Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 16 of 517
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

Swear. The Comtois horse, a family tradition at Chaux Denis Farm. Two generations later, Danny Pujol, grandson of Alexis, a watchmaker by trade, will satisfy his passion for horses by continuing his grandfather’s Comtois breeding activity. In addition to maintaining the family expertise, Danny will also promote the Comtoise breed across eastern France. Dany still fights today for the maintenance of the traditions and the defense of the current interest in the use of the horse, in the forest, in the fields (harrows), in the vineyard and in the city. Passing on his know-how regarding the coupling Today, in La Chaux Denis, the breeding and use of horses continues in La Chaux Denis with Dany’s children, especially his daughter Sophie, his granddaughter Camille and his son-in-law Frédéric Morin, who in addition to the breeding activity opened a driving school in September 2019. Frédéric has 33 years of experience in the horse trade. He began his career in harness racing and harness racing as a young driver before moving to the National Studs in 1999.  Today he puts all his expertise at your service at the Ecuries de la Chaux Denis in Pont-d’Héry, in order to insist on his know-how in the use and use of horses (traction of animals, work on foot, etc.) . Of course, the March pandemic and containment had an impact on the development of activity. Frédéric emphasizes, however, that the months of July and August were more than satisfactory for customers and visitors, who were very satisfied with the training courses offered. He remembers that classes are aimed at adults and children from 6 years of age, regardless of their level. An internship in February For the February holidays, a discovery course with an adapted cavalry (ponies) is offered from Monday 8 to Saturday 13 and from Monday 15 to Saturday 20 February. It also offers gift certificates for birthdays. But Frédéric recently developed an approach to teaching animals in a workshop with the Besançon University Hospital. Children not only come to ride or harness, but also to various horse-related activities in order to forget their suffering. The stables of Chaux Denis also offer carriage rides alone or with the family, weddings with horses and demonstrations of all kinds (e.g. Roman chariots) or slingshots. Phone. 06.78.42.50.53 or 03.84.37.20.29 or by post.

Guelph, ON Jan, 19, 2021 - Nothing can drain the colour from a harness racing owner’s face quicker than hearing the word COLIC! Winter is an important season to focus on colic prevention and ward off water woes that can lead to impaction in the equine gut.    Equine Guelph has many resources to reduce your horse’s risk of colic, including a FREE interactive online healthcare tool, the Colic Risk Rater (www.equineguelph.ca/colictool). The importance of access to clean, fresh water 24 hours a day, to keep everything flowing smoothly, cannot be overstated and is one of the top 12 tips discussed among management practices. For an even deeper dive into digestive health – take the next offering of Equine Guelph’s online course, Gut Health and Colic Prevention, Feb 8 – 19 on the HorsePortal.ca. Both resources are generously sponsored by CapriCMW Insurance Services Ltd.   What you need to know about horses and H2O   Never assume they are drinking! Just because water is available does not mean your horse is drinking enough. Horses should drink about 37 to 45 litres of water per day in order to stay healthy, and they will often drink less water when it is icy cold, particularly if there are any dental issues. It is also a misnomer to believe all horses will break through a thin layer of ice to access their water source. A heater is the best option, not only for the fussy drinker but also to ensure troughs do not freeze over during overnight hours or on frigid days. A study out of Penn State University has shown that increasing water temperature from just above freezing to 4-18° Celsius will increase the amount of water consumed by up to 40%. Make sure the heater is properly installed and check it is in good repair and operating safely. If you see horses standing by a trough but not drinking, be sure to check there is no electric current due to a malfunctioning heating element.   Dehydration: This is a serious issue which increases the risk of impaction colic. Monitor the horse for any signs of dehydration. Discuss how you can do this with your veterinarian. A “skin pinch” on the shoulder of the horse is a useful tool to assess hydration by seeing if there is any delay in the skin flattening back down (this is called skin tenting). Slowed skin response may indicate a degree of dehydration.   Salt: If your horse is not drinking an adequate amount, in addition to monitoring them for dehydration, consider providing free choice loose salt for the horse to take in what they need.   More water at feed time: You can add water to concentrate ration and/or soak the hay for 10 minutes prior to feeding as this will bring more water into the gut. You may also wish to discuss with your vet or equine nutritionist the use of soaked and shredded beet pulp as an addition to the diet for getting more water into the digestive system. Adding a bran mash once a week was once a popular practice, but the sudden introduction of a different feed is actually another colic risk factor. Adding water to their regular feed is recommended. Being consistent and making feed changes slowly is another one of the top 12 tips in the Colic Risk Rater tool (www.equineguelph.ca/colictool).   24/7 access to water: Horses are trickle feeders and their digestive systems operate optimally when forage is always available. This means water must be available at all times to aid in digestion and avoid blockages. In winter water needs may increase as a result of the increased hay being consumed, which is also much dryer than moisture rich pasture. Always make sure there is lots of fresh, clean water provided 24 hours a day.    Snow is not a substitute for water! Ten inches of snow equals one inch of water. If 2 inches of snow fell, a horse would need to consume over four football fields worth to get enough water.   More recommended and required practices for watering horses are listed in the National Code of Practice for the care and Handling of Equines including: checking automatic watering systems daily to ensure they are dispensing water properly and testing water quality at least annually, unless it is from a previously tested water supply safe for human consumption.   Mike King, of CapriCMW, is a dedicated horseman who believes in the importance of education for horse owners. He addresses why it was so important for his organization to partner with Equine Guelph on colic prevention programs, “Given our decades of experience in insuring horses from coast to coast, we know that colic is one of the highest risk factors for death in the Canadian herd. We can think of no better risk management tool to prevent colic than education.”   This winter, take action to further your knowledge on colic prevention   Learn more about best practices to reduce your horse’s risk of colic by taking 15 minutes to assess your risk with the free Colic Risk Rater healthcare tool (www.equineguelph.ca/colictool), and then sign up for the next offering of Equine Guelph’s online course, Gut Health and Colic Prevention, Feb 8 – 19 on the HorsePortal.ca.   by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions, Equine Guelph  

January 14, 2021 - Cagnes sur Mer hosted the harness racing Gr. III Prix de la Cote d’Azur (purse 130,000€, 2925 meters distance handicap, International 5-11 year olds) this day with 16 solid starters. The 8/1 odds Golden Bridge (5m Ready Cash-Usenza) rallied mid-stretch to victory timed in 1.13.6kr, with David Thomain the pilot. Philippe Allaire trains the now seven time career winner for 292,850€ earned. Michel Tessier owns the winner. The 1.4/1 favorite Valzer di Poggio (7m Love You-Glory di Poggio) had surged to the front in the lane and gamely held second with Nicolas Bazire up for trainer Jean Michel Bazire. The 25 meter handicapped and 35/1 outsider Bulle de Laumont (10f Hand du Vivier-Ozo de Laumont) was a good third for trainer/driver Stephane Cingland. Alcoy (7m Ready Cash-Divann) was fourth for Christophe Martens, this one off at 14/1 and handicapped 25 meters. 38/1 Dona Viva (8f Love You) and 9/1 Fashion Queen (6f Ready Cash) were fifth and sixth. Golden Bridge (5) The beauty of Cagnes sur Mer is shown below. On Saturday at Paris-Vincennes there are three groupe contests, with entries for the Prix Gelinotte and Prix de Croix shown below. Aetos Kronos will be at the start in the Prix de Croix with J-M Bazire at the lines as he will battle Power, Green Grass and Gu d’Heripre. Jan 16 - 15:50 C4 - PRIX GELINOTTE 100 000€  Groupe II - Attelé - 2700m - Grande piste Course Internationale Pour pouliches de 3 ans (I), ayant gagné au moins 3.000. Jan 16 C5 - PRIX DE CROIX 100 000€ Groupe II - Attelé - 2 850m - Grande piste Course Internationale+Pour 5 ans (G), hongres exclus, ayant gagné au moins 38.000.   Thomas H. Hicks  

Broodmare owners who are still considering if they should breed their mare this season or not, should study the facts before making their important harness racing breeding decision. The record books show that many of the modern day stars in Australia and New Zealand were born in December or January.  And, with the racing season in Australia being extended to December 31, and the fact that many of the age classics are being held later in the year, points up that breeding your mare later is the season will not disadvantage the earning potential of the resultant foal. The Victoria Cup winner and Miracle Mile runner-up Lochinvar Art, the Victoria Cup and Hunter Cup hero Bling It On, the New Zealand Cup and Hunter Cup winner Arden Rooney and the Queen of the Pacific winners Nike Franco and Ameretto were among the list of top performers born in December. In fact, Nike Franco and Bling It On were foaled four days apart on December 23, 2010 and December 19, 2010 respectively. Nike Franco was the fastest mare in North America in 2017 pacing a mile in 1:48 The dual Inter Dominion heat winner Galactic Star was a December 21 foal, while Lumineer, the undefeated Victorian two-year-old in the 2016/17 season, was foaled on December 9. And, Waylade, the winner of the WA 4YO Championship and McInerney Ford Classic, was a New Year’s Day foal. On the trotting side, the Australian Trotting Grand Prix winner On Thunder Road and top free-for-aller Maorisfavouritesun were both foaled in January. While, the Breeders Crown champions Im Ready Jet, Always Ready and Stress Factor, the Victoria Oaks winner Pretty Majestic and the cups winner Lightning Calder were all born in December. Horse                   Date of Birth         Best Time          Stakemoney Bling It On             19/12/10                 1:50.2                $1,882,957 Arden Rooney        6/12/09                  1:54.2                $1,070,230 Lochinvar Art         7/12/15                   1:48.6                   $921,556 Nike Franco           23/12/10                 1:48                      $913,870 Galactic Star          21/12/12                1:52                       $651,652 Ameretto                 5/12/11                  1:51.4                   $565,419 Philadelphia Man   2/12/08                   1:52.6                   $559,135 Waylade                  1/1/11                    1:53.5                   $447,069 Rock Diamonds        8/12/13                 1:50                     $435,016 Bettor Enforce          5/12/12                1:48.9                    $319,669 Born To Rocknroll       8/12/12              1:52.5                   $300,684 Niki No No                  3/12/11               1:55.6                   $294,455 Whirily School             6/12/12               1:53.5                  $293,358 Lumineer                     9/12/14               1:52.5                  $258,440 Motu Meteor               16/12/13               1:55.4                $252,295 Bettor Promise             3/12/11                1:53.2                $243,288 Jilliby Jitterbug            1/12/12                  1:53.4               $212,480 Flojo’s Gold                 6/12/12                  1:54                  $202,575 Astride                     13/12/13                   1:53.6               $194,960   By Peter Wharton

Equine Business Marketing tips from Marketing and Communications in the Equine Industry instructor, Tracy Dopko   Guelph, ON Dec. 22, 2020 - There is an old saying, “How do you make a million dollars in the horse world? Start with two million.” Anyone who is active in the equine industry can definitely vouch for this statement. But why is this statement true? Why is the equine industry notorious for high-effort, low-profit?   The answer is very simple. Most people who start up an equine business do so because they love horses, not business. As a result, they have little or no understanding of pricing, profit margins or marketing. All they know is that they love working with horses and want to turn their passion into a business. Unfortunately, the equine industry requires far more skill and talent to succeed. If you fail to plan, then you plan to fail.    Marketing isn’t simply an important part of business success; it is the business. Everything else in the business relies upon marketing. Most businesses would not exist without marketing because it is the act of marketing that ultimately sells products and services. At a basic level, marketing is the process of understanding your customers, and building and maintaining relationships with them.   Importance of Personal Branding   When we think about the equine industry, personal branding is necessary for individuals such as coaches, trainers, farriers, and massage therapists. It is important to understand that personal branding is not about the individual at all, but about delivering value to your customers.   Think of yourself as a business of one If you have a business, you need a brand Personal branding is your way of developing your reputation   If branding is about what people think about you, then reviews and testimonials can have an impact on how your business is perceived. There are many factors that help a customer decide whether or not to use your services. Customers frequently rely on recommendations from friends and online research before purchasing a product or service because they demonstrate if you have fulfilled your promise to your current customers. The growth and life span of your business is directly tied to your business’s reputation.    It is fair to say your business reputation determines your brand equity, which is the value of having a recognized brand. As a result, a large portion of marketing activities should be geared towards building the brand equity of your company. A business’s reputation is considered to be successful when it meets the expectations of its customers effectively. Customers then feel the business is a responsible member of the community, and they become proud to be associated with their products and services. This gives them the confidence to buy more from you and become loyal customers.   Learn Who Your Competitors Are   Understanding who your competitors are will help you determine the strengths and weaknesses of other businesses offering similar services in your area. In Equine Guelph’s online course, Marketing & Communications in the Equine Industry, students learn how to gather information about competitors, which lets you know what your business is facing, how competitive the market is, and allows you to determine any gaps in services that you could potentially fill.   The competitiveness within the equine industry can make it difficult for a business to stand out from its competitors. It becomes essential that you create a brand that is seen as unique and distinct. It is not about having the lowest price compared to your competitors. It is about how you do things and the unique value you can offer your customers that is different from your competitors. As part of the Marketing & Communications course, students learn how to incorporate their story, expertise, strengths and passions into developing their brand.   Key Take-aways   Marketing isn’t simply an important part of business success; it is the business.  Marketing a business within the equine industry comes with some unique challenges. Personal branding is your way of developing your reputation. Brand differentiation is ensuring your business is distinct from the competition.   Bio: Tracy Dopko, BA, DipEqS   Tracy is an accomplished rider, breeder, trainer and senior judge and steward with both Equestrian Canada and the United States Equestrian Federation.   She sits on various equine committees in both Canada and the United States and gives regular equine clinics throughout North America. She owns and operates a successful Equine Appraisal/Equine Expert Witness business, is a freelance writer and runs a Web Design and Social Media Marketing company.    Tracy and her husband own and operate Daventry Equestrian just outside of Edmonton, Alberta and focus on breeding, training and showing warmbloods, pony hunters and Welsh Cobs. Tracy is known throughout the equine industry for her keen marketing skills and the ability to draw in clientele from across North America.   Tracy completed her Equine Studies Diploma (with distinction), Equine Business Certificate (with distinction) and Equine Science Certificate (with distinction) all in one year with the University of Guelph. Upon graduating, she was invited back as a Guest Speaker for the Equine Marketing and Communication course and eventually took over as the full-time instructor. She has a Bachelor’s Degree with distinction from the University of Guelph and is eager to share her experience and expertise with her students.   Check out 2 minute marketing videos from Open Learning and Educational Support: The FAB Model Scheduling Facebook Business posts Google My Business           Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph in Canada. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government - for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit www.equineguelph.ca.   Story by: Tracy Dopko, BA, DipEqS   Photo Caption: Tracey Dopko teaches the Equine Guelph 12 week online course: Marketing and Communications in the Equine Industry   Web Link(s): Story web link: https://thehorseportal.ca/2020/12/if-you-build-it-they-will-come-or-will-they/   Other web links: Marketing and Communications in the Equine Industry online Course beginning Jan 11, 2021 https://courses.opened.uoguelph.ca/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=17950   Media Contact:   Jackie Bellamy-Zions Communications Equine Guelph  

Guelph, ON Dec. 15, 2020 Equine Guelph, the horse centre at the University of Guelph in Canada, has announced it is setting up a free virtual classroom for English-speaking youth around the world. Horse-crazy teenagers (ages 13-17) will have the opportunity to take an online Equine Behaviour & Safety course with access open until February 6, 2021 on www.TheHorsePortal.com   With no specific time to be online, the self-paced on-demand format was developed to be super flexible and user-friendly, a perfect way for youth to fuel their passion and learn more about their favourite animal over the COVID-19 second wave months.  There is approximately two-week’s worth of material and activities, but with this special free offering, kids can keep coming back as often as they like during the three month period.     Join over 350 students, from around the globe, that have already signed up in November to learn about:   Course topics include: 1.  Horse Behaviour – Wild vs Stabled 2.  How Horses See and Hear 3.  Herd Behaviour – How Horses Interact with Each Other 4.  Horse Handling – Basic Safety Around Horses 5.  Rider/Helmet Safety 6.  Safe Trailering – Basics 7.  Fire Safety 8.  Safety around the Barn and Paddocks 9.  Returning from an Injury   There will be many more points to ponder as students go through a multitude of videos from industry professionals including guest expert: Dr. Rebecca Husted-Gimenez from the United States. As a world-renowned instructor on technical large animal emergency rescue, Gimenez has a wealth of experience when it comes to horse behaviour and safe handling. For more information on Dr. Gimenez please visit the TLAER website.   Valued at $100, this offering will be a game changer for youth learning to speak horse! As such, Equine Guelph asks youth around the world to pass it on! Tell your friends, tell your barn, tell your ‘Ag’ group!     Equine Guelph thanks its generous sponsors in Canada for making this international youth initiative possible: ESSO, Kubota Canada, Ontario Equestrian, SSG Gloves, System Fencing and Workplace Safety & Prevention Services.   Get all your barn buddies together and sign up today for this awesome opportunity to stay safe and pursue your passion for horses online! Go to www.TheHorsePortal.com for more info.     Jackie Bellamy-Zions Communications Equine Guelph  

Guelph, ON Aug, 27, 2020 - Horse human interaction studies were discussed in a talk presented by Dr. Katrina Merkies, Ontario Agricultural College at the three day virtual conference hosted by the International Society for Equitation Science (ISES).   With around 50 recent horse behavior studies referenced in the 40 minute presentation (and apologies for the many not mentioned), there is an undeniable growing interest to understand our impact on physiological and behavioural states of our equine partners.  “The road to horse and human well-being” was the journey unfolding as Merkies expounded on the discoveries of her studies and those of fellow researchers.  Evidenced-based research stands to make great strides toward continually improving equine welfare.   What do we know about horses?   The talk began by introducing one of Merkies’ collaborative research studies on how humans perceive their bond with horses.  The survey indicated people would characterize their bond in several ways: the horse approaching them, vocally greeting them, trusting them in a frightening situation, taking care of them during hardships and physically touching them.  Another study showed humans can distinguish between positive and negative domestic horse vocalizations.    A study by Merkies PhD student, Cordelie DuBois, surveyed participants with surprising results.  When asked to rank welfare-compromising scenarios, most could easily pick out a physical threat to a horse but there was more variance in answers to questions where the effects of boredom or frustration were to be identified.       How do horses perceive us & what impact are we having on their welfare?   Since the advent of the ‘five freedoms of animal welfare’ and the evolution of ‘the five domains model’, increasing attention has been placed on animals not just surviving in our care but thriving and having their social/emotional needs met for a life worth living.  Scientific research continues to contribute to an ever increasing knowledge base.   Merkies’ latest collective paper on the Effect of Human Attachment Style on Horse Behaviour and Physiology during Equine-Assisted Activities was published earlier this year.  The pilot study aimed to determine the effect of the attachment style of at-risk adolescents on the physiology and behavior of therapy horses during a 10-week Equine Facilitated Learning program.  The therapy horses used during this study indicated a low stress response toward participants in the program.  In particular, a human insecure attachment style produced more predictable behavioural responses in the horses.   In another study, Merkies and her team discovered that, depending on the kind of stress, horses might blink significantly less when they’re experiencing acute stress.     Horses may understand us better than we understand them.  One study has shown that horses are adept at distinguishing human facial expressions.  Another study by Merkies’ graduate student, Abby Hodder, further supported this research and explored how this ability could influence the affective state of a horse.     Can we say we are as good at reading a horses’ expression?  Have a look at the research on facial grimace recognition in horses to see if you can distinguish between relaxed and pained expressions.   Merkies has also joined researchers in the quest to find out how horses listen to us and if the human voice could have a calming effect on horses.  She relays, horses in a round pen moved more quickly when a stern voice was introduced than when a pleasant one was used.  The horses were also more likely to turn their body toward a pleasant voice.  Merkies has also seen for herself in various studies that horses do not like being alone, instantly becoming calmer when a human enters a round pen scenario. Another study reveals horses are more likely to approach an attentive person over an inattentive one.     Studies on horses’ emotional intelligence have come out with conflicting results with some pointing out a confident handler could more easily lead a horse through an obstacle course, while other studies suggest horses are not stressed by a nervous handler.  Some studies have suggested horses can recognize different emotions but empathy or experience of those emotions are unknown.   The hot topics of positive and negative reinforcement in the training of horses had been a recurring theme throughout the ISES conference and was not to be left out of Merkies’ presentation.  Incorrect use of negative reinforcement (such as incorrect timing removing the pressure of an aid) has been linked to increased stress in horses.  Positive reinforcement has been shown to lead to anticipatory behaviour and a greater attentiveness to the trainer.  Other studies have also revealed horses kept on pasture desensitize to novel stimuli quicker.     The talk finished up on more recurrent themes of ‘social license to operate’ and charging the human handlers with practicing ‘agency’ for the horse.  Tuning in to the horses needs and allowing them to express themselves.  Not dismissing if they turn away when the bridle is presented, and similar cues delivered with body language.  Education is the key to recognizing positive indicators of welfare and picking up on warning signs.  Equitation science will continue to play an important role championing for equine welfare.   Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph in Canada. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government - for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit www.equineguelph.ca.   Story by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions   Web Link(s): Story web link: https://thehorseportal.ca/2020/08/horse-human-interactions-studied/   Other web links: 50 recent horse behavior studies referenced https://equineguelph.ca/pdf/facts/A-Match-Made-in-Heaven-references.pdf   humans can distinguish between positive and negative domestic horse vocalizations https://equineguelph.ca/pdf/surveys/VOX lay abstract.pdf   Cordelie DuBois, surveyed participants with surprising results https://www.equineguelph.ca/news/index.php?content=663   Effect of Human Attachment Style on Horse Behaviour and Physiology during Equine-Assisted Activities https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10071156   horses might blink significantly less when they’re experiencing acute stress https://equineguelph.ca/news/index.php?content=646   horses are adept at distinguishing human facial expressions http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2015.0907   facial grimace recognition in horses https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/figure?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0092281.g002   if the human voice could have a calming effect on horses https://thehorse.com/116430/study-tone-pitch-human-voice-could-affect-horses/   Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph in Canada. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government - for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit www.equineguelph.ca.      

MILTON, JULY 25, 2020 - Tattoo Artist collected his second Gold Series and fourth straight victory at Woodbine Mohawk Park on Saturday, July 25 as the harness racing three-year-old pacing colts met for the second time in their Ontario Sires Stakes season. Lining up at Post 1 with Bob McClure in the race bike, Tattoo Artist took a brief spin in the pocket as Aneto led the field of six to a :26.4 opening quarter, but was soon heading for the front where he rang up a :54.2 half and 1:21.1 three-quarters. Down the stretch the fan favourite had to contend with a hard closing Beach Blanket Book, hanging on for a neck victory in 1:49.1. Indictable Hanover finished two lengths back in third. "I think that three weeks hurt him a bit," said trainer Dr. Ian Moore, noting that Tattoo Artist had not raced since the Gold Series season opener on July 4. "I think that good horses have got to be trained or raced pretty well right to where they're going to go, or else if you don't and they have too big a gap there, they may struggle a little bit. And he certainly got a little tired on the end there tonight, which is uncharacteristic of him." Tattoo Artist and his peers face the same three week gap before the next Gold Series event, at Rideau Carleton Raceway on Aug. 16, and the North America Cup eliminations are scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 22. The North America Cup has been circled in red on Tattoo Artist's calendar for months, so Moore is a bit undecided about how the coming weeks will play out for the Hes Watching son. His preference would be to race the colt at Woodbine Mohawk Park in preparation for the North America Cup, but he also does not fancy putting the sophomore in against more experienced competition, which may see him make the trip to Rideau Carleton and head into the elimination on short rest. "I'll have to start looking somewhere and see what we come up with. I'm not taking him across the border anywhere, so we'll see if we can find something here for him," said the Cambridge, ON resident, who conditions Tattoo Artist for Frank Cannon of Sanford and Let It Ride Stables Inc. of Boca Raton, FL. "They don't want to train this time of year, they want to race now. Earlier on they're gung ho to train, and then once the racing starts they look forward to that, any competitive horse does, and he's a good competitive horse and he looks forward to it, so it's difficult. You want to keep their mind fresh and their body in good shape and ready to roll when it's time." Tattoo Artist The second $104,800 Gold division saw heavy favourite Beaumond Hanover and driver Jody Jamieson land in fourth from Post 2 as Rhythm In Motion rolled out to a :26.3 quarter. Jamieson sent Beaumond Hanover to the front heading by the :54.2 half and the colt cruised through a 1:22.4 three-quarters and one to a one and one-quarter length victory in 1:49.2. Rhythm In Motion stayed game for second and Springbridge Jim sprinted into third. "He caught the softer division, so I thought if everything goes right he should win it," said owner-trainer Jack Darling. "It all worked out good. He (Jamieson) was just kind of sitting there chilly through the lane." The win was also Beaumond Hanover's second Gold Series win and fourth of the season. The Sportswriter son prepped for Saturday's test with a 1:49.4 win in a July 18 overnight event at Woodbine Mohawk Park, but, like Moore, Darling is also considering his options heading toward the North America Cup. "It's just turned out, because of the situation this year, that the schedule isn't good, because you've got, like for my horse I've got a Gold at Rideau, which you hate to miss that, and then you've got the NA Cup, the elims and the final, then the week after is the Somebeachsomewhere, the week after that is the Simcoe, both good races, and then the week after that is another Gold, so it's just going to be tough to map out," said the Cambridge, ON resident. "If you're going to skip the NA Cup, then the schedule is just fine, but it's hard to skip the million dollar race." While Darling considers his options, Beaumond Hanover will maintain his usual routine, which Darling says has not varied much even as the racing season heats up. Beaumond Hanover "I try to train him light, but he's such a good trainer he seems to have to go a certain speed, or it's like he's done nothing," Darling explained. "I train him faster than I would another horse, but it's actually easier on him, he just needs to roll along. He just always feels good, always trains great. He's just a real pleasure to have around." Beaumond Hanover Complete results from Saturday's program are available at Woodbine Mohawk Park Results. Video: Race 1 - Tattoo Artist; Race 8 - Beaumond Hanover OSS Program Information For rules, notices, Program changes, up-to-date point standings, race replays, and more, visit: www.ontariosiresstakes.com Ontario Racing

Horsemen are advised that Harrah's Philadelphia Casino and Racetrack will hold pre-meet qualifiers on June 16 (Tuesday) June 18th (Thursday) and June 19th (Friday) mornings, with first post at 10:00 a.m. each day. Entries for the Tuesday June 16th Qualifier will be accepted on Sunday June 14th with the box scheduled to close at 11:00 a.m. The Tuesday June 16th Qualifier will be for 3 Year Old & Older Horses, the Thursday June 18th Qualifier will be for 2 Year Old Horses, the Friday Qualifier will be for All Ages. Please note that due to Covid - 19 pandemic shutdown, the Pennsylvania State Horse Racing Commission is temporarily modifying the 45 day rule, horses who have started and have a clean line after February 1st, 2020 will not need to Qualify. This will only be in effect for a period of two weeks once the first live race resumes, after that the 45 day rule will be in effect. Opening Day for the 2020 Season is now scheduled for Sunday June 21st with a 12:40 Post Time. Following the Opening Day card, Harrah's Philadelphia will move to its traditional race schedule of Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Sunday's. Horsemen are once again reminded to provide the Race Office with all applicable health documents for their horses, including Coggins, EHV and rabies paperwork dated 2020 and a health certificate from the last 30 days. They may be faxed to the race office at 484.490.2230. Additionally, racing applications are available through the Harrah's Philadelphia website: www.harrahsphilly.com, and following the "Horsemen" link. Barry Brown | Director/Racing Operations O (484) 490-1770 777 Harrah's Blvd | Chester, PA 19013 www.caesars.com    

Guelph, ON June 10, 2020 - Could biologic therapies be the future for treating joint disease? Ontario Veterinary College researcher, Dr. Mark Hurtig and his team are investigating novel new methods to potentially repair tissue rather than just suppressing the signs of joint disease.   Hurtig also explains the mechanism and contributing factors to fetlock chip fractures stating they can be related to the surface that the horse works on and the intensity of that work.   Dr. Hurtig explains his research into biologic therapies & gives tips to avoid lameness as horses resume training in this 15 minute video.     As a rider and veterinarian, Dr. Hurtig provides some precautions when resuming training of a horse: Return to exercise slowly and incrementally with lots of walking When introducing trotting avoid hard surfaces. Avoid complex moves at first – promote relaxation. Allow an adaptation time when working on new surfaces and cross-train on the surfaces you intend to expose your horse to   Regarding the period of time required before a horse is ready for harder work, Hurtig says, “It depends on the bio-mechanical challenge to their muscular skeletal system.”   One could spend at least three months preparation before the horse is ready for high level performance. It can also take up to a year to get ligaments and tendons ready for Olympic level sport.   Hurtig is excited about his research on Intra Articular therapies that utilize direct injection into the joint as a targeted therapy but cautions against injections used for maintenance or as a preventative measure.   Learn more about Dr. Hurtig's research   Want to learn more about lameness?   Equine Guelph has free healthcare tools: Lameness Lab and Journey through the Joints  Test your knowledge and savvy for spotting lameness!   Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph in Canada. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government - for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit www.equineguelph.ca.   by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions

CHARLOTTETOWN, PE - Live racing returns to Red Shores Racetrack and Casino at the Charlottetown Driving Park on Thursday evening as the Island track will be the first oval in the nation to host live harness racing since March. The Red Shores broadcast team will be back with Race Day airing at 5:30pm AST. First race post time is 6 P.M. for the 10-dash card with the $2,900 featured fillies and mares open pace lining up in race 9 for a much-anticipated match-up between newcomers. A field of top class mares will tussle in that featured event including Berazzled (To be driven by Mike McGuigan) who moves into the Jonah Moase stable of Warren Grove after a private purchase by his father Neal Moase over the winter months. The mare had been racing at Yonkers Raceway in New York and will leave from post 2 as the morning line favourite Thursday night fresh off an 11-length romp in 1:56.1 in her qualifier. Dreamfair Zenfire also turned in an impressive qualifier in her first charted line on the East Coast as trainer Marc Campbell steered her to a 1:57.3 going away victory Saturday at Red Shores over a muddy track with a two-second variant. Ryan and Everett MacLeod of Souris owns the four-year-old daughter of Sunfire Blue Chip who comes into the race riding a two-race win streak from the Ontario racing circuit. She will leave from post 6 on Thursday. Much Adoo has the respect of third choice on the morning line but will be saddled with post 7 for trainer Ron Matheson and owner Rollwithitharry Racing of Marshfield. Brodie MacPhee will be in the bike behind the Dover Downs ship-in. The Thursday card will mark the return to the driving ranks for the 34-year-old MacPhee, a former top driver on P.E.I., who has not driven in a pari-mutuel race since August of 2014. Other entries in the race 9 fillies and mares open are Collective Wisdom (Ron Matheson), newcomer Southwind Ion (Jason Hughes), Woodmere Chella (David Dowling) and Private Di (Kenny Arsenault). The fillies and mares back-up class is in the race Race 10 finale carrying a $2,400 purse with Miss Kabana making her Island debut from post 3 with Vincent Poulton in the bike for co-owner and trainer Gary Poulton and fellow Charlottetown owners Gail MacDonald and Trevor Warren. The Marc Three miss has been racing the claiming ranks at Woodbine Mohawk Park in Ontario. Other top entries are Arc Light (Campbell) from post 6 and Tell Me Why (Corey MacPherson) from post 5. The lone trot of the evening hits the track in race 5 with Osprey Delta favoured with rail control in the $1,750 class for owner-trainer-driver Paul Larrabee of Belle River. The Tad The Stud five-year-old last raced at Plainridge Park in Massachusetts for trainer Mike Stevenson. Customers on PEI will be able to watch and wager on the product through Horse Player Interactive (HPI). It is free to join at hpibet.com. Other customers and fans around the globe will have access through betting platforms on the season opener. Red Shores feature races will be available on Proline all summer long. For race programs, HPIBET.Com and Race Day broadcast go to redshores.ca By Nicholas Oakes For Red Shores

MILTON, June 1, 2020 - Woodbine Mohawk Park's Race Office would like to inform harness racing horsepeople that sign-up to train this week at Mohawk Park opens later today (June 1) at 3 p.m. Training at Woodbine Mohawk Park is available on Wednesday (June 3) and Saturday (June 6) from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Training hours will be allotted by signing up on a first-come, first serve-basis. Sign-ups will start at 3:00 p.m. on Monday, June 1. Trainers are limited to no more than 10 horses per day. A limit of 50 horses are permitted in the paddock during a training time slot. Training time slots will be in 2.5 hour increments (6:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m., 9:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., 12:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.). All paddock COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place for training hours, including the requirement to have all personnel wearing a face mask. Only trainers and essential licensed personnel over the age of 16 will be permitted through the Security check point. The link to sign-up for training is available here: Sign-Up for Training at Woodbine Mohawk Park. Please contact Dylan Allain with any questions at dallain@woodbine.com. Mark McKelvie

Guelph, ON - May 27, 2020 - How would equine industry members describe the welfare status of Canadian horses? Which horses do they believe are the most at risk? And what do they believe threatens horse welfare? These are just some of the questions a research team at the University of Guelph set out to answer. In 2015, Master’s student, Lindsay Nakonechny, with the support of supervisor Dr. Katrina Merkies and PhD student Cordelie DuBois, created a survey to find out what adult members of the Canadian equine industry think about horse welfare. The online survey results revealed that participants largely agree on some of the top perceived threats to horse welfare, but also uncovered a few surprises.   Almost one hundred percent of survey participants agreed that there were welfare issues in the Canadian equine industry, citing unwanted horses, inappropriate training methods, and unknowledgeable owners as some of the key issues within the industry. The majority of participants also highlighted ineffective legislation and the incapacity of law enforcement to protect horses as important.   When examining which groups of horses were perceived to be “at risk”, however, opinions were much more divided. Welfare issues connected to auctions or feedlot horses were less divided. Horses intended for slaughter and horses with owners who lack knowledge, were also suggested as affected groups by survey participants.   Lack of knowledge continued to emerge as a re-occurring survey theme. This, along with financial difficulties was considered one of the biggest challenges to “good” equine welfare. This supports the need for educational programs and targeted knowledge transfer. Gayle Ecker, director of Equine Guelph could not agree more. “What this survey tells us is there is a need to work together with strong support from the industry to extend the reach of welfare education,” says Ecker. “Improved information outreach to the industry incorporating human behaviour change approaches are vital if we are to have an impact on improving equine welfare.”   Close to 1,000 participants from multiple disciplines across Canada took the survey and self-identified as at least somewhat knowledgeable regarding horse care. Of the five options regarding horse care knowledge, participants were most familiar with body condition scoring (BCS; 78.6%,). Surprisingly, under 55% were aware of the national document: the Canadian Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Equines (NFACC). Participants were even less familiar with the American Association of Equine Practitioners Lameness Scale (35.6%), the Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare (29.7%), and Equitation Science (20.4%).   Alongside examining the participants’ views on equine welfare within the industry, researchers also examined what factors, such as a person’s gender or view on their horse’s ability to feel emotions, most often affected their answers. Researchers found that whether a person considered their horse to be livestock or a companion animal, as well as what discipline they were involved in, most often influenced their perception of welfare issues. People who considered horses livestock, for example, were less likely to believe that horses at auction or on feedlots were an “at risk” group.   Additionally, eight scenarios were included in the survey, each outlining a scenario in which horse welfare could be compromised. Those ranked the most welfare-compromising involved horses being pastured without water during the wintertime and a horse given a sedative prior to training. While participants of this survey almost unanimously indicated that they believed horses could feel a variety of emotional states, this belief was not always reflected in their ranking of the scenarios. Several scenarios described situations in which horses could be suffering the effects of boredom or frustration (e.g. a horse on extended stall rest), but these scenarios were not considered as welfare-compromising as others. The intersection between what individuals think horses are capable of feeling and how this translates into practice (i.e. what situations cause horses to feel emotions such as boredom or pain) is an interesting one, and a challenge to all educators looking to bridge the gap between “knowing” and “understanding.”   To learn more about the survey questions, the diversity of the survey participant’s answers, and how they related to their involvement in the equine industry, read the full publication: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30405030.   Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph in Canada. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government - for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit www.equineguelph.ca.   Story by: Equine Guelph

Guelph, ON May 21, 2020 - Lameness is a huge focus for Dr. Judith Koenig as a clinician, researcher and instructor at the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC). Koenig is also a rider with a keen interest in helping grass roots riders and upcoming high-performance athletes. In the accompanying video Dr. Koenig explains her current research endeavoring to heal tendon injuries faster and also takes some time to talk about prevention. Stimulating stem cells to heal faster through the use of shock wave therapy is part of the exciting new research being conducted at the OVC by Dr. Koenig.  They were investigating whether shock wave therapy performed after injecting stem cells into a tendon will result in better quality healing.  Then they came up with the idea of pre-treating stem cells with shock wave prior to injection!    Dr. Koenig is also leading a clinical trial, currently enrolling thoroughbred racehorses.  The trial performs repeated injection of stem cells that have been harvested from umbilical cord blood, frozen and stored in Dr. Thomas Koch’s lab.  These stem cells are from unrelated horses.  Funding from the Ontario Equestrian federation has enabled OVC researchers to also follow a control group treated with platelet rich plasma as a comparison for this study. Reduced healing time is an obvious benefit to the welfare of the horse and of course the horse owner will be pleased about a quicker return to their training régime.     Realizing many will soon be in the position of starting horses back into training after a significant amount of time off, Koenig offers some important advice.  “You need to allow at least a six-week training period for the athletes to be slowly brought back and build up muscle mass and cardiovascular fitness,” says Koenig.  “Both stamina and muscle mass need to be retrained.”  She stressed the importance in checking the horse’s legs for heat and swelling before and after every ride and picking out the feet.  A good period of walking is required in the warm-up and cool down and riders need to pay attention to soundness in the walk before commencing their work out.     Want to learn more about lameness?     Equine Guelph has free healthcare tools:   Lameness Lab and Journey through the Joints    Test your knowledge and savvy for spotting lameness!   Learn more about Dr. Koenig and her research.   Biography: Judith Koenig, Mag vet med, Dr med vet, DVSc   Dr. Koenig is originally from Austria and came to Canada 1996 after graduating from vet school to gain some research experience and complete the research for her MSc. Following a large animal internship at the Ontario Veterinary College she went to Oregon State University where she did a one-year large animal fellowship. The year in Oregon gave her good exposure to Western Pleasure horses as well as Walking horses, which complemented her previous experience with Sports and Racehorse practice.   Judith came back to the Ontario Veterinary College where she did a 3-year large animal surgery residence with a concurrent graduate degree (DVSc). Judith became board certified with both the American and European College of Veterinary Surgeons and started to work as faculty in Large Animal Surgery in 2003. Since then she has been working half of the time as a surgeon with a strong interest in Equine Sports Medicine and the other half as researcher and teacher. In 2016 Judith became a board-certified diplomate for equine sports medicine and rehabilitation.   Judith’s main area of interest in research is tissue healing, particularly wound and tendon healing. She has investigated the use of different modalities (for example shockwave or stem cells) to see if they accelerate tissue healing and which cellular pathways are affected. This will help to direct treatment of tendon injuries and wounds in horses.   by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions

Guelph, ON - May 14, 2020 - There are many important questions pertaining to equine conditioning and fitness as we all look forward to returning to work.   Dr. Hilary Clayton recently shared some cautions and considerations in a Skype interview with Equine Guelph.   Dr. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman.   For the past 40 years she has been conducting amazing research in the areas of equine biomechanics and conditioning programs for equine athletes.   Dr. Clayton has also been a guest speaker in Equine Guelph’s online course offerings.   1. What are the differences between conditioning and training?  training is the technical preparation of the athlete  (learning the skills and movements they will need to perform in competition) conditioning strengthens the horse, progressively making them fit and able the goal of conditioning is to maintain soundness while maximizing performance 2. Considerations for horses that go from full work to just pasture turn-out?  a gradual decrease from full work to less days a week, lessening intensity is ideal. also, ideal that they stay in light work a day or 2 a week, however horses are resilient. when workload decreases, diet decreases do not change things suddenly 3. How long before a horse begins to lose muscle mass and fitness? What about bones/connective tissues? horses maintain their muscle and cardio-vascular ability longer than humans a month before horses start to lose cardio-vascular capacity and muscular strength bone and tissue adapt in accordance with the work they are doing with no work bones become weaker, muscles smaller and endurance decreases good news is the strength of bone & muscle will increase again when work resumes ligaments, tendons, cartilage of horse mature by 2yrs and are a bit more of an unknown resilience is the ability to stand up to the performances 4. When getting back to work, where do you start and how do you know how to move forward? 1st address condition of feet, saddle fit, and plan for increasing nutrition requirements. start very gradually with walking for the first 2 – 4 weeks. start with 10 min under saddle, working just 3 – 4 days in the first week increase amount of walking by 10 min/week  by 3 weeks = 30 min walk/day, start introducing 20 seconds of trot then slowly introduce short canters performing lots of transitions between gaits is great for improving fitness 5. What are the signs of “too fast, too long and too soon!” and how do we avoid this? back pain, limb pain, inflammation monitor any changes carefully horses will fool you with their cardio-vascular fitness improving before their strength. to avoid injury, don’t let an energetic horse dictate how much work you will do. 6. What are some of the similarities and differences in training programs for different disciplines? initial phase of conditioning is similar, building aerobic capacity and strengthening muscles first 2-3 months can be dedicated to general conditioning then start specializing depending on the intensity and endurance required for your sport. 7. What advice do you have for horse owners that are worried that leaving the horse alone is detrimental to its well-being? Plenty of horses living outside 24/7 with little exercise that are doing just fine. Horses are far from their natural lifestyle Maximizing turnout and forage are ways to benefit our horses welfare. They need water, food, shelter and an attentive care-taker. Biography: Dr. Hilary M. Clayton, BVMS, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, FRCVS is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For the past 40 years she has performed innovative research in the areas of equine biomechanics, conditioning programs for equine athletes and the effects of tack and equipment on the horse and rider. She has written 7 books and over 250 scientific articles on these topics. She is a charter diplomate and past president of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, an Honorary Fellow of the International Society for Equitation Science and has been inducted into the International Equine Veterinarians Hall of Fame, the Midwest Dressage Association Hall of Fame and the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.   From 1997 until she retired in 2014, Dr. Clayton was the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at Michigan State University. She continues to perform research through collaborations with universities in many countries and is active in publishing and presenting the findings. In addition, she is president of Sport Horse Science through which she applies the results of scientific research in the development of practical tools and techniques to help riders, trainers and veterinarians.   As a lifelong rider Dr. Clayton has competed in many equestrian sports, most recently focusing on dressage in which she competes through the Grand Prix level.    

Guelph, ON April, 15, 2020 - From adding special online course offerings to updating a Covid-19 resources page daily, Equine Guelph has been responding to harness racing industry requests during this difficult time. You can take a survey right now to let them know of any additional courses you would like to take while you are staying home.   New students are signing up daily for the extended online offering of Horse Behaviour and Safety! Register anytime in April – Adult and Youth offering (13-17).  Check out the BOGO deal!  Buy the adult course for $85 (for provincial federation members & partners) and get the youth one for free ($45 value) Join the Herd at TheHorsePortal.ca       Fire & Emergency Preparedness online course from May 4 - 11 (with extended access to June 30) Newly updated with: developing plans for business disruptions, back-up planning and information regarding COVID-19.  Guest speakers: Dr. Rebecca (Gimenez) Husted and Mike King. This special offering will be available for $60 ($25 savings).     Great news announced for the May offering of 12-week online courses with Equine Guelph - the Early Bird Rate of $549 will not expire = $50 in savings! (special offer for summer semester 2020).     While the Free Sickness Prevention course filled to capacity within 24 hours of the announcement, Equine Guelph does have a free Healthcare Tool - Biosecurity Risk Calculator to help you find out your farm's biosecurity score.     Equine Guelph is thinking of adding more online short course offerings to help horse-people out while they are staying home. What courses would you like to take?  One-minute survey.    Equine Guelph  

1 to 16 of 517
1 2 3 4 5 Next »