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JUNE 19, 2017 - Father-son harness racing duo Gregg and Doug McNair picked up one win and one second in four Grassroots divisions at Grand River Raceway on Monday evening. The Guelph, ON residents kicked things off with a runner-up finish in the first $18,800 division, as fan favourite Shewearsthepants was nabbed at the wire by Manhattan Play. The three-year-old pacing fillies stopped the Grand River teletimer at 1:54.1 off fractions of :28.3, :56.4 and 1:25.2 posted by Doug McNair and Shewearsthepants. Casino Classic was three and three-quarter lengths back in third. Shadow Play daughter Manhattan Play was driven to her second straight Grassroots win by Campbellville resident Mike Saftic for trainer Nicky Comegna of Cambridge and owner Bruno Comegna of Burlington, ON. "She raced good," said Gregg McNair of Big Jim daughter Shewearsthepants. "She kind of got caught on the front end there, not her best spot, but that's a good filly that beat her. She's a nice mare, that mare (Manhattan Play). I like her; I've seen her race a few times." The McNairs scored their victory in the third Grassroots division as Loves Angel cruised home a four and three-quarter length winner in a personal best 1:55.1. Starting from Post 3, Doug McNair hustled Loves Angel off the gate and the Big Jim daughter led the field to a :28.2 opening quarter. Yielding to C Mary heading for the :56.3 half, McNair and Loves Angel sat behind the pacesetter through a 1:26 three-quarters and then powered out of the pocket in the stretch and sailed home to the win. "She's been a pretty nice filly, a bit surprising I think. She's come along better than I thought she was going to be," said McNair about Loves Angel. "She's a good bred little mare, never grew up very much, but looks like she's competitive with them anyways. "She had a nice little burst there when he moved her," added the trainer, who shares ownership of the filly with Jim Newton of Thornhill, ON and Kenneth Newton of Biggar, SK. The victory was the first this season for Loves Angel and also marked her first appearance in the Ontario Sires Stakes winner's circle. Gottalovemyshadow earned her third straight victory and second Grassroots trophy of the season with an impressive 1:53.3 score in the second division. From Post 1 the fan favourite controlled the pace, ringing up fractions of :27.1, :56.2 and 1:25.2 en route to a two and three-quarter length victory over Stellenbosch and Fading Shadow. The mile was just two-fifths of a second shy of the 1:53.1 Grand River Raceway track record for sophomore pacing fillies held by Seaside Rory and L A Delight. Moffat resident Jack Moiseyev conditions Gottalovemyshadow for Joanne Colville of Moffat, Nancy MacNevin of Essex and Emma Christoforou of Moffat, ON. In six lifetime starts the chestnut daughter of Shadow Play boasts a record of three wins and one third for earnings of $31,530. The final Grassroots division, contested in a driving rain, went to Check Mach and Guelph resident Scott Young, who sprinted by pacesetter and fan favourite Kloof Street in the stretch. The pair reached the wire one-half length on top in 1:57.1, a personal best for Check Mach. B Fifteen rounded out the top three while the McNair stable's third entry, Cams Lucky Star, finished out of the money in sixth. Young engineered the win from Post 1 for trainer Jerry Duford of Rockwood and his partner in Home Stretch Holdings Inc., Joanne Wray, along with Lloyd and Barbara Tylee of Grimsby, ON. The victory was the Mach Three daughter's first in Ontario Sires Stakes competition and her third of the season. "With the rail it was either cut it or sit the two-hole behind Travis (Cullen and Kloof Street), so when the option came to follow the favourite I said, 'Well, it works, I should be second'," said Young, who notched his first OSS victory of the season with the effort. "And, you know, she tightened up in the last turn, and when I moved her she paced by, so I was very happy with her." The three-year-old pacing fillies will continue their Grassroots rivalry on July 21 at Mohawk Racetrack, while the Gold Series fillies arrive at Grand River Raceway next Monday, June 26 for the second event on their calendar. OSS Program Information For rules, notices, Program changes, up-to-date point standings, race replays, and more, visit: www.ontariosiresstakes.com Ontario Racing

CAMPBELLVILLE, June 17 - Bettors Up, driven by Doug McNair, pulled off a 11-1 upset by a mere nose in the $440,000 Fan Hanover Final for harness racing three-year-old pacing fillies on Saturday night at Mohawk Racetrack, part of the Pepsi North America Cup undercard. Bettors Up got away third while Agent Q and Al Mar Got A Fever battled for the early lead into the first turn. A parked out Agent Q stuck the front as they blasted by the quarter pole in :26.4. Bettors Up then made a quick rush to the lead before the :55.1 half. The 9-5 heavy favourite, Idyllic Beach, who was sitting fourth, was hoping to catch second-over cover so when Al Mar Got A Fever made a bid for the lead from third, the bettor's choice followed. Bettors Up remained the leader as they passed the three-quarter marker in 1:22.1. Agent Q, who was sitting second, was fed open racetrack and added pressure to Bettors Up. The pair dueled strides before the wire but Bettors Up poked a nose in front to score the victory in a new lifetime mark of 1:49.4. Agent Q was second in the photo finish and Tequila Monday finished third. Idyllic Beach was advancing from fourth to third but broke stride momentarily, which resulted in her finishing fourth. "I thought (she held on)," said McNair. "I got my hopes up a little bit after and I kind of had to relax a bit. She is not a very big filly so I wasn't quite sure." "There wasn't a lot of leavers," he added. "I actually tried to get away in the two-hole behind Dave [Miller and Agent Q]. It didn't work out. But it actually worked out the right away for us. I had to revoke her back to the lead and she did the rest." The daughter of Bettor's Delight and Fresh Idea, who is trained by Scott McEneny, notched her second victory of the season and eighth career triumph. With the win, the filly lifts her career earnings to $456,499 for Bradley Grant, Teresa Davidson and Michelle McEneny. "She had a good week," said trainer McEneny. "She drew well and she raced really tough last week so I was very happy with her race last week. Things worked out tonight." Bettors Up finished second her in her elimination behind Tequila Monday. Bettors Up paid $24.40, 10.40 and $4.80, combining with Agent Q ($10.40, $5.50) for a $280.40 (1-7) exactor. A 1-7-5 (Tequila Monday, $2.60) triactor was worth $782.70, while a $1 superfecta [1-7-5-4 (Idyllic Beach)] returned $3,649.35. Mark McKelvie / Ray Cotolo for WEG Communications  

CAMPBELLVILLE, June 3 – Fans that came to Mohawk Racetrack on Saturday evening witnessed history, as four-year-old pacer Dr J Hanover paced the fastest mile in Canadian harness racing history. The Tony Alagna trained son of Somebeachsomewhere and driver Doug McNair took full advantage of wild fractions to come away with a 1:46.4 victory. The clocking not only set a new Canadian record, but also established a new World Record for a four-year-old gelding. “I thought around the last turn he felt good,” said McNair following Dr J Hanover’s historic mile. “At the head of the stretch he still felt good and then half way down the lane I thought he had a pretty good shot (at the record), but I couldn’t believe it after.” Dr J Hanover was fired to the front by McNair in a field of six and posted an opening-quarter of :26.2. Boston Red Rocks and Brett Miller swept up to take the lead entering the backstretch, but they immediately had company in the form of Lyons Snyder and Yannick Gingras. The half flashed up in :53, as Lyons Snyder powered by Boston Red Rocks and continued to set a wild pace entering the far turn. Positions went unchanged in the third-quarter, as Dr J Hanover sat third and three-lengths back, while Lyons Snyder hit three-quarters in 1:20. In the stretch, Boston Red Rocks angled out and paced by Lyons Snyder, while Dr J Hanover followed the path and eventually tipped off his back to set up a two-horse battle. Boston Red Rocks tried his best to fight off the outside pressure, but Dr J Hanover was too much to handle and powered by to win by a length at odds of 15-1. Saturday’s $67,230 Graduate leg was the first time McNair had driven Dr J Hanover. “They just told me he had pretty good gate speed,” McNair commented. “He had been racing on the small tracks the last six or eight starts, so they told me if I got him out of there he should perform well and they were right.” Trained by Alagna for owners Brad Grant, Robert LeBlanc, Steven Wienick and Irwin Samelman, Dr J Hanover was winless in nine starts heading into Saturday, but that is quickly forgotten after his record performance. “He made the front pretty easy,” McNair noted. “I kind of had him shut down at the quarter-pole, but Brett (Miller) came around and we just kept pacing. “When Yannick (Gingras) came, they went :53 and 1:20 and when Brett came back out (at the top of the stretch) he gave me cover again and when I kicked off cover he felt like he was really pacing and I was surprised to see that kind of a mile.” Dr J Hanover now has career numbers of nine wins and $387,961 earned. He paid $32.90 to win. The clocking of 1:46.4 breaks the Mohawk and Canadian record of 1:47.1, which was set last June by Always B Miki. Dr J Hanover is now also a World Champion, as he broke the four-year-old gelding mark of 1:47.2, which was held by Bettor Sweet and Wiggle It Jiggleit. He also equaled Warrawee Needy’s overall record for a four-year-old pacer. Dr J Hanover The other $67,230 Graduate division didn’t feature any records, but did have a thrilling finish. Dave Menary trainee Sintra battled back to edge out Western Fame in 1:49.3. Driven by Jody Jamieson, Sintra made a second-quarter move to the lead from third to take command away from Western Fame. Jamieson’s charge posted middle-half fractions of :53.3 and 1:21. In the stretch, Western Fame was angled to the outside and got by Sintra for a moment, but the Menary trainee wouldn’t quit and fought back to win by a nose. Easy Lover Hanover shot up the rail late to finish third. “I knew he was going to have to dig deep,” said Menary about his feeling at the top of the lane. “I knew he really dug back in and was by the horse after the wire,” said Menary about his feeling at the wire. “He’s a good enough horse that he was passed and he dug. That’s the kind of a horse he is.” A four-year-old gelded son of Mach Three, Sintra improved his 2017 record to four wins in five starts with his triumph Saturday. He is now a 12-time winner with career earnings exceeding $400,000 for owners Brad Gray, Michael Guerriero and Menary Racing Inc. Sintra paid $3.90 to win. Sintra Over on the trotting side, Ron Burke trainee Dayson prevailed in a photo finish over Trolley to win the $100,845 12-horse Graduate Series Trot. Driven by Gingras, Dayson grabbed the lead in the second-quarter, but had to deal with pressure by first-over challenger Warrawee Roo throughout the middle-half. After trotting a third-quarter in :28 to reach that station in 1:24.1, Dayson put away Warrawee Roo, but immediately had to deal with Trolley, who had been sitting second-over with driver Marcus Miller. Dayson and Trolley went toe-to-toe down to the wire, with the leader holding on to win by a nose in 1:52.3. “I thought maybe he got me in the last step,” admitted Gingras post-race. “My horse had raced on the front a few weeks in a row…I really wanted tonight to race him from the back if it was a shorter field, but I was in a tough spot and if I took him back I would’ve got away about sixth or seventh, but my horse raced another big mile.” Broadway Donna, who had captured the opening leg of the Graduate, didn’t have her usual punch in the lane and finished third. A four-year-old gelded son of Conway Hall, Dayson was winless in three starts heading into Saturday’s outing. He now has 20 career wins and earnings of over $700,000 for owners Burke Racing Stable LLC, Our Horse Cents Stables, J And T Silva Stables LLC and Rossie Smith. Dayson paid $4.40 to win. Dayson Saturday’s card also featured a pair of 11-horse $70,000 Somebeachsomewhere Stakes divisions, as many Pepsi North America Cup eligible three-year-old pacers were putting in their final preparations ahead of next week’s eliminations. Hurricane Beach and driver Louis Philippe Roy captured the first division in 1:50.3. The Luc Blais trainee went gate-to-wire to score his second win of the season. A gelded son of Somebeachsomewhere and North America Cup eligible, Hurricane Beach set fractions of :26.3, :55 and 1:22.1, before scooting home in :28.3 to capture a division of the race named for his sire. Lawrencetown Beach finished four-lengths back in second, while Sports Column was third. Roy’s victory with Hurricane Beach Saturday was the first Grand Circuit victory of his career. Following the race, he noted that some equipment adjustments made a big difference for his charge. “We trained him with different equipment last week and he was too grabby,” said Roy. “So (Blais) put back the equipment he had before cause he couldn’t relax like he did tonight with the other equipment.” Hurricane Beach, who was winless in three starts as a rookie, came into Saturday’s start with only $12,180 in earnings. His bankroll now sits at $47,180 for owner Determination. A $2 win ticket on Hurricane Beach returned $14.40. Hurricane Beach Another son of Somebeachsomewhere captured the second division to make it a perfect sweep for “The Beach” in his own race. Despite never seeing the rail, Macs Jackpot and David Miller came from way back to score a 42/1 upset. The Jim Campbell trainee sat eighth and on the outside throughout the majority of the mile, but was able to pick up the pieces when leader Richard Hill tired in the lane. Richard Hill cleared to the lead just after the opening-quarter and posted fractions of :54.3 and 1:22.1. In the stretch, Richard Hill had to fight off Frontier Seelster, but that took its toll and the backfield came to life. Macs Jackpot followed Stealth Bomber down the lane and was able to surge by all his rivals to win by a neck in 1:51.4. Stealth Bomber edged out Richard Hill for second. Trained by Campbell for owner Jeff Snyder, Macs Jackpot overcame post-nine to score his second victory in six starts this season. “We had planned on trying to get him into the race, but with a big field and all, a lot of guys were taking a shot,” said Miller following the race. “He ended up fourth-over and was out the whole way, but he was just kind of feeling pretty comfortable until the last turn and then he did get interested and finished it up good.” Macs Jackpot is eligible to next week’s Pepsi North America Cup eliminations. He paid $86.30 to win. Macs Jackpot The Pepsi North America Cup eliminations will take place next Saturday (June 10). Live racing resumes Monday night at Mohawk Racetrack. Post time is 7:30 p.m. Mark McKelvie

CAMPBELLVILLE, April 15 - Driver Doug McNair and trainer Richard Moreau were recognized Saturday evening at Mohawk Racetrack for their outstanding performances during the 2016-17 Woodbine harness racing winter meet. The Woodbine winter meet, which concluded on Monday, was contested from November 10 to April 10. Doug McNair, 27, led all drivers in victories and earnings. The Guelph, Ontario resident won 126 races during the five-month meet and drove the winners of over $1.7 million. The Woodbine driving title is McNair's first driving title on the Woodbine Entertainment circuit. While McNair took home his first title, Richard Moreau, 52, added another Woodbine training title to his long list of accomplishments. Moreau, who is the four-time reigning Trainer of the Year in Canada, led all conditioners with 62 wins and earnings of over $1.2 million. Moreau's barn has been led this year by older pacer American Virgin, who's won the Preferred at WEG seven-times and banked $140,080 this season. McNair has been the driver behind the Preferred star all-season. McNair and Moreau also teamed up on Friday night to win the $30,000 Mares Preferred with Sandbetweenurtoes. The 2017 Mohawk meet is now in full swing and McNair and Moreau are both off to solid starts. Live racing is held at the Campbellville oval every Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday beginning at 7:30 p.m. Mark McKelvie

TROIS-RIVIERES, Quebec - This past week, harness racing driver Louis-Philip Roy and his girlfriend were moving from Quebec to Toronto. The 27-year-old Mont-Jolie native has taken the WEG (Woodbine Entertainment Group) harness racing circuit by storm since January. As of press time he is just four wins behind leading driver Doug McNair (85-81) as the racing now switches from Woodbine to Mohawk Raceway. Roy has won over $1 million in purses in just four months and has an impressive Universal Driving Rating of .330. It was just three years ago, that Roy, at age 24, was showing great promise on the Quebec Regional Fair circuit, then the following year advanced to become one of the top drivers at the Hippodrome 3R (H3R) track. It was last year that Roy emerged as a driving force. Not only did he lead all drivers at H3R but also won the driving title at Rideau-Carlton. In his breakout season, last year, Roy ended 2016 with 237 wins and $1,119,000 in purses won. He has already surpassed his record for purses won this year and has 110 total wins after just four months of driving. Then after his impressive track record performance in winning the Gold Cup and Saucer last August, he caught the eye of top trainer Rene Allard and now Roy is on top of the world driving for the Allard Stable in Toronto and he has picked up other top horses that he is winning with. "When the season started at H3R last year," Roy explained. "It was going so well in Rideau Carleton and I was just hoping that it will be the same in H3R. I didn't really care about becoming the driving leader or not, I just wanted to keep doing well and keep getting good horses to drive. "I didn't think it could be possible to be the driving leader at both places," Roy explained, "because of the Sundays where I often had to make a choice between H3R or Rideau, as I couldn't do all the races at both places." But Roy was determined because he was driven with a dream of becoming a full-time professional harness driver and the dream came true. Yet, last year he was not ready to give up his day job for harness racing. "In my mind, becoming a full-time harness driver was a dream," Roy said. "I was working in a way to realize it, but I also knew that it might be impossible too. That's why I didn't want to leave everything behind too early, I wanted to make sure that I could really do it." Moving to Toronto has become a big event for Roy, but he still has such strong ties to his home province of Quebec and says he will try and get back home to visit friends and family and to drive at the Hippodrome 3R. "I'd like to and plan to be at H3R first race day on April 23," Roy said. "I want to see all my friends there, and maybe I will get back some other special days to drive, like for the Quebec Series if possible and, of course, the Prix D'Ete." Who does Roy feel will "fill the gap" he will be leaving at H3R this season? "There are some very good young drivers competing at H3R," Roy said, "including last year's rising stars Jonathan Lachance and Pierre-Luc Roy (Roy's older brother), and in my mind, they only need good horses to drive to show their talent. "There are some drivers that started to race in Rideau Carleton in the last few weeks that can be H3R top drivers," Roy added, "but I don't know if they plan to race more in Rideau or H3R for the summer, like Stephane Brosseau, Jonathan Lachance and Stephane Gendron. "If they compete full time at 3R for the summer," Roy said, "I think they will be in the top standings. Guy Gagnon in my mind is also one of the best half-mile drivers, but I know that he usually come to H3R only on Tuesday. And maybe the title of leading driver could go to another Mont-Joli native guy, like Pascal Berube or Pierre-Luc Roy. "I also just heard that Richard Simard is going to be at H3R this season." Roy said. "And he is most certainly a top driver that will be in demand for his services." Roy says the adjustment to living and working in Toronto has gone very well. "I made some new friends in here," Roy explained. "I play golf and hockey with Doug McNair and James MacDonald. I'm also friends with Jody Jamieson even if he hates the Habs as I don't like the Leafs as much too." Roy joked. "My plan was to go to the Meadowlands for the winter," Roy said, "because I've seen there an opportunity with most of the regular drivers not being there, but if you asked me where I wanted to be among the top drivers between there and the WEG, I would say the WEG. "I just wished I could be there once in my life," Roy said about WEG, "but I never thought I would there in 2017! "I don't really care about money or milestones," Roy add, "My dream isn't to get rich, but to be able to live doing what I love to do and I love driving horses! Like they say, life isn't a matter of milestones, but of moments! Roy will be kept very busy heading towards the summer with top racing at Mohawk and then on the Ontario Sire Stakes Circuit, but his heart lies in Quebec, where his career first started in 2008 when he had just 11 drives with two wins. He says that race fans need to check the race program at H3R as he could show up just any time during the season. "I'll come back," Roy said. "Just not every race day. I love racing at H3R, it's where my career took off from and I have so many friends there that I want to see and drive for." From the Quebec Jockey Club      

CAMPBELLVILLE, April 11 - It's easy to forget harness racing driver Doug McNair is only 27. The young reinsman has been a regular face on the Woodbine Entertainment circuit for several years and has been winning races since the day he hopped in a sulky. But this winter, McNair took his game to new heights and accomplished a feat that not many drivers in their 20's have been able to do. Capture a driving title at Woodbine "It's huge," McNair shared about winning the driving title for the Woodbine Fall-Winter meet. "I remember being a kid and wanting to race here and to win the driver's title is huge, especially at a young age." McNair, a winner of over 2,600 races in his young career, led all drivers in victories and earnings during the recently concluded Woodbine meet. The Guelph, Ontario resident finished the meet with 126 wins, 37 more than his nearest rival. Coming into the Woodbine portion of the season off a solid summer meet at Mohawk, which saw him win 125 races, McNair was poised to post good numbers, but even he didn't expect to jump right to the top. "No, I didn't think I would be rolling like I am, it just started as soon as we got back (to Woodbine)," McNair said. "You got to have the horses and I got lucky that I got the horses this winter. Any top guy will tell you that you can't win races unless you have the horses." Driving for power is always a key to success, but a driver still needs to make the most of the opportunity. That's exactly what McNair did with the chance to drive for the circuit's top owner and trainers. "Brad Grant has really helped me out with a lot of Preferred horses and driving for top trainers Richard Moreau and Carmen Auciello this winter makes a big difference." McNair's top charge this winter has been the Grant owned, Moreau trained American Virgin, who's won the Preferred seven-times since the new year. Success in the top classes has pushed McNair to the top of the earnings category on the circuit, having driven the winner's of over $1.2 million this season. The 27-year-old's hot streak wasn't restricted to the WEG Circuit this winter, as he also took his talents to Ohio to capture Miami Valley's inaugural North American Driving Championship in January. "That set me off big time this year," McNair explained. "I went down there and wasn't expecting anything, was just going to have some fun and got lucky." While luck is a part of racing, McNair's confidence could easily be keyed as a factor for his ability to best 29 other drivers in the driving tournament at Miami Valley. McNair's driving style has always fit racing at Woodbine, but he feels it also translates well for the way harness racing has developed over the years. "You have to be aggressive (at Woodbine), it's always been more of a front-end place and Mohawk is kind of turning into that too," McNair said. "They're going so fast nowadays, going such big first half speed and coming home so fast, that it's tough to win from off the pace." With racing set to return to Mohawk on Thursday, McNair will attempt to hold onto his top spot throughout the summer meet. While the prospects of continuing to drive the top weekly warriors at WEG has McNair pumped for Mohawk, he is also eager for the return of the stakes horses. "Easy Lover Hanover is four now and he's got a few stakes this season and hopefully it turns out good like it did at the end of last year," McNair noted about last year's Progress Pace winner. "Solar Sister's five now so I mean four-year-old year is tough and she competed well. Hopefully she comes back good at five and obviously it would be great to have a few nice two-year-olds." McNair's Mohawk meet will start off in style, as he will be recognized for leading the Woodbine meet with a winner's circle presentation on Saturday evening. Getting off to a great start is important and McNair knows that all so well after starting 2017 with 27 wins in the month of January. Another flying start could lead to a second meet title for McNair this summer. "I've had the right horses and hopefully my career is just starting to take off." Mark McKelvie

It is the place where dreams begin; it is the place where the top drivers and trainers of the future are born. It is the place where friends become family, and complete strangers become friends. This is the place where many trainers and drivers capture their first victories and dream of making it to the big leagues. These are the “B” tracks.  In the communities where these tracks are located, race nights are a time for family, friends, and neighbors to come together to laugh, enjoy each other’s company and create memories; and if they are lucky, maybe even cash a winning ticket or two. The people who race horses here, may not be racing for a million dollars, but to them, their horses are worth just that. Even though they may be racing in a claiming race, they are worth so much more to those that love them. For many fans, it is where they first experienced the thrill of betting and winning. For some owners like myself, it is where we got our first thrill of winning too.  Sometimes the trainer may have roles other than just a trainer. They may be the owner, as well as the driver, as well as the caretaker. In some rare cases, they have also bred the horse. I am going to share with you some of my favorite memories which were created at a “B” track.  There are many, and all of them mean something to me. Not every horse can race at an “A” track like Mohawk Raceway; that is precisely why there are “B” tracks. “B” tracks provide another place for horses to race and be successful. For example, Sydney Seelster (Pinky) liked the tight turns the smaller tracks have, in addition to the speed being a little more manageable for her. This was discovered after we tried racing her once at Mohawk Raceway and once at Woodbine, in both races she tried her very best, came fifth in one of those starts but she definitely raced more competitively on the “B” tracks. The majority of my experiences as an owner came from racing at Flamboro Downs, Georgian Downs, and Grand River Raceway- all “B” tracks. When Pinky won her first race for me on a Saturday afternoon, at Flamboro Downs, I felt like I had won a stakes race. I cried tears of joy. It is because of a “B” track my dream of being a winning owner came true. It is where my adventure with Pinky begins.  It is the place where I discovered the thrill of being an owner. Every track has their big day; their day to shine. It could be holding a stakes race or a track’s opening day for the season. This is one aspect of the sport which unites both “A” and “B” tracks. Whatever the occasion or event is, the ‘little’ tracks always make the occasion a big deal. I look forward to attending these special events and I do my best not to miss one.   Every year on the holiday Monday in August, Grand River Raceway, in Elora, hosts an annual event celebrating the harness racing industry in the province of Ontario. The day is called Industry Day. The day features the finals of the Battle of Waterloo for Ontario-sired colts and the Battle of the Belles for Ontario- sired fillies. The Industry Day of 2011 was my first time attending Industry Day. It is also the first time I recall going to another track other than Mohawk Raceway. Walking through the grandstand, I marveled at the new sights, it is a bee hive of activity. The atmosphere is lively and the passion is remarkable.  That day, driving stars Scott Zeron and Doug McNair were there to take pictures with fans, so I got mine taken with them. That was a highlight for me. The races were fast paced and action packed. The crowd was passionate and excited. There was clapping and cheering. The atmosphere was celebratory and made an impression on me. Many memories were made that day, and I will cherish them always. Since that Industry Day, I have attended every one. Like many people, going to Industry Day has become a tradition for me, and I look forward to going every summer. In the summer of 2012, I made the journey to Hanover Raceway for the Dream of Glory Stake and the fireworks which followed the races. It was time for me to experience another track. Hanover Raceway was a charming track. It was not fancy but that is what makes Hanover Raceway so special. The Dream of Glory may not be the most celebrated stakes race, but for fans in the small town of Hanover, they look forward to it every year. I was honored to be asked to present the trophy. After the races finished, everyone was anticipating the fireworks. The firework show was mesmerizing. To add to the colorful spectacle, snow-like flakes fell on me, they were ashes from the fireworks. In a strange way, it added charm to the night and was something unique, an experience I will always remember. Flamboro Downs holds the Confederation Cup and I look forward to going every year. It is a day where some of the best horses and drivers come to compete on the same track Pinky did. To think of it like that always makes me smile. I was given the signs which have the names of the horses in the Confederation Cup that are used when assigning post positions. I have the ones from 2015 and 2016 (with the exception of the winner, as that gets displayed). They are something I treasure. I have proudly displayed them in my room. My parents and I visit Flamboro Downs often. We go for dinner, to watch the exciting races and cheer on our friends who are racing. I always enjoy talking with the friendly staff. All levels of staff at Flamboro Downs always makes me feel special. Gary Guy is the announcer for Flamboro, as well as Grand River Raceway and Georgian Downs. He is always sure to give me a shout out when he sees me sitting along the rail. I always feel so special when he does. I appreciate how he takes the time to do that. When Pinky won he always tried to play a song that mentioned pink as Pinky returned to the Winner’s Circle.  That made winning even more sweet. Every second-year Clinton Raceway holds an event which is like no other. Legendary drivers including Bill O’Donnell, Ron Waples, and Wally Hennessey, just to name a few, compete in one signature race. Although he did not drive, Keith Waples was also there. Hence, this day is called Legend's Day. The first time my parents and I went, every driver I wished good luck to in post parade won that race. My dad thought I was wearing horseshoes that day. After the Legend's Day race, all of the Legend's went to have a group photo taken.  I said hello to Wally Hennessey on his way to get his picture taken. He asked if I could watch his helmet and gloves. I agree and when he returned he gave his gloves and signed them. For the rest of the day, I wore those gloves with such pride. Later that afternoon it rained a lot. While we were taking cover [outside] from the rain, under an overhang at the end of the grandstand, we met a caretaker who had a horse in the last race on the card, we told her how ‘lucky’ I had been with telling drivers good luck. She told me “Trevor Henry is driving my horse is the last race, wish him good luck, and if we happen to win, come out for your picture”. Trevor Henry won that race. The rain was now teeming down. I raced through the rain to the winner’s circle. I was still wearing the gloves given to me by Wally Hennessey. I had to shield the signature from the rain, so the ink would not run. The drive home that afternoon was spent drying out.  I was drenched, but it added to the memories from that day. Today, those gloves have dried and are in a safe place for me to cherish. Two years later, I returned to Clinton Raceway for Legend's Day. I had the pleasure of interviewing a few of the legends for a story a friend was doing. He is a journalist and was unable to make it. That was an experience which I was honored to have. This past October I made four-hour journey to Leamington Raceway. My parents thought it would be the perfect way to spend a Sunday afternoon. I sat in the backseat, with my iPod and snacks, and we were on the road bound for Leamington Raceway. It was my first time visiting Leamington Raceway.  I love to visit new tracks and meet new friends. My dad was excited to be going too because Leamington was one of the few tracks he had not visited either. Before long, we are driving through small towns and countryside, soon we arrived at Leamington Raceway. I stepped out of my car and I was greeted by smiling faces. Then I received an awesome surprise, I was speechless. It was a sign which read “Stop! Parking for Sydney Weaver”. I felt so special, like a celebrity. It was just a small gesture that made my day even more special. I have always believed it is the little things in life that take up the most room in our hearts. That is something "B" tracks have in common. They add little personal touches, that make you feel welcome. For example, at Grand River, when you walk in the front doors, you are greeted by a gentleman, whose name is Tom, in a top hat and tails. He is happy and always smiling. That warm welcome is so special and has a big impact. The grandstand at Leamington was packed with people of all ages, and lots of kids. Everyone was having a grand time. Lawn chairs lined the fence. The day was picture perfect  We met up with friends and watched a few races, before being invited to take a tour of the new paddock. While in the paddock I had the opportunity to meet the people who were instrumental in getting the new paddock built.    The lovely people of Leamington Raceway were kind and gave me a Leamington Raceway sweater and baseball cap. I helped with on track draws too. Overall it was a fun day, and the day passed quickly. Before I know it, my parents and I are on the road again.  This time headed for home. As we drove, we reminisce about the memories that were created. “B” tracks might not be as well-known as the major tracks, but we need to embrace and support them. “B” tracks make our industry what it is. They are the foundation of our industry.  It is because of the smaller tracks that major tracks are able to prosper.  “B” tracks provide strength and support which is vital to the success of our sport. That is the beauty of a “B” track. Sydney Weaver is 16 years old and resides in Acton, Ontario, Canada. She has been involved with harness racing for years, groom's horses, jogs them on the track, owns both a Standardbred and a Thoroughbred racehorse and has already won major youth writing awards. Sydney also has Cerebral Palsy and spends most of her time in a wheelchair, but has never let her disability hold her back from achieving her goals.

TORONTO, January 20 - Winter Series harness racing action continued on Friday's 11-race card at Woodbine Racetrack and once again Doug McNair was the first star of the night. McNair, who swept round one of the Blizzard Series Thursday, made four visits to the winner's circle on Friday's card, including in one of two divisions of the Snowshoe Series for three and four-year-old pacers. Awesomeness was sent straight to the front by McNair in the first $17,000 Snowshoe split and never looked back en route to an impressive 1:52 victory. The Ryan Maxwell trainee posted a snappy opening-quarter of :26.1 and after a middle-half of :58.4, fired home in :27 to win by 7½ lengths. Clouseau Hanover finished second, while Emptythetill was third. A gelded son of Mach Three, Awesomeness has been making some serious noise at Woodbine over the last couple months. The four-year-old didn't make his career debut until October and now has six wins in 12 starts, while only finishing outside the top-two once. Awesomeness, who was making his second start of the New Year Friday, was purchased privately by Martin Scharf in November and has won three of six starts since joining the Maxwell stable. His career earnings now sit at $76,100. The Maxwell trainee paid $3.60 to win. Awesomeness The second Snowshoe division saw McNair almost make it back-to-back series sweeping nights, but he and four-year-old gelding Senior K had to settle for a second-place finish. Lyons Sands went gate-to-wire to win the second split in 1:53.2. The Bruce Goit trainee was making his first start of 2017 and was guided to victory by driver J Harris. Lyons Sands posted fractions of :27.1, :57.1 and 1:25.3, before pacing home in :27.4 and fighting off Senior K to win by a neck. Ohio Larry finished third. A gelded son of Somebeachsomewhere, Lyons Sands won 9 of 13 starts last season as a three-year-old and now has 10 career victories to his name. His career bankroll increased to $52,590 for owner Geoffrey Lyons Mound with Friday's victory. Lyons Sands paid $13 to win. Lyons Sands Three and four-year-old pacers, who were non-winners of two-races or $30,000 lifetime as of October 31, 2016, were eligible for nomination to the Snowshoe Series. The second-round of the Snowshoe will take place next Friday (January 27). Following Friday's driving Grand Slam, McNair now has 15 wins, 11 runner-up finishes and seven third-place finishes in 57 starts to lead all drivers this season at Woodbine. McNair will look to continue his torrid start to 2017 on Saturday evening, as he is listed to drive in nine of the 11 scheduled races. Post time is 7:30 p.m. Mark McKelvie

TORONTO, January 19 - Harness racing driver Doug McNair has been off to a flying start in 2017 and Thursday night he continued his hot streak by sweeping round one of the Blizzard Series at Woodbine Racetrack. McNair guided Stonebridge Pearl and Senseless Beauty to victories to take both $17,000 first leg divisions of the Blizzard for three and four-year-old pacing fillies and mares. The first division of the evening saw all the attention go towards Niagara Series winner Jimbelina, but the heavy-favourite just couldn't go all the way over the "off-track". Sent to the front from post-ten by driver Sylvain Filion, Jimbelina cut out fractions of :27.1, :57 and 1:25.2. However, Stonebridge Pearl and McNair stalked the leader's every move from the pocket and were able to pounce in the lane. Stonebridge Pearl powered by Jimbelina in deep stretch to win by half a length in a career-best 1:55. Sparkle finished third, while Franschoek was fourth. A four-year-old daughter of Mach Three, Stonebridge Pearl made her first start of the New Year a winning effort Thursday after winning just once in 21 appearances in 2016. Owned by Mark Ford and trained locally by Gregg McNair, Stonebridge Pearl banked $26,100 last season and her Blizzard opening leg victory now gives her three career wins and a bankroll of $69,880. She paid $22 to win. Stonebridge Pearl The second division saw McNair once again crossing the wire first, but this time he did it with the public's choice. Senseless Beauty was pointed directly to the front right from the beginning by McNair and was able to clear Collective Wisdom for the lead just after the opening-quarter of :28. After posting middle-fractions of :57.1 and 1:27, Senseless Beauty was tested in the lane by Collective Wisdom from the two-hole, but the favourite was able to turn aside the challenger and score a two-length victory in 1:55.4. Kloof Street turned in a strong final-quarter to come all the way from ninth and last to finish second just ahead of Collective Wisdom. Xelene Bayama finished fourth. A four-year-old daughter of Vintage Master, Senseless Beauty was making just the fourth start of her career Thursday. The Tony O'Sullivan trainee raced twice as a rookie in August of 2015, but didn't make another start until last month. Owned by Let It Ride Stables Inc. and Dana Parham, Senseless Beauty has now won back to back starts at Woodbine and is on a three-race win streak after finishing second in her career debut. Thursday's victory increases her career earnings to $24,500. She paid $4.40 to win. Senseless Beauty Round two of the Blizzard Series will take place next Friday (January 26). Three and four-year-old pacing fillies and mares, who were non-winners of two-races or $30,000 lifetime as of October 31, 2016, were eligible to the Blizzard. Live racing continues Friday night at Woodbine with round one of the Snowshoe Series for three and four-year-old pacers headlining the 11-race card. Post time is 7:30 p.m. Mark McKelvie

LEBANON, OH. – The 2017 North America Driver's Challenge champion is Doug McNair, who traveled to Miami Valley Raceway from the Toronto area to compete with 29 other top reinsmen from throughout the United States and Canada over three harness racing matinee cards.  On the strength of two championship day triumphs, one second and a pair of show finishes over his eight drives, the 27-year-old narrowly defeated Sam Widger, who finished second with 120 points, Tyler Smith 92, and Tony Hall and Jonathan Roberts who tied for fourth with 74 points each.  McNair scored with Mintiliscious (1:59.4, $3.20) in the first challenge race of the day, over a track rated sloppy.  He also reached the finish line first with Fox Valley Valdez (1:59, $6.80) in the third contest event.  Widger’s two victories came back-to-back in the fifth and sixth challenge races with Mike’s Hope (1:58, $12.00) and Delight Fashion (1:57.3, $23.60).    Others to score on Tuesday afternoon were Tony Hall behind Winchester (2:00.4, $13.60), Marcus Miller with Full Of Sand (1:57.1, $5.80), Jonathan Roberts behind Sweet Colt Of Mine (1:58.1, $44.60) and Jason Brewer, who was sitting in for John DeLong who withdrew from the contest, with Likeafireballshot (1:56.2, $8.60). McNair receives $10,000 as the winner’s share of the North American Drivers Challenge.  Widger receives $5000, Smith $3000, Hall and Roberts $1750 each, Tharps $1250, Miller $1000 and Tetrick $750. Gregg Keidel

TORONTO, December 26 - The Father-Son team of Gregg and Doug McNair were the stars of the show on Monday's abbreviated Boxing Day harness racing card at Woodbine Racetrack. Mild temperatures and consistent rain took a toll on the racing surface throughout the card, which forced officials to cancel the final three-races due to unsafe track conditions. However, the $35,400 Valedictory and $33,400 Niagara Series finals were both contested before the cancellation. Senior K delivered a gritty effort to win the Valedictory final for Team McNair. The three-year-old gelded son of Bettor's Delight shot off cover in the stretch and paced through the sloppy conditions to score a narrow victory by a head over Awesomeness in 1:54.3. Owned by Keith Waples, Senior K now has three wins in 13 starts this season and increased his 2016 earnings to $50,650 with the Valedictory score. He paid $13.80 to win. Senior K Senior K's Valedictory victory added to a big day for the McNair's. Gregg McNair sent out three horses on the card and all three visited the winner's circle, while Doug recorded a driving Grand Slam by capturing four of the nine races contested. The Niagara Series final for three-year-old pacing fillies saw Jimbelina complete a sweep of the series by scoring a four-length victory in Monday's $33,400 final. The Rene Bourassa trainee was fired out of the ten-hole and directly to the front by driver Sylvain Filion. It was lights out from there, as Jimbelina scooted around the sloppy oval for an easy 1:57 victory. Owned by Roland Trudel, Jimbelina is now a 10-time winner this season following her Niagara score. The Bourassa trainee improved her record to 10 wins in 19 starts and her seasonal earnings to $70,580 with Monday's score. Jimbelina paid $3.30 to win. Jimbelina Three-year-olds that were non-winners of $60,000 lifetime as of October 31, 2016 were eligible for nomination to the Valedictory and Niagara Series. Monday's Boxing Day card was the final card of live racing at Woodbine for 2016. Live racing resumes Saturday, January 7at 7:30 p.m.   Mark McKelvie

DOVER, Del.--- Easy Lover Hanover completed a modern day harness racing 'Cinderella story' by winning the $314,600 Hap Hansen Progress Pace in 1:49 at Dover Downs on Monday, Nov. 28 Purchased a year ago after a monumental fire whipped-out owner Brad Grant and trainer Ben Wallace's stable in Ontario, Easy Lover Hanover was purchased at the Meadowlands Sale early this year for $70,000 and it turned into a 15-race winner of more than $300,000, with a personal record 1:49 performance in the final major stake of 2016. Youthful driver Doug McNair made good use of starting from post 1 by trailing race-favorite Check Six (Yannick Gingras) through fast early fractions before finding room along the passing lane to finally pass the leader late in the stretch for the victory. Owner Brad Grant and trainer Ben Wallace were elated in the winner's circle. "He was a great horse to buy," said Wallace. "He won the first five races we had. While giving the horse some time off, we gelded him, which we had planned when we got him. After wins at Mohawk and Woodbine, we decided to put up $25,000 to supplement him to this race." Wallace continued, {Doug McNair had driven him all season for us and he did another good job tonight." Easy Lover Hanover, a son of Somebeachsomewhere- Easy GoGo, completed his sophomore season with 15 wins 4 seconds and 2 thirds. He nearly equaled his seasonal earnings with the Han Hansen Progress Pace earning lifting the total to $314,124. Allan Davis, Vic Kirby and Tim Tetrick had two winners each. PURRFECT BAGS SEEKS AVENGENCE IN $20,000 MARES OPEN  Purrfect Bags, Delaware’s own Cinderella Story female pacer seeks to avenge her odds-on losing appearance in her last start in the $20,000 Fillies and Mares Open pace on Tuesday, Nov. 29 at Dover Downs. A $2,000 weanling purchase that became a Delaware Standardbred Breeders Fund (DSBF) and stakes winning juvenile, was the overwhelming public choice last time out but after taking the early lead, the now four-year-old owned by JoAnn Looney-King faltered on the final turn and finished fourth the $20,000 Filly and Mare Open Handicap pace. Her regular driver meet leader Vic Kirby will be in the bike for trainer Jim King seeking to rebound. Last Tuesday, Legacy Racing’s Empress Deo and Allan Davis scored a wire-to-wire 1:52.3 victory in this event. Elliesjet N, driven by Jonathan Roberts, was second from start to finish for Barry Spedden, Ken Evans, Nanticoke Racing and trainer Josh Parker, her second straight runner-up performance. JFE Enterprise’s Scandalicious with Tim Tetrick starts from the outside post 8. Howard Taylor’s strong contender Shine N Shimmer drew post 1 with George Dennis driving for trainer Doug Lewis. Alongside is the only three-year-old in the lineup George Teague and Teague Racing Partnership’s stakes-seasoned Miss Me Yet handled by Montrell Teague. Rounding out the eight-female field are Chris White owned and trained competitor Fashion Showdown reined by Corey Callahan and the game veteran Matinee Dragon with Pat Berry driving for Lou Catana and co-owner trainer Vince Bradley.   Monday through Thursday racing begins at 4:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays are ‘dark days’ at the track. Fine food is available while watching the races at the acclaimed Winner's Circle Restaurant Buffet. Call 302-674-4600. Marv Bachrad

It was a harness racing challenge in the truest form of the word. Down to the last race. A win by Trevor Henry on Charmbro Curiosity in race eight had him within three points of the winner, Doug McNair. McNair finished with a scratch , awarding him 10 points to take the challenge with a total of 146 points, over Trevor Henry's 143.    The 2016 Driver's Challenge Championship, marks the second win for McNair, his first in the Challenge coming in 2012. Final standings is the challenge were as follows,   Doug McNair 146 Trevor Henry 143 Bob McClure 125 Ryan Holliday 115 Jody Jamieson 100 Alfie Carroll 87 James MacDonald 70 Nick Steward 33   Driver's Nick Steward and Ryan Holliday also tied as Clinton Raceways Top Dash Winning Drivers with 21 wins in the 2016 season. Clinton resident Jim Watt was presented on track with the 2016 training title, with 11 wins on the season. (See photo)   Over the last 35 years the Clinton event has helped to raise over $290,000 for various charities. For the second year, the beneficiary has been the Royal Canadian Legion and through the generous donation of drivers fees, a 50/50, silent auction and Chicken BBQ another approx $6000 was added to that total this year.   The 12 race card ended with four divisions of Ontario Sires Stakes, three year old filly pacers.   The season closer was the best the Huron County oval has seen all season, a record attendance, and a handle of over $57,000 was a great way to end the 2016 live season.     Jessica Carnochan

SEPT. 4, 2016 - Clinton Raceway wrapped up its 2016 season with the 36th annual Driver's Challenge and the last regular season Ontario Sire Stakes Grassroots event for the harness racing three-year-old pacing fillies. Although he did not win one of the four Grassroots divisions, driver Doug McNair earned the second Challenge title of his career, edging out rival Trevor Henry by three points. McNair's best Grassroots finish came in the first $18,000 division, when he guided Heavenly Bet to a runner-up effort behind Icthelight Hanover. Starting from Post 3, driver Jody Jamieson sent fan favourite Icthelight Hanover straight to the front and the filly rolled along through fractions of :28.3, :58.2 and 1:28 before hitting the wire two lengths on top in 1:57. Guelph, ON resident McNair and Heavenly Bet were second and Dancin Inthe Nude was third for driver James MacDonald. "That was the first time I've ever driven her, so it was a nice ride," said Moffat, ON resident Jamieson. "She handled the track real good and simply jogged." Jamieson piloted the daughter of Big Jim and Ifyoucouldcwhati C to her first sophomore Grassroots win for trainer Luc Blais of Lochaber Ouest, QC and Determination of Montreal, QC. The win will give Icthelight Hanover an opportunity to extend her three-year-old Ontario Sires Stakes campaign through the Sept. 16 Grassroots Semi-finals at Mohawk Racetrack. The second Grassroots division went to fan favourite Maxim Seelster and driver Bob McClure, who also employed front-end tactics to secure the 1:57 victory. Local filly Top Royal, owned by trainer Heather Toll of Seaforth and Brydown Farms Inc. of Clinton, finished one and three-quarter lengths back in second with Phil Hudon in the race bike and McNair was third with More Than Many. "She was really very push button. She couldn't have had anything else go her way, she just had everything absolutely in her favour," said McClure, who crafted the Big Jim daughter's second Grassroots win for trainer Rene Bourassa of Fergus and M & S Stable Inc. of Rockwood, ON. "Also I think a bunch of them at the back got roughed up, but she had lots left coming to the wire, for sure." McClure enjoyed the Driver's Challenge, in spite of the fact that he did not take home the title. "It was a lot of fun; we all had a lot of fun. I think Doug cheated," said the Elora, ON resident with a laugh. "They had a big crowd too." A third front-end effort and another 1:57 result came in the next division for driver Phil Hudon and Glorious Delight. The filly cruised home two and one-half lengths ahead of McClure and Bettys Bay and McNair and Northern Prima. "I didn't know much about her so I took a shot leaving and landed front, had good fractions and everything worked out," said Guelph resident Hudon. "She seemed like a nice filly." Hudon piloted Glorious Delight to her second Grassroots victory for trainer Dustin Jones of Waterdown, ON and owner-breeder Emerald Highlands Farm of Mount Vernon, OH. Like Icthelight Hanover and Maxim Seelster, the Bettors Delight daughter will finish among the top 20 point earners and advance to the post season. The final Grassroots winner, Selling The Dream will also appear in the Sept. 16 Semi-final. In rein to Challenge runner-up Trevor Henry, Selling The Dream sat behind pacesetter Killean Finale through fractions of :27.3, :57 and 1:27 and then sprinted down the stretch to a head victory in 1:56. Killean Finale and Jason Ryan settled for second and James MacDonald piloted Trilife to third. Dean Wall conditions Badlands Hanover daughter Selling The Dream for Donald and Sheila Murray of Kincardine, ON. A Grassroots winner at two, Sunday's win was the filly's first in Ontario Sires Stakes action this season. The top 20 point earners from the six regular season Grassroots events will now begin preparations for the Sept. 16 Semi-finals. The top five finishers from each Semi-final earn a berth in the $50,000 Grassroots Championship at Mohawk Racetrack on Sept. 24. Ontario Racing

CAMPBELLVILLE, August 1 - Bettors Dream improved to three for three to start his harness racing career with an impressive 1:53.4 victory in the Dream Maker Series Final Monday night at Mohawk Racetrack. A field of eight two-year-old pacing colts and geldings squared off in the $37,800 Dream Maker Final. Scott McEneny trainee Bettors Dream was a convincing winner in the opening leg and was made the heavy 1/5 favourite in Monday's final. The gelded son of Bettor's Delight did not race in the second leg. Driven by Doug McNair, Bettors Dream got away fifth Monday evening, while leg two winner Deadly Action blasted to the front from the outside to post an opening-quarter of :27.3. The lead didn't last long for the round two winner, as McNair made a big second-quarter move to the front with the favourite. Bettors Dream touched down on the lead just before the half and reached that panel in :58. After picking up the tempo around the final turn to reach the three-quarter pole in 1:26.1, the McEneny trainee charged home comfortably in :27.3 for another convincing victory. Deadly Action finished three-lengths back in second, while Beyond Delight was third. Bettors Dream is a graduated of the Lexington Selected Yearling Sale and was purchased for $45,000 last fall. He is owned by John Fielding, Domenic Chiaravalle and McEneny. The son of Bettor's Delight is eligible to several upcoming Grand Circuit events. McEneny noted following Monday's race that Bettors Dream will get a few weeks off before the Nassagaweya Stakes on Saturday, August 20. Bettors Dream joins an impressive list of past Dream Maker Series champions, including Big Jim, Thinking Out Loud and Control The Moment. A $2 win ticket on Bettors Dream returned $2.60. Bettors Dream No video supplied While the Dream Maker Series wrapped up Monday, the Pure Ivory Series kicked off with a field of eight rookie trotting fillies meeting up for the $14,000 first leg. Muscle Hill filly Dream Together came first up around the final turn and powered by in the lane for the 1:58.2 victory. The Luc Blais trainee was driven by Sylvain Filion, who got away fourth with the rookie trotting filly. The Erm, who was the public's choice, and driver Paul MacDonell cut the mile and led the field through panels of :29, :59.4 and 1:30 to the top of the lane. In the stretch, Dream Together was able to battle by the leader to score the maiden-breaking victory by three-quarters of a length. The Erm finished second, while Southwind Tesla was third. Dream Together was making her second career start Monday after finishing third in her debut a week ago. The Muscle Hill filly was purchased for $240,000 last fall at the Lexington Selected Yearling Sale and is owned by Determination of Montreal, Quebec. Dream Together paid $5.80 to win. Dream Together The second leg of the Pure Ivory Series will take place next Monday (August 8). Live racing continues Tuesday evening at Mohawk. Post time is 7:30 p.m. Mark McKelvie

CAMPBELLVILLE, July 18 - Just two nights after Control The Moment captured the Meadowlands Pace, the series that helped launch his harness racing career kicked off its 2016 edition at Mohawk Racetrack. The Dream Maker Series for two-year-old pacers began Monday evening with a field of nine colts and geldings clashing in the $14,000 opening leg. The Dream Maker has had many notable winners of the years and last year Control The Moment swept the series to add his first of many accomplishments to his resume. Scott McEneny trainee Bettors Dream was a good looking 1:53.1 winner in his career debut last week and the public took notice, as they made him the 3/5 favourite for Monday's first leg. Driven by Doug McNair, Bettors Dream left from post eight and was pointed towards the front. After being parked by the quarter in :27.4, the public's choice cleared to the lead, but was quickly confronted by a rival. Officer Blue Chip brushed from fourth to first and led the field by the half in :56.2. The Casie Coleman trainee fronted the field around the final turn with Bettors Dream enjoying a two-hole ride. After reaching the three-quarter pole in 1:25.4, Officer Blue Chip drifted out a few lanes at the top of the lane. McNair had open racetrack along the rail for the stretch drive and Bettors Dream quickly retook the lead. The son of Bettor's Delight was never really challenged in the lane and looked cool pacing home in :28.3 for the 1:54.3 victory. Soccer Hanover came first up around the final turn and battled hard in the lane to finish second, two-lengths behind the winner. Beyond Delight came from third over on the final turn to finish third, while Always Rock N Roll was fourth. A Lexington Selected Yearling Sale graduate, Bettors Dream was purchased for $45,000 last fall. The Bettors Delight gelding is now two for two to start his career for owners John Fielding, Domenic Chiaravalle and McEneny. Bettors Dream is the sixth foal out of Dream Away mare Enduring Delight, who has produced two winners of over $400,000. A $2 win ticket on the McEneny trainee returned $3.20. The second leg of the Dream Maker will take place next Monday (July 25).   Mark McKelvie

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