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ON Monday October 31, 2016, Harness Racing New South Wales Stewards commenced an investigation into the apparent administration of a medication to the registered standardbred A MATTER OF COURSE which was engaged to race at the Newcastle meeting that day.  That horse was subsequently scratched from the race by order of Stewards. On that night evidence was taken from Mr G Chapple, the licensed trainer of the horse A MATTER OF COURSE, Mr M Chapple who attended the horse, the Official Starter and the raceday Veterinary Surgeon.  Samples were taken from A MATTER OF COURSE for analysis as well a jar of ointment that was confiscated.  Analysis by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory confirmed the prohibited substance menthol was detected in the sample taken from A MATTER OF COURSE.  By letter on April 18, 2017, Stewards notified Mr Chapple of charges laid against him. By email on Friday, April 28, 2017, through his legal representative, Mr Chapple pleaded guilty to the charges and provided detailed submissions in respect to penalty. On Monday, May 23, 2017, HRNSW Stewards convened to consider the submissions entered on the trainer’s behalf and to determine the penalties in the matters. Charge 1 – Pursuant to HRR 192(1) and (3) which state: (1)  No person, unless he has first obtained the permission of the Stewards, shall have in his possession either on a racecourse or in any motor vehicle or trailer being used for the purpose of travelling to or from a racecourse any prohibited substance or a syringe, needle or other instrument which could be used – (3)  A person who fails to comply with sub rule (1) or with a term or condition imposed under sub rule (2) is guilty of an offence. The Stewards announced a fine of $500. Charge 2 – Pursuant to HRR 193 (3), (6) & (8) which state: (3)  A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in a race. (6)  For the purposes of this Rule, medication means any treatment with drugs or other substances. (8)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rules (1), (2), (3) or (7) is guilty of an offence. Mr G Chapple admitted instructing his son, driver Mr M Chapple, to apply medication to the horse on race day. The Stewards announced Mr G Chapple be disqualified for a period of six (6) months. Charge 3 – Pursuant to Rules 190 (1), (2) & (4): (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. The Stewards announced Mr G Chapple be disqualified for a period of six (6) months. In determining these penalties the Stewards noted Mr Chapple’s pleas, his previous disciplinary record, the circumstances of the offence and the subjectives advanced on his behalf, including his cooperation with and before the Stewards. The Stewards ordered that this penalty be served concurrently with the penalty announced in regards to Charge 2. Stewards also ordered that the penalty take effect from midnight Tuesday, May 23, 2017.  Mr G Chapple was advised of his right to appeal the decisions of Stewards. Mr Mitch Chapple – Inquiry Concluded FURTHER to the proceedings at Newcastle on October 31, 2017, Mr M Chapple was notified by letter details dated April 18, 2017, of a charge laid against him. By email on Friday, April 28, 2017, through his legal representative, Mr Chapple pleaded guilty to the charges and provided detailed submissions in regards to penalty. On Monday, May 23, 2017, HRNSW Stewards convened to consider the submission entered on Mr M Chapple’s behalf and to determine a penalty in the matter. Charge 1 – Pursuant to HRR 193 (3), (6) & (8) (3)  A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in a race. (6)  For the purposes of this Rule, medication means any treatment with drugs or other substances. (8)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rules (1), (2), (3) or (7) is guilty of an offence. Before Stewards Mr M Chapple had admitted applying medication, being a chest rub ointment, to the horse, A MATTER OF COURSE on the race day and prior to racing.  The Stewards announced a penalty of a fine of $1000 of which $500 was ordered be suspended on the proviso that Mr M Chapple not be found guilty of a breach of any of the rules relating to prohibited substances within a period of 12 months from this date. In determining this penalty the Stewards noted Mr Chapple’s plea, his previous good disciplinary record, the particular circumstances of the offence, as acting under the direction of his parent being the horse’s trainer, and the subjectives advanced on his behalf, including his (young) age and cooperation with and before the Stewards. Mr M Chapple was advised of his right to appeal the decision of the Stewards. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Schenectady, NY --- The New York State Gaming Commission today indefinitely suspended harness owner, trainer and driver Michael S. Weiner for racing four horses at Monticello Raceway doped with mitragynine, a dangerous drug with performance enhancing and analgesic effects similar to cocaine and morphine. Commonly known as Kratom and derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa that grows only in Southeast Asia, there is no legitimate reason for mitragynine to be found in any race horse. Kratom is a controlled substance in many countries and has been declared a “drug of concern” by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency with no known legitimate industrial, agrochemical, chemical, human or veterinary medical use. The drug was found in Weiner’s horses through the introduction of an analytical detection methodology by the New York Drug Testing and Research Program (NYDTRP). To date, it has not been identified in any other racing jurisdiction. After the NYDTRP identified the presence of Kratom, the lab conducted a drug administration trial to substantiate that administration had occurred within one week of the horses’ races in clear violation of Commission rules. “This dangerous drug has no business anywhere in horse racing,” said Ronald Ochrym, the Commission’s Director of Horse Racing and Pari-Mutuel Wagering. “Thanks to the innovative work of the New York Drug Testing and Research Program, this individual is no longer participating in the sport and we are on the lookout for additional cheaters.” Weiner trained four horses that raced at Monticello Raceway on February 2, 3 and 7, 2017. Bupa Bruiser finished first in the third race at Monticello on February 2, 2017 French Lick finished fifth in the third race at Monticello on February 3, 2017 Vernon Belle finished second in the seventh race at Monticello on February 3, 2017 Majestic Jo finished first in the fifth race at Monticello on February 7, 2017 All four horses have been disqualified and Weiner’s share of purses in the above mentioned races have been ordered returned. Effective today, Weiner is summarily suspended and is excluded from all New York tracks. Upon full adjudication by the Commission, Weiner could ultimately have his license to participate revoked and face up to $25,000 in fines per violation. A hearing on the matter is currently scheduled for June 2. What is Mitragynine? Click here. More here Chemists study the neurochemistry of alkaloids from the Mitragyna plant In study after study, Mitragynine is called out as the most prevalent and potent alkaloid in the kratom leaf’s arsenal. Unintentional Fatal Intoxications with Mitragynine by Lee Park, director of communications, New York State Gaming Commission 

Racing Integrity Unit general manager Mike Godber is defending his organisation's consistency around cobalt positives. Earlier this week, Canterbury harness racing trainer Cran Dalgety was hit with a $32,000 fine for presenting five horses to race with cobalt levels in excess of the 200 ug/L (micrograms per litre) threshold for the prohibited substance. Importantly, the Racing Integrity Unit (RIU) and the Judicial Control Authority (JCA), who handed down the penalty, agreed that Dalgety was guilty of negligence but did not intentionally administer cobalt or any other prohibited substance. Dalgety, a highly successful trainer best known for guiding the career of champion pacer Christen Me, questioned why Southland trainer Shane Walkinshaw escaped a presenting charge when two of his horses returned positive swabs for cobalt in late 2015. But Godber said attempting to compare the two cases was "drawing a long bow". Walkinshaw purchased an over the counter product and the label confirmed a small and legal amount of cobalt was present in the ingredients. However, the batch was contaminated and in fact contained 190 times the amount that was advertised. "In the Walkinshaw case we asked what more could he have done to prevent it and the answer was not a lot," Godber said. A raft of tests were done on the supplement and the Walkinshaw-trained Not Bad to determine that the product had been manufactured incorrectly. Both the supplier and the manufacturer took responsibility. Godber said the Dalgety case was different because the supplement, McGrouthers Equine Mineral Mix, was labelled as containing cobalt but it did not identify the amount. He said that put a significant responsibility on Dalgety to identify the level of cobalt in the product which he did not do. "If you look at the Dalgety case, it did not meet the criteria for there not to be a charge because there was clearly more he could have done," Godber said. He added that Dalgety's case was not helped by the fact the product was not being used by any other trainers in New Zealand and was not sold on a large commercial basis. Dalgety's counter to that argument was that he had been using the product without issue for more than 10 years and the label of the supplement said "will not return a positive swab" and "Licensed under Animal Remedies Act 1967 No 3392". It was later found to have not been licensed since at least 1997. The JCA decision said Dalgety's culpability was his failure to obtain appropriate advice on the use of a product containing cobalt after Harness Racing New Zealand (HRNZ) introduced a cobalt threshold 200 ug/L in May 2015. Godber added that products that were licensed under the act could still contain ingredients that were prohibited under the rules of racing. "It's really a case of buyer beware. The onus is on the trainer to make sure the product is free of any prohibited substances. "The message is, if you are in any doubt do not use the product until you have spoken to your vet." Dalgety also raised another case where two Canterbury trainers were not charged when they returned positive swabs for caffeine in 2013 that was also proven to be from a feed supplement. Godber said that was because the product did not show any signs of caffeine on its label and both trainers had sought veterinary advice. Dalgety described his $32,000 fine as excessive but Godber, who reiterated the value of the fine was set by the JCA, said he did not believe the fine was unreasonable given it was Dalgety's third offence in eight years. The RIU submitted for a fine between $36,000 and $86,250 but because it deemed the offence to be at the lower end of the scale, expected a penalty close to the $36,000 mark. Dalgety's two previous positives (caffeine and bute) were deemed to be unintentional with the caffeine being a result of contaminated feed and the wrong horse being treated with bute by stable staff. The RIU acknowledged Dalgety had been fully cooperative throughout their investigation. WHAT IS COBALT? Cobalt is an essential trace element that is naturally occurring in horses, dogs and other mammals but has been demonstrated to have an effect on the blood system by stimulating the production of red blood cells making for a similar effect to Erythropoietin (EPO) doping. By Mat Kermeen Reprinted with permission of Stuff

On Thursday May 11, 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards conducted an Inquiry into a report received from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory that plasma Total Carbon Dioxide (TCO2) above the prescribed threshold was detected in a pre-race blood sample taken from MINCARLIE prior to race 7, THE 102.9 KOFM BATTLERS STAKES (2030 metres) conducted at Newcastle on Saturday April 8, 2017. The “B” sample was confirmed by the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (Racing Science Centre). Mr Potts appeared at the Inquiry. Evidence including the Reports of Analysis was presented.  Evidence was taken from Mr Potts regarding the training of MINCARLIE and his husbandry practices and also presented to the Inquiry by HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Don Colantonio. Mr Potts was issued with the following charges pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR): Charge 1:      AHRR 196A(1)(ii) for administering to MINCARLIE a prohibited substance which was detected in a sample taken from that horse prior to the running of a race. Charge 2:      AHRR 190(1),(2) & (4) for presenting MINCARLIE to race not free of a prohibited substance. Charge 3: AHRR 193(3) & (6) for administering to MINCARLIE a medication on race day prior to that horse running in a race. Mr Potts was found guilty of all charges.  Stewards issued the following penalties, and ordered the penalties be served concurrently: Charge 1:      2 years disqualification Charge 2: 5 years disqualification Charge 3: 9 months disqualification In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following; This was Mr Pott’s second Prohibited Substance offence; Class 2 Prohibited Substance; The level detected being greater than 39.0 mmol/L; Mr Pott’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of Rule 195, MINCARLIE was disqualified from the abovementioned race. Mr Potts was advised of his right to appeal these decisions. Harness Racing NSW (HRNSW) is the controlling body for harness racing in New South Wales with responsibility for commercial and regulatory management of the industry including 33 racing clubs across the State.  HRNSW is headed by a Board of Directors and is independent of Government.   Michael Prentice                            Integrity Manager

On April 6, 2017, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) released a Memorandum to the Canadian horse racing industry. "The CPMA would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations." On April 21, 2017, the CPMA released another Memorandum with additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds. "Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse." A copy of these CPMA memos are attached to this bulletin. As a result, effective May 1, 2017 Amended General Directive No. 2/2015 (attached) addressing enhanced testing for cobalt, is no longer in force. Please refer to the attached GENERAL DIRECTIVE NO. 2 - 2017 - Rescinding Enhanced Cobalt Testing Directive. The AGCO issues this Information Bulletin as a service. AGCO licensees are expected to know the Rules of Racing, closely review all memos from the CPMA, and keep up to date on the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs. Disponible en français. Additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds – April 21, 2017 Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse. As you may know, several provinces have been testing for cobalt for the past couple of years. The provincial testing of cobalt was in blood only, using a threshold of 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL). The CPMA added cobalt to the list of quantitatively prohibited substances (section 2 of the schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations) in February of this year. After much research and collaboration with international regulators, it was determined that the thresholds for cobalt would be 25 ng/mL in blood and 100 ng/mL in urine. These levels are consistent with thresholds used in many other international jurisdictions. The CPMA's research indicates that vitamin supplements, when used alone and according to label directions, should not increase cobalt levels enough to cause a positive test. In addition, our research indicates that when horses were allowed free access to cobalt-containing salt blocks, there was little to no effect on the horse's cobalt levels. Cobalt levels may build up over time when given repeatedly, and its elimination from the horse can take an extended period of time. It is always good practice to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie   Implementation of cobalt testing under the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's Equine Drug Control Program – April 6, 2017 The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. It should be noted that cobalt testing in Canada will move from provincial oversight to the CPMA under its official Equine Drug Control Program as of May 1, 2017. The CPMA would also like to advise the horse racing industry that the quantitative threshold for cobalt testing will decrease from 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) to 25 ng/mL in blood and that a new threshold of 100 ng/mL will be implemented in urine. These thresholds are published in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. The CPMA would like to remind industry participants to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie

Bathurst harness racing trainer Nathan Turnbull was won the right to continue to train despite a first sample taken from Destiny Warrior showing a irregularity to cocaine after he won at Dubbo in February. Turnbull told Fairfax Media that Destiny Warrior had returned a swab positive to cocaine in his first sample from his win on February 22, but said if the second sample confirmed the result, he would be defending the charge. "I can't make any comment about it at the moment," he said. Harness Racing NSW stewards had stood down Turnbull under rule 183 last week, but he appealed the ruling on Monday and the NSW Racing Tribunal overturned the decision after an admission by a third party who admitted using the drug on the way to the races. At Turnbull's appeal against the standing down, the third party – know as the user – "made full and frank admissions" to stewards that he had handled Destiny Warrior and its gear before the race after using cocaine. To read the full article written by Chris Roots click here

On Thursday April 20, 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards suspended the licences of trainer/driver, Ms Kylie Hughes, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRNSW took these measures after receiving a report from Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a post-race urine sample taken from CAMELOT SPEEDSTAR following its win in race 2, the RANDALL JONES AUTOMOTIVE PACE (1900 metres) conducted at Broken Hill on Friday March 17, 2017. The “B” sample and associated control sample have been sent to the Racing Science Centre (QRIC) in Queensland for confirmatory testing. HRNSW Stewards considered all available evidence at that time and determined that Rule 183 should be invoked based on the following factors: The fact that a certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected; The level of the reading relative to the permissible threshold; The serious nature of the substance; The absolute nature of AHRR 190 offences; The likely penalty of a significant period of disqualification if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The high unlikelihood that AHRR 256 will have any application if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The fact that HRNSW Policy in recent years has been to apply suspensions pursuant to AHRR 183 upon the receipt of one positive certificate; The fact that this is not a finding of guilt and that this will militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension; (i) The fact that an offence against AHRR 190 does not involve any aspect of intent and that this must further militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension Ms Hughes has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her rights of appeal against the imposition of Rule 183. HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation into this sample result and an Inquiry will be scheduled in due course.   MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Wednesday, April 19, 2017) — Increased out-of-competition testing, investing in additional investigators and research into emerging threats is the most effective way to catch — and, more importantly, deter — cheating in horse racing. That was the big take-away from the drug-testing forum on opening day of the Association of Racing Commissioners International’s 83rd annual conference on Equine Welfare and Racing Integrity at the Charleston Marriott. The panel featured Dr. Scott Stanley of the University of California, Davis, which conducts that state’s horse-racing testing; Dr. Anthony Fontana of Truesdail Laboratories; and, speaking via teleconferencing, Dr. George Maylin, the longtime director of the New York Equine Drug Testing and Research Laboratory. Also on the panel was Brice Cote, a former standardbred driver and detective in New Jersey State Police’s racetrack unit who heads the integrity efforts at The Meadowlands, Tioga and Vernon Downs harness tracks. Even if the panelists expressed varying beliefs on the prevalence of rules-violators, they all emphasized the importance of out-of-competition testing — taking samples from horses in between races — as a way to detect substances that no longer show in traditional blood or urine tests from samples taken immediately after a race but still could have an impact on a horse’s performance. "The only way we're going to stop this is by intelligence-based policing and out-of-competition testing," Cote said. “Most jurisdictions have very good drug testing,” Stanley said afterward. “We do robust testing, and most of the labs are accredited as well. Now we look at big challenges. And when you look at big challenges, you can make those mountains into molehills, or you can take them off one at a time and get them knocked down. We are doing both. We are taking the ones that have legitimate concerns for the industry, like cobalt when that came up. We found that, set a threshold, established rules and made that go away — quickly. Steroids, anabolic and corticosteroids, those now are well-regulated. This are big wins for the industry. They weren’t low-hanging fruit either. We still have some challenges that have now climbed the tree, they’re higher up. And we need to knock those off.” Stanley discussed the potential of “biological passports” as a tool, in its infancy of development for equines, that could be used in out-of-competition testing. The testing would provide a baseline result to which subsequent testing both pre-race and between races could be compared. “If they change abruptly, if the bio-markers tell us this horse was given an anabolic agent, we don’t have to detect it,” he said of the exact substance. “We’d be able to say, ‘This horse cannot naturally produce this profile. It has to be enhanced.’” “Informed testing, focused testing and targeting testing is something we need to put more emphasis on,” said ARCI president Ed Martin. “Out of competition testing should be expanded, but it’s real value doesn’t come until you’ve expended the research dollars to be able to detect the substances not being detected in the existing out-of-competition testing.” Also Tuesday: A panel of administrative veterinarians discussed keeping horses’ treatment records and the trust issues that arise among equine practitioners, horsemen and regulators as to proper use. Dr. Scott Palmer, New York’s equine medical director, said that regulators getting horses’ treatment records can benefit horsemen and veterinarians because of the research made possible. He noted that Depo-Medrol was the most popular corticosteroid used in joint injections up until 2012. Unknown at the time, the medication could pool in other tissue and stick around longer when used in hocks and stifles, trickier joints than ankles, Palmer said. “We discovered that Depo-Medrol could be found in the joint in a blood test of a horse as long as 100 days after the administration period,” he said. “The idea that you go on the (Racing Medication & Testing Consortium) guidelines and see 21 days for Depo-Medrol is a risky business. It wasn’t accurate, because there was such a variation in the amount of time that the Depo-Medrol would be discoverable in a post-race blood test.” Palmer said that, with what was learned from knowing the location of injections and the timing of administration, veterinarians were cautioned about using Depo-Medrol in the first place. He said that today in New York if a veterinarian uses Depo-Medrol, the horse must be tested for the substance before running. “That’s a good example how we can use the research findings from the medical records, the treatment records to protect people and help create a better regulatory policy,” Palmer said. A morning panel brought various perspectives on how to promote the good in horse racing while not ignoring issues facing the sport. Wagner to players: ‘Regulators do strive to get it right’ Judy Wagner, outgoing ARCI chair and horse racing’s First Lady of Handicapping, had a message for her fellow horseplayers. Wagner is the 2001 National Horseplayers Championship winner, the horseplayers’ representative on the board of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association and the vice chair of the Louisiana Racing Commission. With her one-year term as ARCI chair ending Thursday, she’ll hand the baton to chair-elect Jeff Colliton of the Washington Horse Racing Commission. “As a horseplayer — and this is a message that I want to get across to horseplayers: Regulators do strive to get it right,” she told the audience at the Charleston Marriott for the three-day conference. “We really want to make the players, everybody in the industry, feel that we have an industry of integrity. “Let handicappers know that they have a product that they can respect; they don’t have to handicap the rumors that this trainer is doping horses or whatever. And saying that, I wish that we could educate the public that there is a difference between d-o-p-e and legal medication to help the horse. There is a place for therapeutic drugs.” Committee recommends banning Clenbuterol for Quarter Horses The Quarter Horse Racing Committee voted 5-3 to recommend amending the ARCI model rule to prohibit the bronchodilator Clenbuterol in Quarter Horse and mixed-breed races, with testing in blood serum and plasma, urine and hair permitted. The recommendation now goes to the Drug Testing Standards and Practices Committee for consideration, then the Model Rules Committee and ultimately the ARCI board, if approved at each step. Clenbuterol is a useful therapeutic medication to treat respiratory ailments, but its abuse to build muscle mass sparked American Quarter Horse Association officials to request that it be completely banned in their breed. The abuse is not seen with Thoroughbreds, for which such muscle build-up could impede running that breed’s longer distances, officials said. The AQHA officials requested that the rule be breed-specific. “We don’t feel it is our job to take it away from other breeds,” said Janet VanBebber, the AQHA’s chief racing officer. “But we readily acknowledge that there is abuse within our breed of the sport.” The three racing jurisdictions voting against the recommendation said they thought it should be banned for all breeds. Ed Martin ARCI president

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Rule of Harness Racing (ARHR) 190(1) against licensed trainer Mr Boris Devcic.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under ARHR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Devcic related to a post-race urine sample taken from the horse ‘Noble Julius’ after it won Race 7, the ‘Weightman’s Packing & Stationary Pace’, at Mildura on 23 November 2016.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain the prohibited substance caffeine.  The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) in NSW reported confirmation of these findings in the reserve portion of the relevant urine sample. Mr Devcic pleaded guilty to the charge before submissions on penalty were heard from HRV Stewards and Mr Devcic. Further evidence was also heard from RASL Scientific Manager Mr Paul Zahra.  In deciding an appropriate penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered Mr Devcic’s guilty plea and co-operation throughout the investigation, Mr Devcic’s record in regard to prohibited substance matters where a previous offence was some 17 years prior, both general and specific deterrence, consistency of penalty and the absolute liability nature of the offence. Mr Devcic was subsequently fined $6000. The HRV RAD Board also ordered that ‘Noble Julius’ be disqualified from Race 7 at Mildura on 23 November 2016, under ARHR 195, and that the finishing places be amended accordingly. Harness Racing Victoria

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Tuesday, April 18, 2017) — Are our testing laboratories catching the cheaters? And are our racing officials getting it right? Those are among the hot-button topics that promise insightful and lively discussion at the ARCI Conference on Racing Integrity and Welfare that runs Tuesday through Thursday at the Charleston Marriott. The three days of panels and presentations address issues facing members of the Association of Racing Commissioners International, which represents the only independent entities recognized by law to license, make and enforce rules and adjudicate matters pertaining to pari-mutuel racing. Paul Matties Jr., winner of the 2016 National Handicapping Championship, will provide a horseplayer’s perspective into whether today’s racing officials are making the correct calls. Joining Matties on the “Questioning Whether Racing Officials Get It Right” session on Wednesday morning will be veteran steward Hugh Gallagher, chair of the Racing Officials Accreditation Program and the New York Racing Association’s first safety steward, and Maryland Racing Commission executive director and ARCI treasurer Mike Hopkins. Outgoing ARCI chair and 2001 NHC tournament winner Judy Wagner serves as moderator. “Any time I can represent the horseplayers, I’m always honored,” said the 47-year-old Matties, a professional gambler and horse owner from Ballston Spa, N.Y. “It’s become commonplace in the industry over time that the players are the ones who are forgotten when decisions need to be made. I’m optimistic that somebody is reaching out. All horseplayers go about things in different ways. I’ve been thinking about it, so I can represent everybody — not just what I believe. I’m going to think of it as we’re a group. “I’m not going there to be critical of anything that has been done in the past. Let’s look at future things. I’m excited to go, and I’m curious what kind of things I’ll be asked. I hope Judy doesn’t take it easy on me. I want it to be substantive.” Wagner, who is vice chair of the Louisiana Racing Commission and the horseplayers’ representative on the board of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, said the panel is part of ARCI’s outreach to players to “listen and ensure a product that has a high level of integrity. “We want this panel — and the others at the conference — to provide unvarnished insight and dialogue on how we can improve, as well as what we are doing right.” “ARCI members work for the public and not any aspect of the industry,” said ARCI president Ed Martin. “We are always careful to keep the horseplayer in mind with everything we do.  Horseplayers outnumber everyone else and keep the sport going. We should never forget that. “There are many racing-related meetings each year by various groups, but the annual RCI conference is the only one where industry issues and potential solutions are discussed directly with the people who actually make and enforce the rules throughout North America and parts of the Caribbean. The regulatory standards determined at this meeting more often than not actually become the policy affecting everyone involved in racing.  The RCI members are the only truly independent arbiters of racing-related matters as designated by the various laws that have empowered them.” Other panels at the conference: “Drug Testing Forum: Are We Doing It Right? Are We Catching the Cheaters?” “Veterinarians: Racing Records and the Trust Issue” “The Adjudication System: Is there a Better Way?” “Policing the Backside: A View From the Front Line” “Regulating the Whip and Crop” “Promoting Racing - Putting our Best Foot Forward in a Storm of Negativity” Presentations include “The Challenge in Adapting New Technology and Opportunities to Statutory Limitations.” Meetings include: model-rules committee, drug testing standards, ARCI’s annual business meeting and board organizational sessions as well as the regulators’ Standardbred and Quarter Horse racing committees. Wednesday’s luncheon speaker features Bennett Liebman, Esq., the Albany Law School’s Government Lawyer-in-Residence, giving a talk entitled, “Confessions of a Recovering Racing Regulator.” The complete agenda and information about speakers can be found at http://bit.ly/2oGkAcj. Ed Martin, ARCI president

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued charges against licensed trainer Michael Doltoff under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 196B (1) and 187(2) (two charges).    The allegations being that Mr Doltoff as the trainer of the horse Valtona, which was engaged to compete in Race 3 at the Yarra Valley harness racing meeting on 9 December, 2016, administered an injection to Valtona on 8 December 2016, without the permission of the Stewards. The other allegations relate to Mr Doltoff providing false and misleading evidence to HRV Stewards during the course of their investigation. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be determined.  

HRV RAD Board Hearing – William Galea. The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed trainer Mr William Galea.  AHRR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Galea related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Rocknroll Dancer’ at the Bacchus Marsh trials on 14 November 2015. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. Note: Australian Harness Racing Rules definition of ‘Race’- means a race or official trial or official time trial or event in which harness horses race or participate. Mr Galea pleaded guilty to the charge before submissions were heard from HRV stewards and Mr Galea.  In deciding an appropriate penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered the general sentencing principles, the nature of the substance involved, other previous cases involving the substance throughout Australia, Mr Galea’s guilty plea and his co-operation throughout the investigation.  Although noting that Mr Galea has had previous offences in relation to prohibited substances these were taking within the context of the sentencing principles outlined in the High Court decision of Veen v the Queen (No.2) [1998]. Mr Galea was subsequently fined $5000 of which $2500 was suspended for a period of 12 months.  Rocknroll Dancer was also disqualified from the relevant trial under AHRR195. ...................................................   HRV RAD Board Hearing – Allan Lousada The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed trainer Mr Allan Lousada. The charge related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Fiftyshadesofbrown’ after it won Race 2 at the Warragul harness racing meeting on 19 January 2016.   Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the hearing, Mr Lousada and Ms Georgina Coram (owner of Fiftyshadesofbrown) requested an adjournment to enable them to obtain further advice in regard to the matter. After considering this submission, the RAD board adjourned the hearing to a later date.   For more on Arsenic click here. And this is an interesting article!

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards commenced an Inquiry on 5 October 2017 into the results of the following out-of-competition blood samples taken from horses in the care of trainer Mr Shaun (Anthony) Simiana: FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 17 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 17 April 2016 FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 3 May 2016 Those samples were reported to contain the prohibited substance Peptide VNFYAWK. On 5 October 2016, HRNSW Stewards issued eight (8) charges against Mr Simiana and adjourned the Inquiry to allow Mr Simiana to consider those charges. The Inquiry resumed on 7 December 2016 at which time Mr Simiana’s legal representatives made a number of requests and further applications. Following correspondence between the parties, due to the fact that no submissions were received from Mr Simiana in response to the charges issued by 20 January 2017, HRNSW Stewards considered the matter on the evidence that was before them, in the absence of any submissions. Mr Simiana was found guilty of all charges and advised through his legal representative of that decision. Mr Simiana was provided with an opportunity to provide submissions in relation to the matter of penalty by COB 3 February 2017. Following an extension until COB 7 February 2017, no submissions were received and HRNSW Stewards considered the matter of penalty. Mr Simiana was issued with the following penalties: In relation to Charges 1,2,3,4 & 7, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(a), Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of six (6) years to be served concurrently; In relation to Charges 5,6 & 8, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A(1)(i) & (2) Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of ten (10) years to be served concurrently. HRNSW Stewards ordered that the two (2) periods of disqualification imposed be served cumulatively. Therefore Mr Simiana was disqualified for a total period of 16 years to commence from 28 July 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. HRNSW Stewards also considered the disqualification of the subject horses pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(b) as follows: AHRR 190A         (1)  When a sample taken at any time from a horse being trained or cared for by a licensed person has detected in it any prohibited substance specified in sub-rule (2):- (b)  The horse may be disqualified from any race in which it has competed subsequent to the taking of such a sample where, in the opinion of the Stewards, the prohibited substance was likely to have had any direct and/or indirect effect on the horse at the time of the race. Consequently, Stewards ordered the following disqualifications: FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 5 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 2 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 30 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its fourth place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its second place at Dubbo on 29 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its third place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 May 2016. In addition, HRNSW Stewards ordered that Mr Simiana pay to HRNSW within 14 days of being advised of the Steward’s Decision, the sum of $15,000 as costs pertaining to the analytical tests that were costs borne by the Controlling Body in relation to the prohibited substances from his horses, pursuant to NSW Local Rule 256A as follows: NSWLR256A       (1)  The Stewards, having determined after an inquiry or investigation to impose a penalty upon a person for a breach of, or offence under, these Rules, may make such order as they think fit as to the payment of costs by that person in part or full of any costs and expenses incurred by the Controlling Body in connection with that inquiry or investigation.                 (2)  A costs order made under this Rule is additional to, and does not form part of, any penalty imposed upon the person.  However the order as to costs does form part of the decision made by Stewards, and is not intended to be protected from any rights of Appeal the person may have. (3)  A costs order is payable as a debt to the Controlling Body within 14 days of notification of the quantum of the order, whether orally or in writing, to the person.  Failure to comply with the terms of payment, or to enter into a payment arrangement satisfactory to the Controlling Body, may lead to the person being placed on the Unpaid Forfeit List. Mr Simiana has lodged an appeal. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY OFFICER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Stewards’ Report – Harness Racing Trainer – Ashlee Neilson Date – 15 February 2017 Panel – N. Torpey; P. Zimmermann & J. Hackett Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding regarding the Total Carbon Dioxide concentration found in the pre-race blood sample taken from Mach Cullen (NZ) prior to the horse competing in Race 5 at Albion Park on 18 October 2016. Mach Cullen (NZ) was trained for this event by Ms Ashlee Neilson. After taking evidence from Ms Neilson and Dr K. Caldwell as the Manager, Veterinary Services at the Racing Science Centre, Stewards charged Ashlee Neilson with the contravention of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A which reads: “A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance For the purpose of affecting the performance or behaviour of a horse in a race or of preventing its starting in a race or Which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of a race.” Ms Neilson pleaded guilty to the charge. In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Ms Neilson’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of the case; The guilty plea entered; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards disqualified Ashlee Neilson for a period of 6 months effective immediately. Acting under the provisions of AHRR. 195 Mach Cullen NZ was disqualified from Race 5 at Albion Park on 18 October 2016 and the placings amended accordingly. Ms Neilson was advised of her rights of an Internal Review

Stewards’ Report – Harness Racing Trainer – Rachel Scott Date – 15 February 2017 Panel – N. Torpey; P. Zimmermann & J. Hackett Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding regarding the elevated Total Carbon Dioxide concentration levels found in the pre-race blood samples taken from Major Command prior to the horse competing in Race 2 at Albion Park on 19 November 2016 and Race 4 at Albion Park on 22 November 2016. Major Command was trained for both events by Ms Rachel Scott. After taking evidence from Ms Scott and Dr K. Caldwell as the Manager, Veterinary Services at the Racing Science Centre, Stewards issued the following two (2) charges against Rachel Scott pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 193(3) which reads: “A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in the race.” Specifics of the charges being: That Rachel Scott did administer or allow or cause to be administered medication, namely an alkalinising agent to Major Command on 19 November 2016 prior to it running on that day. That Rachel Scott did administer or allow or cause to be administered medication, namely an alkalinising agent to Major Command on 22 November 2016 prior to it running on that day. After carefully considering the evidence Stewards determined that both charges had been established to a reasonable satisfaction and found Ms Scott guilty on both charges. In determining the matter of guilt Stewards were of the opinion that the only creditable explanation for the elevated TCO2 levels detected in both samples was as a result of the administration of an alkalinising agent on race day. When assessing an appropriate penalty in each case Stewards acknowledged that the levels in both samples did not give rise to a positive finding. In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Ms Scott’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of each case; The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards fined Rachel Scott the sum of $4,000 on each charge. Acting under the provisions of AHRR. 195 Major Command was disqualified from Race 2 at Albion Park on 19 November 2016 and from Race 4 at Albion Park on 22 November 2016. Ms Scott was advised of her rights of an Internal Review

The New York State Gaming Commission today announced significant, nation-leading action in addressing the presence of the alkaloid glaucine in the urine and plasma of harness racing horses, resulting in more than $100,000 in purses returned and 11 disqualifications, plus additional fines and suspension for a single trainer whose horses had particularly high levels of the substance. Glaucine, also known as Boldine Dimethyl Ether or 1,2,9,10-Tetramethoxyaporphine, is a potent drug with the potential to affect race performance by means of its anti-inflammatory, antitussive, bronchodilatory and hallucinogenic properties. Glaucine has not been approved as a drug for any use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) does not include glaucine in its Uniform Classification Guidelines for Foreign Substances. “New York is once again leading the way when it comes to preserving integrity in horse racing,” said Commission Executive Director Robert Williams. “The Commission took deliberative action based upon solid research to hold trainers accountable for substances found in horses under their care. We call on other jurisdictions around the country to follow suit to send a clear message: we will tolerate nothing short of fair and safe horse racing.” “The New York State Gaming Commission’s action on glaucine preserves the integrity of the internationally renowned horse racing we host in New York State,” said Peter Arrigenna, a prominent New York harness horse owner and Trustee for the Agriculture and New York State Horse Breeding Development Fund (New York Sire Stakes). “Glaucine has been a hot topic in the harness racing world for the past year, and thanks to New York’s prudent action on this substance, the industry has a clear path forward in how to best handle future cases.” Over the past year, the Commission found 55 instances of horses with glaucine in their systems at levels greater than 100 pg/ml. As is standard practice, all impacted horses were immediately put on the Stewards List, which prevents a horse from entering any future races until the horse is tested and found negative for the presence of any illegal substance. Of the 55 instances found by the Commission, 11 were found to have levels higher than 500 pg/ml. For these cases, the Commission ordered that the horses be disqualified from the applicable races and any purses won by the owners of those horses be returned, totaling $103,530. Trainer Richard Johnson twice raced the horse “Rubber Duck” at Yonkers Raceway with glaucine levels far greater than 1 ng/ml. In addition to the disqualification and purse return totaling $61,660, Johnson is facing a 45-day suspension and $1,500 fine. A complete list of horses that had elevated levels of glaucine may be found here. The Commission began finding elevated glaucine levels in January 2016, but reserved issuing rulings pending further investigation. Over the past year, the Commission and the New York Drug Testing and Research Laboratory have collaborated with other jurisdictions and national racing organizations to conduct research on glaucine, which may be naturally found in wood shavings used to line horses’ stalls. New research conducted by New York and Pennsylvania officials substantiate that glaucine levels of 500 pg/ml or greater in a horse on raceday indicate that the horse was introduced to a potentially efficacious dose of the substance on race day. Therefore, the Commission’s Rule 4120.2(n) applies, which states that no drugs or medications – other than those specifically exempted - may be administered by any means within one week of the scheduled post time of the race in which the horse is to compete and that it is the trainer's responsibility to prevent such ingestion within such one-week period. Most recently, the Racing Medication & Testing Consortium’s (RMTC) Glaucine Task Force and Science Advisory Committee – both of which include New York State Equine Medical Director Scott E. Palmer, VMD – recommended applying two thresholds for the presence of glaucine in a race horse. The Commission’s actions today – and going forward – are based on these standards and disqualifying a horse that violates such thresholds: > 500 pg/ml = Disqualification, loss of purse and Stewards List > 1 ng/ml = Disqualification, loss of purse, Stewards List and additional penalties, including fines and suspension The Commission will continue to place horses that test in excess of 100 pg/ml for glaucine on the Stewards List and require those horses to test below such concentration before being permitted to race again. Horses testing in excess of 500 pg/ml will incur penalties as described above. Per Equine Medical Director Dr. Palmer, environmental contamination is avoidable by the adoption of simple stable management practices: ·         Stalls should not be bedded with bulk wood shavings that may contain tulip poplar material on a chronic basis or during the week that a horse races. Do not administer any product or plant material, whether purchased online, compounded or otherwise, that may contain glaucine. NYS Gaming Commission

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