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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - Vinny Ginsburg and Dexter Dunn had the hot hands Friday night at the Meadowlands, as each drove three winners on the 13-race card. Ginsburg, who entered the night tied for 10th in the Big M driver standings, got his evening going with Hammer Creek in the second race conditioned trot, going went wire to wire in 1:58.1 and returning $8.20 as the second choice in the betting. Hammer Time was Ginsburg's second winner of the night in the fourth race conditioned trot, roaring past the field after going a third-over trip. He returned $4.00 to win as the second choice in the wagering after hitting the wire in 1:55. Miss Ruby completed Ginsburg's three-bagger in the ninth race conditioned trot, gunning down 3-5 favorite Miami by skimming the cones to grab the win in 1:54.4. As the second choice in the wagering, Miss Ruby returned $9.80 to her backers. Dunn, who started the night second in the standings, scored with favorite Dawson Springs ($6.00) in the first race conditioned trot in 1:55.3. He followed that up with victories behind Followthewind N ($9.20 as the third choice, 1:52.4) in the 10th race fillies and mares conditioned pace before completing his big night guiding Godspell Hall to an amazing victory in the 12th race conditioned trot. Racing in a fourth-over flow while last at three-quarters, Godspell Hall exploded by the field to score in 1:56.4 and return $8.60 to win as the third choice. TAG, YOU'RE IT: Tag Up And Go won the $18,000 feature for conditioned trotters in the seventh race. Marcus Miller piloted the Patti Harmon trainee to victory in 1:53.3 after going a third-over trip and paid $12.20 to win as the third choice in the betting. Rock Of Cashel, the 6-5 public choice, finished third while bidding for his third straight win. THE CLAIM GAME: Friday marked the first time the Big M has raced with increased purses since New Jersey lawmakers approved purse-subsidy legislation, and the action at the claiming box was hot and heavy as seven horses left at evening's end with new connections. A LITTLE MORE: One lucky player who lasted eight legs in the 20-Cent Survivor Pick-10 had the wager's lone winning ticket and walked away with $12,753. ... The 50-Cent Pick-4 pool topped six figures, as $100,022 in action was taken. ... All-source handle totaled $2,877,718. ... Racing resumes Saturday at 7:15 p.m.   By Dave Little, Meadowlands Media Relations    

Richard "Nifty" Norman is looking forward to watching his 3-year-old female trotters this season and is getting an early look at one of them that he didn't get to see in action on the racetrack last year. Haveoneforme was unraced at age 2 because of soundness issues. She made her career debut Jan. 25 and defeated a field of mostly older horses, both male and female, in a conditioned class at the Meadowlands. She returns to the same class Friday and is the 9-5 morning-line favorite from post eight with Dexter Dunn in the sulky. She is among a group of 3-year-old fillies that has Norman feeling hopeful as he looks ahead to stakes season. Others in the stable are returning Grand Circuit winners Evident Beauty and Princess Deo as well as lightly raced Mother Bonnie. Princess Deo and Mother Bonnie were trained previously by Noel Daley, who returned home to Australia to continue his career at the end of last year. "I've got a good group," Norman said. "I've got a couple others that are just maidens but have got some talent I think. It's good to have depth. Anytime you've got depth, you're all right." Haveoneforme adds to that depth, although she might be pointed more toward restricted-stakes action in Ontario. The filly is a daughter of Kadabra out of All Filled Up. Her second dam, Filly At Bigs, and third dam Mombasa were O'Brien Award winners. The family also includes stakes-winners Big Rigs, Miss Tezsla, and Bridger. "We trained her down last year and she got a bit sore," said Norman, whose Enzed Racing Stable owns Haveoneforme with Mel Hartman. "She went through the July (Tattersalls Summer Mixed) sale and we bought her back. She is pretty good this year; no killer, but handy. I'm probably just going to stake her in Ontario. I think she could maybe do well up there. "I liked her last year. She was nice enough, but she wasn't sound. We just turned her out and gave her some time, let her grow up. She's lovely to be around, has got a good head on her, and she is good gaited." Haveoneforme finished second in a qualifier prior to winning her debut in 1:58 on a 30-degree night at the Big M. "I wasn't sure if she had enough speed, but she actually showed good speed in her qualifier and her race," Norman said. "I liked the way she finished up both times. I just wanted to race her a few times to see if she's good enough to go to the next level. I'll maybe give her three starts and then give her another break and get her ready for Ontario." Racing begins at 7:15 p.m. (EST) at the Meadowlands. Six-year-old Trolley, trained by Erv Miller and driven by Marcus Miller, is the 2-1 morning-line favorite in the night's Preferred Handicap for trotters. Trolley is 2-for-2 this year and has won five of his past six races dating back to November. For Friday's complete entries, click here. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Robyn Camden, unbeaten in 12 starts at 2 and 3 won her first race in the US at Yonkers on Monday night Jan 28th. The best of her generation in the British Isles, the four year old filly had made a pleasing start to her career stateside being placed in all 3 of her starts so far at the Meadowlands in December and had paced the mile in 1:51 on one of these occassions Lining up against some stiff local opposition on Monday night the filly by Art Professor out of Keystone Havoc was driven to victory by crack New Zealand reinsman Dexter Dunn who kept things simple by taking cover from the gate before producing her in deep stretch with an electric turn of foot to triumph a shade cosily in 1:57.3 much to the relief of trainer Richard "Nifty" Norman and the delight of co-owner Clive Kavanagh, spokesman for the All Out Syndicate. After the race Norman admitted that it had taken a while for Robyn Camden to acclimate to life in the US and being a precocious sort it had just took a little while longer for her to readjust than some of the others that had made the journey from Ireland before her. One of these recent exports Rebel Rouser continues to impress and is a winner of his last 4 at The Meadowlands for trainer Robert Cleary. Another, Reclamation who travelled over shortly before Robyn Camden has shown great promise and is a multiple winner both at Harrahs Philadelphia and The Meadowlands. Reclamation and Rebel Rouser are joined owned by Bill Donovan from Delray Beach, Florida and Donal Murphy from Baltimore in Cork, Ireland and both horses along with Robyn Camden spent their formative years being reared on the lush green pastures of Ireland - which many claim have given them a strong constitution and solid foundation, perfect springboards to achieve success across they are all currently enjoying across the atlantic. Now that shes resumed her winning ways got her first win on the board, its onwards and upwards for Robyn Camden and connections are confident that she will have many more victories under her belt before returning home to Ireland in utero from a yet be named a top sire. by Thomas Bennett, for Harnesslink

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - If you're going to rock the apple cart, then your name might as well fit the result. Saturday night harness racing at the Meadowlands, a win for K Ryan Bluechip or Geez Joe in the Preferred Handicap would have established the victor as the Big M's top pacer in training, but Constntlysidewys A threw a monkey wrench into the machine, going a big mile for owner-trainer Tahnee Camilleri, and scoring as the 9-2 fourth choice in the wagering in the $21,000 weekly feature. The race saw plenty of action as New Talent was the leader at the quarter before K Ryan Bluechip, the 5-2 second choice, came calling to poke a nose in front at the half before assuming the front end. Tuxedo Bay ripped out of three hole shortly thereafter to grab the lead at the three-quarters as Constntlysidewys A was advancing from first-over. At this point, 2-1 favorite Geez Joe was last in the field of seven in a third-over flow. Through the stretch, 15-1 Tuxedo Bay was stubbornly hanging in there as Constntlysidewys A continued to chip away at his advantage, and it wasn't until deep stretch that Constntlysidewys A would get past that foe, winning by a hard-fought head in 1:50.1 for driver Dexter Dunn. Geez Joe kicked home in :27 but finished an unthreatening third. Mindtrip was fourth. K Ryan Bluechip faded to fifth. Constntlysidewys A, an 8-year-old gelded son of Village Jasper-Miscilla, paid $11.60 to win. Lifetime, he has 26 wins from 102 starts and a bank account of $169,117. Dexter Dunn A LITTLE MORE: A meet-best $109,617 was poured into the 50-Cent Pick-4 pool, and despite favorites winning the last two legs of the bet, the return was a giant $11,646.50 after a 14-1 and an 80-1 hit the wire first in the initial two legs. ... Driver Dexter Dunn got a big leg up on possibly being named the Big M's "Driver of the Week". The New Zealand native, after winning three times on Friday, added four more scores on the Saturday card, finishing with seven victories over the course of the two-card race week. ... All-source handle on the 14 races totaled $2,704,027, meaning wagering has exceeded $2.5 million for five consecutive programs. ... The always entertaining Larry Lederman called the Saturday race card. ... Racing resumes Friday at 7:15 p.m. By Dave Little, Meadowlands Media Relations  

LEBANON, OH. - The battle lines have been drawn for the third annual $25,000 North America Drivers Championship at Miami Valley from Sunday, January 6 through Tuesday, January 8. Three consecutive matinee harness racing programs will decide which of the 30 talented drivers in the contest will emerge with the title, the trophy and the $10,000 first prize.   Each driver has four randomly drawn horses and post positions on each of the first two programs.   Following Monday afternoon's results the top ten point getters will advance to Tuesday's championship round and race head-to-head starting with a clean scoring slate over eight races on the card.   Thirty points are awarded to the winner of each contest race with 20-14-11-9-7-5-3-1 points earned for second through ninth place finishes.   Based on post positions alone, Dexter Dunn--the Down Under sensation who won the 2015 World Drivers Championship--gained a slight nod over his competitors. With an average post position draw totaling 44 over each driver's eight opportunities on Day 1 and Day 2, Dunn's starting posts equal 30.   A total of seven drivers drew post positions totaling under 40. The others were Anthony Napolitano (31), Bruce Ranger (32), Jeremy Smith (33), Brett Miller (34), Randy Tharps (35) and Drew Monti (36).   On the flip side, there are six drivers who drew post positions adding up to over 50. Joe Bonjiorno will have his work cut out for him with a total of 64, although that number is skewed by an assigned outside post behind Grana Padanno--a winner of two straight at the top level at Northfield Park--in the $27,500 Open Trot on Sunday. Others who didn't fare particularly well at the draw are Roger Plante Jr. (55), Bob McClure (55), Dan Noble (53), Pat Berry (51) and Simon Allard (51).   Dunn will be looking to get off to a fast start as his four Day 1 drives include two rails and just nine in total post positions.   Others who will have a slight advantage as they try to top the leader board early are J. Bradley Harris (11), defending champion Trace Tetrick (13), national dash champion Aaron Merriman (16) and top Chicago-land reinsman Casey Leonard (16).   Those with an excellent chance of moving up the leaderboard on Day 2, based on post positions alone, will be Hollywood Dayton Raceway's recently named dash champ Jeremy Smith (9), Billy Davis Jr. (13), Anthony Napolitano (14), 8959-time winner Bruce Ranger (14) and the all-time winningest African-American driver Randy Tharps (16).   "We look forward to an exciting championship that goes right down to the wire, just as the first two editions of this competition did," said Tournament Director and Race Secretary Gregg Keidel. "Unless someone gets really hot, the winner isn't usually known until they hit the wire in the last race. These drivers have over 120,000 collective wins so they all know how to reach a winner's circle. I hope the fans and the participants enjoy this unique contest format and may the best man win!"   Gregg Keidel

I went to school with Graeme Anderson. We were in the same class at James Hargest High School in Invercargill back in the early 70’s. I can tell you first hand that the Turf Digest was the most read book he ever opened in those formative years and I can tell you he was in charge of the sweepstake on Melbourne Cup day – not that he got my money. He always had talent on the sports field too whether it was cricket or rugby and he always had an air of confidence about him. Those attributes have been well utilised to carve out a successful sporting and harness racing career. Graeme caught the racing bug at a young age through his connection to Riverton; his father Bill lived there for some of his life. “Riverton was a big thoroughbred area in those days and Dad’s sister ended up marrying Jack Cleaver. Jack trained a very good mare back in the sixties called Shangri-La. We would always go to the Easter races at Riverton. It was a family thing and mum would buy us new clothes. Other members of the family didn’t love it so much but I got hooked from a young age,” he said. Shangri-La’s many wins included the 1961 Winton 80th Anniversary Cup ridden by Rodney Marsh, the 1961 James Hazlett Gold Cup and the 1962 Wyndham Cup when ridden by Graeme Wright carrying 9lb 6oz. She was by Kurdistan out of Mystic. Kurdistan left 256 winners including Bagdad Note the winner of the Melbourne Cup, and Sydney Cup victor Gay Master. He also left versatile gallopers like Eiffel Tower, Kumai and Koral. Anderson was a pretty good rugby player as well. He played for the first fifteen at Hargest, was part of a successful Star senior side that won a few Galbreith Shields and also played for Central Pirates near the end of his playing career. “It was a bit of a change. Out there, there were Skinners, Browns, Deverys and Hunters. Brent McIntyre also played for us as well as Craig Hamilton. Wayne Adams played and coached us so there were plenty of harness boys.” He also played representative rugby for Southland. “We beat the Aussies in 1978 and French in 1979. Players like Leicester Rutledge, Ken Stewart, Brian McKechnie and Steve Pokere were around. One day we had seven to eight All Blacks playing for Southland so that was a pretty good side. There were also great trips away on the bus and a lot of the boys had a racing connection.” Later on, he had success as a coach, winning three Dunedin Rugby Premierships with the Taieri prems. “We started with nothing. We had a great group of managerial staff. I think fifteen of those boys played for Otago. There was Hayden Parker, Charlie O’Connell and Kieran Moffatt. We had a lot of high class players.” Some of that knowledge he gained throughout his rugby career he adapted in his horse training business. “I use a lot of the sports ideas when training.  I like to keep the legs fresh before playing rugby on Saturday. If you knocked yourself around on a Thursday or Friday you’d have dead legs. So with racehorses you get them fit the week before and just leave them alone. We do heart rates all the time and keep a comprehensive diary.” Although initially interested in gallopers he was also keen on the trotters and ventured into harness racing through Southland trainer Gary McEwan. “He taught me to drive and use a watch properly. He got me a trip to America on the horse plane. I went over with Donny Hayes. We stayed in California back then which was the centre of harness racing. It had three or four tracks. I had about six weeks over there and met a whole lot of people and that started my buying and selling career.” In the early years he also worked with Central Otago trainer Murray Hamilton. “We had a business together which didn’t last long. We shipped horses on the boat out of Bluff.” Early on Anderson also formed a good working relationship with legendary Gore galloping trainer Ted Winsloe. “I was training Standardbreds when I had Whisper Jet (galloper) and Ted had a few Standardbreds as well so I’d train his trotters and he trained my gallopers which was a nice arrangement. I ended up working a few (thoroughbreds) up. We got a few down from the North Island and had a bit of luck with them. It’s a bit tougher now (training gallopers). You can’t get the staff and the horses I used to buy at the South Island Sales have tripled in price. I’m not saying I won’t get another one but you just need to have the right people to work them.” One of the first pacers Anderson owned was the Fernside Bachelor gelding King Red. He was bred by John Higgins and trained by Bryce Buchanan. Fernside Bachelor was an unraced stallion by Bachelor Hanover out of Queen Ngaio. Queen Ngaio left good pacers Waratah (8 wins) and Trio (16 wins). King Red’s win was at Forbury Park in October 1988 and was the first winning drive for Doug Buchanan. “He was a claiming horse. We claimed a few back in those days. We’d take them to Addington because there was no racing down here in the winter. Tank Ellis and Tony Stratford were working for me back in those days. We used to have some great trips and we’d carry on to the Nelson and Blenheim circuits.” Anderson officially started training on his own account in 1998 and his first winner was Connor at Oamaru in October driven by Clark Barron. He also trained Ando’s Prospect to win three races. She later became a good source of winners for him leaving Southern Boy (5 wins), Southern Prospect (5) and Bonvoyage which won two races for him and another nine races in Australia. He ran second to Monkey King in a heat of the Interdominions at Harold Park in 2010. Another horse Anderson owned and trained was Good Prospect. By Son Of Afella out of Majestic Chance mare Karma, Good Prospect won three races and provided junior driver Belinda White with one of her six career winners. At that point he was mixing training with a fair bit of travel. “I was selling a lot of horses to Perth to guys like Greg Harper. One of the Australian guys decided to buy yearlings and leave them with me. I tried to farm them out but ended up buying a property at Rimu and building a big barn and doing them myself for him. Because I was also travelling a bit and selling I was only doing it when I was at home. “ At that point Tony Barron started to work for Anderson after a stint with Barry Purdon. The high point of Anderson’s buying and selling came in 1985 when he purchased Jay Bee’s Fella and Arden Meadow. “They quinellaed the 1986 West Australian Derby. They were two Son Of Afella’s I sent away to Greg Harper. That was the catalyst for me doing a lot of buying and selling of horses in Australia. On my trip to America I met a couple of boys from Perth who were over there trying to do the same thing. They’d run out of money. I didn’t have much but I lent them a couple of hundred bucks to get them home. They said that they would ring me. They did and it was through them that I sold Arden Meadow and Jay Bee’s Fella.” After Rimu, Anderson moved out to Winton where the success continued and he was able to train gallopers there. Xstream was one thoroughbred he trained there. He owned the mare in partnership with another harness trainer Allan Beck. She was good on dead to heavy tracks and won three races (all in a round), ridden each time by Riverton jockey Kerry Taplin. “We had success with Xstream, Carver (3), Feel The Heat (3) and Dusty Girl (5).” Anderson says training thoroughbreds gave him a good insight into training the modern day pacers. “We train pacers like thoroughbreds now. They’ve all got five or six generations of American blood in them and they just don’t take a lot of work.” After Winton he moved to Cambridge where he continued to train gallopers and travelling around Australia and Asia. In 2003 he headed back south and set up at Wingatui and from there re-established himself as a harness trainer at Westward Beach, adding another dimension to his training regime. “We’re lucky we’ve got the beach. It’s almost a three mile straight run. Sometimes it’s very difficult to work there but you’ve just got to get up and do it. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea. The other night we got home at 6:30pm in the dark because of a late tide. We don’t have a track so we can’t cheat ourselves. We just have to get out and do it.” He says horses get bored with just running around the same training track and the beach provides a different environment every day as the surfaces and vista changes with each tide. “You can do different things with them. We ride a few and canter a few. We have a couple of secrets when we work them which I’m not going to tell ya. If a horse is on R n R, he may have a paddle or trot in the sea for half an hour rather than work.” His Westward Beach stable isn’t flash – it doesn’t have any barns or boxes so the horses live outside. “They’re all out in the open. They’re all sand yards. It was Brenda Harland’s old place. She hadn’t trained for a long time and it was by fluke that I ended up there and I’ve never left. There are shelter sheds and plenty of trees and loopins to get their bums backed into. They’re all double rugged. With the sand hills around us it’s a lot warmer than you’d think. ” He actually came across the facility when he took a thoroughbred that had cut a leg in a fence to the beach. “I went out there to give it a bit of sea water treatment. That’s how I came to training at Westward Beach.” Since then his success rate in training horses and resurrecting careers has been outstanding. “95% of them you can improve but there’s 5% you can’t help. As long as they want to be with us we can help them.” Despite having a straight line sand surface it’s surprising that Anderson doesn’t train too many trotters. “This is a great environment for straight line training and we should have more trotters. They by pass me a go to Phil Williamson’s (laughter).” Anderson also likes to adopt a completely fresh approach when taking on tried horses. “We take off all the gear, ignore everything they’ve done before and start again. We have our tests. They’ve got to work a certain time and to have a certain heart rate at the end of that to know if they’re any good.” It’s also been noticeable over the years that a lot of his horses run without an over check. “That came from West Australia. I went over there and the great trainers like Fred Kersley, Greg Harper, Ray Duffy and the likes never had over checks and the horses were really relaxed and muscled up in the front. I came home here and saw guys pulling their horse’s heads up and the horses would be throwing themselves on the ground. I got criticised in some quarters when I did it originally because it wasn’t the done thing but there’s a few copying me now so I’m happy about that.” In recent times he’s gathered around him a loyal bunch of owners who have raced some of his better horses. Names like Brian Sceat, Ray Chalklin, Tony Dow, Stephen Pulley, and more recently Pauline Gillan. “They’re loyal but we’ve had a bit of success which helps keep them in.” And in those early years he trained for the much famed Essemdee (Sunday Morning Drinkers) Syndicate who raced gallopers Carver and pacers Ballindooly and Eb’s Fella. “It’s all fun when those guys are on the job.” Two of his best horses have come along in the last five years – Titan Banner and Eamon Maguire. “Titan was a tough horse but wasn’t as fluent in his gate as Eamon. Eamon has that high speed and beautiful gait and that helps you go a long way.” Eamon Maguire after his Supremacy Stakes win at Ascot Park   - Photo Bruce Stewart King Kenny is one of the few trotters he’s trained. “He came to me with a high suspensory problem. Then he went again then I got him back. When he was sound he was just a beast. He could work better than any of the pacers could. He could have been anything if he hadn’t succumb to an injury as a young horse. We never saw the best of him.” King Kenny won nine races from just twenty seven starts – two for Tim Butt and seven for Anderson. Anderson was also one of the first trainers to use World Champion reinsman Dexter Dunn and that partnership has proved formidable particularly at Anderson’s home track Forbury Park. “I remember the first day he drove. It was Front Page Girl. Cran had it and I was looking after it. He said to me he had this boy who had come back from Australia to work for him and the clients won’t put him on so he sent him down. I’d never met him. I said to him this horse will probably win tonight. He said ‘Mr Anderson this horse has been breaking at home.’ Big Stephen (Stephen Pulley one of Andersons owners) said to him ‘listen son, if Mr Anderson says it’ll win it’ll win.’ That’s how it started. He came down here as a junior and had a hell of a strike rate with me. I’m rapt to think that I was one of the catalysts for him being famous. We have that association and understanding and don’t have to say one word.” Dunn’s first winner for Anderson was the aptly named Dayinthepub on 19th June 2008. The winning margin was seven lengths. Dunn has driven 111 winners for Anderson as a solo trainer and 51 for Anderson and training partner for four seasons Amber Hoffman. Included in that tally were five winners on one night – Forbury Park 16th June 2011 when the Anderson/Dunn partnership scored with No Courage Russell, Grace Rex, Terrorway, Raven and Tom and Grace. Terrorway was one of the really good horses Anderson’s trained in the last decade. He bought the colt at the 2008 Sale of the Stars for $26,000 and raced him with Brian Sceat and Wendy Muldrew. He raced five times in New Zealand, winning at every start. He was sold to Aussie in July 2011 and won his first five races there. He went on to win 13 races in Australia including the Group One $100,000 The Blacks A Flake and Group One $100,000 Cranbourne Cup. He ended up posting a 1-52.6 mile. “He was a difficult horse to get going. He never raced until he was a four year old. He was a fizzy horse so we just took our time with him. We’d turn him out, bring him back and didn’t put any pressure on him. He was a good challenge.” Another one that Anderson was able to rejuvenate and get the best out of was Belkmyster. “He arrived as a four win horse and we got him to Cup class. He was one that we had to strip everything off. He was a Mach Three and he was a bit ‘sweaty’. We went back to basics and didn’t over work him. He came from Cran’s in great order but didn’t need to be a number. He just needed a bit of individual treatment. A lot of the Mach Three’s don’t have great feet so that’s where the beach training helped. It takes away a lot of the concussion.” But its Anderson’s UDR rating that is a true testament to his skill as a trainer. In the past five seasons he’s been one of the top three UDR trainers (UDR 20 + wins in the season). In 2017 he topped the UDR rating with .4706. In 2014 he finished third behind Mark Purdon and Geoff Dunn while in 2015, 2016 and 2018 he finished 2nd behind the All Stars stable of Mark Purdon and Natalie Rasmussen. Over the years Anderson has been a solid supporter of the national yearling sales. Some haven’t made the grade, but a good portion have. Successful racehorses he bought at the Sales included: Terrorway $26,000 (2008), Highview Anwell $29,000 (2011), Mako Banner $20,000 (2012), Sovereign Banner $13,000 (2013), Titan Banner $80,000 (2013) and Eamon Maguire $34,000 (2015). At this year’s sale he brought Vintage Crop (Mach Three – Queen Of The Crop) for $14,000 and Celebrating (Mach Three – Rejoicing) for $17,000. Anderson still lives at Wingatui but the property has been reduced in size and some of it’s used as an agistment farm. “It was 20 acres when we bought it but we sold 10 acres to a developer about three or four years ago. We have a house there. That’s where the horses go after they’ve raced and need rest and recreation. When they’re ready to go again we take them back to the beach.” Below is a list of wins from his best horses which Anderson trained either on his own or in partnership with Amber Hoffman. Pretty impressive. Titan Banner (13) Starsky’s Dream (9) Eamon Maguire (9) Tartan Rover (8) Yokozuna (8) Ballindooley (8) Highview Anwell (8) Blechnum Grove (7) Expresso Martini (7) King Kenny (7) Belkmyster (7) Sovereign Banner (6) No Courage Russell (6) Ants (5) Motu Moonbeam (5) True Macatross (5) Graeme Anderson has trained some very good horse flesh over the years. He’s had the ability to get the best out of horses that appeared to be at the end of their careers, and he has a good eye for young stock. He’s realised the importance of looking after a core group of owners and he’s been able to provide them with winning racehorses. His record to date is impressive and we expect his UDR to be up there for more years to come.   Bruce Stewart

LEXINGTON, KY--Joe Holloway trainee Zero Tolerance vaulted from off cover and nailed pacesetter Queen Of The Pride to win the second of three harness racin divisions of the $273,100 Artspeak Bluegrass Two-Year-Old Filly Pace, sponsored by the Artspeak Syndicate and Winbak Farm, in 1:51 on Friday, Sept. 28 at The Red Mile. Driver David Miller positioned the daughter of Heston Blue Chip in fifth as Queen Of The Pride posted a :27.2 opening quarter on the front. She's Allright, sitting third, flushed first over as Beautyonthebeach angled off the rail from fourth heading toward a :55.1 half. Zero Tolerance, still fifth, entered the flow third over. She's Allright pressured Queen Of The Pride to three-quarters while Beautyonthebeach fanned three wide along with Zero Tolerance in behind. Past that station in 1:24, She's Allright stalled as Queen Of The Pride accelerated into the stretch. Beautyonthebeach rallied but hanged from off cover while Zero Tolerance rallied widest of all to slide past Queen Of The Pride in the final strides. Beautyonthebeach took third from She's Allright fourth. Winning her seventh race from nine starts, Zero Tolerance competes for owners Val D'Or Farms and Ted Gewertz, earning $241,291 in the process. She paid $5.60 to win. Stonebridge Soul paced to the top early and withstood late pressure to win the $90,700 first division of Bluegrass in 1:52.1. The Chris Ryder-trained daughter of Somebeachsomewhere cleared command from early-leader Bestseller Hanover at the quarter in :28. High Reward, sitting third, edged first over past a :57 half to apply pressure to the pacesetter around the final turn with Blue Ivy in tow second over. Maintaining a short lead by three-quarters in 1:25.3, Stonebridge Soul turned away High Reward in the stretch. Blue Ivy kicked off cover from second over and began a pursuit towards the center of the track with Louphoria wider and Sweet Lucy Lou weaving through competition towards the inside. Stonebridge Soul extended to the line as Blue Ivy snagged and held second from Louphoria charging home for third. Sweet Lucy Lou took fourth. Winning her third race in eight starts, Stonebridge Soul, owned by Henderson Farms and Robert Mondillo, has earned $116,790. Dexter Dunn piloted the $5.60 winner. Prescient Beauty blew off cover and swept to a length victory in 1:51.1 to take the final division of the Bluegrass filly pace. Undefiable took the lead as Annie Hill pushed through at the rail for the pocket. Prescient Beauty sat seventh as Undefiable paced the first quarter in :29.1. St Somewhere, away fifth from post nine, edged off the rail heading to the half and sprinted to the top following a :56.4 half. May Bride Hanover tracked the backside brush, with Prescient Beauty on cover, but travelled uncovered into the final turn. St Somewhere's lead narrowed to three-quarters, timed in 1:24.3, as May Bride Hanover dug into the pacesetter on the outside. Prescient Beauty tipped three wide into the stretch as May Bride Hanover retreated and St Somewhere continued on the lead. The odds-on favorite surged to the front late in the mile to best St Somewhere with Annie Hill chasing third and Jk Mardi Says snagging fourth. A homebred for owner James Avritt Sr., Prescient Beauty, a daughter of Art Major, won her fourth race in nine starts, collecting $178,537 in earnings. Doug McNair drove for trainer Gregg McNair and paid $3.40 to win. Overcoming post 10, the Jim Campbell-trained Muscle Hill colt Cloud Nine Fashion stayed undefeated with a 1:55.3 victory, her sixth win career, in the fourth of four divisions for the $373,000 Norman Woolworth Memorial Bluegrass Two-Year-Old Filly Trot Friday, Sept. 28 at The Red Mile. The 8-5 favorite floated away seventh to the quarter while Sister’s Promise progressed past early leader Whispering Oaks through a :28.1 opening quarter. Cloud Nine Fashion moved off the rail in the backstretch and flushed cover from Speed Titan heading to a :57.4 half. Speed Titan ranged toward tempo-setter Sister’s Promise circling the final turn. Cloud Nine Fashion, positioned fourth, kicked off cover following the 1:27.3 third-quarter. She advanced to the lead through the stretch as Speed Titan fought towards her inside and Conway Kellyanne, from third over at 132-1, launched through the center of the course. Cloud Nine Fashion held a length margin on the line as Conway Kellyanne snatched second from Speed Titan in third and Whispering Oaks fourth. Earning $113,875 in her six victories, Cloud Nine Fashion, racing for Fashion Farms LLC, returned $5.40 to win. David Miller sat in the bike.   Even-money favorite Evident Beauty caught cover moving into the final turn and gradually progressed to the front in the stretch to take the $93,000 first division of Bluegrass in 1:54.4. Double-digit contender Southwind Storm swept to the top from post eight as Mother Teresa inherited the pocket spot from the rail and Graceful tucked into third. Southwind Storm trotted to the quarter in :29.1 and sped to the half while widening her lead. In front by two-and-a-half lengths through a :57.1 half, Southwind Storm continued leading around the far turn while Asiago, from fourth, gradually reeled in the pacesetter from first over, carrying Global Pageant second over and Evident Beauty third over. Asiago advanced to the lead past three-quarters in 1:26.1 as Evident Beauty kicked three wide from fourth. The Richard “Nifty” Norman trainee slowly gained ground through the stretch and took a narrow lead on Global Pageant taking second nearing the wire before winning by a neck. Asiago held third while Golden Tricks checked in fourth. Owned by Melvin Hartman, Little E LLC and R A W Equine Inc., Evident Beauty, a filly by Trixton, won her second race from six starts and collected $146,332 in earnings. David Miller drove the $4.00 winner. Jim Doherty Memorial and Peaceful Way winner The Ice Dutchess claimed her third-consecutive victory with a 1:54.4 on-the-front performance. Driver Yannick Gingras placed the Jimmy Takter-trained filly by Muscle Hill fourth as Bella’s Rose Power paced to the quarter in :29.1. Gingras angled wide with The Ice Dutchess before entering the backstretch and brushed to the top heading to the half, timed in :57.4. Starita, the second betting choice and positioned fifth, tipped first over heading into the final turn and stalled a touch before rolling towards leader. The Ice Dutchess remained on the lead by three-quarters in 1:26.4 and coasted through the stretch with Starita besting Bella’s Rose Power in a photo for second and Ma Was Right finishing fourth. Winning her fifth race from eight starts, The Ice Dutchess has compiled $395,915 in earnings for owner Coyote Wynd Farms. She paid $3.00 to win. Noel Daley-trained Trixton filly Princess Deo weaved through competition at the rail and held off a late charge from favorite Special Honor to win the third Bluegrass split in 1:55.1. Hanna Dreamgirl left for the lead from post eight and cleared from Scirocco Donnahill through a :28 opening quarter. Princess Deo, positioned third, stuck to the inside as Jezzys Legacy moved first over with Fade Into You and Special Honor on cover heading to the half. Hanna Dreamgirl continued on the lead through a :57.2 midpoint. Jezzys Legacy applied minor pressure to Hanna Dreamgirl rounding the final turn as Fade Into You and Special Honor mounted their wide bids heading by the 1:27.1 third-quarter. Fade Into You kicked to the lead in the stretch as Jezzys Legacy lost ground and Hanna Dreamgirl clung to position. Princess Deo, shooting around fading pocket-sitter Scirocco Donnahill and through a seam at the pylons, powered to command entering the eighth pole. Special Honor lunged late towards the center of the track but settled for second a half length behind. Fade Into You finished third ahead of Hanna Dreamgirl fourth. Owned by Noel Daley, Deo Volente Farms LLC and John Fodera, Princess Deo won her second race from eight starts, compiling $72,106 in earnings. Andrew McCarthy sat behind the $16.00 winner. The four divisions of the Norman Woolworth Memorial were sponsored by Arden Homestead Stable, Et Gerry & Peter Gerry, Margareta Wallenius-Kleberg, Stoner Manor, Inc., Menhammar Stuteri Ab, Jorgen Jahre, Jr., Lawrence DeVan and William DeVan, Jr. Grand Circuit action continues at The Red Mile Saturday, Sept. 29 with five divisions of the $367,000 Western Ideal Bluegrass Two-Year-Old Colt and Gelding Pace, sponsored by Hanover Shoe Farms and Brittany Farms, and a single dash of the $126,000 American Ideal Bluegrass Three-Year-Old Filly Pace, sponsored by Brittany Stallion Management. Racing gets going Saturday with first-race post at 7:00 p.m. (EDT). By Ray Cotolo, for The Red Mile

CHESTER, PA - Trotter Century Empress and pacer Uffizi emerged victorious in the $16,000 featured events on the Wednesday afternoon harness racing card at Harrah's Philadelphia and New Zealander Dexter Dunn had the hots hands with four driving winners. The Donato Hanover sophomore filly Century Empress took a new mark of 1:55.4 in the spotlight trotting event. Trainer/driver Jeff Gregory had her in perfect stalking position behind the first-over Muscle Fashion, then caught that foe by a half-length for the ownership of Jeff Gregory Inc., Dumain Haven Farm, and Carlo Lattinelli. Uffizi, a son of American Ideal, opened up a big lead down the backstretch and through the far turn in the pacing contest, and although favored Torrin Hanover methodically reduced the margin in the stretch, Uffizi was still clear by 1 3/4 lengths at the finish in 1:51.2 for trainer Chris Ryder and owners Robert Mondillo and Craig Henderson. Uffizi was guided by New Zealand sensation Dexter Dunn, who wound up his afternoon with four driving triumphs. Dunn has already worked his way up to 14th in wins for the yearlong driving statistics at Philly, and his local UDR is hovering in the .300 range - and may go even higher as local trainers grow to appreciative his aggressive style and impressive results. The next two days, Harrah's Philadelphia welcomes two-year-olds contesting their action in the John Simpson Sr. stakes series, honoring the late Hall of Fame horseman and Hanover Shoe Farms executive. Fillies will be in the spotlight on Thursday, with colts featured on Friday; both days will have action on both gaits. From the PHHA/Pocono Downs

CHESTER, PA - Two-year-old fillies on both gaits contested three $30,000 divisions of the Liberty Bell stakes series on Thursday afternoon at Harrah's Philadelphia, with the favorites winning all of the trots and none of the paces. George Brennan guided two of the trio of trotting winners. First up was the Donato Hanover- Glide About miss American Kosmos, who raised her career record to three-for-four while reducing her mark to 1:55.3. The winner, sent off the 6-5 chalk, sat far off the runaway pacesetter Scirocco Donnahill, then gradually reeled that one in for a 3¾ length tally for trainer Julie Miller and the ownership of Marvin Katz, Al Libfeld, and David Goodrow. The other two triumphant trotters proved worthy of 1-5 favoritism, including Brennan's second winner Magical Beliefs, who lowered her mark to 1:56.4. The daughter of Cantab Hall - Frisky Magic trotted past the leading Sigilwig past the half, opened a big lead, then maintained a 2½ length margin on the shuffled closer Mimi'spearloflindy, giving her four wins and four seconds in eight career starts, with earnings of $166,686 (she was second in the PA Sires final). Linda Toscano conditioned the consistent miss for Highland Green Farms, South Mountain Stables, and R-And-I Farms LLC. First visitor to the Harrah's winners circle on Thursday was the six-time winner Sonnet Grace, whom owner/trainer/driver Rod Allen sent to the front and improved on her position from there, winning by 4½ lengths in 1:55.1, last half 57.1, for a personal best. The impeccably-bred daughter of Muscle Massive - I Believe, a granddaughter of synonymous-with-baby-trot-speed CR Kay Suzie, now has earnings totaling $125,397. Form took a holiday of the pacing side, with the biggest upset A Beach Cowgirl, whom Corey Callahan piloted to a 1:53.4 lifetime best while paying $83.20. The Somebeachsomewhere - Limestone Cowgirl miss took advantage of a pocket journey, withstanding closing Renaissance Lady K by ¾ of a length for trainer Brett Bittle, co-owner with Dan Bittle and the Charles Kellers, III and IV. Somebeachsomewhere sired a second surprise winner - a surprise to most everyone but the morning linemaker, who had tabbed Stonebridge Soul, whose dam is Rock N Soul, as the one to beat, then saw her generate a $13.40 win payoff after a two length wire-to-wire win while taking a new mark of 1:52.2. If ever an early favorite were to be overlooked, it might have been this race at this track, as Philly Hanover and Rockin Philly wound up the first two choices, but Stonebridge Soul proved the best for driver Marcus Miller, trainer Chris Ryder, and the ownership of Henderson Farms and Robert Mondillo. Down Under wonder Dexter Dunn, fitting very nicely in the tough local driving colony, was behind the third pacing winner, the Captaintreacherous - Musicale Hanover filly May Bride Hanover, who won in 1:53.1. Dunn let the winner roll on the engine in quick numbers, then kept her together in the lane to win by a neck over What A Fox in a finish that saw all six fillies within two lengths of each other at the wire (Trillions Hanover, the big favorite, broke early but recovered for fourth). Nifty Norman trains the winner of four-of-seven for the Pinske Stables and David Hoese. Liberty Bell series two-year-old action continues tomorrow at Philly, with the colts turning out in the same proportions as their filly counterparts, with three divisions of each gait going gateward. From the PHHA/Harrah's Philadelphia

The combination of the $2 million Kentucky Sires Stakes (KYSS) Super day and the inaugural Fayette County Fair brought out a large crowd to The Red Mile on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 16. While several music acts performed on two stages, including rising star and Lexington native Walker Montgomery, eight $250,000 KYSS finals highlighted the 10-race card that also included a pair of $50,000 consolation events. The revamped KYSS program was in full evidence on Sunday as seven different stallions were represented in the winner's circle, with the only two-time winner being Yankee Glide, who was just retired from active stud duty at the age of 24 by the Lexington-based Kentuckiana Farms. The first KYSS final was for 2-year-old male trotters and it appeared odds-on favorite Don't Let'em, who earlier this year won the Peter Haughton Memorial at the Meadowlands, was on his way to victory as the field of 10 came out of the last turn. But Don't Let'em suddenly went on a break, which paved the way for the two-hole sitting Forecast to take advantage and score a 1:53.4 victory. Shake N Bake (Tim Tetrick finished a length behind in second and just ahead of show finisher Reign Of Honor (Dexter Dunn). Corey Callahan was in the sulky for trainer John Butenschoen behind Forecast, who won for the fifth time in nine starts while posting a career best. A $70,000 yearling purchase and owned by Bill Wiswell, Jean Goehlen and Eugene Schick, Forecast now has career earnings of $186,650. The son of Cantab Hall was bred by Diamond Creek Farm. Callahan and Butenschoen teamed up for a second KYSS champion with the 3-year-old filly trotter Nixie Volo, who redeemed herself after making a break in last year's final. Leaving from post 8, Nixie Volo was parked the entire mile but was still able to hold onto the lead she finally secured in deep stretch to win in a career-best 1:51.1. Pat Matters (Jimmy Takter) was a head back in second, with Live Laugh Love (David Miller) third. A daughter of Yankee Glide, Nixie Volo was a $22,000 yearling purchase and now owned by Kentuckiana Racing Stable, VIP Internet Stable, 83 Racing and the University of Kentucky football team's offensive coordinator Eddie Gran. With her fourth win of the year Nixie Volo boosted her seasonal earnings to $215,486 and career total to $286,786. She was bred by Jorgen Jahre Jr. Beautyonthebeach swept her way through the trio of 2-year-old filly pace preliminaries and she had no problems in the final as she cruised to a 1:51 victory. Doug McNair was in the sulky as Beautyonthebeach quarter-pole moved to the front where she led the rest of the way to win by two lengths over Margret Hill (Miller) with Summer Charm (Matt Kakaley) third. Trained by Gregg McNair, Beautyonthebeach is a Jim Avritt Sr.-homebred daughter of Somebeachsomewhere out of the standout mare Precocious Beauty. The was her fifth in eight starts and equaled her career mark set in the second KYSS leg. Her earnings now stand at $181,343. Whispering Oaks sprung a 16-1 upset in the KYSS final for 2-year-old filly trotters. Driven by Yannick Gingras, Whispering Oaks left fast from post eight, but after taking the lead soon yielded to heavy favorite Taylor Swiftly. That odds-on choice held the lead turning for home but in deep stretch gave way to Whispering Oaks, who crossed the wire in 1:54. Ma Was Right (Dunn) was able to get up for second late, just ahead of Taylor Swiftly (Scott Zeron). A daughter of Father Patrick, Whispering Oaks is a $100,000 yearling purchase of Brixton Medical, Herb Liverman and RAW Equine. Trained by Jimmy Takter, the win was Whispering Oaks' third of the year and came after three consecutive second-place finishes in the KYSS prelims. Her career-best effort increased her earnings to $124,574. Whispering Oaks was bred by Al Libfeld, Marvin Katz and Sam Goldband. While the remnants of Hurricane Florence slowly made their way into the Bluegrass on Sunday, it was Hurrikane Emperor who captured the KYSS final for 2-year-old male trotters. Already the winner of the New Jersey Sires Stakes final, Hurrikane Emperor became a two-state champ with a 1:49.3 victory for driver Daniel Dube and trainer Joh McDermott Jr. Hurrikane Emperor led at every call to best the pocket-sitting Blood Money (Gingras) by a head, with favorite Captain Trevor (Andy McCarthy) third. A son of Hurrikane Kingcole, Hurrikane Emperor was bred and is owned by Jonathan Klee Racing, Kuhen Racing, Pegasis Investment Group and Lind Racing Stable. The win was his sixth in eight starts, bringing her earnings to $214,400. The $250,000 KYSS final for 3-year-old filly pacers went to favorite Dance Blue and driver Andy McCarthy in 1:51.1. Defending divisional champ Band Stand (Doug McNair), who went off at odds of 68-1 on the toteboard, finished a neck behind in second, with Cabowabocuttie (Zeron) third. Winless last year at two, Dance Blue won for the sixth time in 12 starts this year, bringing her career earnings to $241,880. A $50,000 yearling purchase from breeders Steve Stewart and Julie and Charles "Cotton" Nash, the daughter of Rock N Roll Heaven is owned by Katz, Goldband and Goran Anderberg Eurobond outgamed Tactical Landing in the stretch to capture the KYSS final for 3-year-old male trotters. With Wolfgang (Gingras) on the lead and Tactical Landing and trainer-driver Takter first-over, driver David Miller waited patiently along the inside. In deep stretch Miller found room with Eurobond and he was able to urge his charge to the wire a head in front of Tactical Landing in 1:51.3. Classichap (Callahan) rallied for third as Wolfang tired to fourth. A son of French stallion Love You, Eurobond is owned by breeder Lindy Farms of Conn. In partnership with Robert Rudolph. The win was just his second in a dozen starts this year and lowered his previous mark by more than two seconds. Domenico Cecere trains Eurobond, who increased his earnings to $152,900. The rich program was capped off by a 1:48.1 victory by American History in the KYSS final for 3-year-old male pacers. Driven by Gingras for trainer Tony Alagna, American History used a final quarter of :26.1 to get past leader Thinkbig Dreambig (Jordan Stratton) in deep stretch to win by one length. Grant Teton (McCarthy) was third. A son of American Ideal, American History was a $150,000 yearling purchase and now owned by breeder Brittany Farms, Marvin Katz and American History Racing. The win was the seventh of the year for American History, who earlier this year posted a 1:47 victory at the Meadowlands. The effort boosted American History's earnings to $472,285. Two $50,000 KYSS consolations opened up the card. The 2-year-old filly trot consolation went to Mother Teresa in 1:55.2 for driver Zeron and trainer Cecere. The daughter of Father Patrick is a homebred of KR Breeding. The consolation for freshman male pacers went to Waterway, who won in 1:50.1 for driver Brett Miller and trainer Alagna. The daughter of Captaintreacherous was bred by Brittany Farms and is owned by Alagna & Begley Stable, Santo Barbera, David Silverman and Joseph Barbera. Three KYSS consolations were held on Saturday night. Supergirl Riley (Muscle Mass) won the 3-year-old filly trot in 1:54.3 for driver Marcus Miller, trainer Erv Miller and owners Paymaq Racing, George Golemes and Harvey Eisman; Amico Mio Bi (Donato Hanover) won the 2-year-old male trot in 1:55.4 for trainer-driver Brian Connor, who shares ownership with Janice Connor, Arden Homestead Stable and Caroline Gerry; and Cruise (Sweet Lou) won the 2-year-old male pace in 1:52.4 for driver Christian Lind, trainer Brian Brown and owner Emerald Highlands Farm. From the Kentucky Sire Stakes  

CHESTER, PA - Two natives of New Zealand, born just 300 miles apart but who have spent most of the last decade 6000 miles apart, combined for a visit to the winner's circle in the Harrah's Philadelphia winners circle Friday, as the Roll With Joe sophomore filly Believe In Me, trained by Brett Pelling and driven by Dexter Dunn, won the $16,000 feature distaff pace in a career best 1:51.2. Dunn spotted third early with Believe In Me, but past the 27.1 quarter he was out and rolling with his filly, making the lead well before the 55 half. Race favorite Special Kay Deo, who defeated Believe In Me two weeks ago, came first-over down the back, but her bid stalled before the 1:22.4 3/4s, and Dunn kept the winner rolling through the lane to win by 2¾ lengths. She is owned by the Bay Pond Racing Stable of Paoli PA, only 20 miles away from Harrah's. Driver Dunn and trainer Pelling have a more interesting - and spread-out -- geographical "relationship." Both were born on the south island of New Zealand - Dunn is from Christchurch, centrally-located on the east coast of the island, while Pelling was born in Mataura at the southern tip, but only 320 miles apart. When Pelling was enjoying his success in North America and was based in New Jersey, they were separated by 8936 miles; when just over a dozen years ago Pelling "retired" to Australia, the country "next door" to New Zealand, they were still separated by over 3000 miles, as Pelling lived in Perth, on the West Coast of Aussieland. But on Friday the pair of native Kiwis were back together winning the feature in the city of brotherly love, Philadelphia. In the $14,500 co-feature for pacing distaffs, Diamondtoothgertie posted her third win in four starts since going to the care of trainer Richard Johnson, taking a new mark of 1:51.3. Tony Morgan, who went over $130 million in career earnings earlier on the card and who is now about 650 races behind Heinz Wewering for second place on the all-time world list for driving victories with 16,863 (Dave Palone has 18,471), guided the victorious daughter of Sportswriter for D'Elegance Stable IX, Joseph Gandolfo, NR Holdings LLC, and Anthony Fiscetti. At press time (after the 11th race), driver George Napolitano Jr. had five winners, for five different trainers. From the PHHA/Harrah's Philadelphia      

Chester, PA --- After a first-over bid came up short in last week's Pennsylvania Sire Stakes final, Fashion Farms LLC's Patent Leather ($3.60) overcame the elements and proved dominant in the second of three $30,000 Liberty Bell splits for Pennsylvania-sired 3-year-old trotting colts and geldings on Sunday afternoon (Sept. 9) at Harrah's Philadelphia.   Tim Tetrick floated the son of Broadway Hall forward from his outside post 6 to land in third behind early pacesetter Hill Street (Corey Callahan) and pocket sitter Stonebridge Gamble (Tyler Buter). After drafting patiently behind soft fractions of :29 and :57.2, Tetrick gave Patent Leather his first-over cue with three-eighths to go, and the Jim Campbell trainee's response was instant. He powered past Hill Street at the 1:26.1 three-quarter mark and drew clear at once. He amassed 7-3/4 lengths of clearance over eventual runner-up Stonebridge Gamble at the end of the 1:54 mile, while Hill Street faded to finish third.   Patent Leather, who finished second to Tactical Landing in a Hambletonian elimination, earned the sixth win of his career. For Tetrick, the win capped a Liberty Bell double on the card, as he also teamed up with Tom Fanning trainee Mississippi Storm ($10.60) for a 1:54.3 victory over Scirocco Rob (Callahan) in the first trotting division.   Toast Of Lindy ($9.00, 1:56.1) rounded out the winners of the trotting divisions, taking advantage of an early break from twos-on favorite Lindy's Big Bang (Dexter Dunn) and edging away late in rein to Andy Miller for trainer Julie Miller.   Liberty Bell - 3-Year-Old Colt and Gelding Pace   Hayden Hanover ($2.20), runner-up to Dorsoduro Hanover in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes final, won the last of four $30,000 Liberty Bell divisions for sophomore pacing colts and geldings convincingly, shrugging off a challenge from JK Wildfire (Dunn) en route to a 1:51.1 mile amid intensifying wind and rain. Andy Miller sent the son of Somebeachsomewhere to the lead at race's outset, and the pair controlled fractions of :27.2 and :56 before JK Wildfire emerged at their flank to press a :28 third sectional.   Despite his rival working to within a head a quarter from home, Hayden Hanover responded in kind, kicking on the afterburners at the eighth pole and edging away to a two-length win with plenty left in reserve. Daddyofemall (Mike Wilder) chased off cover to narrowly claim third.   Julie Miller trains four-time winner Hayden Hanover for the Pinske Stables, Andy Miller Stable, TLP Stable and Deo Volente Farms. For the Millers, Hayden Hanover capped a stakes double on the card.   Iluvtomakemoney ($51.00) opened the pacing proceedings with a major upset, circling four-wide from astern under Dexter Dunn to narrowly reach in 1:53.1 for trainer Mark Harder.   Messenger starter Winston ($10.60) followed in the second division by vaulting from the pocket to overtake odds-on pacesetter Terror Atthe Beach (George Napolitano Jr.) and stave off a late charge from Go West Go Fast (Matt Kakaley) by half a length in 1:53. Corey Callahan drove for trainer John Butenschoen.   After breaking in his two previous starts, Wheels On Fire ($10.80) and Matt Kakaley righted the ship in the third division with a 1:52.1 mile which saw him emerge late from the pocket to upend Macadoodledoo (Tetrick) by half a length. It was the seventh career win for the Ron Burke trainee.   Multiple players successfully hit the 20-cent Jackpot Hi-5 in the afternoon's fifth race, resulting in a carryover of $2,119.85 to Wednesday (Sept. 12). First post is 12:25 p.m. Eastern.   James Witherite Harrah's Philadelphia racing media

CHESTER, PA - Shebang N, guided by "countryman" Dexter Dunn, won the $16,000 distaff pacing feature on a special Friday evening card at Harrah's Philadelphia, gaining into a 27.4 last quarter to win in 1:53.2 in weather that forced three short delays in the races due to hard rain and lightning. Dunn and the victorious daughter of Mach Three went up to the lead shortly out of the first turn, then yielded to race favorite Rob Them Blind. Shebang N was content to sit until the stretch sprint, then showed sharp acceleration to get by the favorite by a neck for trainer Nifty Norman and the Robert Cooper Stables LLC. The victory was the fourth in a row for Shebang N, and her driver Dexter Dunn has also been hot as well at Philly. After not getting the best of stock upon returning to the southeast Pennsylvania oval (he won two races here in 2011) and not tasting success in his first 20 local drives, the 29-year-old New Zealander certainly has turned things around -- his win in the feature was his seventh in 19 starts here since that unremarkable beginning. In the $14,500 co-featured pace for distaffs, the Artzina mare Use Your Noodle and driver Victor Kirby also found a pocket trip the route to the winners circle, catching millionaire pacesetter Regil Elektra to also win by a head in 1:52.1, last quarter 28 in the off going. Use Your Noodle, trained by DeShawn Sample for Nanticoke Racing Inc., Henry Faragalli III, Arthur Feeney, and Trevor Johnson, now has earned $285,315. In a $14,000 trot, the Muscle Hill colt Fleet Admiral, a full brother to Ariana G, was handled patiently by driver Josert Fonseca, moving from midpack at the ¼ and grinding his way to the lead by the half, then stepping home safe from his opposition in a 1:55.2 mile. Fleet Admiral has now won three in a row for trainer Jimmy Takter and owners Marvin Katz, Al Libfeld, and the S R F Stable. The Liberty Bell stakes series returns on the Sunday card, which begins at 2:05 p.m., as will the remainder of the cards raced on Sunday through meet's end on December 16. Three-year-old colts of both gaits will contest half of the 14 races set for Sunday in Liberty Bell series racing, with four divisions for the pacers and three for the trotters. From the PHHA/Pocono Downs

Whether the current harness racing race fixing blow ends up a bleeding nose or a gaping wound will almost certainly depend on the contents of texts and phone calls now in police hands. Some of the industry's biggest names spent at least part of today in police custody, and while unconfirmed, some have already been charged with race fixing or similar offences. Names at the centre of the investigation named Operation Inca include last season's premiership-winning driver Blair Orange, the man he dethroned for that title Dexter Dunn, and Dunn's brother John, himself a leading driver. The Herald understands at least one other successful Canterbury trainer was extensively questioned by police, while they also visited the stables of champion trainers Mark Purdon and Natalie Rasmussen, with Purdon reportedly not part of the investigation. While police today suggested race fixing and potentially drugs are at the centre of their investigations the Herald was told that illegal performance-enhancing substances used on horses are not the focal point of Operation Inca. The investigation was sparked by information passed to police by the Racing Integrity Unit as early as April last year and police have tapped phones and checked text messages as part of the investigation. What they found or are still to find in those texts or calls will be crucial to building a case against any of those under investigation because race fixing is incredibly hard to prove. And often even harder to actually achieve. While there have and always will be those who are suspicious of racing being "fixed", the reality is it has never been cleaner because of technology. Most trainers and drivers/jockeys don't bet because it is too easy to trace, with bookies openly supplying betting records to authorities. So any of the people under investigation placing a bet on a race they were involved with would set off alarm bells regardless of the result. Which is why the spouses of several of those under investigation were also questioned today, to see whether they had placed bets on their partner's behalf. That is almost certain to be a dead end. What is more likely to end up at the centre of the investigation and any future charges will be betting activities of third parties who bet on information supplied by horsepeople and may have rewarded them for that information. That in itself is an offence but a relatively minor one. The real problem for harness racing would be if any of the parties involved colluded to rig a race, supplied that information to a third party and benefited from that information and any money subsequently won. That would have huge ramifications, an iceberg to racing's Titanic. Text messages, phone calls or face-to-face conversations between punters looking for a tip, even just an opinion, from horsepeople have been going on for as long as there have been phones or racetracks. So if the text messages, recordings and apparently emails, the latter a seemingly very strange way to fix a race, confirm that any drivers knew each other's plans and passed that information on, then harness racing has a problem like cricket's famous match fixing scandals. The other option is a punter ringing multiple horsepeople, putting that information together and betting accordingly for their own purposes. Christchurch-based owner Graham Beirne also had property raided today but was overseas and denies any wrongdoing. Whether any punter, in New Zealand or overseas, would have the money and more importantly the power to fix a race and convince the people at the centre of this investigation is questionable. Such scams are incredibly hard to pull off, as the mastermind needs drivers capable of controlling the main variables of the race without outside interference. The money gambled on New Zealand harness races is relatively small compared with overseas thoroughbred action and any unusual transactions are easily spotted and the driving tactics around them noted. The electronic trail is so pronounced, the telecommunications so easy to track, anybody engaging in prolonged race-fixing would be certain to get caught. This investigation could last a long time but regardless of how it pans out, to the punting public, perception is often reality, and harness racing's reputation has taken a huge blow. The irony is this: Orange and Dexter Dunn travelled to almost every race meeting they attended last season together. I spoke to them before, after and sometimes even during those meetings. They are, hand on heart, two of the worst tipsters I have ever met among the leading horsepeople and if your betting strategy was punting on what they thought was going to happen, you would go broke. But now the racing industry will wait to find out what was said, texted and written.   Michael Guerin

Lexington, KY - The Kentucky Sires Stakes (KYSS) for 2-year-old trotters took place on a perfect, cloudless Saturday night at The Red Mile with temperatures in the mid 70's at the 7:00 post time. There were five harness racing stakes, three filly divisions and two colt races, all for a purse of $30,000. Hall of Fame horseman Jimmy Takter swept both colt divisions with a talented pair of freshmen from his barn of trotting all stars while Dave Palone won two of the filly divisions for Lindy Farms and trainer Domenico Cecere. The colts opened the card and Peter Haughton Memorial winner Don't Let'em made amends for last week's miscue with a workman-like 1:55.2 win with Takter in the sulky. Handicapped with post 10, Takter patiently moved his charge away from the gate, stayed wide as he navigated around several breakers in tune one then ground to the front just after High Into The Sky (Matt Kruger) took the field by the quarter. Once Don't Let'em crossed over to the top the race was, for all intents and purposes, over. Takter set a moderate pace then widened his lead to 6 1/4 lengths at the wire while asking the colt for nothing. High Into The Sky held nicely for second while Buckeyeonbroadway (Randy Jerrel) trotted well to be third. The winner is a Brittney bred son of Muscle Hill, racing for the interests of the breeder with partners Christina Takter, John Fielding and Herb Liverman. He was an $80,000 buy at the Lexington Selected Yearling Sale (LSYS). Super Schissel repeated his leg one win as the Uncle Peter colt took over near the half and held sway in 1:56.4. With heavily favored Greenshoe again undone by a break well before the start, first Reign Of Honor (Dexter Dunn) then Lindy's Crazy Hall (Palone) took turns on the lead before Takter and Super Schissel arrived on the scene. Once again the Takter tactics paid off, at $15.60 return to his mutual backers and $15,000 prize to owners Al Libfeld and the red hot Perry Soderberg as their $115,000 LSYS buy from Coyote Wind Farms came home a 2 ¼ length winner. Reign Of Honor and Lindy's Crazy Hall followed him across the wire. Taylor Swiftly reprised her love story with The Red Mile, becoming a KYSS repeat winner with her remarkably easy 1:55.3 score for Dave Palone. Leaving from the seven hole, Palone eased the Trixton filly around turn one, wore past early leader and eventual place finisher Asiago (Takter) near the 57.3 half, got a 29.3 third quarter breather then won as she pleased with a controlled 28.2 end to the mile. Longshot Highway To The Sky (Mike Wilder) rallied for third. Taylor Swiftly is a Lindy Farms homebred from True Diva and is trained by Domenico Cecere. The Palone, Cecere, Lindy Farms juggernaut came right back in the third race to score a $50 upset win with yet another homebred filly, this time it was the Muscle Hill lass Lindy Pearl taking a nice 1:55.1 mark for the group. Starting from the rail after a series of unfortunate post draws, Lindy Pearl was settled in the pocket by Palone as the speedy yet erratic Run Lindy Run (Wilder) reeled off fair fractions before jumping off stride as the field neared turn two. This development left Lindy Pearl fresh on the lead with heavy favorite French Press (Andy Miller) launching an unsuccessful uncovered bid. Lindy Pearl was well up to the task here, closing out the mile with a 28.2 final quarter an handy 2 1/4 length winner over So Romantic (Ken Holliday) and Graceful (Pat Lachance) with something left. Ma Was Right got up over favored Whispering Oaks (Takter) in the shadow of the wire to put visiting Down Under reinsman Dexter Dunn in the Red Mile winner's circle for the first time in the New Zealander's stateside tour. Dexter settled his charge in third as Whispering Oaks cut the mile, shifted out around the last turn to engage then eyeball the leader mid-stretch and edged by late in 1:57. Atonement (Wilder) took third. The Muscle Hill filly, a $100,000 LSYS purchase by the All Laid Out stable, was winning for the fourth time in seven starts for trainer Noel Daley. She was bred by the Moni Market Breeders. The freshman pacers take to the clay oval tomorrow evening in their second KYSS leg. Post time is 7:00. by Nick Salvi, for the Red Mile

Dexter Dunn is only 28 years old, but his accomplishments as a harness racing driver belie his age. The New Zealand native, who arrived in the U.S. last week to spend the next several weeks (at least) competing in North America, won his first race a dozen years ago and has continued to accumulate victories at a record pace in his homeland. A native of Christchurch, Dunn led New Zealand's premiership in wins for 10 consecutive years from 2008 through 2017. During that span, he won at least 200 races on six occasions and twice finished with 199. He was the only New Zealand driver to win at least 200 races in a season prior to this year, when he saw his record of 229 victories toppled by friend Blair Orange. Orange finished 2017-18 with 232 wins, followed by Dunn with 213. Dunn already ranks fifth in New Zealand history with 2,225 wins. Tony Herlihy is No. 1 with 3,456. Dunn was the youngest driver to both 1,000 and 2,000 wins, and the youngest, at the age of 18, to win a Group 1 race in New Zealand. In 2015, Dunn represented his country in the World Driving Championship and drove off with the trophy. Harness racing is a family affair for the Dunns. Dexter's father, Robert, is among the top trainers in wins in New Zealand history, with 1,374, and last year set a career high for purses with $1.37 million while finishing second in victories in the premiership. Dexter's brother, John, also is an accomplished driver, with nearly 1,000 wins. He has finished in the premiership's top five each of the past six seasons. Dunn was invited to drive in the U.S. this summer by trainer Chris Ryder, a longtime family friend. Dunn drove in the States in 2011 as part of an extended visit that included participating in the U.S.-hosted World Driving Championship and in Canada in 2017, again in the WDC. He finished fourth both times. For his career in North America, Dunn has won nine of 141 races and $174,266 in purses. So far this visit, Dunn has raced at Yonkers and Harrah's Philadelphia. He drives again tonight at Yonkers and tomorrow at Philly. Dunn spoke recently with Ken Weingartner, the media relations manager for the U.S. Trotting Association, about his career, proudest moments, visiting the U.S. last year to play rugby, and another recent Stateside arrival, New Zealand-bred champion pacer Lazarus. KW: Your dad is an accomplished horseman, so how old were you when you started working with the horses? DD: When I was young, my dad stopped training for about four or five years, probably when I was about (ages) 6 to 11. So in that period, I really had nothing to do with horses. Then he started training again when I was about 11. When he first started back, he just had a couple horses. He got me out of school one day because he needed me to go with him to the beach, he was taking them to the beach, to work the horses. From that day on, I was back into it. From then on it was just horses, horses, horses. KW: Working the horses on the beach has to be pretty cool. DD: Yeah, it's nice. I think the horses enjoy it too. It's good for them. They walk in the water afterwards. KW: Is this what you've wanted to do from then on? DD: It gets in your blood. Once you get attached to horses it's pretty hard to get away from it. I left school when I was 16. We took some horses to Auckland for six weeks from Christchurch and then I got a job in Australia for three months and ended up staying there for another year. KW: How old were you when you started driving? DD: I was 17. My first win was in Australia. I spent six months driving over there and then came home. KW: Have you ever had another job? DD: I was a milk boy when I was a kid. (Laughs.) I would jump off the truck and deliver the milk bottles to the door. It was good after-school money. KW: What made you decide to come to the U.S. now? DD: I spent three months here seven years ago. The World Driving Championship was here and I came over two months before. I really enjoyed it. It's always been on my mind, but you get back home and you're busy most of the year and in your routine. Chris went home a few months ago for his niece's wedding and we started talking about it again. I woke up one day, I was on my way to qualifiers, and I decided I was going to come over. That was it. Why not? I'm not getting any younger. If I'm going to do it, now is probably the right time. KW: What is your plan? DD: I've got no set plan. I'll see how it goes. I want to do a little bit of looking around too. Like, I've never been to the Little Brown Jug. Whether I'm driving or not, I want to go and have a look at it. I want to work and do the driving, but it's a little bit of a break from racing at home too. There's no set plan when I'm going back. If I go home, it would probably have to be in mid-October. We'll see how things go. KW: Would you stay for the Breeders Crown? That's not until the end of October. DD: If I'm here until the Breeders Crown, I'm probably not going home. Our big meeting, we have New Zealand Cup Week, and that's the second week of November. That's our biggest week of the year, really. If I'm at the Breeders Crown, I'm missing Cup time. I'm pretty lucky. I've got all my supporters at home and then I come over here and Chris and (his wife) Nicola are looking after me, putting me on horses. It's a pretty lucky situation. Real lucky. KW: You've come over here, and I'm sure you want to show people what you can do, so is it difficult to be patient and not want to over-drive horses or anything like that? DD: It's probably a little bit hard, I think. You just have to let things happen. It's probably hard because I sort of haven't come over here unnoticed. But I don't worry too much about things like that. I try not to put too much pressure on myself; it's not the way I am. I knew coming over here it wasn't going to be easy. You can't come over and just expect to be driving good ones. But I was looking forward to it. I'm really looking forward to a new challenge, something different. You have the same routine day in and day out and this is almost like starting again. KW: What is the biggest challenge? DD: Knowing the horses. You have to study up. You can read the lines, but you don't really know much about the horses or the competition. You have to pick up on it pretty quick. But everyone over here is really good, they look after you. KW: Will you do more studying? DD: I've always been quite keen on studying the fields, but I'll probably do more. At home I know all the horses, so I could probably do a field a lot quicker than I could here. KW: Is the driving style here a lot different than home? DD: It's different, but the gap has closed a lot. Our racing at home, the times are just dropping readily. It's kind of that up-front tempo. It's hard to come from the back now. You used to be able to come from last and win a race, but now it's changed a lot. KW: How would you describe yourself as a driver? DD: It's hard to say. It's really horses for courses, I guess. Competitive is probably the top one. KW: Do you turn the page quickly or carry things with you? DD: When I was younger I was really hard on myself. I'd go home and think about a bad race and it would worry me. But over the years, it's completely gone. I think if you can't turn the page it's bad. The minute you scuff up, you know and everyone else knows, so you just turn the page and move on to the next race. You win the next one and it's forgotten about. KW: What are you most looking forward to over here? DD: The challenge. And I know a lot of people, I've met a lot of people over here from over the years, so it will be good to catch up with them. I just want to have a good time. KW: With all you've accomplished so far in your career, what are you most proud of? DD: I think my biggest achievement was in 2009. I won the Canterbury Sportsman of the Year. I beat a fella named Richie McCaw. He was the All Blacks (national team) captain for two World Cup wins. Probably on the top of the list of New Zealand heroes, he's it for playing rugby. He's a hero to me. To beat him in that was pretty special. Winning the World Driving Championship was cool too. That's right up there as well. KW: What do you most enjoy about the sport? DD: The people. I love the people. I've driven in six different countries now and everywhere you go you meet great people. You really do. I'd never had met these people in any other job. I probably wouldn't have gotten out of New Zealand. And then winning, of course. KW: Was it tough to see your record for wins (in a season) broken? DD: No. (Blair Orange) is one of my closest mates. It's OK. Change is good. I didn't mind. KW: Growing up, did you play other sports? DD: I played rugby my whole life. I was still playing last year. My team, the West Melton Warthogs, went to Aspen, Colorado, in September of last year and played in a rugby tournament there (Aspen Ruggerfest). That was really cool. That was probably the experience of a lifetime, going there and playing. And Aspen is a beautiful place. It's good to play rugby. It's a different group of people and you can get away from horses and horse talk for that little period of time. It's good to freshen up. I didn't play this year because I was busy. My body doesn't like it much when I play. You always wake up on a Sunday morning, it's a good hurt, but it's sore. Your body doesn't bounce back like it does when you're a teenager. KW: Well, it's great for us to see you come over here and drive. First Lazarus arrives, and now you. DD: I'm sure Lazarus will make more of an impression over here than I will. He's an awesome horse. I had to race against him a bunch of times, which stunk because he was so good. He was always so hard to get past. You might think you had him beat at the top of the stretch, but by the end of it he'd get away from you again. I don't think he's ever lost when he's been in front in his whole career. He is a champion horse. KW: Did you ever drive him? DD: No. I got to pet him once. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

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