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State Rep. Thaddeus Jones, D-Calumet City, is sponsoring legislation in the Illinois House to prevent the closing of Balmoral Park and Maywood Park, harness racing tracks, at the end of the year. Jones, whose district includes Crete, where Balmoral Park is located, admitted to me that his effort is a long shot, "but the only hope we have right now of keeping Balmoral Park open next year so that it might attract a buyer." The lawmaker questioned the Illinois Racing Board's decision to take harness racing dates away from Balmoral and Maywood, which had historically held them, and give them to Hawthorne Race Course. "There was no public discussion about this, no consultation with state legislators, and we don't know exactly what information the racing board was acting on when it made its decision," Jones said, adding that he wants to hold a public hearing in Chicago to find out how the board reached its decision. Jones' bill, H.B. 2663, would amend the Illinois Racing Act of 1975 and allocate a minimum of 30 days of racing in the next year to any race track that was in good standing during the current year, meaning Balmoral and Maywood. Under the current law, the off track betting operations associated with Balmoral and Maywood could remain open for a few years, but would be placed in jeopardy by the way OTB money is distributed, according to Jones. Jack Kelly, a former lobbyist for Balmoral and Maywood, said gambling revenues at OTB parlors are divided up among racetracks under a complicated system that rewards "host tracks" which are featuring live races. All the revenue wagered at local OTB parlors, he said, goes to those tracks that have live racing at the time (day or night), which has ultimately resulted in what he called a fairly equal distribution of funds between Arlington International Racecourse, Hawthorne, Maywood and Balmoral. According to Kelly, Balmoral and Maywood generate about one-third of all the OTB revenue in the Chicago metro area. But if Maywood and Balmoral have no live racing next year, they would get none of that revenue split. So Jones' bill would alter the "host" system that determines how revenues are split on bets made at OTBs and inter-tracks. The change would allow each OTB and race track to retain the commissions and purse money earned from betting out-of-state races at their respective operations. Jones admitted that at this point he can't even muster the votes to get his measure out of a House committee. "So my goal now is to get a hearing in Chicago where we can go into how the Illinois Gaming Board made its decision and how it was influenced by the people at competing racetracks in the hope that once people understand how these decisions were made they will start questioning the entire process," he said. Jones said he believes Arlington and Hawthorne used a $78 million civil judgment against the Johnston Family, which owns Balmoral and Maywood, as fodder to sway the votes of racing board members. The Johnstons were forced to file for bankruptcy after being caught up in the Gov. Rod Blagojevich scandal, resulting in a civil lawsuit filed by casinos for allegedly offering campaign contributions to the former governor in exchange for the state extending an agreement to share casino gambling revenue with the two racetracks. The contribution apparently was never made and the deal never completed. "The racing board decided to take the harness racing dates away from Maywood and Balmoral because of that, but if it was a matter of them saying they wanted to clean up horse racing in Illinois and punish the tracks involved in the scandal, that could have been done back in 2011 when the information first came out," Jones said. "Instead, they waited for a decision in the civil suit. "What I'm interested in is the economic impact on the communities I represent," Jones continued. "We have 270 acres of land out there in Crete that really isn't of much use for anything other than a race track. Its economic impact on Crete, Steger, Beecher, Monee and other surrounding communities is between $2 million and $3 million a year. "There are hundreds of jobs at stake, either connected to the track directly -- tellers, food service staff, security, parking attendants, maintenance staff people who work the backstretch -- and those people employed by businesses that do business with the track," Jones said. "There are also people who live on the track, at Balmoral, and some of them may be able to relocate, but many of them will have no place to live. "Finally, to sell that track to a new buyer, you have to be able to offer them something in return. No one is going to buy a race track if they are not guaranteed race dates by the state. It would be foolish to invest that kind of money. Our only hope of attracting a buyer, of retaining those jobs and that revenue for the businesses in the community, is to keep the track operating until a buyer can be found." Jones said he hopes to convince south suburban mayors to support his measure and lobby their lawmakers to back his bill. Earlier this week, the legislative and policy committee of the Will County Board voted to back the legislation. "This reminds me of the closing of Oak Forest Hospital," said Jones, who testified against the closing at a public hearing. "The closing of that hospital had a significant economic impact on the south suburbs. We lost jobs and revenue and most of that hospital remains vacant. We can't keep allowing our government, which we pay taxes to support, to work against the best interests of the people of the south suburbs. We have to take a stand and put a stop to this. I believe we can do it." While Jones sounded optimistic, I'm not convinced there's time to reverse the gaming board's decision. Maywood has already shut down its operations and Balmoral is in the process of doing that, although it remains open for harness racing this year. In addition, the Illinois Harness Horsemen's Association, which represents breeders, trainers, drivers and others in the industry – came out in support of the Racing Board's decision because Balmoral and Maywood had each sought only two racing days a week next year, far too few to support the people who make their living in harness racing. Hawthorne will host 117 days of harness racing next year, down from the 192 dates at Maywood and Balmoral Park this year, but far more than what those tracks had requested in 2016. Trainers and horse owners also told me that purses at Balmoral had decreased significantly in recent years making it nearly impossible for them to show a profit. They expressed optimism that Hawthorne's purses would increase, making it easier for them to make a living. Jones said he had not reached out to the horsemen, but planned to do so in the near future. "I respect their concerns and their problems," Jones said, "but this is about the larger community. This is about the impact on the entire south suburban region. And they have to understand that." Jones said he hoped to have his public hearing on Balmoral and Maywood sometime before Thanksgiving in order to gain support for his bill before Christmas. Since there is no place to find the odds on such things, I'm officially setting the line at 100-to-1. You know, I've always been a sucker for long shots. By Phil Kadner Reprinted with permission of The Southtown News

After a week of daily discussions between state officials and representatives of Pennsylvania's horse and harness racing industries and its race tracks, Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding expressed optimism today that a long-term solution to the structural deficit in the State Racing Fund is within reach. "This has not been an easy process, but it has been an incredibly productive process," said Redding. "We have come a long way since last Friday when the future of racing in Pennsylvania was very much in doubt, but today, thanks to the tremendous work of a lot of people around the table, we find ourselves in a very much improved position. Everyone seems genuinely committed to finding a long-term, sustainable solution that will keep racing alive and well in Pennsylvania for years to come. "I want to thank everyone for their diligence and their willingness to return to the table day-after-day and talk through these issues," Redding added. "That goes for members of the General Assembly, the horsemen and the track operators. While we don't yet have a comprehensive agreement, we do agree on many of the major points. Those areas where differences remain are not insurmountable. Our goal has always been to reach a consensus among all of the stakeholders that promotes the future of racing in Pennsylvania. We believe that within another week, we can get there." Given the progress in conversations over the past week, Redding said the state was delaying any decision on whether it had to initiate the suspension of live racing in the state for one-week. Previously, it looked like a suspension of racing was to start on Oct. 30. The chairs of the State Horse and Harness Racing Commissions echoed Redding's optimism and appreciation for the ongoing dialogue with the industry and its stakeholders. "We are optimistic that this next week will get everyone where we need to be so that racing is not suspended," said Harness Racing Chairman Johnathan Newman. "The Harness Racing Commission appreciates all efforts extended by the various partner groups to get us to this point. We remain confident that we're on strong footing and are close to coming to an agreement." Similarly, Alan Novak, chairman of the State Horse Racing Commission said, "Significant progress has been made. Whenever you bring together a group representing diverse interests, there has to be time given to allow them to come to a compromise. We know that everyone involved is working in a cooperative spirit and my hope is that an agreement is reached soon." The questions over the future of equine racing in the commonwealth were brought to the forefront last week when the department announced a deficit State Racing Fund, leaving the state without the resources to maintain the financial integrity of the industry and to protect the wagering public. Pari-mutuel tax revenues from total handle — or the total amount wagered on racing — has declined tremendously over at least the past 15 years. In 2001, more than $1.46 billion was wagered on races in the state. In 2014, that number had declined to $427.5 million — a 71 percent decrease. Similarly, the state's share of tax revenues on those wagers decreased 65 percent over the same period, from $31.8 million in 2001 to a little more than $11 million in 2014. It costs between $18 million and $20 million to regulate racing in the commonwealth. In recent years, the Racing Fund's deficit has been filled using transfers from the Race Horse Development Fund, which is supported by a percentage of tax revenues from slot machine gaming. A transfer of $4.2 million, spread over fiscal years 2013-14 and 2014-15, allowed the Racing Fund to remain solvent. Governor Tom Wolf's budget proposed a $6.5 million transfer for fiscal year 2015-16. While the Race Horse Development Fund has helped to keep the Racing Fund afloat, the law that created it contributed to the present dilemma. Act 71 of 2004, or the Race Horse Development and Gaming Act, increased the regulatory oversight responsibilities of the state racing commissions by 50 percent, adding two new race tracks to the four that existed at the time, but the act did not dedicate any of the approximately $2 billion in slot revenues that have been generated to date for the Race Horse Development Fund to meet that increased workload. The present deficit is also complicated by another factor. In 2013, the General Assembly enacted Act 52, a provision which imposed a 10 percent advanced deposit wagering tax on horse racing bets placed with companies other than the six licensed Pennsylvania racetracks via the Internet from a Pennsylvania-based IP address. As a result of litigation challenging the constitutionality of this provision, a $1.9 million tax refund must be paid from the Racing Fund. For more information on horse and harness racing in Pennsylvania, visit www.agriculture.pa.gov. Chairman Newman also reiterated that the Standardbred Sale that kicks-off today, Nov. 2 at the Farm Show Complex & Expo Center in Harrisburg was moving forward as planned. Reprinted with permission of the NJ.com site

Harrisburg, PA - After a week of daily discussions between state officials and representatives of Pennsylvania's horse and harness racing industries and its race tracks, Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding expressed optimism today that a long-term solution to the structural deficit in the State Racing Fund is within reach. "This has not been an easy process, but it has been an incredibly productive process," said Redding. "We have come a long way since last Friday when the future of racing in Pennsylvania was very much in doubt, but today, thanks to the tremendous work of a lot of people around the table, we find ourselves in a very much improved position. Everyone seems genuinely committed to finding a long-term, sustainable solution that will keep racing alive and well in Pennsylvania for years to come. "I want to thank everyone for their diligence and their willingness to return to the table day-after-day and talk through these issues," Redding added. "That goes for members of the General Assembly, the horsemen and the track operators. While we don't yet have a comprehensive agreement, we do agree on many of the major points. Those areas where differences remain are not insurmountable. Our goal has always been to reach a consensus among all of the stakeholders that promotes the future of racing in Pennsylvania. We believe that within another week, we can get there." Given the progress in conversations over the past week, Redding said the state was delaying any decision on whether it had to initiate the suspension of live racing in the state for one-week. The chairs of the State Horse and Harness Racing Commissions echoed Redding's optimism and appreciation for the ongoing dialogue with the industry and its stakeholders. "We are optimistic that this next week will get everyone where we need to be so that racing is not suspended," said Harness Racing Chairman Johnathan Newman. "The Harness Racing Commission appreciates all efforts extended by the various partner groups to get us to this point. We remain confident that we're on strong footing and are close to coming to an agreement." Similarly, Alan Novak, chairman of the State Horse Racing Commission said, "Significant progress has been made. Whenever you bring together a group representing diverse interests, there has to be time given to allow them to come to a compromise. We know that everyone involved is working in a cooperative spirit and my hope is that an agreement is reached soon." The questions over the future of equine racing in the commonwealth were brought to the forefront last week when the department announced a deficit State Racing Fund, leaving the state without the resources to maintain the financial integrity of the industry and to protect the wagering public. Pari-mutuel tax revenues from total handle - or the total amount wagered on racing - has declined tremendously over at least the past 15 years. In 2001, more than $1.46 billion was wagered on races in the state. In 2014, that number had declined to $427.5 million - a 71 percent decrease. Similarly, the state's share of tax revenues on those wagers decreased 65 percent over the same period, from $31.8 million in 2001 to a little more than $11 million in 2014. It costs between $18 million and $20 million to regulate racing in the commonwealth. In recent years, the Racing Fund's deficit has been filled using transfers from the Race Horse Development Fund, which is supported by a percentage of tax revenues from slot machine gaming. A transfer of $4.2 million, spread over fiscal years 2013-14 and 2014-15, allowed the Racing Fund to remain solvent. Governor Tom Wolf's budget proposed a $6.5 million transfer for fiscal year 2015-16. While the Race Horse Development Fund has helped to keep the Racing Fund afloat, the law that created it contributed to the present dilemma. Act 71 of 2004, or the Race Horse Development and Gaming Act, increased the regulatory oversight responsibilities of the state racing commissions by 50 percent, adding two new race tracks to the four that existed at the time, but the act did not dedicate any of the approximately $2 billion in slot revenues that have been generated to date for the Race Horse Development Fund to meet that increased workload. The present deficit is also complicated by another factor. In 2013, the General Assembly enacted Act 52, a provision which imposed a 10 percent advanced deposit wagering tax on horse racing bets placed with companies other than the six licensed Pennsylvania racetracks via the Internet from a Pennsylvania-based IP address. As a result of litigation challenging the constitutionality of this provision, a $1.9 million tax refund must be paid from the Racing Fund. For more information on horse and harness racing in Pennsylvania, visit www.agriculture.pa.gov. Chairman Newman also reiterated that the Standardbred Sale currently slated to kick-off Monday, November 2 at the Farm Show Complex & Expo Center in Harrisburg will move forward as planned. Brandi Hunter-Davenport, 717.787.5085 William R. Nichols | Press Aide Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture | Press Office 2301 North Cameron Street | Hbg PA 17110 Phone: 717.787.5085 | Fax: 717.705.8402  

As racing steward Terry Bailey stumbled on to his nature strip, clutching a tribal carving for ­defence seconds after gunfire peppered his suburban family home, he confronted two new realities. His world as sheriff of the track had changed forever: criminal elements had taken the fight straight to his doorstep only days before the Melbourne Cup. His second thought provided little comfort: the shooter could be anyone among a bulging Rolodex of enemies the 48-year-old chief steward had accumulated during a meteoric rise from Rockhampton racetrack to the hallowed turf of Flemington. Among the beaming celebrities and corporate suits in the luxurious marquees of the Birdcage from today, the party will barely miss a beat: DJs, champagne, fashion and some stunning feats of equine athleticism. But the racing industry — and its top cop — have been blasted into a new and terrifying era. Bailey speaks with a slow, nasal drawl that betrays his humble ­origins as the son of a cop who grew up in the backblocks of Queensland and NSW. But, up close, his eyes twinkle with a raw intelligence that smart folk quickly detect. John “The Sheriff” Schreck, perhaps the most famous steward in Australian turf history, saw that glimmer in Bailey’s eye and plucked him from obscurity at Rockhampton and put him on the path to the big league. “I first met him when he was still at school and he was working as a gofer on the track at Rockhampton — all he ever wanted to do was be involved in the administration of racing,’’ he tells The Weekend Australian in his first ­extended interview since the shooting. “His work ethic was quite outstanding and his common sense.” Today the stakes are astronomically higher, the villains smarter and far more ruthless, but Bailey hasn’t lost his laconic bush sense of humour. “I don’t have any other interests in life so, I presume, this is the common denominator,’’ he said the morning after an unknown enemy had pumped six rounds from a semi-automatic weapon into the front door of his suburban Melbourne house. “If they want to find you, they’ll find you.” Now, as the $16 billion racing industry begins its biggest week of the year, with the eyes of the racing world fixed on Melbourne, he and his family (a wife and two teen daughters he “idolises”) are living out of a safe house with a security detail attached to them 24/7. The attack was written up this week as the moment that racing lost its innocence, a description that didn’t pass the laugh test even for those who love the so-called sport of kings. “Don’t they remember (gangster) Tony Mokbel betting up a storm? Or (a certain jockey) taking bungs? Or the Smoking Aces (race-fixing) case? Or the cobalt scandal,’’ one world-weary racing fan mused. But Bailey’s mentor Schreck, who was the Australian Jockey Club’s chief steward for 15 years and did stints in senior roles in Hong Kong, Singapore and Macau, believes the attack on his friend and protege marks a significant new low and racing needs to recognise it. “It’s a bloody awful thing and it’s done untold damage to horse racing in this country,’’ he said. “He (Bailey) would be terribly disturbed about it and worried for his family. In the future, when Terry Bailey moves back home I would expect he will have CCTV throughout the house. I never thought I would see those days. It’s just gangster stuff, isn’t it?” Gunshots flying into the home of the industry’s top cop is undoubtedly a new low, but villains have always lurked in the shadows of horse racing. There was the Fine Cotton scandal in the 1980s, ­George Freeman roaming Sydney tracks before that — the links even go back to the days of John Wren, depicted in Frank Hardy’s Power Without Glory. In more recent times, there has also been the unsolved execution-style murder of horse trainer Les Samba, gunned down on a Melbourne street in 2011. The jailed drug lord Tony Mokbel was a horse owner and reputedly still punts from his maximum-security prison, having led the so-called Tracksuit Gang in the 1980s and 90s, trading words and tips at racecourses across Australia. His brother Horty Mokbel was banned from tracks in 2004. Mick Gatto, who shot dead gangland killer Andrew “Benji’’ Veniamin more than a decade ago but beat a murder charge, is also now banned from racetracks and Crown casino. Carl Williams, the murderer who was killed in jail, was at the epicentre of Melbourne’s gangland war. He loved a punt as well. As did ­Alphonse Gangitano, once the public but violent face of the Carlton Crew. His interest in horse racing and protection rackets ended with his death in 1998 at the hands of — police believe — Jason Moran. The Morans had close links with racing and Jason Moran was accused of triggering the underworld war that killed dozens. He, too, is no longer with us. Beyond the glittering success of the Flemington carnival, racing has for years been locked in a struggle to expel criminal elements, with Bailey at the vanguard. Pretty much ever since he was lured from the Gold Coast to clean up harness racing in Vic­toria, he has had a tiger by the tail. Bailey soon unearthed a race-fixing scandal involving the use of a drug known as Blue Magic. In a move that foreshadowed his ­aggressive style, he liaised closely with police and used covert surveillance to build a case that culminated in raids in Australia and New Zealand that would smash a crime syndicate. He parlayed that success into a shift into thoroughbreds — the main game — where he became one of the youngest chief stewards in Victorian history, replacing stalwart Des Gleeson. As Bailey drove a more aggressive enforcement culture, that Rolodex of enemies continued to grow. His detractors accuse him of the law enforcement equivalent of “managing up” — kicking the shit out of industry participants to garner publicity and to further his own career. He tangled with talented but troubled jockey Danny Nikolic, pursuing the hoop unsuccessfully over the so-called Betfair scandal and then the Smoking Aces race-fixing probe. Nikolic was cleared on both, but it was the start of a bloody war of attrition between the steward and jockey that would ultimately see Bailey get his man following a clash outside the steward’s tower in which Nikolic is alleged to have said: “We’ve all got families, c---, and we know where yours live ...” Nikolic, who was banned for two years, denied making the comment and was not commenting on this week’s incident. Bailey has been unrelenting in driving higher integrity standards, pushing for covert surveillance of stables and demanding trainers give his officials keys to their stable doors and even seeking to implant a spy in one stable. He found himself at the centre of the most high-profile drug case in the sport’s recent history when big-name trainers Peter Moody, Mark Kavanagh and Danny O’Brien were charged over positive swabs for cobalt returned by horses in their care. The cases continue to grind on, further damaging the sport’s image as ever darker secrets emerge, such as the reported links between a vet involved in supplying cobalt and organised criminals with ties to the harness racing world. It is true that racing has taken big strides towards a far more ruthless enforcement culture, introducing tough drug standards and investing in testing laboratories that keep officials close on the heels of biochemists. Victoria’s Racing Integrity Commissioner, Sal Perna, says on top of sophisticated race-day betting analysis teams, racing now has its own compliance and audit squads. “These are guys who are jumping the fences of trainers’ properties and checking the stables and drug testing,’’ he said. “Integrity has become much (more) important. Racing’s success is based on public confidence. If the public don’t have confidence in integrity, they won’t bet, then there’s less money coming in.” Racing Australia chief executive Peter McGauran says the brazen gun attack is a wake-up call for the federal government, which must let the industry’s integrity bodies have better access to phone call and intercept data to protect the sport from organised crime. “If there are criminal elements capable of that here you can only imagine what those associated with illegal Asian bookmaking are capable of,” he said. Racing commentator Richard Freedman, the brother of Melbourne Cup winning trainers Lee and Anthony Freedman, says the attack on Bailey comes at a bad time for the sport but he doesn’t believe it will have a lasting negative effect. “I don’t want to sound blase about what happened to Terry because it’s appalling, but you have to take the long view — in the long term, the sport will be better.” Freedman agrees that racing is suffering from “the Tour de France syndrome”. “If you attempt to tackle cheats in your sport, you will expose yourself to claims your sport is full of cheats, because you will find them,’’ he said.   By Rick Wallace   Reprinted with permission of The Australian.com.au site

Last week, state officials announced that the financial health of the Pennsylvania Racing Fund was declining and had reached a point where it could no longer sustain or protect the integrity of the racing industry. Officials noted without a fix in place, racing may have to be suspended. A one-week timeline was instituted for all vested stakeholders to come to consensus on a solution to address the structural deficit. This evening, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture provided the following update regarding the matter: "Considerable progress has been made over the course of the last week, in particular, the last 24 hours," said Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding. "We appreciate the engagement of all the parties - everyone from the track operators, the horsemen, and members of the General Assembly. While there is agreement on a vast number of the issues, more work remains on a few important, final points. We've asked all of the parties to reconvene tomorrow to further discuss these remaining issues. We remain optimistic." William R. Nichols | Press Aide Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture | Press Office 2301 North Cameron Street | Hbg PA 17110 Phone: 717.787.5085 | Fax: 717.705.8402  

Following a period of suspension and disqualification for drugs of abuse, Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers indicated their intention to be re-licenced by Harness Racing South Australia. The Board of Harness Racing SA issued both Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers with a notice which required them to attend before the board and ‘show cause’ as to why they should be re-licenced. The rules allow the Controlling Body to refuse an application for a licence without assigning any reason. At this ‘show cause’ hearing, the Board re-inforced to both Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers that HRSA grants the privilege of a licence to individuals committed to adherence to the rules and lifting the industrys profile and that licencees that engage in conduct unbecoming to their status could bring them or harness racing into disrepute. The Board questioned Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers as to whether they were fit and proper persons to be licenced taking into account their history, behaviour, ability to operate within the rules, honesty and personal circumstances. After taking into account their conduct that has occurred in the past, the Board looked to the future as to whether there is likely to be a repetition of the subject conduct. The Board took into account that both Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers had:   *Successfully undertaken drug and alcohol counselling *Provided clear urine samples in recent weeks *Shown they were remorseful *Understood the consequences of providing a sample in the future that contained drugs of abuse As a result the Board of HRSA resolved to re-licence both Byron Hornhardt and Ken Rogers on the understanding they would be subject to an increased level of scrutiny and would continue to have targeted and random sampling for drugs of abuse. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

Harness Racing New Zealand had scheduled a meeting for Friday, 25 September to review the licenses of Mr Mike Stratford. This was following his attempt to drive with a modified whip on Friday 11 September at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club race meeting. This matter has been adjourned till 22 October due to Mr Stratford’s legal counsel being unavailable and also requesting further time to prepare for submissions in his defence. HRNZ and Mr Stratford have agreed that pending the hearing on the 22nd of October, Mr Stratford will not drive in a race or present any horse trained by him for racing. Background. Mr Stratford’s licences are to be reviewed pursuant to Rule 324(1) which states: 324 (1) The Board may, in its discretion, at any time cancel, withdraw, suspend, or impose, amend or delete any conditions or restrictions upon any licence for such period during the currency thereof as it thinks fit, giving seven days notice of its intention to do so. The HRNZ Committee established to review this matter is comprised of the following Board members:  Mr Brain Wastney (Chair HRNZ Animal Welfare Sub-Committee)  Mr Ken Spicer (HRNZ Vice Chairman)  Mr Colin Hair (Chair HRNZ Audit & Finance Sub-Committee) Edward Rennell Chief Executive  

Sample Irregularities Harness Racing South Australia has been advised by Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) of sample irregularities. THE NATURE BOY – Trainer R. Lemon. RASL have advised HRSA that arsenic has been detected in the urine sample taken from THE NATURE BOY following its win in Race 2, The Pirie Fodder Supplies Pace, conducted at Port Pirie on Friday 10 July 2015. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Chem Centre in Western Australia. Acting under Rule 183A, THE NATURE BOY has been stood down and shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an inquiry or investigation. A date for the inquiry has not been set. Barbara Scott, Chair of Stewards

LEXINGTON, KY - The President of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) today predicted that the currently unregulated horse breeding industry will ultimately be folded into any federal racing legislation that advances in Washington. "I fully anticipate that as current proposals advance in the legislative process, Members of Congress will heed comments made by a key supporter of federal intervention about the practices of Thoroughbred breeders that may be contributing to an inappropriate reliance on drugs," Ed Martin said. Prior to becoming involved with racing regulatory matters, Martin served as a senior aide on Capitol Hill for almost a decade. The President of the Humane Society of the United States and a member of The Jockey Club's coalition, Wayne Pacelle, wrote in a July 20, 2015 column published on the animal welfare website thedodo.com the following: "Doping horses for racing is more dangerous today than ever because breeding practices - which select for speed and champagne-glass legs - make the horses less sturdy and more vulnerable to breakdowns than they were even 10 or 20 years ago." The Thoroughbred breeding industry and related sales companies are not currently regulated by the states, creating a void that Martin predicted Congress would fill given the universal concern about Thoroughbred racing breakdowns. Martin noted that state racing commission medication reforms already implemented are starting to reduce catastrophic injuries in some jurisdictions as reported by Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear at The Jockey Club's Roundtable conference this past weekend. He predicted that unregulated sales company medication policies that permit the stacking of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids to be used on horses going through the auction ring could be considered permissive. "I predict that Members of Congress will want to know why drugs need to be given to horses that have never raced and have not been injured," he said. The ARCI President said that if a state were to expand the jurisdiction of an ARCI member commission to regulate the breeding industry and sales companies, the association would begin working on Model Rules to assist that agency in meeting the legislative mandate. To date, that has not happened. Steve May

Harness Racing Victoria is pleased to announce its Integrity Department will receive a significant boost this month with the appointment of Brent Fisher to the role of Investigations and Compliance Manager. HRV General Manager – Integrity Andy Rogers said Mr Fisher would be a valuable addition to the Integrity Department. “Brent is an incredibly well credentialed and experienced criminal investigator,” Mr Rogers said. “Brent also possesses a good understanding of the sport of harness racing and his appointment is significant to the future protection of the integrity of the industry. “The industry is well-served in obtaining a person of Brent’s calibre and the entire Integrity Department look forward to working with him.” HRV CEO John Anderson echoed Mr Rogers’ sentiments: “The HRV Board has supported the call for additional resources to be allocated to industry integrity. The appointment of Brent Fisher will greatly enhance the good work already being done by Andy Rogers and his team of investigative stewards.”  Harness Racing Victoria

On Friday 10 July 2015, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW), acting under the provisions of Rule 183, suspended the Trainer’s licence of Mr Neal Wardle, effective immediately. It did so after receiving advice from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) that Total Carbon Dioxide (TCO2) above the prescribed threshold was detected in a pre-race blood sample taken from Our Red Sky Night NZ prior to it running in race 6, THE GARRARDS HORSE AND HOUND PACE (1609 metres) conducted at Tabcorp Park Menangle on Tuesday 7 July 2015. The “B” sample has been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria. Mr Wardle was given an opportunity to be heard on the imposition of Rule 183 and he provided submissions that were considered by HRNSW Stewards. Acting under the provisions of Rule 183A, it has been determined that Our Red Sky Night NZ, the horse subject of the certificates, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an inquiry or investigation. This also has immediate effect. An inquiry has been scheduled for 2pm on Thursday 16 July 2015. Harness Racing New South Wales

Racing Queensland (RQ) Stewards today concluded an inquiry into a report issued from the Queensland Government Racing Science Centre (RSC) which stated that high levels of Cobalt were detected in the urine samples taken from Pacific Cruza following its winning performance in the Seymour Group Claiming Pace at the harness racing meeting at  Albion Park on 8 April 2014 and Designer Style after its winning performance in the Follow Trottips On Twitter Fillies & Mares Pace at Albion Park on 14 April 2014. The inquiry commenced on 6 May 2015 and evidence was taken from trainer Shawn Grimsey, who explained his feeding regime and husbandry practices leading up to the races in question. Evidence was also provided by Professor Paul Mills (University of Queensland), Dr Bruce Young (RSC) and John Smith (legal counsel representative for Mr Grimsey). Following submissions from Mr Smith, Stewards granted an adjournment of the inquiry to enable Mr Grimsey to provide evidence from Dr Robert Kinobe (James Cook University). On 25 June, further submissions were tendered by Mr Smith for Mr Grimsey and evidence was also taken from Dr Kinobe. After consideration an adjournment was again granted to allow Mr Grimsey to consider further evidence that had been tendered. On 30 July, the inquiry was reconvened and after considering all the available evidence, RQ Stewards charged Mr Grimsey pursuant to Australian Harness Racing (AHR) Rule 190(1) which reads: “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances” CHARGE 1 The particulars of the charge being that licensed trainer Shawn Grimsey presented Pacific Cruza for racing at Albion Park on 8 April 2014 when a urine sample taken from the gelding following its winning performance in Race 7, the Seymour Group Claiming Pace, was found, upon analysis, to contain a prohibited substance, namely Cobalt at a mass concentration of 270 ug/L. CHARGE 2 The particulars of the charge being that licensed trainer Shawn Grimsey presented Designer Style for racing at Albion Park on 14 April 2014 when a urine sample taken from the filly following its winning performance in Race 6, the Follow Trottips On Twitter Fillies & Mares Pace, was found, upon analysis, to contain a prohibited substance, namely Cobalt at a mass concentration of 230 ug/L. After due consideration Stewards were of the view that both Charge 1 and Charge 2 could be sustained as issued and formally found Mr Grimsey guilty.   In determining an appropriate penalty Stewards were of the view that the following points were relevant:   1. Mr Grimsey has held a licence in Queensland since 1995 and has no prior breaches of this rule.   2. The level of Cobalt detected in PACIFIC CRUZA, being 270 Ug/L and DESIGNER STYLE being 230 Ug/L.   3. The negative impact to the image of Harness Racing and the potential to undermine the integrity of the sport.   4. Need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent and to illustrate that the non-standard use of this prohibited substance has no place in the harness racing industry.   5. Nature of the substance Cobalt and the potential to compromise the health and welfare of both Pacific Cruza and Designer Style.   6. Personal circumstances of Mr Grimsey.   Having considered the abovementioned points, Stewards ruled that the imposition of an 18 month disqualification was appropriate. This penalty will take effect from midnight Wednesday, 8 July 2015.   Acting under the provisions of AHR Rule 195, Pacific Cruza was disqualified from its 1st placing at Albion Park on 8 April 2014, and Designer Style was disqualified from its 1st placing at Albion Park on the 14 April 2014 and all other placegetters were amended accordingly.   Mr Grimsey was advised of his rights of appeal. Panel: D Farquharson & A Reardon  

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) today conducted an inquiry into a report received from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory that plasma Total Carbon Dioxide (TCO2) above the prescribed threshold was detected in a pre-race blood sample taken from Tayspastime following its win in race 1, The Newcastle City Holden Pace (2030 metres) conducted at Newcastle on Friday 12 June 2015. The “B” sample was confirmed by Racing Analytical Services in Victoria. Mr Glover appeared at the inquiry. Evidence including the Reports of Analysis and and expert evidence from Harness Racing NSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Wainscott were presented. Evidence was also taken from Mr Glover and Mr Fenwick, on behalf of Mr Glover, regarding the training of Tayspastime, Mr Glover’s husbandry practices and circumstances following the race. Mr Glover was issued with a charge pursuant to Rule 190 (1), (2) & (4) for presenting Tayspastime to race not free of a prohibited substance. Mr Glover was also issued with a charge pursuant to Rule 90A (2.9)(a) & (b) for allowing Mr Fenwick to carry out the duties of a licensed stablehand without being appropriately licensed. Mr Glover pleaded guilty to both charges. In respect of the charge under Rule 190 (1), (2) & (4), Mr Glover was disqualified for a period of 3 years 9 months to commence from 17 June 2015, the date upon which he was stood down. In respect of the charge under Rule 90A (2.9)(a) & (b), Mr Glover was issued with a $250 fine. In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following; This was Mr Glover’s 2nd offence for Prohibited Substance offences;Class 2 Prohibited Substance. The level of greater than 39.0 mmol/L detected;Mr Glover’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of Rule 195, Tayspastime was disqualified from the above mentioned race.   Harness Racing New South Wales

After applications from Clubs across NSW, a new withdrawal fee has been introduced by Harness Racing New South Wales which will be effective immediately. The $44 fee will apply if a horse is withdrawn from a race after the fields have been made available for viewing. HRNSW CEO John Dumesny acknowledged there was one exception to the Policy and that was for the Divided Stakes. "In relation to the Divided Stakes fields, HRNSW understands connections may feel the need to withdraw a horse from a race and therefore each trainer will be allowed to withdraw one horse per meeting without the imposition of the fee," Dumesny said. "HRNSW has implemented the rule from July 1 however due to the significant change affecting the entire industry and so trainers can become accustomed to the new process there will be a fee moratorium until August 1." The new initiative will give the Clubs a clearer indication on how many horses will compete at meetings. "A number of Clubs were experiencing difficulties with knowing what horses would remain in the nominations and therefore constitute races." "The option of closing the viewing of nominations was not palatable to participants as previously experimented." Greg Hayes

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) has a new Chairman of Stewards in Nick Murray. Murray started with the HRV Stewards Panel in January, 2004, and, save for a period of eight months in 2009-10 when he moved to Racing Victoria, has been on the panel ever since. HRV CEO John Anderson welcomed Murray to the role. "Nick has well and truly earned his stripes," Anderson said. "This is an important time for Nick to be heading up the Stewards Panel, with so much emphasis on racing integrity generally in recent times. "However, I am sure Nick is up to the task and will be an asset to the organisation in this senior role." CODY WINNELL 

Harness Racing Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Chris Alford under Australian Rule of Harness Racing (ARHR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Stormed Out was presented to race at Geelong on 8 April 2015 by Mr Alford whilst not free of the prohibited substance phenylbutazone and its metabolite oxyphenbutazone. HRV Stewards have issued a further charge under ARHR 190B(1)(b) which requires trainers to keep and maintain a log book recording all treatment administered to horses in their care. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.                                                        AND HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed NSW trainer Mr Michael Day (Jnr) under Australian Rule of Harness Racing (ARHR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. It is alleged that the horse Fake Art was presented to race at Cobram on 7 May 2015 whilst not free of alkalinizing agents, a prohibited substance when evidenced by the presence of total carbon dioxide (TCO2) at a concentration in excess of 36 millimoles per litre in plasma. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

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