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TORONTO, November 19 - Downbytheseaside got one back on harness racing rival Huntsville Saturday night in the $520,000 Governor's Cup at Woodbine Racetrack. The Brian Brown trained colt delivered a powerful performance to win the final major race of the season for two-year-olds in 1:51.1. Driven by David Miller, Downbytheseaside was unhurried at the start and got away fifth, directly behind Huntsville, the 1/5 favourite. Air Strike charged off the wings of the gate from post nine and put up an opening-quarter of :27.2. Huntsville got his cue to go from driver Tim Tetrick after the opening-quarter and rushed up to grab the front. However, Miller was not going to let the favourite get away and followed Huntsville to the front, ultimately clearing to command at the half in :55.2. Downbytheseaside and Huntsville began to edge away from their competition on the far turn, as the leader paced a solid third-quarter of :27.3 to reach three-quarters in 1:23. In the stretch, Huntsville angled off Miller's back and took his shot at glory, but Downbytheseaside was fired up and turned aside his rival to win by 3¼ lengths. Saturday's contest was the first start for both colts since Downbytheseaside finished runner-up to Huntsville in the Breeders Crown. "I was just kind of waiting to see what Tetrick did and when he moved I thought I better get with him," said Miller following the race. "My horse got to the front and he swells up when he is on the lead and he was very strong, I never pulled his plugs, he paced right through the wire." The Governor's Cup was the fifth meeting of the season between Downbytheseaside and Huntsville. The season series comes to an end with Huntsville holding a three to two advantage, but Downbytheseaside now has a signature victory to be held up against Huntsville's Breeders Crown score. "I honestly thought I was second best," Miller said post-race. "But I thought if the trip worked out or one of us got used pretty hard getting where they wanted to go, I maybe could pick it up. I was able to get to the front without too big of fractions and like I said he is a good horse." A son of Somebeachsomewhere, Downbytheseaside now has eight wins in 13 starts. The Brown trainee completes his rookie season with earnings of $644,706 for owners Country Club Acres Inc, Joe Sbrocco and Richard Lombardo. Huntsville's two-year-old season comes to a close with seven wins and four runner-up finishes in 11 starts. The Ray Schnittker trainee also by Somebeachsomewhere pocked over $700,000 for his connections this season.  Third in the race at least seven lengths was Filibuster Hanover also by Somebeachsomewhere to make it a clean sweep by the champion son of Mach Three. Downbytheseaside and Huntsville each finish 2016 with the title of co-fastest two-year-old of all-time, as both took a mark of 1:49 in early-October at The Red Mile. The standout rookies finished one-two in all five of their meetings this season. A $2 win ticket on Downbytheseaside in the Governor's Cup returned $6.70. The top-five finishers in Saturday's rich contest were rounded out by Filibuster Hanover, Bettors Dream and Air Strike. Mark McKelvie

TORONTO, November 19 - Thats The Ticket charged home to win the $427,000 Three Diamonds for harness racing two-year-old pacing fillies at odds of 5-1 Saturday night at Woodbine Racetrack. The Chris Ryder trained pacing filly was able to convert off a perfect third-over trip from driver David Miller for her second win in 14 starts. Idyllic Beach, the 6-5 favourite, left out hard to grab command ahead of a pesky Someomensomewhere. The public's choice posted an opening-quarter of :27.2 and was unchallenged in the second-quarter to lead the field by the half in :56.4. Caviart Ally came first up just after the half and supplied cover to Candlelight Dinner from fifth and Thats The Ticket in sixth. The first-over challenger pulled up along side Idyllic Beach at three-quarters in 1:25.2. In the stretch, Thats The Ticket shot off cover and delivered a stunning stretch rally to fly by her rivals with powerful strides. The Ryder trainee crossed the wire first in 1:53.4, 3¼ lengths ahead of runner-up Idyllic Beach. Candlelight Dinner edged out Caviart Ally for third. Known as a front-end favouring racetrack, Thats The Ticket completely ignored the Woodbine track bias to win the Three Diamonds. "We had planned on just racing her off the end of it there and hopefully get some cover that takes us where we needed to go," said Miller post-race. "Passed the half when they all started moving I was hoping they would get up with the leader, which they did and everything worked out good, but I moved her over at the head of the stretch and she really dug." Thats The Ticket, a daughter of Roll With Joe from the Artsplace mare Art Account, has shown big closing speed throughout her rookie season, including last week's :26.4 kicker to finish second in her elimination. Miller was confident victory was within reach with an eighth of a mile to go. "About half way through (the stretch) she was almost up to the leader and starting to get wound up," noted Miller, who did not drive the Ryder trained filly in the elimination. "I was feeling pretty comfortable and she won pretty handy." Owned by Craig Henderson, Robert Mondillo and Lawrence Minowitz, Thats The Ticket now has two wins in 14 starts and earnings of $331,824 this season. She paid $13.70 to win. by Mark McKelvie    

Columbus, OH --- Hall of Fame harness racing driver David Miller posted career victory No. 12,000 when he piloted Vegas Dream to a 1:54.4 victory in the 13th race on Sunday afternoon (Nov. 13) at Harrah's Philadelphia. Miller became just the fifth driver in North American harness racing history to reach the 12,000 victory plateau. He trails only Dave Palone, Tony Morgan, Herve Filion and Cat Manzi on the all-time win list. Earlier this season he joined John Campbell and Ron Pierce as the only drivers in harness racing history with more than $200 million in purses. He has ranked among the top five in purses in 16 of the last 17 years and currently sits in second place in that category in 2016 with $11.9 million. Miller also holds the record for most seasons with at least $10 million in purses, with 14, including this year. Miller, who was voted to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 2013, has been named Driver of the Year in both 2003 and 2015. His first Driver of the Year honor came in 2003, when he was the regular driver of Pacing Triple Crown winner and Horse of the Year No Pan Intended and led all drivers in purses with $11.49 million. He won a record 10 races at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on Little Brown Jug Day that year, including the feature event with No Pan Intended, and also enjoyed successes during the season with the likes of Kikikatie, Kadabra, Modern Art, and Forever Starlet. In 2015, Miller won a record five Breeders Crown victories with trotting mare D’One, older male pacer Always B Miki, 3-year-old female pacer Divine Caroline, 3-year-old male trotter The Bank, and pacing mare Color’s A Virgin. Divine Caroline was voted the Dan Patch Award for best 3-year-old female pacer and Miller also was the regular driver behind Dan Patch Award winning 2-year-old female trotter Broadway Donna. In addition, he scored stakes wins in 2015 with Dan Patch Award honorees State Treasurer and Bee A Magician. “Those two years were pretty much equal,” Miller said earlier this year, comparing his two Driver of the Year campaigns. “That year with No Pan Intended, I won 10 races that day at Delaware. People still will bring that up from time to time. I’m sure down the road people will bring (the Breeders Crown) up. “It was quite an accomplishment to have that big a night on a night that is that big. It’s a little luck, and good horses, and everything kind of clicked. Nights like that I’ll cherish forever.” USTA Communications Department 

East Rutherford, N.J. - Always B Miki ($2.10) will always be remembered as a harness racing champion. The fastest pacer in the history of harness racing capped his career in triumphant fashion, using a sustained first-over bid to overpower All Bets Off and sprint off to a 1:48.2 victory in the $400,000 TVG Free-For-All Pace on Saturday (November 12) evening at The Meadowlands. David Miller moved Always B Miki first-over out of midfield after patiently stalking sizzling fractions of :25.4 and :54.1, making gradual gains into pacesetter All Bets Off (Matt Kakaley) through the far turn. The 5-year-old Always a Virgin entire pushed to the fore in upper stretch, leaving All Bets Off well in his wake and evading eventual runner-up Mach It So (Tim Tetrick) by 4-1/4 lengths. Melmerby Beach (Marcus Miller) benefitted from the outer flow and saved third with a mild stand-side push over the tiring All Bets Off. Miller and trainer Jimmy Takter had nothing but glowing reports of Always B Miki's curtain call. "When I asked him, he took right off," said Miller. "Jimmy [Takter] has done a great job keeping him good all year, and I tell you what, he's good today as he's been all year. He's an incredible horse; he's a true champion." "It's a wonderful feeling standing here at our home track," said Takter. "He's just a wonderful horse to be around. He's so personable, anybody working with this horse just would love him." "It's nice to quit on the top, too," Takter concluded. "This horse has a future ahead of him, and it's going to be very, very exciting to train his offspring." Always B Miki wraps up his racing career with 30 wins in 53 starts--12 of those wins coming this year--as well as $2,719,368 in earnings for the Bluewood Stable, the Roll the Dice Stable, and Christina Takter. by James Witherite, Meadowlands    

CHESTER PA - Photobombr Hanover never looked back from his outside post six in taking the final harness racing event in the John Simpson Sr. stakes series, the $74,000 two-year-old colt pace, on Sunday afternoon at Harrah's Philadelphia, winning in a lifetime best 1:52.4.   Hall of Fame driver David Miller hustled the freshman to the top in 27, then took a 30 second breather in the second quarter. Photobombr had to step it back up to 27.3 down the back to hold off a huge rush by first-over Point Somewherelse, did so successfully, and then kept pocketsitting Maconupwiththedragon at bay by 1¼ lengths through the lane with a final split of 28.1, with Pointsomewherelse another length back in third. Tom Fanning trains the four-time seasonal winner, bred by Hanover Shoe Farms (which Simpson Sr. helped grow and prosper for so many years), who increased his earnings just over the $80,000 mark, for owners Howard Taylor and Susan Kajfasz. The son of Somebeachsomewhere-Pilgrim's Witchie has a pedigree to show even more improvement, as his dam was one of four to win $200,000 out of six foals by his second dam Witchtree (who herself won $199,000+), and his fourth dam is the double-gaited world champion Countess Adios , whose brother has also had some impact on the breed - Meadow Skipper.   Pennsylvania Harness Horsemen's Association

East Rutherford, N.J. -- Broadway Donna and David Miller continued to swoon the division by earning an easy win in the $500,000 Breeders Crown for harness racing 3-year-old trotting fillies at The Meadowlands in 1:53.1. The Jim Campbell-trained daughter of Donato Hanover from the Broadway Hall mare Broadway Schooner, didn't make her move until mid-race and was never urged to coast down the stretch and win. Emoticon Hanover and Fad Finance left quickly from the gate with the former getting the top to cut tepid :28 first panel. Caprice Hill stalked those two in third until All The Time pulled to first over as the field went to a half in :56.3. All The Time got the best of Emoticon Hanover to take the lead and that's when Broadway Donna began to stride rapidly on the outside. Earn Your Wings picked up live cover but Broadway Donna was in full flight at three-quarters in 1:25.3, wearing down All The Time, who held for third, while Emoticon Hanover shook loose to get second. Owned by Fashion Farms LLC, Broadway Donna won the Breeders Crown final after a victory in her elimination, coming off a straight-heat score in the Kentucky Filly Futurity to register her seventh win in a dozen starts as a 3-year-old. Broadway Donna paid $3.60 to win. "I was hoping to get away somewhere in the middle and come with cover," said Miller, "but, right off the gate nobody from the inside was even pushing off, so I had to do something. I got around, and when Yannick [on All The Time] was moving back, I [knew] I was going to be first over. She really has [gotten better through the season]. She's way sharper now than she was half way through the summer, and that's always a good thing." "[Jules Siegel and I] are both very happy," remarked Campbell. "From Mr. Siegel's point of view, he bred her, and to have a filly like this and put her over one-million dollars lifetime [is incredible]. When you breed one and race one that does that for you, you're supposed to be happy. Jules is always extra proud of his homebreds."   by Frank Cotolo, Hambletonian Society

East Rutherford, N.J. -- Always a champion. The much-anticipated showdown between the top two harness racing horses in the world lived up to the hype as Always B Miki forged ahead by three-quarters of a length to upend  2015 Horse of the Year Wiggle It Jiggleit to capture his second straight $421,000 Breeders Crown Open Pace at The Meadowlands. The 3-5 favorite Always B Miki, driven by David Miller and trained by Jimmy Takter, paid $3.20, 2.10, 2.10 and is the likely choice to take 2016 Horse of The Year honors.   “We saw two great, great horses, fighting side by side down the stretch.  To me, it was one of the better races, maybe the best ever had a horse participate in and it was so exciting to see it,” said Takter, who won his 29th Breeders Crown race to date. “When he dug in that little extra, that’s what a champion has.  I am so proud of this horse and I’m speechless – what a horse.  Two weeks from now (will be his last start in the TVG) and I hope everyone will come back.  Everybody should see it, it’s going to be his last appearance here in the TVG, so wonderful to do this on his home track on a cold night like this. Fantastic feeling.”   Wiggle It Jiggleit, with Montrell Teague aboard the 6-5 second choice, paid $2.20, 2.10 for second and Shamballa, with Scott Zeron aboard, paid 2.60 for third. “Me and Miki have been trading wins and losses back and forth all season,” said Teague, in just his second start in a Breeders Crown race. “One race isn’t going to deter me, I was happy with my horse, it was a big effort. There was a big headwind out there today and the horse got on the left line a little bit but from having all those difficult problems he still put in a game effort.”  Wiggle It Jiggleit stormed to the lead right from the gate and led throughout with Always B Miki right at his heels in second place every step of the way until surging ahead to take the lead right at the wire.   Always B Miki won in fractions of 27.1, 55.1, 1:22.1, and a finishing time of 1:49. Wiggle It Jiggleit and Always B Miki have met seven times this year with Always B Miki now leading the head-to-head matchup at 4-3. “I couldn’t be happier with him, he’s a tough horse,” said Miller. “He shows up and he was determined to get his head in front there.”    Since returning to action last fall, Always B Miki has won 15 of 21 races, totaling 29 for his career and became the first horse to win the Open Pace in consecutive years since Bettor Sweet in 2011-12. Always B Miki’s other wins this year include the Ben Franklin Pace, William Haughton Memorial, Jim Ewart Memorial, and Hoosier Pacing Derby.   Nineteen days ago, Always B Miki paced the fastest mile in harness racing history at Lexington’s Red Mile, winning the Allerage Farms Open Pace in 1:46, eclipsing Cambest’s mark of 1:46.1, which was set in a time trial at Springfield, Ill., in 1993. No horse had ever paced faster than 1:46.4 in a race.     by Lou Monaco, Hambletonian Society

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - Always B Miki, fastest harness racing horse of all time, easily won the $25,000 Open Pace at The Meadowlands on Oct. 21, a prep for the older division of male pacers' final next week.   David Miller drove the champion again, winning in 1:48 for trainer Jimmy Takter and owners Bluewood Stable, Roll The Dice Stable and Christine Takter.   Leaving from the 10 post (the 9 spot with the scratch of Art History), Miller took Always B Miki three wide around the first turn as Bushwacker, Luck Be Withyou, Bettors Edge and Americanprimetime fired hard to a :26.1 first quarter. As the shuffling continued among the four leavers, Always B Miki found a smooth path behind them as the half went in :53.4.   By three-quarters in 1:21.1, Always B Miki was coasting down the stretch and easily won. Dealt A Winner was second and Artistic Major was third. By Frank Cotolo

The Grand Circuit meet at The Red Mile is behind us, and it was a classic. Whether you privilege the breathtaking speed embodied in Always B Miki’s 1:46 world record win in the Allerage Open or the historical significance of the triumph by Marion Marauder in the Kentucky Futurity that capped the first Triple Crown season in a decade, nobody can cite a lack of drama. As one might expect, Muscle Hill and Somebeachsomewhere, the dominant forces at the Lexington Selected Sale that paralleled the meet, also rode roughshod over the competition on the track. Muscle Hill’s progeny won eight stakes races/eliminations, while SBSW’s get won 15 of the same. This is in addition to the success they had in the late closers that filled out the cards. Muscle Massive and Donato Hanover were second to Muscle Hill with four stakes wins each, while Art Major played second fiddle to SBSW, also with four. Appropriately enough, Marion Marauder, our new Trotting Triple Crown winner, is a son of Muscle Hill. He won for Scott Zeron and the extended Wellwood family. This was the young stallions first Kentucky Futurity credit.  The new speed king, Always B Miki, who won for David Miller and Jimmy Takter, is by the 12-year-old Indiana sire Always A Virgin, a successful regional stallion who has had limited exposure to the Grand Circuit. Miki broke the 1:46.4 race record shared by He’s Watching, Holborn Hanover, SBSW and Warrawee Needy as well as Cambest’s 23-year-old 1:46.1 time trial mark. Tim Tetrick won the most races at the meet: nine stakes and eight late closers. His most impressive win was Thursday’s 1:51.3 world record score by the impressive Chapter Seven freshman Walner for Linda Toscano and Ken Jacobs. This was only his fifth start, after taking two in the NYSS and a Kindergarten leg. He knocked a tick off of Southwind Frank’s 2015 mark. This colt is trending straight up. What Frank was to the 2015 meet, Walner was to this one. David Miller, who laid the foundation for his 2015 Driver of the Year award with a big closing day at last year’s Red Mile meet, may have done the same on Sunday with wins behind Darlinonthebeach in the Garnsey, Broadway Donna in the Filly Futurity and Always B Miki in the Allerage. Overall, he was second to Tetrick with seven stakes wins, in addition to scoring in a pair of late closers. Last year he sealed the deal with five wins on the Breeders Crown program at Woodbine two weeks after the Red Mile meet. Whether he recreates that feat at The Meadowlands this year or not, his numbers, in a season where he took the winter off, combined with the quality of his wins, make him the favorite to repeat as DOY. Andy Miller won five stakes, four of them for his wife Julie and one for Ross Croghan, as well as one late closer. Yannick Gingras also won five stakes, just as he did last year, but was blanked in the late closers this time. Corey Callahan, Brett Miller and Marcus Miller each had four stakes wins. The latter won three splits of the ISS on Saturday, all for his dad, with two of them, the SBSW filly Zane Hanover and the Art Major colt, Chip Walther, paying $189.80 and $84.80, respectively. Ake Svanstedt, Charlie Norris and Scott Zeron each had three stakes wins, with the latter also taking four late closers. Jimmy Takter topped all trainers with eight stakes wins, including that record mile by Always B Miki. Just as David Miller is primed to once again overcome Yannick’s earnings lead in the DOY contest, Takter may again overcome Ron Burke’s huge plurality in wins and money in the TOY race. Ron Burke had five stakes wins, including an upset in a Tattersalls split by the 20/1 Art Major colt, Stolen Glimpse, for Brian Sears. Last year Burke only won four of the high-dollar races, but he had eight second place finishes in them. On Sunday his Crazy Wow was second in the Allerage Open at 13/1, while Big Top Hanover was second in the Tattersalls Pace at 28/1. And Southwind Frank was nosed out by Marion Marauder in the Futurity. So the money was still rolling in. Julie Miller, Ake Svanstedt and Erv Miller each had four stakes wins, while Charlie Norris and Jim Campbell won three apiece. Tony Alagna, who had 5 stakes wins last year, including the Tattersalls Pace with Artspeak, had only 2 this time, although he did win 6 late closers. 54% of the stakes winners were bred in Pennsylvania, while 21% were from New York and 16% from New Jersey. Most of the latter are by Muscle Hill, who now stands in PA, and that must be taken into consideration. Ohio, Indiana, Florida and Ontario had one each, and one was by the French stallion, Love You. The Ontario SS Super Finals take place over the weekend so participation by that sector in Lexington is minimal. On the trotting side, there were eight for Muscle Hill, four each for Donato Hanover and Muscle Massive, three each for Cantab Hall and Credit winner, two for Andover Hall and the rest with one apiece. In 2015 Cantab Hall had 5 wins to 3 for Muscle Hill. As was the case this year three-quarters of the trot wins went to PA stallions. Somebeachsomewhere’s domination was more extreme than that of Muscle Hill. His progeny won 15 high-dollar stakes to four for Art Major and one each for all the rest. That amounts to a ridiculous 55% win rate for the 11-year-old son of Mach Three. This served as a marked contrast to last year when SBSW’s get had only three wins and New York pacing stallions dominated Pennsylvania by an 11 to 6 margin. American Ideal had no stakes credits this year, after accumulating four in 2015. Lots of juicy payoffs, aside from the pair from Marcus Miller and one from Sears/Burke already mentioned. The Crazed colt Shake It Off Lindy paid $29.60 for Tetrick and Antonacci in a Bluegrass split; the Yankee Glide filly Overdraft Volo paid $49.20 in another Bluegrass split for Andy and Julie Miller; the RNR Heaven colt Rock The Boat paid $38.20 in a Bluegrass division; the Credit Winner filly Bankette paid $73.60 for David Miller in a LC; the Donato filly Temple Ruins paid $30.60 in an ISS split for Brian Sears; and Gingras’ Cantab Hall filly Dancing IN The Hall paid $98.60 in a Filly Futurity elimination…. The most interesting winner was the Florida bred sophomore filly pacer Prairie Sweetheart, who was supplemented to the Allerage Mare and smoked her more accomplished foes in 1:49.1 for Matt Kakaley and Ross Croghan. Her sire, Royal Millennium, is an obscure 17-year-old son of Run The Table, whose granddam is a full sister to the great Sonsam. Prairie Sweetheart has won all 12 lifetime starts. There were some short fields, the Allerage Mare Trot had to be cancelled due to a lack of entries, and there was some wind and rain to contend with, but on the whole the record setting numbers at the sale were mirrored by some of the same on the track. Joe FitzGerald has been an avid harness racing fan and historian for the last half-century. He writes a weekly blog for  http://viewfromthegrandstand.blogspot.com/.  Joe’s commentary reflects his own views and not that of Harnesslink.

Always Be Miki fastest harness racing horse in history 1:46  26.1  -  52:2  -  1:19.4  -  1:46   LEXINGTON, KY-- Making his move for the top midway down the backstretch, Always B Miki set fast fractions before driver David Miller implored him through the stretch, advancing to win the $138,000 Allerage Farms Open Pace at The Red Mile in an all-time record mile of 1:46.   Always B Miki got away third as Shamballa was sent to the lead through a :26.1 opening quarter. David Miller showed Always B Miki the whip and he rushed first over to claim command to the half, timed in :52.2. He continued his sprint around the far turn, passing three-quarters in 1:19.4 before being chased home by Shamballa and All Bets Off in the stretch.   A five-year-old horse by Always A Virgin out of the Artsplace mare Artstopper, Always B Miki won his 27th race in 50 starts, earning $2,296,368 for owners Bluewood Stable, Roll The Dice Stable and Christina Takter. He is trained by Jimmy Takter and paid $2.10 to win.   "It's a moment I'm never going to forget," Jimmy Takter said. "You don't get horses like this for long, and it's definitely emotional to be around him. I can't wait to see him as a stallion. His personality and everything about him will be well-received through the sport. He's not the easiest horse because he had a lot of injuries, but what this horse overcame every single day nobody else did.   "He has the Breeders Crown and TVG Final; those are the only two races left for him."   "I really thought the three-quarters was maybe a little too slow," David Miller said. "But like I've said: he's an incredible horse and does incredible things. I couldn't be happier with him."   Always Be Miki - World Record     Circling by Frost Damage Blues and Lady Shadow as they battled around the far turn, Praire Sweetheart advanced to the front and defeated her older rivals to win the $112,500 Allerage Farms Filly & Mare Pace in 1:49.1.   Lady Shadow set the pace, going fractions of :26.4 and :54.4 before receiving pressure from Frost Damage Blues, pulling first over from fourth, into the far turn. The two matched strides through a 1:22.2 third-quarter before Frost Damage Blues took the top. Lady Shadow retreated at the pylons while Prairie Sweetheart moved three wide, powering by Frost Damage Blues at the eighth pole. Prairie Sweetheart finished in front of Bedroomconfessions and Venus Delight, who stormed down the center of the track to finish second and third respectively.   Prairie Sweetheart, a three-year-old filly by Royal Millennium out of the Masterman mare Taylors Lady, remained undefeated in 12 starts with her lifetime-best win. She has earned $155,024 for owner Let It Ride Stables Inc. and trainer Ross Croghan. Driven by Matt Kakaley, she paid $14.80 to win.   We recently purchased her," Ross Croghan said. "I got a call from a friend of mine up at Pocono, and he said 'I just saw a filly that looked fantastic.' I watched the replay, and I had to agree with him, so I watched her again the next week, and the next week, and I just thought this filly has something special.   "We actually purchased her the day before I was going to leave for the [Little Brown] Jug. I was going to be away for a month and I didn't want to be away from her for that amount of time, so I brought her with me.   "We gave her a qualifier here last week just to see how she was and Matty [Kakaley] said she was super and that there were two seconds up her sleeve if he ever wanted to use it," Croghan also said. "I spoke to the owners, and they're both here enjoying the week in Lexington, so they opted to pop up with the supplement and watch the race, and it worked out in our favor."   Prairie Sweetheart     Flanagan Memory fanned off cover and trotted down the center of the track to take the $101,000 Allerage Farms Open Trot in 1:51.2.   Jl Cruze was sent to the lead, clearing early race-leader Muscial Rhythm through a :27.2 opening quarter. After a :55 half, Jl Cruze braced the challenge of Obrigado into the far turn. They were stride for stride after a :21.4 third-quarter before Jl Cruze reemerged to the lead. Crazy Wow, tracking Obrigado from second over, edged three wide and trotted by Jl Cruze to take the lead before Flanagan Memory and Brian Sears rushed down the course to grab command. Crazy Wow took second, while Jl Cruze held third.   A six-year-old horse by Kadabra out of the Yankee Glide mare Classy Stacy, Flanagan Memory won his 18th race in 65 tries, compiling $1,163,070 for owners Liette Flanagan and trainer Rene Dion. He paid $5.00 to win.   "I was real happy to be third over," Brian Sears said. "I was just hoping Mark [MacDonald on Obrigado] went out a little bit and didn't wait too long for Ake [Svanstedt on Centurion Atm] to make a decision. This horse loves to finish up in the last quarter, so we were in a good position."   "He has gotten better and better through the years. I was fortunate to drive him a year ago and win the [John] Cashman at the Meadowlands. He was a little disappointing in Canada a couple of weeks ago [in the Maple Leaf Trot], but I'm glad we're going in on a positive note; we have the International Trot coming up."   Flanagan Memory     By Ray Cotolo, for The Red Mile

LEXINGTON, KY-- Darlinonthebeach kicked off her cover at the top of the stretch and sprinted to a 1:48.1 harness racing victory to win one of two divisions of the $213,500 Glen Garnsey Memorial on Sunday, Oct. 9 at The Red Mile. Getting away fifth as Penpal cleared command in :26.2, Darlinonthebeach flushed Rock Me Baby first over at the half, timed in :55. Blue Moon Stride, having brushed to the top after yielding to Penpal at the quarter, was challenged by Rock Me Baby at three-quarters in 1:22.1. Darlinonthebeach tipped off her cover at the head of the stretch and drew away from the field in the stretch. Kiss Me Onthebeach closed down the center of the track to take second, while Penpal slid up the pylons for third. A three-year-old filly by Somebeachsomewhere out of the Bettor's Delight mare Darlin's Delight, Darlinonthebeach won her 12th race in 28 starts, amassing $830,823 for owner White Birch Farms. Trained by Nancy Johansson and driven by David Miller, she paid $3.00. "It worked out just the way I wanted it to there," David Miller said. "We had a bit of a pace on the lead and she felt comfortable the whole way; felt like I had a lot of horse. She's an all-round professional; she's pretty handy and will do whatever you want to do. "She was a bit of a bully earlier in the year and we've worked with her. She has learned how to race and she's a big strong horse who can carry her speed really good. I couldn't be happier for Marcus and Nancy and all the connections with her. I've always been a big fan of her; I've been high on her all season. It started out a little rough, but I kept telling them it was going to get better." Darlinonthebeach Sent the 1-2 favorite, Pure Country stalled in her first over bid around the far turn before hitting her best stride and storming by pacesetter Call Me Queen Be to win the other division of the Glen Garnsey in 1:48.2. Leading through splits of :27.1, :55, and 1:21.4, Call Me Queen Be held an uncontested lead. Pure Country was first over but about two lengths off the lead at the top of the stretch, chasing Call Me Queen Be along with pocket-sitter Lakeisha Hall and Lindwood Beachgirl behind her. Pure Country drifted towards the center of the track as she edged past Call Me Queen Be to win. Winning her 18th race in 28 starts, Pure Country, a three-year-old filly by Somebeachsomewhere out of the Western Hanover mare Western Montana, has earned $1,649,968 for owner Diamond Creek Racing. She's trained by Jimmy Takter, was driven by Brett Miller, and paid $3.00 to win. "She's a pure champion," Jimmy Takter said. "It's not easy to stay at the highest [tier] throughout the year. She hasn't been undefeated, but at the same token, this has been a great, great group of three-year-old fillies this year." "She has been really good to us and we take it one race at a time," Adam Bowden of Diamond Creek Racing said. "We'll make a decision [on her career] when the season's over." Pure Country By Ray Cotolo, for The Red Mile

Tim Tetrick was the top driver at the first week of the Grand Circuit meet at The Red Mile; he won seven splits of the Bluegrass and five late closers. Last year, including both weekends at Lexington, Tetrick won six stakes and eleven late closers. His 1:52.3 win on Sunday over John Campbell and Per Henriksen’s tough 8/1 shot Blenheim, a Yankee Glide colt coming off a win in the Bucket, was one of the best races of the opening stretch. We should see both of them in Sunday’s Kentucky Futurity. Tetrick also had a good win with Huntsville on the rainy Saturday night card. The freshman Somebeachsomewhere colt, an already more fully realized version of his brothers Stevensville and Cowboy Terrier, was a handy 1:53 winner at 4/5 for owner-trainer Ray Schnittker. SBSW was the star pacing stallion with eight Bluegrass wins—six of them on Saturday night. Jimmy Takter’s colt Blood Line bottomed the field in 1:52.1 over the off track for David Miller as the 6/5 favorite. In similar fashion to Huntsville, he’s full to Blood Brother, who hasn’t fulfilled his early promise. Andy Miller had four Bluegrass wins, while Corey Callahan and David Miller had three each. The latter also had a pair of late closer wins. Last year David Miller’s performance at Lexington propelled him to his driver of the year award. He had a strong second week with wins in the Allerage Mare stakes with Color’s A Virgin and D’One as well as both splits of the Tattersalls Filly with Rock Me Gently and Divine Caroline. He won seven stakes and four late closers overall. Jimmy Takter is making no secret of the fact that he is sending Miller out to break the world record with Always B Miki in the Allerage Open. Whether that’s simply the 1:46.4 race record or Cambest’s twenty-three-year old 1:46.1 mark, we don’t know. Cracking either barrier would give Miller, who is having an excellent year, momentum in his quest for another Driver of the Year title.  Brett Miller was the top driver in Lexington last year, with eight stakes wins and one late closer. After week one he has a single Bluegrass win, with the Art Major filly, Roaring To Go, who upset 1/9 Idyllic Beach in a $73,000 division, although he has captured four late closers. Two years ago money leader Yannick Gingras won sixteen stakes and four late closers at The Red Mile. That dropped to a more modest five and one, respectively, last year. In week one he won Bluegrass divisions with Jimmy Takter’s freshman trotting filly, Princess Aurora, and Ron Burke’s money machine Check Six. Yannick will be highly motivated in week two. Andy Miller won four stakes, three of them in conjunction with his wife Julie. He treated those who bet on him well as the freshman Yankee Glide filly Overland Hanover paid $49.20 on Friday and Ross Croghan’s Rock N Roll Heaven colt Rock The Boat paid $38.20 on Saturday night. Andy capped off his weekend with an eye opening win with the Donato Hanover colt Sutton on Sunday. The winner of the Zweig crushed his competition by four lengths in 1:52 at odds of 1/5. Sutton may add some excitement to Sunday’s Futurity. Newly minted Hall-of-Famer Brian Sears was saddled with dead stock and managed only one late closer win. Jimmy Takter, who led the trainers with four stakes wins, won 13 over the two weeks two years ago and seven last year. Two of his Bluegrass winners, Bar Hopping and Western Fame, should be players in the Futurity and Tattersalls, and you can bet he’ll have plenty entered in the ISS. Julie Miller had three stakes winners, which have already been mentioned, while Ake, Trond, Charlie Norris and Ron Burke had two each. The latter only had four last year, although he also had eight second place stakes finishes. He won nine in 2014. Muscle Hill led the trotters in stakes wins, with three on Thursday from freshmen Long Tom, Fly On and New Jersey Viking, and one on Sunday from Bar Hopping. Muscle Massive had three, a two-year-old colt and two fillies. Andover Hall, Cantab Hall and Donato Hanover had two each. On Thursday Dover Dan, a two-year-old Andover Hall colt out of the great CR Kay Suzie won a Bluegrass split in 1:55 for Corey Callahan and John Butenschoen. Suzie, who hasn’t matched her success on the track as a broodmare, is currently 24-years-old. The next day That’s All Moni, a freshman three-quarter sister to Snow White, won a stake in 1:54.4 at 4/5 for Tim Tetrick and Jimmy Takter. Celebrity Eventsy and Broadway Donna both disappointed on Sunday, and Ginny Weasley (Andover Hall) and Fad Finance (Credit Winner) picked up the pieces. On the pacing side, the SBSW filly Darlinonthebeach, who won the Shady Daisy and Valley Forge, put in a strong 1:50.2 mile on the front end for David Miller and Nancy Johansson. The Rocknroll Hanover filly Blue Moon Stride also won in wire to wire fashion for Andrew McCarthy and Mark Harder. Owner Emilio Rosati was ecstatic in the winner’s circle. And Mark MacDonald sent the lightly raced Western Ideal colt Western Fame, who recently won a Jug elimination, down the road and never looked back. He won a neck in 1:50.3 for Jimmy Takter. I can’t wait for round two. Joe FitzGerald has been an avid harness racing fan and historian for the last half-century. He writes a weekly blog for  http://viewfromthegrandstand.blogspot.com/.  Joe’s commentary reflects his own views and not that of Harnesslink.

ANDERSON, Ind.-September 25, 2016 - The majority of the members of the Hoosier Park audience were in attendance to witness a show of superb speed and unrivalled power. They certainly received what they traveled to the Anderson harness racing oval to witness, as Always B Miki paced yet another tour-de-force in a facile triumph in the $170,000 Hoosier Park Pacing Derby. "I think he and Wiggle It Jiggleit are horses before their time," said David Miller, who steered the 5-year-old stallion through his mile. "They are just not like any other horses we have seen before. We will see other horses that come along like them as time goes on with their speed and how far they can carry it, but right now they stand alone." The overwhelming public selection at 1-9, Always B Miki and Miller left from the rail and went straight to the front. Freaky Feet Pete and Trace Tetrick were right on their heels from post position three as those two horses clicked off a first-quarter mile of :26.2. Miller and Always B Miki pulled comfortably away from Freaky Feet Pete to lead by a length at the half-mile pole in :55. At that juncture, Dealt A Winner with Aaron Merriman at the controls and Always At My Place in rein to Ricky Macomber Jr., made their bids for the front, with Dealt A Winner passing Freaky Feet Pete to take second and locking the 4-year-old stallion in the pocket. After three-quarters in 1:22.3, the six horse field entered in the stretch with Always B Miki and Miller still reigning supreme. As they were set down for the final push to the wire, Freaky Feet Pete's only option for victory was the passing lane, while it appeared Dealt A Winner and Always At My Place, had far too much real estate to cover to even draw even with the leader. Tetrick and Freaky Pete punched through the inside to give chase and despite a :25.4 final quarter panel on their part, it was simply not enough to relegate Always B Miki to their rearview mirror prior to the finish line. Miller and Always B Miki crossed the finish line in 1:48.2. Like Freaky Feet Pete, Always B Miki came home in :25.4, yet it appeared the stallion could have went much more swiftly if Miller had truly asked for what remained in reserve. After a valiant effort, Freaky Feet Pete was second with Always Bets Off rushing from sixth to claim the show position over the fading Dealt A Winner. Owned by Bluewood Stable, Roll The Dice Stable and Christina Takter, world and Indiana champion Always B Miki, is conditioned by Christina's husband Jimmy. The son of Always A Virgin-Artstopper, paid a paltry $2.10 for a trip around the Anderson oval that truly demonstrated his hooves step in rarefied air, with the exacta paying $4.20 and the trifecta $18.00. After the winner's circle festivities were complete, Miller solemnly stated what over recent months is beginning to become very obvious. "I have driven a lot of very good horses over the years," he said. "I've been doing this for a long time, but this horse has to rank up there with the best of them and he may be the best." **By: Kim French, for Hoosier Park**

Betting Line won the 71st Little Brown Jug, presented by the Ohio Harness Horsemen’s Association, with a world record performance in the $577,000 harness racing event’s second heat Thursday at the Delaware County Fairgrounds in central Ohio. The Casie Coleman-trained Betting Line, who extended his win streak to 13 races with his Jug victory, stopped the timer in 1:49, equaling the fastest mile ever by a 3-year-old pacer on a half-mile track. Wiggle It Jiggleit, a gelding, established that record last year at Harrington Raceway. Betting Line’s effort, though, was the fastest half-mile triumph ever by a colt. Betting Line, the 1-9 favorite in the second heat, took the lead from Western Fame just after the halfway point in the mile race for 3-year-old pacers and cruised to an eight length victory from there. Western Fame was second, followed by Dr J Hanover and Lyons Snyder. It was driver David Miller’s fourth career Jug win and the third for Coleman. “It was pretty easy,” Miller said after the second heat. “He was great both trips and I’m so glad for all the connections and the horse to win the Little Brown Jug.” Miller is among five drivers to win the Little Brown Jug at least four times. Billy Haughton and Mike Lachance lead the list with five apiece while Miller, Stanley Dancer and Ron Pierce have four. Coleman joined four other trainers with three Jug triumphs. Haughton tops the list with six victories. “I enjoy each and every one of them and this is really special,” Miller said. Earlier in the day, Betting Line and Western Fame won their respective first heats. Betting Line captured his division by 2-1/2 lengths over Lyons Snyder in 1:50.4 while Western Fame won by 1-1/4 lengths over Big Top Hanover in 1:50.1. But prior to the first heat, a controversy that had been brewing behind the scenes since early this morning came to a head. It involved a lost cell phone belonging to one of winning trainer Casie Coleman’s employees that was found on the backstretch with a message on it that trainers Ron Burke, Jimmy Taker and Tony Alagna brought to the attention of the judges because they interpreted it as a message directing her employee to give something to the horse this morning. Coleman explained that she was referring to yogurt that Betting Line gets twice a day. The three other trainers, who had nine of the 11 horses in the Jug, asked the judges to scratch the eventual Jug winner and protested Betting Line’s participation with a threat to scratch their horses if their protest was not accepted. As a show of their protest, the three other trainers demanded that Betting Line leave for the post parade five minutes earlier than the rest of the field for the first Jug heat. “The horsemen expressed their concerns to the Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC),” said the official statement from the Little Brown Jug following the race. “Little Brown Jug officials worked with the OSRC and the horsemen and we are pleased that the horsemen participated in our event. At this point it is an OSRC decision.” Betting Line has won 13 of 14 races this year and earned $1.37 million. He is owned by Coleman’s West Wins Stable, Christine Calhoun, and Mac Nichol. “We’re just so excited he got the job done,” said Coleman, whose previous Jug victories came with Vegas Vacation in 2013 and Michael’s Power in 2012. “I love the Jug. Every single year I’ll be here supporting it as long as I have horses good enough. “Coming to Delaware, Ohio -- whether it be any horse, let alone a Jug or Jugette horse -- I’ve never seen a fan base this big. The crowd here deserves to see a good show and they do a great, great job here. I’m just fortunate that we’ve had horses good enough to compete in this race.” Betting Line is a son of 2001 Little Brown Jug winner Bettor’s Delight out of the stakes-winning mare Heather’s Western. He was purchased for $60,000 at the 2014 Standardbred Horse Sale. The Little Brown Jug was the third jewel in the Pacing Triple Crown. The first, the Cane Pace, was won by Control The Moment while the second, the Messenger, was won by Racing Hill. "He is not probably the best horse, he is the best horse that I’ve ever trained," added Coleman. "There is no question and I have had a lot of nice horses. "I love all my horses. I don’t know what it is with this horse. It’s the wind he has. He just never gets tired after a race. There have been many times he has just been sitting, where I haven’t been a happy camper with where he has been sitting coming around the last turn and he just mows them down. "His heart. He just loves to win. I’ve never been able to train a horse this good and I don’t think many people have. Heart, intelligence, speed, it’s all a great combination. He’s just the perfect animal. "If there was one thing I could change on him, I would change nothing. He’s just an awesome animal. Ones like these don’t come along very often." Betting Line, Western Fame win Jug opening-round heats Betting Line won for the 12th consecutive time, capturing the first of two opening-round heats of Thursday’s Little Brown Jug by 2-1/2 lengths in 1:50.4 at the Delaware County Fairgrounds. Lyons Snyder was second, Dr J Hanover third, and Check Six fourth. Check Six set the pace for much of the mile, hitting the quarter in :27.1, half in :56, and three-quarters in 1:23.4. But by that time, first-over Lyons Snyder had pulled even and second-over Betting Line was ready to go three wide coming out of the final turn. Betting Line, who was fifth for the first three-eighths of the race before flushing the cover of Lyons Snyder prior to the halfway point, pulled away from his foes in the stretch and won comfortably for trainer Casie Coleman. “It worked out just kind of like I thought it would,” winning driver David Miller said. “(Check Six) left and I was able to pick up good cover. He actually took me farther than I thought he would. My horse was strong the whole way and anxious to go anytime I asked him. He finished up good. He was good and strong all the way to the wire.” Western Fame and driver Mark MacDonald controlled the race from post one, parking out favorite Racing Hill for much of the mile, on their way to a 1:50.1 win in Thursday’s second opening-round heat of the Little Brown Jug for 3-year-old male pacers. Big Top Hanover, Racing Hill, and Manhattan Beach rounded out the top four. MacDonald hustled Western Fame off the gate and protected the inside spot from Racing Hill, who started in post two. After reaching the quarter in :26.4, Racing Hill challenged Western Fame for the lead, but was unable to get to the front. He briefly ducked back to third as the half was reached in :53.4, but soon thereafter was back on the move again. Western Fame rebuffed Racing Hill again as they hit three-quarters in 1:22.1 and then held off Big Top Hanover by 1-1/4 lengths for the victory. “It was kind of an all-or-nothing drive, I guess,” said a laughing MacDonald, who drove Western Fame for trainer Jimmy Takter. “The first heat, there wasn’t a whole lot of action so I wanted to give the crowd something to see. “We had the rail; it’s tough when you get stuck in the two hole at Delaware, not too many horses win out of the two hole. Jimmy had a lot of confidence in the horse. He thought he would be really good over this track and he showed some grittiness today. He never got a breather. When I called on him halfway down the stretch, he paced away for me. “It was the perfect opportunity for him to show his speed. He has always had it, but quite possibly today he could finally really show it. He has always raced well. You can see that from his last race in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes final.” Western Fame is owned by breeder Brittany Farms. He was the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship runner-up to Check Six on Sept. 10. Racing Hill and Check Six were scratched from the second heat. -- Kim French also contributed to this report Ken Weingartner

DELAWARE, OH - Harnessracing.com reported today that Betting Line and harness racing driver David Miller won the 71st edition of the Little Brown Jug on Thursday afternoon, rolling to a commanding 1:49 victory in the second heat on a hot and sunny afternoon. Although there wasn't a cloud in the sky, the atmosphere for the Jug was not exactly picture-perfect as text messages allegedly sent by the winning trainer, Casie Coleman, prompted concerns that her horse could have been treated, in violation of the rules, the morning of the Jug. Trainers Tony Alagna, Ron Burke and Jimmy Takter said they were filing a formal protest with the Ohio State Racing Commission and made it clear they were racing their horses under protest. One of Coleman’s assistant trainers lost their phone sometime Wednesday night at the fairgrounds and when the person who found the phone tried to figure out who it belonged to, they found text messages. The content of the text messages compelled the person to contact the judges. Presiding judge John Yinger, who is employed by the Ohio State Racing Commission, decided the text messages did not contain evidence that Betting Line should be scratched from the Jug, but Takter, Alagna and Burke were so upset by what the texts said—and to them, implied--that they conferred with Yinger and the owners of their horses over the course of hours. Takter discussed the situation with Jeff Snyder, co-owner of Lyons Snyder, on the backstretch. At one point they agreed to scratch the horse. To read the rest of the story click here. 

Delaware, OH --- Betting Line will put his harness racing 11-race win streak on the line in Thursday's (Sept. 22) 71st edition of the Little Brown Jug presented by the Ohio Harness Horsemen's Association, where he will start from post five in the first of two opening-round heats at the Delaware County Fairgrounds. A horse must win two one-mile races on the same day to capture the Little Brown Jug trophy. Eleven horses entered the $577,000 event for 3-year-old pacers and were divided into two $92,320 first-heat eliminations. Betting Line is the 3-5 morning line favorite in the first elimination while Racing Hill is the 3-5 choice in the second elimination. The top four finishers in each elimination advance to the $276,960 second heat. If one of the two elimination winners is victorious in the second heat, he is the Jug champion. Otherwise, the three heat-winners return for a $115,400 race-off. The last race-off was in 2000, when Astreos won the event. Betting Line, who was the 3-5 favorite in the first Little Brown Jug Future Pool, will have three-time Jug winner David Miller in the sulky for trainer Casie Coleman. The colt has won 11 consecutive races since beginning his season with a second-place finish against older horses. His victories include the North America Cup, Battle of the Brandywine, and Carl Milstein Memorial Invitational. He heads to the Jug off a win in the Simcoe Stakes on Sept. 10 at Mohawk Racetrack, where he rallied from an 8-1/4 length deficit on the final turn to beat Lyons Snyder by a half-length in 1:49.1. "I thought he was finally getting beat with the way the trip was working out -- he was in no-man's land, I thought anyway, coming off the last turn -- and Lyons Snyder is a pretty nice horse," Coleman said. "But somehow Betting Line got him at the wire. I was pretty nervous watching the race, but when we were in the winner's circle David said I had nothing to worry about. "Every time he's raced he's been pretty awesome. It's hard not to be happy with him. Hopefully everything goes good (in the Little Brown Jug). I don't see two heats bothering the horse at all. He always comes out of his races good and never seems tired. He looks pretty good coming into it." Betting Line, a son of 2001 Little Brown Jug winner Bettor's Delight out of the mare Heather's Western, has won 17 of 24 career races and earned $1.50 million for owners West Wins Stable, Christine Calhoun, and Mac Nichol. Coleman has won the Jug twice in her career, with Michael's Power in 2012 and Vegas Vacation in 2013, and would join four other trainers with three triumphs if Betting Line is victorious next week. Billy Haughton holds the record for training wins with six. Stanley Dancer, with four Jugs, is the only other trainer with more than three. Racing Hill has won five of 11 races in 2016 and never finished worse than third in any start. He is the richest horse in the division this year with earnings of $1.21 million. His wins include the Messenger Stakes, Max C. Hempt Memorial and Delvin Miller Adios, and he finished second to Betting Line in the North America Cup and Battle of the Brandywine. He also finished second in the Meadowlands Pace. Brett Miller will drive the colt from post two for trainer Tony Alagna and owner Tom Hill. Racing Hill is a son of Roll With Joe, who finished second to Big Bad John in the 2011 Little Brown Jug, out of the mare Chasing Ideals. Trainer Ron Burke, who won the 2014 Little Brown Jug with Limelight Beach, will start five horses in this year's race including Check Six who will start from post four in the first elimination. Check Six has won seven of 15 races this year, including the Pennsylvania Classic and Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship, and earned $751,033. He finished second to Racing Hill in the Adios. Yannick Gingras will drive Check Six, who is a son of Somebeachsomewhere out of the mare Southwind Vanna. The colt is owned by Burke Racing, the partnership of Mark Weaver and Mike Bruscemi, William Switala, and James Martin. He is 2-1 on the morning line behind Betting Line. Another of Burke's pupils will be Manhattan Beach, who is a full brother to Limelight Beach. Manhattan Beach has won four of 16 races this year and earned $260,853 for owners Burke Racing, the partnership of Mark Weaver and Mike Bruscemi, Geoffrey Lyons Mound, and Wingfield Brothers. Matt Kakaley will drive the son of Somebeachsomewhere-Benear from post four in the second elimination and will open on the board at 6-1 odds. Geoffrey Lyons Mound also is co-owner of Lyons Snyder, who is trained by 2006 Jug-winning trainer Jimmy Takter. Lyons Mound's partner on the horse is Jeff Snyder, who shares the record for most Jug victories by an owner (three) with Stanley Dancer and George Segal. Lyons Snyder will score from post three in the first elimination and is 8-1 on the morning line. The second Little Brown Jug future pool will be from noon Sunday (Sept. 18) through 11:30 p.m. Wednesday (Sept. 21). For all of the latest news, photos and videos for the 71st edition of the Little Brown Jug, visit the Harness Racing FanZone's mini-site by clicking here. Below are the fields for the Little Brown Jug first heat eliminations, with listed drivers, trainers and morning line odds. Actual race numbers and estimated post times will be assigned when the full card is drawn on Monday. First elimination-Purse $92,320 HN-Horse-Sire-Driver-Trainer-Morning Line 1. Dr J Hanover - Somebeachsomewhere - Scott Zeron-Tony Alagna-6/1 2. Stolen Glimpse - Art Major - Yannick Gingras-Ron Burke-15/1 3. Lyons Snyder - Well Said - Yannick Gingras-Jimmy Takter-8/1 4. Check Six - Somebeachsomewhere - Yannick Gingras-Ron Burke-2/1 5. Betting Line - Bettor's Delight - David Miller-Casie Coleman-3/5 6. Fernando Hanover - Dragon Again - Tim Tetrick-Ron Burke-12-1   Second elimination-Purse $92,320 HN-Horse-Sire-Driver-Trainer-Morning Line 1. Western Fame - Western Ideal - Mark MacDonald-Jimmy Takter-4/1 2. Racing Hill - Roll With Joe - Brett Miller-Tony Alagna-3/5 3. Big Top Hanover - Western Ideal - David Miller-Ron Burke-15/1 4. Manhattan Beach - Somebeachsomewhere - Matt Kakaley-Ron Burke-6/1 5. Spider Man Hanover - Western Ideal - Andy Miller-Nick Surick-20/1 Paul Ramlow

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