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Guelph, ON March, 18, 2019 - Responding to research needs of the Ontario racing commission (now AGCO), a recent study led by Dr. Janice E. Kritchevsky, at Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, reveals use of thyroxine supplementation is deleterious to racehorse's performance and may result in cardiac arrhythmias. Researcher Dr. Janice E. Kritchevsky was selected to do this work by the Equine Guelph Research Committee with AGCO support.   Kritchevsky explains, "Thyroid disorders are actually rare in horses." The concentrations of thyroid hormones, including thyroxine, can be measured in blood. Blood thyroid hormone concentrations outside the normal ranges can lead one to believe hypothyroidism (low production of thyroid hormones) may be the cause of a horse looking a little lethargic. However, abnormal thyroid hormone concentrations can occur after a high grain diet meal, after trailering fatigue, training stress, or if a horse is ill. In actuality, administering thyroid medication to a horse fighting a respiratory infection can compromise the animals natural response to the infection.   Horses that benefit from thyroid hormone supplement tend to be suffering from Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) or insulin resistance, neither syndrome is recognized in fit racehorses and they are both quite rare in other performance animals. Thyroxine supplementation may have a place in treating some over-conditioned (obese) horses at risk for laminitis. To diagnose a thyroid disorder, it is not enough to perform a one-time blood test; instead, a function test must be conducted. In a function test, two thyroid hormones are measured in the blood, then the horse is given a releasing hormone, and the two hormones are measured again. If the thyroid hormone concentrations do not respond normally, then there may be a true thyroid disorder. Kritchevsky adds, "In the case of over conditioned horses, thyroxine supplementation is to be used only until the horse reaches a normal body weight."   The misconception over thyroxine supplement use among horse owners and trainers may stem from the initial reaction to the drug, which can cause a flat or less spirited horse to appear more alert and hypersensitive. In Kritchevsky's study using fit Standardbreds, they did find a behaviour change after administration of Levothyroxine. The horses became quite alert and more difficult to handle but then they fatigued quicker.   When Dr. Kritchevsky gave Levothyroxine (a thyroid supplement) to the horses, it resulted in changes to blood concentrations of all thyroid hormones. Horses given 0.25mg/kg Levothyroxine went to maximum heart rate quicker, but the horse's blood lactate concentration did not change post-exercise, which told the researchers that they had the same level of fitness. The drug was not found to be performance enhancing. In fact, four out of the six horses in the study developed cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart beat) when treated with Levothyroxine and one developed atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a serious performance limiting condition that can be career ending.   Kritchevsky thanks Equine Guelph and AGCO for providing the lion's share of the funding for this important research on thyroxine supplementation. This research was done in response to reports of open containers of thyroxine supplement that were observed during barn visits as part of out of competition testing by ORC (now AGCO). Elevated blood concentration of thyroxine has been documented on numerous occasions on post-race blood testing of horses from Ontario tracks.   Kritchevsky says, "This is an important problem anywhere! People are using thyroid supplement and it does not do what they think it is doing. This research is important for all, including racing commissions. While thyroxine is not a foreign substance, as this study indicates, high levels render the horse unfit to race."   Some officials believe thyroxine should be regulated and next steps in research may include developing an assay to test for a carrier protein that is excreted indicating a high thyroid.   Stay tuned to Equine Guelph E-News for more updates about this study.     Web Link(s): http://www.equineguelph.ca/news/index.php?content=610     Jackie Bellamy-Zions Communications Equine Guelph  

Guelph, ON - March 14, 2019 - “You never think it would happen to you, and one of your horses, until one day you wake up to a phone call in the middle of the night,” recounts Sarah Scott, member of the horse racing community for over 20 years, and owner of Fork.    Since the first line fire in December, Sarah has not only been busy with her horse’s recovery but also spreading awareness of fire prevention programs.   Sarah works as an account manager specializing in equine rehabilitation, at System Equine in Rockwood and they will be hosting a Barn Fire Prevention and action plan evening on March 19 at 6 pm. Special guest speakers will include: TJ Snow of Milton Fire Department, Riley McGilloway of Halton Hills Fire Department, and Dr. Liz Shiland DVM (one of several vets who assisted at the First Line fire). Sarah will also be sharing her experience as a horse owner.    They will discuss: barn fire prevention, what to do in case of fire with horses and/or animals, fire safety and caring for horses after they have been exposed to smoke inhalation and fire trauma.  Barn owners need to be ever vigilant with barn fire prevention, never get complacent and always prepare themselves for emergencies.    Equine Guelph will be offering a new Fire & Emergency Preparedness online short course on TheHorsePortal.ca– Apr 8 – Apr 15   Sarah’s Story:   We celebrated our staff Christmas party at Mohawk raceway December 20th, having a great time filling the night with Christmas cheer. I arrived home, around 12:30 am and settled into bed shortly after 1 am. I was awoken by my husband to the words “the barn is on fire and there is nothing we can do.” I was instantly numb. I felt almost robotic as I grabbed some clothes, and drove to what was our horses’ home, now land marked by police cars directing fire trucks. The car did not even come to a complete stop before I jumped out.    When I arrived no one knew where my own horse was, but we knew he was out. It was dark, raining and the most unsettling of sights, with red and blue flashing lights intermingling with the mist. I was told it took two firefighters and one of the second trainers to move my horse Fork from his stall, with singed facial and mane hair from the inferno he escaped and was taken to another barn on the property and placed in an empty stall.   Emergency response:   Sarah quickly joined the growing team of fire fighters, owners and veterinarians triaging the scene. They were fortunate to have a number of containment areas with other barns close by, a pool area that held three horses, and paddocks to hold the horses after they were removed from barn seven. Other factors that aided the rescue were: rain, wind blowing away from the barn and educated/experienced horse people, on scene that did not pull open the doors until fire and rescue arrived.   Each horse was evaluated and treated by the attending veterinarians before they were given the “ok” to go to Mohawk.  When the horses arrived at Mohawk (for temporary stabling) they were all bathed and once again looked over for burns or distress. Black soot was embedded in the horses’ hair, leading to the conclusion the lungs must also be compromised. Fears of smoke inhalation damage were confirmed with the first scope.  The owners were worried if their horses would be ok, racked with questions if they were suffering and if they would ever race again. It was a quick paced day with lots of decisions.   Sarah’s expertise served her well, having worked with clients, vets and owners whose horses were affected by the encroaching wild fires in BC and Alberta, supplying them with nebulizers from System Equine that were donated by Nortev Flexineb and assisting the equine practitioners in developing treatment cycles. Never had she imagined she would be implementing a similar treatment plan for her own horse who had won his race just a few short weeks before.   The team worked diligently with the vets following up on the temperatures, discharge, vitals and overall observation. Sarah is very grateful to everyone involved with the rescue and rehabilitation, including her employers at System Equine and Nortev for supplying the nebulizers aiding in the recovery of many of the horses.   Sarah’s prayers have been answered as subsequent testing and scoping showed no signs of soot and no residual inflammation in the lungs. Sarah is also very grateful to her husband Mark who was so supportive, working tirelessly caring for both of them.  “He truly is the reason Fork has returned to the racetrack,” says Sarah. Fork is in the clear and qualified to race at Mohawk on January 24 2019.   Final thoughts:   Sarah will forever be a fire prevention crusader and advocate of having a plan. No matter how busy life gets, she will never turn her phone off at night. Much reflection takes place after an incident, from the simple things like having emergency numbers in your phone to having the fire department out to do a pre-plan. Having halters, leads, pens and paper quickly accessible, clear barn aisles, feed tubs positioned so they are not in the way of exiting a stall are some of the little details that can make a big difference in an emergency.   And of course, looking back on the chaos, there is much gratitude for the community who rallied together. Thanks, and huge acknowledgements must be given to the first responders, the community who all sprung from their beds in the dead of the night and for everyone who came together to support the rescue.   Sarah hopes sharing her story will move people to take preventative measures and looks forward to seeing large attendance both at the Fire & Emergency Preparedness online short course on TheHorsePortal.ca– Apr 8 – Apr 15 and at System Equine’s Barn Fire Prevention and action plan evening on March 19 at 6pm, also available by live feed at: https://imp.easywebinar.live/registration-2    

Josephine Brook has been a model of consistency for Robbie Clifford this season, but there is still one thing the harness racing trainer has yet to witness from his mare - a win. Across her 13 starts Josephine Brook has only twice finished outside the top three, with three of her runner-up performances seeing her cross the line less than two metres behind the victor. Clifford hopes that Wednesday night's Harness Racing NSW Rewards Series Final (1,730m) at the Bathurst Paceway will be the race where the five-year-old can finally break through.  If she can it would be her first victory since May 25, 2016. "It's just frustrating," Clifford admitted. "This will be the fifth Rewards Series Final for her this time in. She's been pretty consistent, that's for sure, and she's not doing anything wrong, she's just not finding the line in front. "She seems to be well graded in this series, but every final or series there just seem to be one or two that are coming through that are just that bit better than her." The Roll With Joe x Kassandra Brook mare qualified for Wednesday's final via a second placing in her Dubbo heat. That was from a second row draw, but for the 8.40pm decider she will go from the inside of the front with Tony Higgs in the gig after drawing barrier three. Clifford feels that will play in Josephine Brook's favour given the two runners he sees as the biggest threats - Wendy Turnbull's Walk On Kimmy and William Stubbs' Lovin Everyday - have drawn on the back row. "In her last final she drew okay and led, but she got run down in the finish. We'll be going forward with her again from this draw and then I guess just play it by ear from there," Clifford said. "The two main dangers, Wendy Turnbulll's and the one from Dubbo Mat Rue is driving, they were heat winners. They both led and won, but at least on Wednesday we'll start a cart in front of them."- By Anya Whitelaw Reprinted with permission of The Western Advocate

January 21, 2019 (Guelph, ON): Planning is well underway for the 15th Annual International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) Conference, being held at the University of Guelph, Canada’s largest agricultural university, on August 19-21, 2019.   The theme for this year’s conference is “Bringing Science to the Stable”, highlighting our past relationship with horses and examining where we are headed.   Both conference registration and abstract submissions opened on January 18, 2019. All information regarding the conference, including links to conference registration, abstract submissions and accommodations can be found on the Horse Portal websitehttps://thehorseportal.ca/ISES-2019/. Researchers in the field of equitation science are invited to submit an abstract of their research findings for consideration to present during the conference. Abstracts are due by April 1, 2019.   Join our line-up of thought-provoking speakers as we journey through history and into the present, supporting and challenging the way we interact with horses through scientific research. Dr. Sandra Olsen (Curator-in-Charge, Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum, University of Kansas) will trace how our relationship with horses began. Dr. Camie Heleski (Senior Lecturer, University of Kentucky) will describe the field of Equitation Science and what we have learned about horse-human relationships. Dr. Nic de Brauwere (Head of Welfare, Rehabilitation and Education, Redwings Horse Sanctuary, UK) will discuss how human behaviour change into the future can improve equine welfare. Dr. Andrew McLean (Equine Science International, Australia) will present similarities and differences in the application of learning theory across species.   The ever-popular Clever Hans talk will be hosted on Monday evening with guest speakerDr. Jonaki Bhattacharyya, Ethnoecologist and Senior Researcher with Firelight Group. Dr. Bhattacharyya has spent time in the interior of British Columbia, observing the wild horses and their impact on the land and interactions with the indigenous peoples. She will highlight how modern research can fit into other ways of knowing and approaches to managing both wild and domestic horses.   The third day of the conference will include a short course on large animal rescue training (additional fee applies). Space in this hands-on workshop is limited, so be sure to register early. Demonstrations and seminars from equine behaviourists, technology entrepreneurs and saddle fitting experts will fill the remainder of the day.   Registered delegates can also attend two free pre-conference workshops on Sunday, August 18. Cristina Wilkins and Kate Fenner (Australia) will workshop on how to communicate scientific information to equestrian communities. Dr. Marc Pierard(Belgium) will lead a discussion in describing equine behaviours for the equine ethogram.    Early bird conference registration pricing is available until June 1. After that date regular conference fees apply. Check the ISES website https://equitationscience.com/conferences/ or the Horse Portal https://thehorseportal.ca/ISES-2019/ to learn more. Check back regularly to the Horse Portal for updates, sneak peaks, and local information.   About the International Society for Equitation Science The International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) is a not-for-profit organisation that aims to facilitate research into the training of horses to enhance horse welfare and improve the horse-rider relationship. www.equitationscience.com   For more information contact: ISES Honorary President Janne Winther-Christensen presidents@equitationscience.com   Local Conference Organizer: Katrina Merkies, PhD Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph (519) 824-4120 x54707 ISES2019@uoguelph.ca     Registration and abstract submission now open for the 2019 ISES conference being held in Guelph, Ontario, Canada from August 19-21.   The theme of "Bringing science to the stable" will explore our relationship with horses through the past, present and future.   Check the website for conference updates and links to the registration and abstract submission pages https://equitationscience.com/conferences/ or https://thehorseportal.ca/ises-2019/. 

Winter is here - Are you ready?   Does this horse kick for no reason or is there an underlying cause?   Cribbing – A behaviour or nutritional deficiency?   Sign up at TheHorsePortal.ca to have your horse behaviour and safety related questions answered.   IMPORTANT ALERTS   Alert: Equine Infectious Anemia - Cariboo Sub. B, B.C   Alert: Rabies - In Canada   Alert: Rabies - Hamilton, ON   Alert: Strangles - New Brunswick   EQUINE GUELPH thanks Merck Animal Health for sponsoring the HEALTHflash program     HEALTHflash - WINTER EDITION 2019      ‌  ‌           IMPORTANT ALERTS       Alert: Equine Infectious Anemia - Cariboo Sub. B, B.C Alert: Rabies - In Canada Alert: Rabies - Hamilton, ON Alert: Strangles - New Brunswick         EQUINE GUELPH thanks Merck Animal Health for sponsoring the HEALTHflash program           FEATURED STORIES               Behaviour & Safety - Q & A     Does this horse kick for no reason or is there an underlying cause? Cribbing – A behaviour or nutritional deficiency?   Sign up at TheHorsePortal.ca to have your horse behaviour and safety related questions answered.                 Take Stock of your First Aid Kit & Update Your Skills     3 items that do not survive sub zero… Don’t forget Equine Guelph’s first aid course online begins Feb 25!                 Gastric Ulcer Prevention     Why you should give hay before exercise is discussed by Kathleen Crandell. Crandel is also the instructor of Equine Guelph’s Advanced Equine Health through Nutrition online course. Pre-requisite Equine Nutrition starts Jan 14!                   Biosecurity Risk Calculator TOOL OF THE MONTH     Start the year reviewing your biosecurity plan in 6 steps! Identify risks, prepare a farm diagram... info from the National Farm Level Biosecurity standard makes it easy to minimize disease risk - Try The Tool of The Month.         EQUINE HEALTH       Vaccination Survey Results     82% of our survey participants vaccinate their horses against influenza. 82% rely on their veterinarian for vaccination information. 73% leave the decision as to the specific brand of vaccine up to the vet. 43% know the benefits of a modified-live vs. a killed equine influenza virus vaccine.   New Update in Vaccination Equi-Planner links to an AAEP page explaining the benefits of a modified-live vs. a killed equine influenza virus vaccine                Horse Behaviour & Safety Short Course     January 21 to February 8     Learn to speak horse! Take action to create a safe environment for you and your horse   REGISTER TODAY       MORE TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES           New 12-Week Courses Start January 14th     Mgmt of the Equine Environment   Health & Disease Prevention   Equine Nutrition   Equine Functional Anatomy   Equine Exercise Physiology   Marketing & Communications   Equine Event Management   The Equine Industry   Global Perspectives in Equine Welfare   SIGN UP TODAY         Upcoming Horse Portal Short Courses     Horse Behaviour & Safety January 21st to February 8th   Horse Behaviour & Safety (Youth) January 21st to February 8th   Equine First Aid February 25th to March 4th   Sickness Prevention in Horses TBA   Horse Care & Welfare TBA   Gut Health & Colic Prevention TBA   SIGN UP TODAY       OTHER NEWS & EVENTS         When did you last check under that rug for Body Condition Score?   Cold weather riding tips   Winter management of the outdoor horse   First signs of Heaves video   Reduce Respiratory Risk video   How to transition feedstuff in your horse’s diet   Going on Vacation – Post your emergency preparedness plans   Extending your Hay Supply   Video - Stop, Think, Act and be safe around horses  

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - Andy Miller might be known as "The Orange Crush" but on Saturday night at the Meadowlands, anyone who referred to the harness racing driver as "Red Hot" would have been 100 percent accurate. Miller won six times on the 13-race program, and for good measure, included among his victories was the $21,000 featured Preferred Handicap for pacers. The 50-year-old's half-dozen got started with Surfing Tide, who scored in the second race non-winners of three pari-mutuel races pace in 1:52.1 as the even-money favorite before he scored with Joe's Bid in the next race in 1:51.4 in a non-winners of $3,500 in their last five starts pace as the 3-2 public choice. The sixth race NW$11,500L5 pace saw another favorite as Miller got 9-5 Winning Linc up on the wire in 1:51.4, but the man clad in orange, white and black colors was only halfway done. Win No. 4 was the big one, as in race eight, Miller put K Ryan Bluechip into a live third-over flow and stormed home to take the feature in 1:50.4 as the 5-1 third choice in the wagering. Andy's fans got their biggest price of the night in the ninth, as Miller coaxed just enough speed out of Awesomeness to get his fifth win - at odds of 8-1 - in 1:51.2 in a NW$8,600L5 pace before completing his six-bagger in the 12th with Odds On Lauderdale, the 6-5 public choice, in 1:51.4 in a NW4PM pace. A LITTLE MORE: Wagering on the 50-Cent Pick-5 was vigorous, with $58,083 in action taken. After favorites won four of the sequence's races, the return was $244.40. ... The 50-Cent Pick-4 topped $90,000 for a fourth straight card, taking in $92,513. After a sequence that saw winner's odds of 5-1, 8-1, 6-5 and 27-1, the payout was a healthy $4,393.05. ... All-source wagering topped $2.8 million for a third straight program, as $2,856,661 was pushed through the windows. ... Racing resumes Friday at 7:15 p.m. By Dave Little, Meadowlands Media Relations

New Zealand bred, Breckon Farms bred, had a big week in three Countries this past week wiith harness racing winners in New Zealand (Elle Mac), North America (Never Say Never N) and Australia (Miss Streisand). The winning started at the Auckland Trotting Cup Meeting on New Year's Eve with Jean Fiess owned Elle Mac putting up a sensational run in a New Zealand record of a 1:51.6 mile rate over 1700 metres recording her 11th victory in just the 22 starts for stakes off $519,827. Elle Mac now has six track records to her credit including two overall New Zealand records for a four-year-old and older mare. Elle Mac is bred on the golden cross, she is a Bettor's Delight from a Christian Cullen mare, the same as champion Lazarus and many others that are racing. Elle Mac winning in a New Zealand record of a 1:51.6 mile rate over 1700 metres Your chance of securing a close relation to Elle Mac has improved dramatically with three outstanding entries from the Breckon Farms draft at the Inaugural 2019 National Yearling Sale held in Karaka, Auckland, on the 17th and 18th of February. Lot 6 an American Ideal filly from a race winning full-sister to Elle Mac, Lot 12 an American Ideal filly from a race winning Mach Three sister to Elle Mac and Lot 18 an Art Major colt brother to Elle Mac who is appropriately called Billion Dollar Boy. Lot 6 - Needamargarita is a filly by American Ideal from Fellamongstabeauty by Bettor's Delight from the Christian Cullen mare Goodlookinggirl. Lot 6 - Needamargarita Lot 12 - Allamericanlover is a filly by American Ideal from Goodlookinbabe by Mach Three from from the Christian Cullen mare Goodlookinggirl. Lot 12 - Allamericanlover American Ideal has produced ten millionaires in North America in total. Four have been fillies including his richest progeny American Jewel 1:48.2s ($1,834,823) and also the champion current North American three-year-old filly of the year Yourmycandygirl 1:48.2 ($1,497,000). American Ideal has produced the winners of over $87 million to date in North America. In New Zealand he is the sire of progeny that has earned $7.5 million to date and in Australia he has progeny earnings of over $10 million to date.  Therefore, American Ideal now belongs to the $100 million club an outstanding achievement. He best performing mare in New Zealand is The Orange Agent ($516,974) and in Australia, American Ideal has produced two millionaires to date. They are Bling It On 1:50.8 ($1,656,656) and Soho Tribeca 1:53.8 ($1,103,374)  Lot 18 - Billion Dollar Boy is a colt by Art Major from Goodlookinggirl by Christian Cullen from the Butler BG mare Twice As Good. Billion Dollar Boy is the first colt from Goodlookinggirl. Lot 18 - Billion Dollar Boy The stallion Art Major needs no introduction. He has sired the winners of over $122 million in North America alone. In New Zealand he has sired the winners of over $13 million and in Australia he has sired the winners of over $51 million.  The second winner this last week for Breckon Farms was Miss Streisand, the A Rocknroll Dance half-sister to Elle Mac, who won at Newcastle this past Friday night in New South Wales, Australia. Miss Streisand has been unbeaten in her last five seasonal starts putting together a very good record of 16 starts lifetime for 9 wins, 4 placings and earning $115,000 in the process taking a record of 1:53 flat. Miss Streisand is a half-sister to Lot 18 - Billion Dollar Boy featured above and of course Miss Streisand is a half-sister to Elle Mac. What more needs to be said for this great family of Elle Mac, Miss Streisand and especially for the close  relations of these outstanding winners in the Breckon Farms draft at the Inaugural 2019 National Yearling Sale held in Karaka, Auckland, on the 17th and 18th of February.  Miss Streisand winning her fifth race on end at Newcastle on Friday night The third winner this last week for Breckon Farms was the ever improving Never Say Never N winning at Dover Downs in North America on Thursday of this past week and what a win it was. It was his second win in a row and 18th lifetime from 58 starts and it was a very impressive victory in 1:50.4 a new lifetime nark, and he beat home the former New Zealand open class pacer Tiger Thompson N who was having his first start on American soil finishing second.   RACE 7 - Dover Downs - DE - January 3, 2019  Conditions: WINNERS OVER $9,500 (DE $11,400) LAST 6 STARTS OR WINNERS OVER $110,000 LIFETIME    Gait: Pace     Purse: $14,000     Class: WO9500L6     Distance: 1 mile     Track Cond: FT     Temp-Allow: 45-0     Off Time: 6:21 PM HN  Horse  PP  1/4  1/2  3/4  Str  Finish Actual LQ Odds  Driver  Trainer     3  Never Say Never N  3  3°/2Q  1/1H  1/Q  1/1H  1/1 1:50.4  28.1 *1.70   Corey Callahan  Dylan Davis         1  Tiger Thompson N  1  5/5T  5°/3  4°/1Q  3/2H  2/1 1:51.0  28.1 7.40   Art Stafford Jr  Joshua Parker         6  Last Gunfighter  6  1/2  2/1H  3/1Q  2/1H  3/1Q 1:51.0  28.1 7.30   Mike Cole  Joseph Columbo         8  Sweet Rock  8  8/10Q  8°/6  8°/3T  6/3T  4/2T 1:51.2  28.0 17.40   Allan Davis  Wayne Givens         7  Soto  7  2/2  4/2T  5/2Q  4/3H  5/3 1:51.2  28.2 6.40   Russell Foster  Eric Ell         5  Machiavelli  5  7/8T  7/5H  7/3T  7/4Q  6/3Q 1:51.2  28.0 28.10   Victor Kirby  Mark Harder         4  Sprinter N  4  4/4Q  3°/1T  2°/Q  5/3H  7/3H 1:51.2  28.4 1.70   Tim Tetrick  Michael Hall         2  Star Messenger  2  6/7Q  6°/4H  6°/2T  8/5Q  8/4Q 1:51.3  28.2 33.60   Anthony Morgan  Gary Ewing       Time:  26.2 54.3  (28.1) 1:22.3  (28.0) 1:50.4  (28.1)     HN  Horse  Driver Win  Place  Show    3  Never Say Never N  Corey Callahan 5.40  3.60  2.80    1  Tiger Thompson N  Art Stafford Jr   6.20  4.20    6  Last Gunfighter  Mike Cole     4.00       Wager Type  Numbers/Payouts Pool     Exacta  (3-1 $42.00)      Trifecta  (3-1-6 $227.80)      Superfecta  (3-1-6-8 $853.40)       1st Never Say Never N  (6, H   Bettor`s Delight - Maid In Splendor - Christian Cullen) Registered Owner(s)/Lessee(s):  Thomas Lazzaro - NY Breeder(s):   ** View Top 3 Finishers (-) 2nd Tiger Thompson N  (6, G   Big Jim - Aziza - Pacific Rocket) Registered Owner(s):  Nanticoke Racing Inc - DE, Joshua Parker - DE, Stephen Messick - DE, Prestige Stable - DE Breeder(s):  H 3rd Last Gunfighter  (5, H   Rocknroll Hanover - One Last Kiss - Artsplace) Registered Owner(s):  George & Tina Dennis Racing - DE Breeder(s):  Steve Jones - NY   Never Say Never N was sold to North America by JC International in November 2016 and has been a good earner there making a tidy $236,728 to date. Before he was exported, Never Say Never N had only five starts in New Zealand for trainer Ken Barron, for one win at Ashburton over 2600 metres rating a 2.05.9 mile rate over the distance. When he arrived in North America Never Say Never N won his first five races in a row with the last of those five wins coming in the $61,800 Sagamore Hill Final at the half-mile oval of Yonkers Raceway in 1:54.2 which was a great effort for a new import from New Zealand. Never Say Never N is the first foal of the Group placed race winning mare Maid In Splendour who has produced three to the races for three winners to date. A full-sister to Never Say Never N was a recent winner for The Allstars stable at Addington called Ruby Rose. Another full-brother is entered in the inaugural National Standardbred Yearling Sale at Karaka on the 18th of February 2019. Entered on behalf of The Breckon Farms draft as Lot 58 this full-brother to Never Say Never N  is called Pace N Pride and is the fifth foal of Maid In Splendour. Lot 58 - Pace N Pride Pace N Pride is by Bettor's Delight, who needs no introduction as he is the dominant leading pacing stallion in the world right now, yes that is right he is the overall leading money winning sire in all four Countries, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the USA. Bettor's Delight has bred over 7,500 mares in all Countries and he is heading towards $300 million in progeny earnings right now. Maid In Splendour Maid In Splendour is from the race winning and now great producing Holmes Hanover mare Diamonds N Gold, dam of ten winners to date including Diamonds N Furs 1:54.8f ($231,399). Diamonds N Gold is a half-sister to the super racehorse Desperate Comment ($1,033,065) who won many races including the 1996 $250,000 Victoria Cup seen here; Harnesslink Media

We all try to put away money for our kids' education, if we can. If you want to be a doctor, lawyer, nurse, teacher, or anything else in life, you need a formal education. I recently read an article by Dean Hoffman about how horsemen need to promote their own industry. I agree. I often preach about horsemen marketing themselves better. But is that really fair? We are asking hard working people to put in long hours to try to get by in this industry, and then put in more time and money to market it? I like Mr. Hoffman's article and agree with much of it, but the reality is that horsemen for the most part aren't that good at marketing. I mean, I could run a marathon, or wrestle a bear. But neither are what you might call "my strong suits". Just because you want to do something, doesn't necessarily mean you can achieve it. I do think the industry does need to market itself better. But that requires education to implement. Who will educate our horsepeople? Look around, I don't think there are an abundance of teachers. Honestly speaking, our industry has employed so-called marketing experts for years. Where has that gotten us? I've said it for four years, and now unequivocally proven that horse racing can attract new people to our industry from all walks of life. This power absolutely lies in the hands of the horsepeople, but they need help to achieve it. Make no mistake, horsepeople aren't alone. The entire industry need to change the way it sees itself and markets itself. In each jurisdiction, for the most part you'll find a failing racetrack. Sure, some are propped up, but they are not profitable on their own from wagering revenues. We have watched our clients leave year after year, with no replacements to speak of from the younger generations. We have lost our understanding of what we actually are, and do not recognize that we are no longer a viable gaming product in the eyes of the general public. Horse racing is interesting, but the entry points into it are complex and often not appealing to the very people we need to attract. This isn't new, we've known it for years. Look around the grandstands for our average fans age group. We can't convince people to become fans of horse racing with the promise of Super Hi Five jackpots, and lower takeouts on the Win Fours. People in the general public don't care about those things. What we need is a way to get people to the track. Much like a bar, you only need to get them there; they'll figure out what they want to drink once they are. Affordable ownership is a promising way to attract them. (Let's not argue if it works; I think we've done more than enough to prove that it does.) But one or two fractional stables means nothing for the future of our sport, and that's why educating and helping our horsepeople with it is invaluable to the entire future and viability of this industry Our other problem: Horsepeople try to convince potential clients that there is a formula to find a return on their investment in racing. (ROI) This is all we have had in the past to attract people, but for the most part this is a fool's errand. That also plays a part in why our owners are leaving. They've been lied to; albeit inadvertently in most cases. Like George Costanza said "it's not a lie if you believe it, Jerry." Most trainers mean well and believe they can turn a profit. They're simply wrong. It's incredibly difficult with the overhead we carry today. To put it simply: it costs more today to race for less that we did in the past. The Goal: What is happening with thestable.ca should not be surprising to anyone. The information gathered to start it was pristine, resounding and emphatic. But people still ask, why, and how does it work? It's simple: we offer only what we can absolutely provide. Entertainment, and an unmatched experience in society. The second part is what we have all missed. Our industry has forgotten how exciting it is to be a part of this industry and how affordable it is when offered in small percentages. The one thing everyone in society wants is affordability, and entertainment has slowly become unaffordable. That's our opening. People spend much more on tickets to a hockey game for their family for one night, than they will to own a percentage of a horse over most of one year (bills included). If you're in it for fun and not for profit, you only need a small percentage. The entertainment attributed to horse ownership is unmatched by any mainstream sports exposure. Simply put, that's why and how thestable.ca works. By changing the way we approach the general public and the message we attract them with, you will see an influx of interest and ownership requests never seen before. Again, this isn't hypothetical jargon, this is reality. Thestable.ca just surpassed 600 active clients before Christmas and now sits at 604. Our average client owns no more that 4% of any horse. We don't sell investment, we sell entertainment. And we make good on our promise. The obvious question anyone would ask is: How does that help gaming dollars, because that's what really drives our industry. We found an interesting thing about our clients. Although they professed to not "gamble", guess what they did when they were at the races? When in Rome, do as the Romans do. By attracting people from the general public with a strong message of affordable horse ownership, we strengthen our stables. Those people are exposed to racing in the way that original horse racing enthusiasts and in turn gamblers were. We are bringing the potential of new clients to the doorsteps of our racetracks. These are people that would never attend a race or a casino otherwise. We need to work together to build-up both sides of the racetracks with the promise of an unmatched entertainment experience and heightened customer service, and we deliver on both. This industry is on the cusp of new growth, but without education and help from all facets of racing, none of it can be achieved. I call on all racetracks, horsepeople and every stakeholder in this industry to use the failures of the past to help map the future. What you just read isn't a paper written by a government panel on how it believes the industry can succeed in the future. What you have just read has been battle-tested and thoroughly proven in real life. I tried not to mention my company's name too often in this article, because it's not any one stable that will pave the way for our industry's future. It isn't any one person or model. It is all of us working together, understanding that there is a way forward and collectively persuing it. I simply proved it is possible. It's up to all of us to succeed together. Through education, we will find an understanding, and a profound realization that by changing the way we promote our industry we change the way it's viewed and experienced by the people we have been looking for forever. A New Year's resolution for the entire industry. Happy New year, Anthony MacDonald TheStable.ca    

Trainer David Vozlic claimed a hat-trick on Thursday night at the Mildura Harness ­Racing Club Sunraysia Daily Family Fun Night, including the Sunraysia Daily Summer Cup.  Vozlic’s Causenfriction took out the night’s main race and training honours for the night, but overall it was the South Aust­ralians who gained revenge from their ­defeat the previous week in the State of Origin ­series against Victoria.  Danielle Hill drove a treble and her brother Wayne scored a good win, driving Frank Mercieca-trained Our Little Actress. To read more on this article click on link; Reprinted with permission of The Sunraysia Daily

Chris Lakata hopes it's best to be "Lucky" this weekend at The Meadowlands. Lucky Weekend, trained by Lakata, starts from post eight with driver Vincent Ginsburg in Saturday's $221,540 Kindergarten Classic Series championship for 2-year-old male harness racing trotters at the Big M. The gelding, purchased last month by Richard Mishkin for $45,000 at the inaugural Lexington Selected Mixed Sale, has won five of nine races and is among the season's 10 fastest 2-year-old male trotters, with a mark of 1:54.2. He went off stride in his first start for his new connections on Oct. 12, but rebounded with a Kindergarten win a week later. He was scratched last week because of sickness. "There are a lot of horses that are sick now; it seems to be going around," Lakata said about Lucky Weekend, a son of Lucky Chucky-Weekend Vacation who was trained previously by Chuck Sylvester. "He seems to be better now. "He seems like a nice solid horse. He's got a great attitude and is a very happy horse. I really like everything about him. He was already on his way to looking good before we got him. He made a break the first week we raced him so we changed a couple things and he was really good his last start." The Meadowlands hosts four Kindergarten championships on Saturday. In addition to the final for 2-year-old male trotters there is the $236,060 final for 2-year-old female trotters, $173,800 final for 2-year-old male pacers, and $148,700 final for 2-year-old female pacers. Post time is 7:15 p.m. (EDT) for the program's first race. Lakata, a former longtime assistant to Hall of Fame trainer Ron Gurfein, is in his fourth year operating his own stable. His barn at Joie De Vie Farm in New Jersey typically numbers five to 10 horses. Lucky Weekend's appearance in the Kindergarten championship is Lakata's first trip to a Grand Circuit final with his own stable. "Some weeks are great, and some are not so great," said a laughing Lakata, who grew up near Saratoga and began working with horses there after graduating from high school. "Sometimes you think you're a genius, and other times you look in the mirror and ask yourself if you know what you're doing. I've been doing it all my life, so I'm used to it. "I don't think I could work indoors in an office. As soon as I started (with the horses) I liked it. You're around all kind of people and they all blend together. It's a lot of fun." Lucky Weekend faces a field that includes 4-for-4 Seven Hills, trained by John Butenschoen, and Divine Spirit, trained by Brett Pelling. The horses, which were tied atop the Kindergarten standings, both enter the final off back-to-back wins in the series. This will be Lucky Weekend's final start of the year. "I think (Lucky Weekend) is as good as the others in there," Lakata said. "We'll find out. I hope he's as good this week as he was in his last start. He should be OK." For Saturday's complete entries, click here. For the Kindergarten standings, click here. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA  

The Victorian Masters Games is an opportunity for equestrians over 30 to show younger riders how it is done. Dressage, show horse, combined training and harness racing events in recent weeks have seen riders and drivers up to 70 years plus competing for honours at Werribee Park. In the show horse section, Kerry Tempest-Clark’s Fine Romance was led champion, while Catherine Sfregola took out the ridden championship with Between the Beats. Champion rider was Bree Stevens. There were five divisions in the combined training section with the championships going to Jackie Waite on Darby Day (45cm), Nikki Jupp on Avanti Kryptonite (60cm), Walter Burger on Feldale Griffin (75cm), Julie Bramucci on Rafiki Delargo (90cm) and Tania Harding on Jirrima Easy Jet (105cm). In the dressage, Rachael Edwards on Mr Spot took the preliminary championship. The novice champion was Gwyn Coulthard riding Samaran and the elementary champion was won by Elizabeth Sheather on Coldstream Universe. The medium level champion was Fiona Cooper on Belcam Camponelle and the advanced champion was Lucy McNutt on Thamesbourne Sunsmart. The harness section was very popular and showed age is no barrier to horse sports. Competing in the class titled “over 70 and still breathing” were accomplished drivers Diana Lawrence and Evanne Chesson, with Lawrence taking the section. Diane Boardman from the over-55 years section was supreme champion driver. Cheryl Sheddan’s pony Little Plains Phillipa earned her driver the high point mini award, with placings in dressage, obstacle driving and cones. William Lewin drove Magpie to a win in the delivery horse class and Kathy Reynolds’ Shepherds Hill Little Wayne was champion novice. The Hero award for the best performed Standardbred horse was won by Natasha Pettingill’s Rose of Ambrose with Michelle Wight’s It Happens in Vegas, the reserve. Natasha was also the gold medallist in the driver under 55 years. Janice Lewin was judged best groom. Reprinted with permission of The Weekly Times

Endurance riding events – long-distance competitions against the clock which challenge both horse and rider – are run across the UK. Gayle Ritchie meets those taking part in one round Tentsmuir Forest A breathtakingly beautiful Friesian stallion canters through the forest, his glossy coat shimmering in the sunlight. His luxurious mane and tail flow freely and his ears prick forwards, listening to the gentle tones of the rider perched on his majestic back. The stallion in question is 16.3hh Oscar and his rider is Blairgowrie-based Janine Mason. The duo is taking part in a timed ride around Tentsmuir Forest alongside 71 other horse and rider combos. © Kris Clay Janine Mason taking part in an endurance ride at Tentsmuir Forest on Freisian stallion Oscar. Run by the Scottish Endurance Riding Club (SERC), the goal is to complete a set distance in an allocated time and with the horse in sound condition, its heart rate below a certain level. Routes today range from a “taster” 9km to a full-on 62km challenge but some riders can boast of completing longer rides – up to a staggering 160km. Some ride in teams while others go solo and there are horses of all shapes and sizes – from slinky, speedy Arabs to hairy Highlands. Overall, there’s a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere; there’s no snobbery or elitism whatsoever. A major focus is on fun and there are some fantastic colour combinations going on, with riders matching their hat silks to their horse’s bridles. Horse welfare and safety are hugely important. Spurs, martingales, blinkers and other restraints are not permitted and horses are vetted before the ride. © Kris Clay From Highlands to Arabs, all breeds take part. “Heart rates must be at a certain level and during the ‘trot up’, they mustn’t be lame,” chief steward Nancy Murdoch tells me. “Those doing big distances have another vet check half way round, and again at the end. “Rather than having a winner, mileage accumulated over time can result in awards.” Top team Mary Stockdale and her stunning black Arab Cumbria Khafifa, and Fiona Kirk with handsome Mr Charles, a Welsh D Cross Thoroughbred, are the first team to hit the half-way 32km mark. As they take a quick break to feed and sponge down their horses, they reveal why endurance is their favourite equestrian discipline. “You can be as competitive or non-competitive as you like,” beams Fiona. “You build a lovely partnership with your horse – a fantastic bond. You can ride all day as long as your horse is sound. “Performance is based on merit, unlike showing, which is based on someone else’s opinion.” © Kris Clay Mary Stockdale on Cumbria Khafifa. Mary, meanwhile, who has awards coming out of her ears – having clinched SERC’s 2017 trophy for rider with most mileage – tells me Khafifa has completed 3,742km under competition rules. “It’s a great opportunity to ride across beautiful countryside we’d never otherwise be lucky enough to see,” she smiles. “There’s a wonderful community and it’s a simple sport to get into. Any horse can do it, provided it’s reasonably fit, and taster sessions allow you to get a feel for the sport. “The relationship that horse and rider build together over the years is deeper than for many other disciplines.” © Kris Clay Mary shares a moment with Khafifa. Lorraine Laing is competing in the 30km option with her Standardbred ex-harness racing horse Tom, who is 20 years old. “We started with shorter pleasure rides then progressed to competing,” she tells me. “We’ve done 50km but prefer to do 30km. I ride in a team with Anne Scott and her Arab, Smokey. “We really love it and are trying to encourage more people to give it a go!” Sheila Bruce, chair of the Tayside branch of SERC, says the sport is open to everyone. “You go out, have fun, set your own parameters and ultimately, compete against yourself,” she says. “Our motto is: ‘To complete is to win’. We believe in challenges – and in the welfare of the horse.” © Kris Clay Janine Mason and Oscar about to be vetted. It wouldn’t be possible to run rides without helpers and roles include everything from runner to vet writer, timekeeper, gate opener, road crossing marshall and checkpoint steward. It’s hugely rewarding and addictive and who knows, it could inspire you to get involved in the sport yourself. To check the calendar or to sign up as a volunteer, see www.scottishendurance.com INFO The Scottish Endurance Riding Club organises three types of ride: pleasure rides, normally between 16 and 29km, competitive rides of 30km and over, and endurance rides of 60km and over. The ultimate competition is the endurance race, which may be up to 160km in one day but is always 60km and over. By Gayle Ritchie Reprinted with permission of The Courier

Guelph, ON, May 10, 2018 - Ah Spring; when countless materials are covered in shedding horse hair including your clothes, car, perhaps even your couch if you don’t change out of barn clothes immediately when you get home. But what if you are not covered in your horses shedding coat? Delayed shedding or regional hypertrichosis can be early warning signs of Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID) – a metabolic condition that suppresses the immune system when high cortisol levels increase blood sugar levels.  Look for abnormal hair coat including patches of long hair on the legs, wavy hair on the neck, changes in coat colour or shedding patterns and unusual whisker growth.  Equine Guelph’s Senior Horse Challenge healthcare tool contains useful resources to practice identifying metabolic issues.   Did you know horses seen for laminitis have frequently been found to have PPID or Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)? Laminitis can be a sign of both metabolic issues yet it is often treated without identifying the underlying cause.   There is a fair bit of confusion in the horse world over mixing up PPID and EMS as they share many of the same clinical signs. Horses with PPID may also have some of the features of EMS. Equine Metabolic Syndrome had many previous names: peripheral Cushing’s Syndrome, pseudo Cushing’s syndrome, hypothyroidism, and insulin resistance syndrome.   Horses with EMS do not display hypertrichosis (excessive hair growth) or delayed shedding. New research studies are investigating changes in gut microflora as another possible early warning sign of EMS. PPID cases are more common in horses over 15 where EMS tends to be seen in horses over 5 years of age. Laminitis and obesity are often the first clues in identifying both disorders. Working with a veterinarian who can perform diagnostics is necessary to conclude which disorder you are dealing with and determine the best treatment options. Early warning signs can be subtle and of course early diagnosis is important.   “Every year Boehringer Ingelheim sponsors a PPID testing campaign in partnership with Animal Health Laboratory in Guelph,” says Guillaume Cloutier, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health. “In 2017, out of the 442 horses that were tested, 273 (62%) had a positive result for PPID.”   To learn more about detecting early warning signs for metabolic issues and other important factors in maintaining health as your horse ages, visit Equine Guelph’s Senior Horse Challenge Healthcare Tool, kindly sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim.   by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions

The $12,000 Goulburn Sapling Stakes highlights the seven-race harness racing card scheduled for Sunday afternoon at the Goulburn Paceway. The two-year-old open feature has attracted a small but interesting field of six. Up-and-coming filly Platinum Revolution from the Shane Tritton stable has drawn barrier 5 and will likely go to the start as the public elect. The filly has won two of her three starts and before being sent for a spell was an easy winner of the Group 3 Pink Bonnet at Menangle in early March. On that occasion the Changeover filly sat outside the leader and race away to score easily in a solid 1:54.7 mile. One of four fillies engaged in Sunday’s event, Platinum Revolution will find strong opposition from the well performed Tactical Response. The Big Jim gelding was a last start fifth in the $100,000 Group 1 Bathurst Gold Crown final when beaten by only 11.9 metres by star colt College Chapel. Tactical Response has faced the starter on only three occasions and earned his spot in the Gold Crown final by winning a heat in the good time of 1:57.1. Trained at Leeton by Wayne Sullivan, Tactical Response has drawn well in barrier 4 and appeals as the hardest to beat. While Sunday’s meeting has drawn a strong contingent of Sydney trainers, local trainer David Hewitt will be looking forward to featuring in winner’s circle through the promising three-year-old Sword And Shield. A lightly raced Million Dollar Cam gelding, Sword And Shield has won two of his three starts. Following some solid trial performances, the pacer is set to figure prominently after drawing gate 1 in the Goulburn Livestock Transport Pace. The Hewitt stable also has a strong chance of taking out the last of the afternoon, the Goulburn Soldiers Club pace with the proven performer Stanley Ross Robyn. Owned in the same interests as Sword And Shield, Stanley Ross Robyn hasn’t raced since March when he was a close up sixth at Menangle behind Rakarolla who posted a fast 1:50.6 mile. On that occasion Stanley Ross Robyn came from midfield to be beaten only 6 metres and will appreciate the drop in class on Sunday. Racing on Sunday, May 13 starts at 12.52pm, and with only three race meetings remaining before the close of the season, the club’s committee invites all harness fans to come out and experience the wonderful facilities of the Grace Millson Centre. Enjoy quality food and a wide range of cold alcoholic and soft drinks while watching all the racing action in air conditioned comfort. Goulburn harness racing is brought to fans by the kind support of Tabcorp, Goulburn Soldiers Club, Goulburn Mulwaree Council, ARW Multigroup, Hollingworth Crane Hire Service, RSM Accountants, and a host of smaller businesses including Top Water Carters Crookwell, First National Real Estate Goulburn, Goulburn Livestock Transport, Goulburn Landmark, Albury J Communications, Crust Gourmet Pizza, Glen Mia ACT Saddlery and Ranvet. For all the latest Goulburn harness racing news visit the club’s website at goulburnpaceway.com.au and don’t forget to like us on Facebook at facebook.com/goulburnpaceway. Tips Race 1: 4 My Major Rocket, 1 Cherry Stride, 8 Allstar Sea, 2 Kettering Girl Race 2: 1 Sword And Shield, 2 Lynnsanity, 4 Billysbredone, 9 Speedy Dominic Race 3: 2 Franco Landry, 4 Nadeen Franco, 1 Brian Who, 10 Oscar The Great Race 4: 4 Tactical Response, 5 Platinum Revolution, 1 Sunshine Stride, 6 Cee Cee Ambro Race 5: 9 Sheza Tricky Bridge, 6 Recipe For Dreaming, 2 Boobalaga Road, 1 Valla Swan Race 6: 1 Ballymore Boy, 8 Roarn, 4 Deecaesar, 2 Tavewa Sunset Race 7: 7 Stanley Ross Robyn, 9 Return Ace, 4 Shadow Reign, 5 Iamboogie By Mark Croatto Reprinted with permission of The Goulburn Post

Guelph, ON, May, 3, 2018 - With a hefty focus on emergency management, this year’s annual conference for the Organization of Racing Investigators (ORI), at Woodbine racetrack in Toronto, included Large Animal Emergency Rescue training provided by Equine Guelph. On the morning of Tuesday March 27th, Racing Investigators from as far afield as Australia received Awareness Level presentations on the technical aspects of rescue and then participated in hands-on practical exercises.   “The Equine Guelph Large Animal Emergency Rescue (LAER) course that was provided for the Organization of Racing Investigators at their 2018 annual conference was excellent,” said Racing Investigator/Firefighter, Troy Moffatt. “The content and delivery methods were accurate for the audience and there were numerous positive comments from our international partners claiming that this conference was one of the best. Having been a past student of this (LAER) course at both Mohawk and Meaford in 2017, I knew it was one not to miss.   I would encourage anyone involved in the equine world to attend and gain this valuable practical knowledge. I would also encourage any first responder to seek out this training and take it home to their departments.”   In this highly condensed version of the LAER program the key points stressed that successful rescue techniques follow an incident command system, mitigating risks and improving the odds of a favorable outcome for both animals and responders. All large animal incidents regardless of cause or scope, present a risk of injury to responders. That is why proper training of best practices and how to use rescue equipment is of the utmost importance for the safety of all involved.   “The feedback from participants was that the demonstrations were extremely interesting, informative, and practical,” said Tyler Durand, Racing Investigator from Toronto. “This was an excellent program provided by knowledgeable instructors."   A highly engaged group of racing investigators, security officers, racing officials and police officers were taken through the basics of animal behaviour and handling techniques, restraint and confinement techniques, basic anatomy and the roles of others at an animal incident. The working relationship with a large animal and equine veterinarian was discussed as an important part of a successful rescue as well as aftercare.   The participants were then put to task practicing rescue scenarios using a 600 pound horse mannequin with a focus on safety for both humans and animals and the general welfare of the animal. Remembering the anatomy lessons clarifying that tails, legs, heads and necks are not appropriate handles, they practiced several different ways to perform drags, lifts and assists with safe attachment methods using specialized webbing for straps and proper support.   “Prevention of such incidents is key,” says Equine Guelph director, Gayle Ecker, “but response to the incidents involving animals through knowledge and best practices is an important part of the health, welfare and safety of animals and first responders. We thank AGCO chairman, Jeremy Locke for organizing this event and bringing this important training to the 2018 Organization of Racing Investigators Training Conference.”   Jackie Bellamy-Zions Communications Equine Guelph Guelph, ON  N1G 2W1 519.824.4120 ext. 54756 jbellamy@uoguelph.ca

Guelph, ON April, 25, 2018 - EquiMania! would like to extend a sincere thank you to the organizers, supporters, sponsors, volunteers and the attendees at the Can-Am Equine Expo in Markham, ON. It was the 13th consecutive year of participation for EquiMania! at yet another brilliant show! Can-Am is always a must-attend for horse lovers from all disciplines. The April 6 – 8 event offered a multitude of learning opportunities, as well as entertainment and shopping for a well-rounded sensational outing. The staff and volunteers manning the education booth and Equimania! fun zone are always impressed by the dedicated equestrians coming out to Can-Am to further their equine knowledge.   To build on Can-Am’s atmosphere of education, attendees of the Equine Guelph and EquiMania! displays were encouraged to fill out ballots for a chance to win a free short online course from The Horse Portal.   Congratulations to Victoria Ayres, of Queensville, Ontario, who won her choice of one of the following 3-week courses offered to ages 16 and up: Horse Care & Welfare (September 17 – October 5, 2018), Sickness Prevention (October 15 – 26, 2018), Gut Health and Colic Prevention (November 12 – 30, 2018) or Horse Behaviour & Safety (January 21 – February 8, 2019). Congratulations also go out to Teya from Ontario, who won free enrolment into Horse Behaviour & Safety for Youth (July 23 – August 10, 2018). Check out The Horse Portalfor more information on these courses and upcoming 12 week courses.    “My heartfelt thanks go out to Ross Millar and the Can-Am team, especially auction organizer Janice Blakeney, for their dedication to putting together the annual Art Auction featured at the Can-Am Saturday Evening Extravaganza,” says Gayle Ecker, director of Equine Guelph. The auction was a resounding success with $4275.00 raised in under 15 minutes, with all the proceeds going to Equine Guelph. Many thanks to the four talented ladies who donated their beautiful pieces of art include: Nola McConnan, Ann Clifford, Kelly Plitz and Shawn Hamilton.    Equine Guelph would also like to acknowledge Heartland star, Amber Marshall for her role in the art auction. Amber provided a gift basket (signed magazines, necklace she wears on Heartland show, horse treats). When a call came out from the crowd to include a selfie, she quickly agreed to add that to the gift pack. The bidding quickly reached $800, and there were still 3 bidders at this level, so Amber suggested she would provide 3 gift packs and selfies if everyone would donate $800.  She tripled the donation with this action! Thank you Amber!   The strength of great partnerships has made EquiMania! a popular exhibit in Ontario and beyond. Equine Guelph thanks the sponsors and volunteers who make it possible to bring EquiMania! to approximately 2 million visitors every year! Thank you ESSO, Greenhawk, Kubota Canada, Ontario Equestrian, Shur-Gain, SSG Gloves, Standardbred Canada, System Fencing and Workplace Safety and Prevention Services.    To book EquiMania! for your next event contact Eq4kids@uoguelph.ca    Kids, visit EquiMania! online to play games online & stay tuned to upcoming events for more EquiMania! outings.   Equine Guelph

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