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Stewards’ Report – Harness Racing Trainer – Ashlee Neilson Date – 15 February 2017 Panel – N. Torpey; P. Zimmermann & J. Hackett Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding regarding the Total Carbon Dioxide concentration found in the pre-race blood sample taken from Mach Cullen (NZ) prior to the horse competing in Race 5 at Albion Park on 18 October 2016. Mach Cullen (NZ) was trained for this event by Ms Ashlee Neilson. After taking evidence from Ms Neilson and Dr K. Caldwell as the Manager, Veterinary Services at the Racing Science Centre, Stewards charged Ashlee Neilson with the contravention of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A which reads: “A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance For the purpose of affecting the performance or behaviour of a horse in a race or of preventing its starting in a race or Which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of a race.” Ms Neilson pleaded guilty to the charge. In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Ms Neilson’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of the case; The guilty plea entered; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards disqualified Ashlee Neilson for a period of 6 months effective immediately. Acting under the provisions of AHRR. 195 Mach Cullen NZ was disqualified from Race 5 at Albion Park on 18 October 2016 and the placings amended accordingly. Ms Neilson was advised of her rights of an Internal Review

Stewards’ Report – Harness Racing Trainer – Rachel Scott Date – 15 February 2017 Panel – N. Torpey; P. Zimmermann & J. Hackett Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding regarding the elevated Total Carbon Dioxide concentration levels found in the pre-race blood samples taken from Major Command prior to the horse competing in Race 2 at Albion Park on 19 November 2016 and Race 4 at Albion Park on 22 November 2016. Major Command was trained for both events by Ms Rachel Scott. After taking evidence from Ms Scott and Dr K. Caldwell as the Manager, Veterinary Services at the Racing Science Centre, Stewards issued the following two (2) charges against Rachel Scott pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 193(3) which reads: “A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in the race.” Specifics of the charges being: That Rachel Scott did administer or allow or cause to be administered medication, namely an alkalinising agent to Major Command on 19 November 2016 prior to it running on that day. That Rachel Scott did administer or allow or cause to be administered medication, namely an alkalinising agent to Major Command on 22 November 2016 prior to it running on that day. After carefully considering the evidence Stewards determined that both charges had been established to a reasonable satisfaction and found Ms Scott guilty on both charges. In determining the matter of guilt Stewards were of the opinion that the only creditable explanation for the elevated TCO2 levels detected in both samples was as a result of the administration of an alkalinising agent on race day. When assessing an appropriate penalty in each case Stewards acknowledged that the levels in both samples did not give rise to a positive finding. In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Ms Scott’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of each case; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards fined Rachel Scott the sum of $4,000 on each charge. Acting under the provisions of AHRR. 195 Major Command was disqualified from Race 2 at Albion Park on 19 November 2016 and from Race 4 at Albion Park on 22 November 2016. Ms Scott was advised of her rights of an Internal Review

The New York State Gaming Commission today announced significant, nation-leading action in addressing the presence of the alkaloid glaucine in the urine and plasma of harness racing horses, resulting in more than $100,000 in purses returned and 11 disqualifications, plus additional fines and suspension for a single trainer whose horses had particularly high levels of the substance. Glaucine, also known as Boldine Dimethyl Ether or 1,2,9,10-Tetramethoxyaporphine, is a potent drug with the potential to affect race performance by means of its anti-inflammatory, antitussive, bronchodilatory and hallucinogenic properties. Glaucine has not been approved as a drug for any use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) does not include glaucine in its Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances. “New York is once again leading the way when it comes to preserving integrity in horse racing,” said Commission Executive Director Robert Williams. “The Commission took deliberative action based upon solid research to hold trainers accountable for substances found in horses under their care. We call on other jurisdictions around the country to follow suit to send a clear message: we will tolerate nothing short of fair and safe horse racing.” “The New York State Gaming Commission’s action on glaucine preserves the integrity of the internationally renowned horse racing we host in New York State,” said Peter Arrigenna, a prominent New York harness horse owner and Trustee for the Agriculture and New York State Horse Breeding Development Fund (New York Sire Stakes). “Glaucine has been a hot topic in the harness racing world for the past year, and thanks to New York’s prudent action on this substance, the industry has a clear path forward in how to best handle future cases.” Over the past year, the Commission found 55 instances of horses with glaucine in their systems at levels greater than 100 pg/ml. As is standard practice, all impacted horses were immediately put on the Stewards List, which prevents a horse from entering any future races until the horse is tested and found negative for the presence of any illegal substance. Of the 55 instances found by the Commission, 11 were found to have levels higher than 500 pg/ml. For these cases, the Commission ordered that the horses be disqualified from the applicable races and any purses won by the owners of those horses be returned, totaling $103,530. Trainer Richard Johnson twice raced the horse “Rubber Duck” at Yonkers Raceway with glaucine levels far greater than 1 ng/ml. In addition to the disqualification and purse return totaling $61,660, Johnson is facing a 45-day suspension and $1,500 fine. A complete list of horses that had elevated levels of glaucine may be found here. The Commission began finding elevated glaucine levels in January 2016, but reserved issuing rulings pending further investigation. Over the past year, the Commission and the New York Drug Testing and Research Laboratory have collaborated with other jurisdictions and national racing organizations to conduct research on glaucine, which may be naturally found in wood shavings used to line horses’ stalls. New research conducted by New York and Pennsylvania officials substantiate that glaucine levels of 500 pg/ml or greater in a horse on raceday indicate that the horse was introduced to a potentially efficacious dose of the substance on race day. Therefore, the Commission’s Rule 4120.2(n) applies, which states that no drugs or medications – other than those specifically exempted - may be administered by any means within one week of the scheduled post time of the race in which the horse is to compete and that it is the trainer's responsibility to prevent such ingestion within such one-week period. Most recently, the Racing Medication & Testing Consortium’s (RMTC) Glaucine Task Force and Science Advisory Committee – both of which include New York State Equine Medical Director Scott E. Palmer, VMD – recommended applying two thresholds for the presence of glaucine in a race horse. The Commission’s actions today – and going forward – are based on these standards and disqualifying a horse that violates such thresholds: > 500 pg/ml = Disqualification, loss of purse and Stewards List > 1 ng/ml = Disqualification, loss of purse, Stewards List and additional penalties, including fines and suspension The Commission will continue to place horses that test in excess of 100 pg/ml for glaucine on the Stewards List and require those horses to test below such concentration before being permitted to race again. Horses testing in excess of 500 pg/ml will incur penalties as described above. Per Equine Medical Director Dr. Palmer, environmental contamination is avoidable by the adoption of simple stable management practices: ·         Stalls should not be bedded with bulk wood shavings that may contain tulip poplar material on a chronic basis or during the week that a horse races. Do not administer any product or plant material, whether purchased online, compounded or otherwise, that may contain glaucine. NYS Gaming Commission

Harness Racing New South Wales Stewards today concluded the Inquiry into the presentation of VINNY CHASE to race at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 June 2016, when subsequent to it winning race 4 on that date a urine sample taken from it was found to contain the prohibited substances boldenone, nandrolone and 5 alpha – estran-3 beta, 17 alpha-diol. A further sample taken from the horse at its stables on 15 July 2016 also detected prohibited substances boldenone, nandrolone and 5 alpha – estran-3 beta, 17 alpha-diol. HRNSW Stewards convened an Inquiry into the substances being detected in the two urine samples on 28 September and 20 November 2016. Mrs McCarthy was issued with the following charges pursuant to the Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) on 28 September 2016: AHRR 190.  (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. AHRR 190A.          (1)  When a sample taken at any time from a horse being trained or cared for by a licensed person has detected in it any prohibited substance specified in sub-rule (2):- (a)  The trainer and any other person who was in charge of such horse at the relevant time shall be guilty of an offence.   On 20 November 2016, Mrs McCarthy, accompanied by her legal representatives Ms Valerie Heath of Counsel, Solicitor Mr Matthew Hammond and Professor Whittem, provided evidence and submissions in defence of the charges. On 15 December 2016, HRNSW found Mrs McCarthy guilty of both charges via a written decision. Submissions on the matter of penalty were invited and these were received by HRNSW on 30 January 2017. The submissions made the following points: That Mrs McCarthy was only the trainer of VINNY CHASE for some 20 clear days prior to the race in question; There is inconclusive evidence that Mrs McCarthy was responsible for the administration of the substances; That as the trainer of the horses Mrs McCarthy carries the absolute responsibility to ensure horses in her care are presented to race free of any prohibited substances; The specific nature of the substances detected; Mrs McCarthy’s clean record, the number of horses in her care, lack of motive; Supporting character references. HRNSW Stewards considered the submissions when balanced with an appropriate penalty in a disciplinary regime where the aim of this action is to ensure the integrity of the industry and for those associated with the industry to understand the consequences of their non-compliance with the Rules. The Stewards were also mindful of the following factors to determine penalty: The nature of the substance; The scientific evidence regarding the elimination of such substances; The HRNSW Penalty Guidelines; Mrs McCarthy’s licence and disciplinary record; The personal subjective factors relevant to Mrs McCarthy. Stewards have determined that Mrs McCarthy should be disqualified for a period of 12 months and fined $5000. The period of disqualification is backdated to 22 August 2016 the date upon which Mrs McCarthy was stood down pursuant to Rule 183. Acting under Rule 195 the Stewards further ordered that VINNY CHASE be disqualified as the winner of Race 4 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 June 2016. Stewards further ordered that subject to Rule 190AA(4),  VINNY CHASE is not permitted to start in any race before 15 July 2017 and only after the production of an Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Clearing Certificate. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards conducted an Inquiry yesterday into a report received from the Australian Government National Measurement Institute that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a post-race urine sample taken from Apollo Thirteen NZ following its win in race 2, conducted at Newcastle on Saturday 22 October 2016. Licensed trainer-driver Mr Shannon Lindsay appeared at the Inquiry and provided evidence regarding the horse Apollo Thirteen NZ and his husbandry practices. Evidence including the Reports of Analysis was presented to the Inquiry. HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Don Colantonio also provided evidence to the Inquiry. HRNSW Stewards issued the following charge against Mr Lindsay pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1), (2) & (4) as follows: AHRR 190.  (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence…. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. Mr Lindsay was found guilty of that charge and disqualified for a period of four years to commence from 15 December 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following: The serious nature of this offence; Mr Lindsay’s not guilty plea; Mr Lindsay’s first offence for a Prohibited Substance; Class 1 Prohibited Substance under the HRNSW Penalty Guidelines; Level of substance detected (240 ug/L); Mr Lindsay’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, Stewards disqualified Apollo Thirteen NZ from the abovementioned race. In addition, acting under the provisions of AHRR 195A, Stewards also disqualified Apollo Thirteen NZ from Race 1, conducted at Tabcorp Park Menangle on Sunday 30 October 2016. Mr Lindsay was advised of his right to appeal these decisions.   MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed Tasmanian trainer Mr Rohan Hillier.  AHRR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Hillier related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Ryley Major’ after it had been presented to race at the Melton harness racing meeting on 7 July 2016 in Race 1, the ‘Empire Stallions Vicbred Super Series (3YO Colts and Geldings) Bronze Pace.   Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the investigation Mr Hillier explained he had not used any arsenic based product upon Ryley Major and that the only explanation he could provide for the finding was fence posts which had been chewed or some pine shavings which had been used as floor covering where the horse was stabled.  Subsequent analysis of relevant samples revealed the fence posts contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing the need for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic.  Mr Hillier pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  The HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Hillier guilty though imposed no penalty in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as tonics that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne and the analysis of the fence posts from Mr Hillier’s property.  The RAD Board also noted Mr Hillier’s guilty plea and his previous record. The RAD Board considered Mr Hillier’s lengthy involvement in the sport with a training career stretching over 25 years and involving more than 1,400 horses being presented to race.   The RAD Board considered the principles of the High Court decision of Veen v the Queen when taking into account Mr Hillier’s prior matters.  The RAD Board also considered other precedent cases involving the substance, including the matter of Rasmussen in Queensland in 2015 whereby no penalty was imposed for such an arsenic case.    The HRV RAD Board ordered under AHRR 195 that ‘Ryley Major’ be disqualified from Race 1 at Melton on 7 July 2016, and that the placings be amended accordingly.  Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing South Australia stewards today suspended the trainers licence of Mario Borg, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. This action was taken after receiving a report from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from ITS BEDLAM after it competed in Race 8, Book a Xmas Night At Globe Derby Pace, at Globe Derby on 12 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample was sent to the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in Sydney and has been confirmed. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including submissions provided by Mr Borg as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates from  approved drug testing laboratories have been received which confirmed the presence of dexamethasone; the nature of the substance; the absolute nature of Rule 190 offences; the obligation of HRSA to protect the harness racing industry. Mr Borg has not been charged with any offence and has been advised of his appeal rights against the imposition of Rule 183. No date for the inquiry has been set. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Francesca Carbone pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from PROMINENT ART following its first placing in Race 1, Jubilee Room New Menu Pace at Globe Derby on 5 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample has been confirmed by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in New South Wales. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Ms Carbone as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates had been received from approved drug testing laboratories confirming the presence of dexamethasone which is conclusive evidence of the presence of a prohibited substance. the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Ms Carbone has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Mark Billinger pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from RAP ARTIST prior to its second placing in the Just Wrecking Toyotas Pace Final at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Billinger as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Billinger has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards ............................................................................   On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing SA (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Nick Tardio pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from GENUINE EXCUSE prior to its seventh placing in Race 9, Farewell Come On Frank Pace at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Tardio as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Tardio has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

Harness Racing Victoria Stewards and veterinarians have been collecting out of competition blood samples from yearlings scheduled to be sold at the upcoming Australian Pacing Gold (APG) Sales in Melbourne on Sunday 5 February 2017. All blood samples collected have been subjected to testing by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) on their steroid screening test, which covers over 40 substances, and is understood to be the most comprehensive screening test in operation in Australia. RASL report that all of the analysed samples are clear of steroids. HRV wish to acknowledge the significant support of APG in assisting HRV’s efforts to ensure compliance with the national harness racing rules, introduced in May 2014, which banned the use of steroids at all times. Harness Racing Victoria

Following Harness Racing New South Wales' endless commitment to fight against the use of illegal and banned substances, more than 40 out-of-competition swab samples have been collected over the past two days. These samples were taken from horses that are competing at Tabcorp Park Menangle this Saturday night. This strategy follows tests obtained from horses that were engaged at Penrith last Thursday week and also Tabcorp Park Menangle last Saturday night and HRNSW Integrity Officers will continue collecting more samples according to Chairman of Stewards Graham Loch. "This strategy will be continued in coming weeks as feature meetings and Carnival of Cups race meetings wind up," Loch said. "In addition, whilst our recent focus has been close to Sydney similar visits are planned across the state." For further information please contact Graham Loch at (02) 9722 6600 or gloch@hrnsw.com.au AMANDA RANDO

The NZ Racing Laboratory Services has advised the Racing Integrity Unit of irregularities in the urine samples taken from the horses Fatima Siad in Race 11 at the Timaru Harness Racing Club meeting on Saturday 19 November 2016 and Raukapuka Ruler in Race 1 at the NZMTC meeting on Friday 16 December 2016. Both horses are trained in Canterbury by Mr C Dalgety.   The irregularities are to Cobalt which in New Zealand Harness Racing is a prohibited substance at a level above 200 ug/L.    RIU Officials are conducting an investigation and no further comment will be made until the investigation has been completed.    A previous cobalt positive in harness racing was caused by contamination in a feed supplement.    Mike Godber  General Manager  Racing Integrity Unit

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today concluded the inquiry opened on 2 November 2106 into the analysts finding of Dexamethasone in the urine samples taken from the registered Standardbred Plain Dream from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016. Plain Dream was trained for these events by John Edmunds. Dexamethasone is a potent synthetic member of the glucocorticoid class of steroid hormones that acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant. After considering the evidence presented Stewards charged John Edmunds with two (2) breaches of Australian Harness Racing Rule 190(1) which reads: 190      (1)        A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances Charge 1 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Charge 2 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Mr Edmunds pleaded guilty to both charges.   In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Mr Edmund’s previous record relating to this type of matter; Ms Edmund’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of this case; The guilty plea entered The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards deemed that in relation to Charge 1 a fine of $5,000 be imposed and in relation to Charge 2 a fine of $5,000 be imposed. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 190(5) Plain Dream was disqualified from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 and the placings amended accordingly. Mr Edmunds was advised of his rights of an Internal Review. Stewards’ Report – Harness Trainer – John Edmunds Date – 22 December 2016 Panel – N. Torpey; L. Wilson & E. Little

Fabrice Souloy, who is one of the leading harness racing trainers in France, is one of five trainers who have been suspended and fined after findings of Cobalt in tests. It was after a race in Cabourg, Normandy, in July, that Lover Face trained by Souloy came up with a positive test for Cobalt. Some weeks after it was announced that four more trotters trained by Souloy had tested positive for Cobalt in Sweden and Norway in races like the Elitlopp and Oslo Grand Prix. However, these cases are still under investigation. On Monday (Dec. 26) the French Trotting Association Le Trot made it public that five trainers -- including Souloy -- each had been fined $15,500 and their licenses were revoked for one year, starting Jan. 2, 2017. Souloy is nicknamed Mr. Group 1 as he has trained the winners of more than 70 Group 1 races all over Europe. In France horses trained by Souloy earned around $4 million this year. by Karsten Bønsdorf, USTA Newsroom Senior Correspondent

Pending RAD Board Hearing – Rohan Hillier - Harness Racing Victoria Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Rohan Hillier under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Ryley Major was presented to race at Melton on 7 July 2016 by Mr Hillier when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Jodi Quinlan HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Ms Jodi Quinlan under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Sky Majesty was presented to race at Bendigo on 22 June 2016 by Ms Quinlan when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Andrew Gath HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Andrew Gath under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse K D Muscles NZ was presented to race at Horsham on 14 March 2016 by Mr Gath when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.  

As a result of a hearing held on Nov. 30, the New Jersey Racing Commission has suspended harness racing trainer Ake Svanstedt 15 days and fined him $500 as a result of a positive test on Resolve in the $273,600 John Cashman Jr. Memorial Trot on Aug. 6 at the Meadowlands. Svanstedt also received a second positive on his trotter Blue Muse, who won an $8,000 amateur race on Aug. 5 at the Meadowlands with his wife, Sarah, driving, and received the same penalties. The positives were for Dexamethasone, which is a Class C violation as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International. With Ake Svanstedt driving, Resolve won the Cashman in a career-best 1:50.2, besting Obrigado by 1-1/4 lengths. As a result of the positive test and subsequent disqualification of Resolve, Obrigado is now the official winner of the race. According to the New Jersey ruling, Svanstedt's two 15-day suspensions will be served consecutively, starting on Jan. 2, 2017, and continuing through and including Jan. 31, 2017. The ruling also states that "in addition to the penalty issued, a total of two Multiple Medication Violation points, as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International, shall be assigned as a result of these Class C violations."   Resolve (Ake Svanstedt) John Cashman Memorial TVG FFA Trot     Courtesy of harnessracing.com 

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