud of mine, but I'm proud of the competition. It's a good race and it's a pleasure to compete with really good horses. That's good for everybody." White, who works as a business coach and trainer, finds harness racing to be a healthy diversion from his job. "I find it to be very relaxing," White said. "I do a lot of traveling and I coach a lot of professionals. To be able to go down in the wintertime to the training center on Saturday and just watch the horses train and clear my head really helps. And in the summertime being able to go to New York and watch the horses. To me, it's the greatest thing in the world. I'm thankful that I have the ability to do it." And he's thankful for the thrills provided by Sonofa Sizzle. "This horse has a bit of a personality," White said. "Everyone says he's real easy to drive, you just have to let him know what you want. He's still so young. If he ever figures out the ability he has, who knows what he could be. "Sometimes things come together. You never know how they're going to work. Harness racing is one of those things that you have to do for love before you do it for money. This is one of those times when you get something special, and special doesn't mean having to be the best, but special in the fact we have this opportunity. "I'm looking forward to seeing where the colt takes us." By Ken Weingartner Harness Racing Communications USTA

Rockin Wizard got his nose on the wire, literally in a thrilling photo finish in the $22,500 featured condition pace at The Meadowlands on Saturday night. With four horses across the track on the wire, Rockin Wizard just got to the wire in time, holding off the fast closing harness racing longshot, Fool Me Once, who was rallying up the pylons. Sweet Rock was launched to the lead and reached the opening quarter in 27.2, but on the backstretch David Miller guided Rockin Wizard to the outside and launched their bid for the lead, which they would claim shortly before the 55.4 half mile. The son of Rocknroll Hanover led the field around the far turn, with Sweet Rock in the pocket and Ontario Success advancing on the outside. Sweet Rock pulled pocket through three-quarters in 1:23.2. In the stretch, Rockin Wizard was called on for everything he had, Sweet Rock was trying to get to the leader, Fool Me Once found room at the pylons and Smart Rokker rallied off cover. The four of them would race to the wire together, with Rockin Wizard gamely holding onto the lead and earning the victory in 1:51. The win was one of three on the program for David Miller. Rockin Wizard is trained by Virgil Morgan Jr. for Majs Ny Inc., Gerrie Tucker and RBH Ventures Inc. Rockin Wizard That's My Opinion, the $350,000 yearling, made his first start of his four year old campaign a winning one, scoring a 1:51.2 triumph in non-winners of four company. Released at 5-1 in his comeback, the Somebeachsomewhere four-year-old showed good speed off the gate, securing a pocket position behind the speed of Murder He Wrote. Driver Scott Zeron was content to remain in a stalking position from the pocket with his four year old gelding throughout the mile, allowing Murder She Wrote to establish the early pace, posting fractions of 27.2, 54.4 and 1:22.4. Murder She Wrote carried That's My Opinion all the way into the stretch, when the first over bid from FF Bigshow stalled, allowing That's My Opinion to rip out of the pocket and wear the down the early leader to grab the victory. The win was the sixth for That's My Opinion who was sent out by trainer Tony Alagna for Brittany Farms, Marvin Katz, Joe Sbrocco and Little E L.L.C. Windsong Gorgeous found the winners' circle for the fourth consecutive week. After back to back wins for the Virgil Morgan stable, 'Gorgeous picked up the victory for Mike Watson tonight, the eighth victory for the eight year old Rambaran gelding already this season. He was claimed once again for $35,000 and will return the Morgan barn once again. On the track, 'Gorgeous was a one-horse show, going right to the top, leading through fractions of 27.4, 56.1 and 1:24 before turning for home and accelerating once again when Ballinrobe came out of the pocket to challenge the leader. But Windsong Gorgeous promptly dismissed Ballinrobe and then fended off the late rally of Panchester United to win in 1:51.1. Windsong Gorgeous got his picture taken with owners Melvin Fink and Clifford Grundy tonight. You Bet Your Glass rebounded in the $10,000 Claiming Dash for the "G" Notes Final, scoring a victory out of the pocket for Corey Callahan, who had a big night winning five races on the program. The win was timed in 1:51. Trained by Robert Breshnahan Jr. for Lee Cotroneo, the twelve-year-old Bettor's Delight gelding scored his third victory of the season and made amends for his defeat as an overwhelming favorite the week before. You Bet Your Glass The fifth race Super Hi-5 carryover continues to grow, with the carryover pool now at $71,506 and the last race carryover is now $35,827. Racing returns on Friday, with first post time at 7:15 P.M. Darin Zoccali

The featured $27,500 Fillies and Mares Open Handicap Pace at The Meadowlands was a wide open harness racing affair on paper, especially considering the scratch of morning line favorite Sayitall BB. But, Radar Contact had other ideas, taking the initiative from the start and powering home to win in 1:50. Sent off as the even-money favorite, Radar Contact was sent immediately to the lead and was allowed to settle on top of the field through an opening quarter of 26.4. The seven year old mare didn't see any challenge through the half-mile of 56.3, where she was able to catch a 29.4 breather in the second quarter. From there, Radar Contact picked it up, pacing a 27.4 third panel, reaching three-quarters in 1:24.2. Throughout the mile Inittowinafortune was riding the pocket behind the leader. Addys Way committed first over on the far turn, but could never get closer than the leader's wheel. That mare backed away in the stretch and with no one else rallying, Inittowinafortune ripped out of the pocket to challenge Radar Contact, but she stumbled inside the final eighth of the mile, costing her any chance of catching the leader. Amazingly, Radar Contact paced the final quarter in 25.3, winning by just over one length to trip the timer in 1:50, equaling her lifetime mark. Cloris Hanover rallied to be third. The winner was driven by John Campbell for trainer Noel Daley and owners Charles Stillings and Dean Ehrgott. The $25,000 Dash for the "G" Notes Final for trotters kicked off the late pick four. Muscolo, a winner of his division last week was sent off as the 8/5 favorite. But, it was second choice, Looking Hanover who would establish the pace, trotting to the lead in rather tepid fractions of 28, 57.2 and 1:26.3. The outer flow began to develop moving into the far turn, led by longshot Walltocousins. All About Justice was well-situated second over with Sweet Justice lurking in the cover flow as well. As the trotters straightened up, Looking Hanover was met with an onslaught of challengers and gave way in deep stretch. Muscolo sat the pocket and made his presence felt late and All About Justice loomed into contention off cover. But it was Sweet Justice who towered up over the crown of the racetrack and trotted past them all to reach the wire first in 1:54.1 for Dave Miller. Muscolo was second with All About Justice third. Sweet Justice is trained by Bruce Saunders for M&M Harness Racing L.L.C. The amateurs took to the track in the fifth race. Peter Kleinhans tried to steal the race, setting a torrid pace with his trotter, Mr. Ridgetaker, but Hannah Miller was able to reel him in near the wire to grab the victory in this round of the GSY Amateur series with her trotter, Jacks To Open. For Miller, it was her tenth win from 21 starts this year. Nine different drivers found the winners’ circle at The Meadowlands Friday night, with Dave Miller, Andy Miller and Corey Callahan scoring doubles. Both Jackpots went unclaimed in the Super Hi-5 wagers.  The fifth race carryover has swelled to $67,715, with the last race carryover now at $32,949. Racing returns on Saturday with first post at 7:15 P.M. Darin Zoccali

WILKES BARRE PA - Walk The Walk, a son of former harness racing "Horse of the Year" Muscle Hill, emerged as the only horse competing in Bobby Weiss Series action to take a second straight win in the $15,000 Tuesday preliminaries, two for trotting males and two for pacing females, at The Downs at Mohegan Sun Pocono.   Last week's first round trotting male winners, Walk The Walk and Two Hip Dip, were matched in one division, and Walk The Walk maintained his perfect record in the series by winning Tuesday in 1:55.2 on a cold night and a sloppy racetrack. Last week Walk The Walk was well in front when he made a break nearing the wire, so in the interim trainer Chris Ryder qualified him with trotting hopples, and this week Walk The Walk was errorless, making an early move to command and then stepping home in 57 to defeat Raise The Curtain, with Two Hip Dip, the slight second choice as last week's winners were both sent off at 11-10, third after a first-over trip.   David Miller, who drove both winners last week, stayed with Walk The Walk, and the horse repaid that confidence of Miller in tallying for the ownership of Ruder, Sidney Korn, Robert Mondillo, and Max Wernick.   Bourbon Bay, third last week in snapping a six-race win skein, bounced back to winning ways, going a tick faster than the other trotting cut in winning by open lengths. The Sand Vic gelding is trained by Megan Wilson for driver/owner John Cummings Jr.   Thebeachnextdoor put paid to the hopes of a repeat Weiss win for Life Is A Beach and Crescent City, both nose victresses last week, by taking a personal mark of 1:53.4 in one leg of the female pacing competition. Jim Morrill Jr., behind hid fourth winner of the night, guided the daughter of Somebeachsomewhere, like Muscle Hill a former Horse of the Year and who was nosed out in the first round, to a wire-to-wire triumph, with last week's winners finishing 2-3 respectively. The Brewer Adams-trained mare is owned by Adams Racing LLC and Brian Clark.   Allthatjazz De Vie couldn't be a repeat winner because Tuesday's other division for females was her first start of the year, but she won her Weiss debut by personally coming home in 56.3 to win in 1:54.4 over Hollyrocker (the other distaff to be nosed in the first round). Andrew McCarthy sulkysat behind the sophomore daughter of American Ideal, now 5 for 7 lifetime, for the familiar pairing of trainer Ron Burke and the ownership combine of Burke Racing and Weaver Bruscemi.   PHHA / Pocono    

WILKES-BARRE PA - Trotting males and pacing females were featured in first leg harness racing action of their divisions of the Bobby Weiss Series Tuesday night at The Downs at Mohegan Sun Pocono, with two $15,000 sections for each group contested. In the first trotting cut Two Hip Dip set the pace, then blasted home in 1:55.4 - 56.2 - 27.1 for driver David Miller and trainer/owner Nick Salenetri. The son of Glidemaster was the slight favorite in a race where two horses were sent off at 4-5 - his co-"odds-on" rival Bourbon Bay was outfooted late for second by Raise The Curtain. The other diamondgaited division also went to driver David Miller, again on the engine, this time with Walk The Walk. Walk The Walk trotted the trot about five lengths better than anyone else in the field until the shadow of the wire, where he ran the run, but was not in violation of the breaking rules. The son of Muscle Hill, owned by trainer Chris Ryder in partnership with Sidney Korn, Robert Mondillo, and Max Wernick, posted a new personal speed badge of 1:55.1 despite the bobble, with back timings of 56.3 - 28. Miller and Ryder again teamed in a division of the female Weiss action, using "pocket rocket" tactics into a 28 kicker with the Rocknroll Hanover filly Crescent City to get a nose up in a new mark of 1:54 for Diamond Creek Racing. This event also featured an unusual betting pattern, with three horses at less than 2-1 - the winner was 7-5, place horse Hollyrocker was 9-5, and first-over Caviart Shelly (fourth) was 3-2. The other distaff division also saw a nose separate the top two, as a daughter of Somebeachsomewhere, Life Is A Beach, maintained an early brush to command to the wire over The Beach Nextdoor in a personal best 1:53.1, with twin 28.1s the last half. Matt Kakaley had sulky duty for trainer Ron Burke and the omnipresent Burke Racing / Weaver Bruscemi partnership. David Miller and Kakaley had three wins on the card; doubles were recorded by George Napolitano Jr. and, on his birthday, Mike Simons, with the latter win for "The Trot Man" the appropriately-gaited Magnum Kosmos. As opposed to opening night this past Saturday, where the average win mutuel was over $21, 7 of 13 chalks clicked this evening. Jerry Connors for PHHA/Pocono             Spam Not spam Forget previous vote

Last May, trainer Chris Ryder looked at his then 3-year-old trotter Walk The Walk and said he thought the horse might be better at age 4. Walk The Walk won three of 11 races last year, earning $27,250, but was shut down in July because of soundness issues. He returned in January for his 4-year-old campaign, finished second in his seasonal debut and has since won back-to-back starts as he heads into Saturday's $49,000 Charles Singer Memorial Series final at the Meadowlands Racetrack. "Am I right?" Ryder said with a laugh when reminded of his comments last spring. "Well he's won his last two starts, so that's better. I like him. He's sounder this year. The poor guy was pretty sore (last year) and now he's not sore. He had quite a lot (of issues) and the whole lot have gone away." Walk The Walk will start from post six in the Singer final, with David Miller at the lines. He is 3-1 on the morning line, the third choice behind favorite JL Cruze (6-5) and the three-horse entry of Opulent Yankee, Blocking The Way, and Propulsion (8-5). JL Cruze won the Super Bowl Series on Jan. 24 at the Meadowlands. He has four wins in six starts this year, with both losses being second-place finishes to Opulent Yankee. The Singer is part of a Big M card that includes the finals of the $59,000 Sonsam Series for male pacers and the $50,600 Burning Point Series for 3- and 4-year-old female pacers, as well as the opening round of the Buddy Gilmour Series for 3-year-old male pacers. Walk The Walk, who was unraced at age 2, is owned by Ryder, Sidney Korn, Robert Mondillo and Max Wernick. A son of Muscle Hill out of the mare Letsjustalkaboutme, Walk The Walk was purchased for $20,000 at the 2012 Standardbred Horse Sale. He competed in only the first round of the Singer Series, winning by one length over Detroit Rapper in 1:55.4. Following the Singer, Walk The Walk will compete primarily in overnight races, but Ryder made the horse eligible to the Graduate Series for 4-year-old trotters, which concludes on July 11 with a $250,000 final. "It might be a little ambitious, but what the heck," Ryder said. "We'll give it a go. He's doing good." Ryder also sends out National Seelster in the first round of the Gilmour Series. National Seelster was unraced as a 2-year-old and is 2-for-2 this season, with both victories coming in conditioned races. He is a son of Bettor's Delight out of the mare No Strikes Against and was purchased for $50,000 at the 2013 Standardbred Horse Sale. His family includes millionaires Strike An Attitude, Delinquent Account and Artiscape. National Seelster is owned by Mondillo and Peter Mazzella's Oompa's Farm. "He was ouchy last year," Ryder said. "It was nothing serious, but he just wasn't ready to push on. We kind of liked him, but never really got to go much with him until now. He's a nice horse. We (staked) him to most races." Ken Weingartner/Harness Racing Communications/USTA  

Tim Tetrick has long been one of North America's top harness racing drivers. Now he is ready to take on the world. A native of Illinois who now lives in southern New Jersey, Tetrick will represent the U.S. in the World Driving Championship in Australia. The competition, which brings together 10 drivers from around the world for a 20-race series at six different tracks, begins Saturday at Tabcorp Park Menangle in New South Wales. The 33-year-old Tetrick, a four-time U.S. Driver of the Year who has led North America in purses seven of the last eight years, is making his first appearance in the World Driving Championship. "It's a great honor to be able to represent the United States and hopefully I can win it and make America proud," Tetrick said. "I love competing at a very high level and this is on the international scene. I'm just going to go into it and try to have a good time and enjoy myself and do what I love to do, which is race horses." The World Driving Championship, introduced in 1970, is now conducted every two years. France's Pierre Vercruysse won the 2013 edition, held in his home country, and will defend his title in Australia. Also part of this year's field is Canada's Jody Jamieson, a two-time WDC champion. Past U.S. champs are Joe Marsh Jr. (1974), Ron Pierce (1989) and Dave Magee (1995). "Timmy, good luck over there," Pierce said in a video message to Tetrick. "I hope you get on the right horses and put it on them boys. You know you're better than them. "You're driving for all of us, so we're all rooting for you." Drivers already have received their post positions for the World Driving Championship's 20 races and will drive whichever horse randomly draws the matching starting spot. Tetrick will drive the post No. 10 horse in the opening heat. All drivers will start twice from each of the 10 posts. "Hopefully they give me the best horses," Tetrick said with a laugh. "I'm going to study it the best I can, work with what horses they give me to drive, and hopefully I don't embarrass myself too badly. There are a lot of different (driving) styles. We're all kind of in the same boat, but hopefully I get some good luck with the draws." Learning to compete against various driving styles will be among Tetrick's most difficult challenges. "It was a completely different style of racing than what I was used to," said David Miller, who represented the U.S. in 1999 and finished fifth. "It took me a while (to adjust). We raced at five or six different racetracks and they were action packed. "I think (Tim) could probably watch tapes of races, maybe study the horses. I would just tell him to have fun. Go over there, go all out, and try to win the whole thing. He's a great driver, but you've got to get the horses and you've got to have luck." Andy Miller, who represented the U.S. in 2005 and 2007, with a best finish of fourth, said having a good time is important. "The camaraderie and meeting new people are great memories," Miller said. "I would tell him to have a great time and meet everybody you can and take everything in that you can. It's something you don't get to do very often, so enjoy it. If you're having fun, the wins will come and you'll do better." Tetrick, who in his career has won more than 8,500 races - including the Hambletonian Stakes and 14 Breeders Crowns, is one of five drivers making his first trip to the World Driving Championship. The others are Spain's Guillermo Adrover, Denmark's Knud Monster, France's Tony LeBeller, and Norway's Vidar Hop. Rounding out the field are Australia's Chris Alford, New Zealand's Dexter Dunn, and Finland's Mika Forss. "I definitely want to win," Tetrick said. "But I'm looking forward to visiting the country and seeing what it's like. I'm familiar with a few of (the other drivers). I'm looking forward to hanging out with them and getting to know them, and hopefully coming out with more friends." Ken Weingartner / Harness Racing Communications

It all started with the book Born to Trot written by Marguerite Henry, which was loaned to me by a friend. This book told the beginning of horse racing in North America and the birth of one of the most prized and respected races in North America- the Hambletonian. It is a must read book for every, trainer, owner, driver, caretaker and harness racing enthusiast alike. The drive took us about 8 hours to get to Goshen, New York and where our hotel was, was not too far from the Goshen Historic Track. The entire drive I was doing my best to contain my excitement. Tomorrow I would be at the oldest race track in North America, The Historic Track in Goshen, NY. Racing only takes place at the Historic Track 4 days every year for the New York Sire Stakes and a few weekends of matinee races. The next morning I was so excited. After breakfast we headed straight to the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame. I was overcome with delight as my parents and I walked up the stone path with each stone bearing the name of a horse, driver or someone else that had a big impact on harness racing from long ago and others more recent that someone wanted to remember; that is when I first got the feeling that I was stepping back in time. As my parents and I walked through the big wooden doors the feeling that I was being transported back in time got even stronger. It was interesting to learn that the museum was once a stable. The dividers between every few stalls had been taken down. In the stalls was a different period of racing and some were even dedicated to a specific person or horse. There was a stall just for Stanley Dancer and stable memorabilia and one for the great trotter Hambletonian, another for the pacing marvel Dan Patch, I was in awe. There were also plaques that explained the artifacts and history that happened in that time period. I made my parents stop at everything so I could read every plague. I did not want to miss a single detail of the museum. Even though there have been renovations at the historic site over the years, looking around you would never know. Beneath your feet is still a cobblestone walkway, the ceilings still tower high above your head. After walking through what felt like decades, we then entered a room with every single race bike ever invented. It was intriguing and amusing to see the innovations that shaped our sport. There was a room just for the Little Brown Jug. The Living Hall of Fame which honors the living legends both human and horses of harness racing, the statues in the living Hall of Fame featured the works of the late Beverly Lopez. There was the Communicators Hall of Fame section with cute portraits and biographies of the top writers, announcers and other journalism greats in our sport. Maybe, just maybe, I could be there one day. There was an interactive section which included a game where you were at the Lexington Sale and you had to under bid on horses, but all the horses were well known horses. Another game was where a clip of a replay was shown and the person watching had to spot the infraction. There were a couple other interactive components but I do not want to spoil all the surprises. After looking at everything there was to see and reading everything there was to read, my parents and I headed to see the track. Just looking at the track, I could feel the history come back to life. I could hear the faint pounding of horses’ hooves hitting the dusty track and see the clouds that formed from the horses whizzing around the turns and the horses racing past me. I hear the cracks of driver’s whips echo in the air and the cheers of pure excitement as the horses drew closer and closer to the wire. With the fall breeze blowing around me, life just seemed peaceful and perfect; I was in a state of true admiration. The tote board did not have a clock, only slots for numbers to slide into and a door for a person to enter through to put the numbers up. The judge’s stand was in the infield and stood high above the track. When I looked at the grandstand I thought of the times of old when men and women wore their very best to take in an afternoon of racing. The track simply took my breath away. I stood in admiration; this is where it all started. This is where the very first records were set and the first rivalries were challenged other than on the dirt road. Without this historic and beautiful track our sport would not be in existence, this is where it all started. I had heard that along with other trainers, Ray Schnittker was stabled at the barns behind the Harness Racing and Hall of Fame and Museum.   Ray Schnittker trained the champion trotting mare Check Me Out. So my parents and I made our way across the track to see if we could meet her. We got to one of his barns and no one was there. So we headed over to the other barn with his name marked in a sign on the front on one of the barn door. On our way to the second barn, we met a farrier and he turned out to be the farrier of Check Me Out. He was kind enough to take my parents and me to see her. She was so sweet, I rubbed her forehead and she snuggled into chest. My dad then turned to me so my mom could get a picture of me and Check Me Out. Then, the next thing I knew Check Me Out was gently tugging on the collar of my colors.   I think she was trying to tell me that I should stay a little bit longer.  While I spent a few more minutes with Check Me Out, my parents and I spoke with the farrier.  Then he said he would be back in a moment. When he returned he brought with him a horseshoe and handed it to me. “It is her shoe.” pointing to Check Me Out. That is something I will always remember and cherish and to this day I have not let my mom wash Check Me Out’s shoe. A week after my visit with Check me out it was announced that she had been retired. I felt really special to have had the opportunity to meet a true champion.  Just like Born to Trot is a book every racing fan, trainer, owner, driver and caretaker should read, the Harness Racing Hall of Fame and Museum is one place that every fan, trainer, driver, owner and caretaker in harness racing should visit. Going to the Hall of Fame and Museum was an incredible experience and was one place I hoped to return to as soon as possible and if I was lucky, I would be able to return when the four days of racing were on.   After reflecting for months and months about my memories of going to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame and Museum I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to return during one of the four days of racing. After visit the Meadowlands Racetrack on the Friday and Saturday I was going to spend the Sunday at the USHWA (United States Harness Writers Association) meeting in the morning and the Hall of Fame induction ceremony that evening, both events took place at the Harness Racing Hall and Museum. It was sure to be the perfect way to end an unforgettable weekend.     Being back felt like the first time. The feeling of history took my breath way, only this time it was more captivating. People were going this way and that anticipating the exciting races to come later in the day. For now people were looking around the museum and gift shop and so was I. One of the many special keepsakes I bought was a copy of the book Old Friends by Barbara Livingston and Ellen Harvey. I was lucky enough to meet Ms Harvey and she was kind enough to sign the book for me. I was then looking at the t-shirts and caps when a voice behind me said “Sydney! You don’t know who I am, but I know who you are!” I turned my head as quick as I could. Standing exactly where I had heard the voice coming from was Roger Huston! My jaw dropped. It was Roger Huston! I was speechless! He was the voice of the Little Brown Jug, and perhaps the most famous announcer in harness racing. And he was right in front of me. That realization made my heart skip a beat. The two of us talked for a few minutes, and then my mom reminded me that I had a Little Brown Jug t-shirt that I was hoping to get Roger Huston to sign. He agreed to sign it and I sent my mom out to our vehicle to get it. After that unbelievable encounter I made my way to my USHWA meeting. I was honored to be a part of meeting which discussed important events that had happened and that were going to happen in the coming months that involved harness racing. It was also an honor to be surrounded by people who share a passion for harness racing and writing as I do. After my meeting, I had opportunity to meet Elbridge Gerry, III, the son of the founder of the Harness Racing Hall of Fame and Museum that was a true honor for me. His passion and knowledge for harness racing was inspiring. Then, my parents and I headed outside to see the action.  I was blown away; the scene around me was nothing I had ever expected. The grandstand was packed, but the part that made me smile was how every person cheered as each horse and their driver entered the track for the first race.  Everyone cheered because they loved the sport. All the races on the card were trots and non- pari-mutuel. Another highlight of the day was the ‘Mr. and Mrs. Elbridge T. Gerry, Sr. Memorial Hall of Fame Trot’. This race was unlike another on the day’s card because all of the drivers who drove in it were Hall of Fame drivers and legends in harness racing. Following the race the drivers went to meet and greet fans and I was lucky enough to be one of them.   That evening I had the honor of attending the United States Harness Racing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.  It was an evening full of laughs, new memories and people coming together to celebrate each other’s accomplishments.   A sense of enchantment encompassed the museum. The outside gardens were decorated with lights and everyone was dressed up. The museum had an elegant vibe; everyone in attendance was just having a great time. But like all fun times it eventually had to come to end and when it did I was a little sad, the final piece in my very eventful weekend. I met so many wonderful people and was blessed to be able to spend my final night with them and they made my night even more special. Being able to go back to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame was truly special and I am very grateful that I was able to attend during such a monumental time of the year, and I am very thankful to those whom made it possible. Whether you attend during the Fourth of July weekend or another day of the year if you are an owner, trainer, driver, caretaker, or someone who has a deep passion for harness racing, I hope one day you visit the Harness Racing Hall of Fame and Museum too and it leaves you inspired as it did me when I visited...

The Super Bowl re-match took center stage in the first round of the harness racing Charles Singer Memorial Trotting Series Thursday night at The Meadowlands, a night that saw temperatures fall into the single digits, with a windchill approaching zero. It featured Super Bowl Champion JL Cruze and the runner-up, Opulent Yankee. Sent off as the 1/2 choice, JL Cruze got away fourth early, while his rival, Opulent Yankee went straight to the lead, establishing and opening quarter of 28.3. Sensing a softening pace up front, John Campbell sent JL Cruze to the lead down the backstretch, where he took over through a 58-second half. Candy Stash, who left for position was moved to challenge JL Cruze fist over through three-quarters of 1:26.3, while Opulent Yankee loomed in the pocket as the field turned for home. In the stretch, JL Cruze maintained his advantage over Opulent Yankee, who began to pick it up nearing the wire, but fell one length short of his rival. The victory marked the third time in four starts that JL Cruze defeated Opulent Yankee. It was also one of three consecutive wins to start the program for John Campbell. Candy Stash checked in third. JL Cruze is trained by Eric Ell for owners Kenneth Wood, William Dittmar Jr. and Stepehn Iaquinta. The second division was more wide-open on paper and it played out that way as three horses were sent off at 5/2, with Propulsion being a slight favorite by a few hundred dollars. Surprisingly, it was 79-1 longshot Lady Windsor who established the early lead from her outside post, getting to the first quarter in 28.1. She relinquished that lead to the oncoming Propulsion early on the backstretch, who quickly felt a stiff challenge in the form of a blitz from Donnie Darko who cleared the lead just past the half-mile in 56.4. Donnie Darko quickly felt pressure from Walk The Walk who began the first over grind around the far turn, with longshot Detroit Rapper right on his back. In the meantime, Two Hip Dip was starting to rev his engine from the back of the pack. As the field went past three-quarters in 1:25.4, Walk The Walk took the lead as Donnie Darko faltered. Detroit Rapper was a fresh threat with Two Hip Dip charging and Propulsion in behind horses. Nearing the finish, it appeared that Two Hip Dip was going to trot by them all, but he went off-stride in the final sixteenth of a mile, and Walk The Walk hit the wire first for Dave Miller. Detroit Rapper out-performed pari-mutuel expectations to be second with Propulsion and even third. Two Hip Dip was disqualified from fourth and placed fifth behind Lady Windsor for a violation of the breaking rule. Walk The Walk is trained by Chris Ryder, who co-owns the trotter with Sidney Korn, Robert Mondillo and Max Wernick. The $25,000 Dash For The "C" Notes Final for the mare pacers was also contested Thursday night at The Meadowlands. The race featured plenty of early action, with Antigua Hanover heading to the lead before releasing Caviart Shelly through a quarter of 28-seconds. SGT Molly Pitcher promptly engaged the leader, but could not advance past the leaders wheel through a 56-second half mile. Meanwhile, Marty Party, the 7/5 favorite was struggling to catch the cover of SGT Molly Pitcher as the leaders separated themselves from the field through three-quarters of 1:24.1. Caviart Shelly turned for home with the lead, with a pocket-sitting Antigua Hanover in pursuit second. That mare dove to the pylons and took over in mid-stretch and faced a challenge from longshot Stormunn who followed Antigua Hanover around the track, but Antigua Hanover held on to win in 1:54. Stormunn was the runner-up with Caviart Shelly holding on to be third. Antigua Hanover was driven to victory by Andy Miller for trainer Amber Buter and owners Oldford Farms LLC and Tyler Buter. There will be a pair of Jackpot Super Hi-5 carryovers into the Friday card at The Meadowlands. The fifth race carryover is $9880.26, while the last race carryover grew to $87,669.49. Post time for the Friday card is 7:15 P.M. It features round one of the Worldly Beauty series for pacing mares and the $25,000 Final for the trotters as they Dash For The "C" Notes. Darin Zoccali Director of Racing Operations New Meadowlands Racetrack LLC

Somwherovrarainbow made her five year old debut a winning one as she triumphed in the harness racing $30,000 Free-For-All Handicap at The Meadowlands on Friday Night. Sent off as the 3/5 favorite, the daughter of Somebeachsomewhere was sent hard off the gate by Dave Miller and cleared the lead heading toward the opening quarter without any urging. Essentially, that was the end of the race as the World Champion and millionaire would coast through fractions of 27, 55.2 and 1:23.1 before turning for home with an ever-expanding lead. Breeders Crown winner, Monkey On My Wheel, made a brief bid, but tired first over. Southwind Serentity offered minimal response off cover. The only horse to make any noise in the stretch was For The Ladies N, who rallied from last to finish second with Icommandmyspirit getting up to be third. The final clocking was 1:50.4. For Somwherovrarainbow, the win marked the 20th time the magnificent mare has made the trip to the winners circle from 45 starts, sending her earnings past $1.34 Million. Somwhereovrarainbow is trained by Joe Holloway for owners Theodore Gewertz and Diamond Creek Racing. On the wagering front, there will be a Pick 5 carryover of $22,616 into The Saturday card at The Meadowlands. Post Time and the start of the Pick 5 which begins in the first race is 7:15 P.M. Hill I Am got back to his winning ways in the fifth race, a $17,050 non-winners of three trot. Sent off as the 9/2 third choice in the wagering, Hill I Am was aggressively moved to the lead heading to the half-mile pole and proceeded to lead the charge around the far turn. Candy Stash made a first over move after the leader, but Corey Callahan could be seen looking over his right shoulder as the field approached the top of the stretch, seemingly looking around for competition. As the field straightened up, Callahan called to his trotter and the response was instant as Hill I Am powered away to win impressively by nearly five lengths in 2:10.2 for the 1 1/8th miles. Hill I Am was an undefeated New Jersey Sire Stakes Champion as a two year old for Dennis Laterza and Roy Dobbins who were the winning connections tonight. Tim Tetrick was the driving star on the night, winning four races. The fifth race jackpot super hi-five was hit tonight and returned $47,172.50 for $.20 cents. That pool will start fresh on Saturday night. The last race jackpot super hi-five went unclaimed and will feature a carryover into the 13th race on Saturday of $61,470. The win by Hill I Am sparked a Pick 5 carryover of $22,616 into The Saturday card at The Meadowlands. Post Time and the start of the Pick 5 which begins in the first race is 7:15 P.M.   Darin Zoccali    

It was a double dose of Miller at The Meadowlands on Thursday night with Dave and Brett Miller combining to win six races on the harness racing program, with the Buckeye crossing the finish first on four occasions and Brett scoring a driving double. Dave Miller scored wins with Alhambra in a C-2 trot, Colossal and Rocnrolwilneverdie in a pair of C-2 pacing events and My QP Doll in the nightcap, a C-2 Filly and Mare pace. Not to be out-done, Brett earned victories with Explodent in the $10,000 claiming pace and Casanova Lindy in a $12,500 claiming trot. Mike Simons turned the Late Pick 4 on its end with a 45-1 upset in the eighth race with Spectator K, resulting in a payoff of over $1,000 for just $.50 cents. The fifth race jackpot super hi-five went unclaimed, resulting in a carryover of $35,863 into the Friday program. The last race jackpot super hi-five also carried over, with $56,093 heading to the last race pool on Friday. Post time for the Friday card is 7:15 P.M. Darin Zoccali

From where trainer harness racing Linda Toscano sits, JK Patriot looks like his mom. More importantly, the 4-year-old pacer acts like her too. Toscano trained JK Patriot's dam, JK Majorette, a stakes-winning three-quarter sister to millionaire Yankee Cruiser, in 2007 and 2008. Now she conditions JK Patriot for owners Matt Bencic and Sam Schillaci, and is preparing the gelding for Saturday's $56,000 Escort Series final for 3- and 4-year-old male pacers at the Meadowlands. "They have a similar gait," Toscano said about JK Patriot and JK Majorette. "Sitting behind them, his rear end is the exact same as hers was. "She was a good race mare for me, so to get to race him is kind of a cool thing. He's got a really good desire and she was the same way too. She wanted to win." JK Patriot will start Saturday's nine-horse Escort final from post eight with driver David Miller. JK Patriot, who had a win and a second-place finish in the two preliminary rounds of the series, is 6-1 on the morning line. Toscano also will send Khan Blue Chip into the final. Khan Blue Chip, who had a dead-heat win and second-place finish in his preliminary rounds, is 4-1 from post three with driver Andy Miller. The entry of Major Uptrend and Brick Bazooka is the 8-5 morning line favorite, followed by What I Believe at 2-1. JK Patriot and Khan Blue Chip both were trained by Schillaci before being sent to Toscano for the Escort. JK Patriot has won seven of 24 career races and $59,709. In his last nine starts, dating back to early November, he has five victories and four second-place finishes. Khan Blue Chip, owned by William Heinz and Jack Heinz, has won six of 16 lifetime races and $38,739. "They both came from Jodi and Sammy Schillaci; I babysit for them in the wintertime, and I'm happy to do it," Toscano said. "They're good horsemen and they always send horses that look great and are ready to do exactly what they tell me they're ready to do. "(JK Patriot) was good every start before I got him and he's been holding his form. He's been very sharp. (Khan Blue Chip) is a fast horse. He was unlucky in his first start -- he got caught in -- but finished up good. Last week he raced great." Last week, JK Patriot won his Escort division - which was contested at 1-1/8 miles - by two lengths over Major Uptrend, who was eventually disqualified and placed 11th. Toscano believes the extra distance might help the horse in this week's traditional mile race. "It can't hurt," Toscano said. "I don't think (the horses) notice a difference unless they're on the lead or on the outside. But there's no question it will leg one up. When I'm trying to leg one up training, it's not uncommon for me to go a mile-and-a-half, so why wouldn't it help." Major Uptrend, Company Man and What I Believe each won a first-round Escort division. JK Patriot was joined by Khan Blue Chip and What I Believe, who finished in a dead heat, with victories in round two. What I Believe will start from post four with Ron Pierce driving for trainer Ron Burke. Major Uptrend, who went off stride last week in the race won by JK Patriot, leaves from post five with Corey Callahan at the lines, also for Burke. Major Uptrend is coupled with Brick Bazooka, trained by Larry Remmen, because of common ownership. Company Man, trained by Virgil Morgan Jr., drew post one and is 6-1 with driver Tim Tetrick. "It's a good group," Toscano said. "I think the trip will win it. That's what I like about the (JK) Patriot horse; he doesn't seem to need one. The outside hasn't hurt him too much and he's been first up for a long ways. He kind of does what he needs to do. "But there are some really nice horses in there and I think whoever gets the best trip is probably going to be the victor." By Ken Weingartner / Harness Racing Communications / USTA

The Escort Series resumed on Saturday at The Meadowlands and was split into two divisions. The first division was contested at one mile and one eighth due to the 11-horse field with one trailer. Longshot Rockstar Stride showed unsual speed and made the lead through a 26.2 opening quarter before yielding the lead to JK Patriot who made a brush early on the backstretch. Heavy-favorite and round one winner Major Uptrend was right on that rivals back and moved three-wide to the half mile pole, but broke stride nearing the far turn, causing several horses to scatter throughout the field. JK Patriot settled into a rhythm through a 54.4 half-mile and rolled through the far turn, taking the lead past the three-quarter mark of the race. Major Uptrend re-rallied following the miscue and rallied down the center of the racetrack, but couldn't get to the JK Patriot who paced powerfully through the mile in 1:50.4 and completing the mile and one-eighth in 2:04.2. Major Uptrend finished second, but was disqualified and placed last int he field of 11, moving Company Man to second with Blacktree third. Dave Miller drove the winner for Linda Toscano and owners Matthew Bencic and Sam Schillaci. The second division looked like a showdown between round one winner What I Believe and Khan Blue Chip on paper and it played out that way on the racetrack. In fact, a photo finish could not decided the winner as both horses got their nose on the wire simultaneously resulting in a dead heat. What I Believe cut the mile, establishing a 27.4, 57.1 and 1:26 tempo for the mile event, with Khan Blue Chip right on his back throughout the mile. Brick Bazooka flipped out three wide for the stretch drive and threatened the two favorites, but Khan Blue Chip promptly split horses decisively charging after What I Believe who was reaching for the wire, which they both hit together. What I Believe was driven by Yannick Gingras for Ron Burke, Burke Racing Stable LLC and Weaver Bruscemi LLC, while Khan Blue Chip was driven by Tim Tetrick for Linda Toscano and owners William and Jack Heinz. Brick Bazooka was third. Scratched down to a field of five, the $27,500 Free For All Pace turned into a showdown between the 3/5 favorite Wake Up Peter and the recent back to back winner at the top level, Doctor Butch. The two favorites got away fourth and fifth, while the chestnut and recent private purchase Dapper Dude, dictated the terms early, through fractions of 26.4, 56.2 and 1:24.3. Turning for home, Dapper Dude was bracing for the challenge of Wake Up Peter who rolled up first over and paced by the once-leader, while out-sprinting Doctor Butch, who had been riding his cover throughout. Wake Up Peter tripped the timer in 1:51, pacing a powerful final quarter in 26.1 for Brett Miller. The winner is trained by Larry Remmen for owner Bradley Grant. The fifth race $.20 cent Jackpot Super Hi-5 went unclaimed, in fact there were no winning tickets, resulting in a $34,076.55 carryover into Thursday's program. The last race $.20 cent Jackpot Super Hi-5 paid out to multiple winning tickets and will feature a carryover into the Thursday program of $52,684.69. Post Time for the Thursday card is 7:15 P.M. by Darin Zoccali, for the Meadowlands  

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