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This year we might have the chance to see American trotters participate, like Market Share and Maven! Make your plans now! There's an old saying that you can't get people in horse racing to agree on just about anything, but anyone who's ever been to Stockholm for the Elitlopp agrees it's an experience no harness racing devotee should miss. Quite literally, you've never seen anything quite like it. It's a bit like the Little Brown Jug as you have over 35,000 enthusiastic Swedes and other Europeans cheering on 16 of the best trotters in the world. And the Elitlopp takes place in Stockholm, one of Europe's most beautiful cities, at a time of year when the weather is unbeatable. Many people also enjoy the chance to visit the resplendent Menhammar Stud, Sweden's largest breeding facility, just outside the city. You'll certainly be familiar with many of the stallions there (Maharajah, From Above, Going Kronos, Chocolatier and others). Maybe the best part of the Equitours Elitlopp Tour is that all the details of the trip---lodging, transportation, sightseeing tour----are taken care of for you. All you need to do is enjoy! If you want a reference on Equitours, contact us and we'll be happy to give you the names of others have who enjoyed the Equitours experience, or contact Moira Fanning at the Hambletonian Society: (+1) 609 371 2211 or email to moihambs@aol.com * You can get full details on the 5-day trip (4 nights) by clicking here. * If you prefer to have a light program of 3-nights please click here. * If have any questions, or wish book the tour please email info@equitours.se The entire Elitlopp experience in Stockholm will be one you'll never forget. Equi Tours Sweden AB | Stjärnplan 3, 216 18 Limhamn, SWEDEN | www.equitours.se info@equitours.se | Tel: +46 (0)40 29 88 08 | Fax: +46 (0)40 30 58 05 | Mobil: +46 (0)708 540 200

It has been such a downward spiral for the NHL's Toronto Maple Leafs that this latest lowest of lows has harness racing driver Jody Jamieson contemplating switching allegiances to another NHL team. As for which team Jody might start cheering for, nothing has been decided but all of us Maple Leafs fans understand that at some point we must all move on or do we become the Chicago Cubs of the National Hockey League. "It's in my blood" says Jody, "I'm a diehard fan but this is getting out of hand." Jody's career in harness racing has been remarkable, with some comparing his success to the likes of hockey greats Wayne Gretzky or Sidney Crosby. As flattered as Jody is by the comparison, in no way does he consider himself to be painted with the same brush as the hockey legends. "It's a lofty comparison, and it's not something I am not comfortable with" Jody notes. Admittedly, Jody feels he was able to jump start his career thanks to his father, legendary trainer Carl Jamieson. "My father is a hall of fame horseman and I had probably one of the best starts anybody could have in this business, by having him back me up." Jody says. A key piece of advice given to Jody by his dad is to always be respectful, regardless of whom that person is. It doesn't matter if it's a groom or a racing official, everyone matters. Jody Jamieson's name is up there with drivers such as Tim Tetrick, Mike Lachance, Chris Christoforou and Brian Sears and even after all the wins and accolades, Jody's focus hasn't changed. There's never a race he takes for granted and Jody admits he's human and makes mistakes, like everyone else. "I'm out to win every possible race I'm in... it's never lack of trying or being prepared but I make mistakes. Thank God there is another race right after that one where I can try and redeem myself." Jody says. With any sport, competition is extremely fierce and the guys who lead the standings are always battling between themselves and new comers. The saying goes, if you're going to win, you want to beat the best and Jody acknowledges everyone on the track wants to make a name for themselves. "That's what makes this game so fun, in one moment you're king of the castle but twenty minutes later you're knocked off." Jody adds, "It's very competitive, every twenty minutes, every night of the week." All drivers and trainers have been through dry spells, going through stretches of time without positive results. A piece of advice Jody was given is you need to learn to lose well before you learn to win well. "Don't get to high with the highs and don't get to low with the lows" is Jody's approach to keeping a level head to remain mentally grounded. "If you look at my record, I have way more losses than I do wins and I've learned to deal with it and keep it on the track as much as possible." With people having hard days or rough spells, it's amazing how well the horsemen are able to cope and still keep it classy amongst them. "I find in Canada and Ontario, it's the kind of people we are." Jody says. "We all try to get along off the track; there is no reason to be enemies off the track and not like each other. But when we go to the gate, it's on! I think that's taken for granted in other places, with people taking issue of being beat in a race." "Not only is life too short, our careers are too short to be hung up on every last thing, so you have to keep it light." Jody says. "I think I can relate to almost anybody, I enjoy busting (chops) and I can handle having my (chops) busted as well." Speaking with Jody, the biggest take away I got would be understanding how tough it is to mature in such a highly competitive sport. Yet in an odd way it can still be very easy. Yes I am aware there is a contradiction to what I have just written but the difficulties I perceive is being young with an ego. At this point I am not speaking for a driver, I am thinking of myself as a young one who is 18 or 20 and all I focus on is me and my success. If something were to come in between, I can honestly admit I would of taken issue from the get go. However, through it all in any sport, life hands you a constant wave of highs and lows and the earlier you notice these waves, the easier it is to 'ride it out' so to speak. Things can't always go your way, if they did, how would anyone learn? Over the last couple of years, Jody admits there have been some up and downs and this year he is more driven because of that. "Last year it took me until December to win a Classic race. It was the Cleveland Classic with Apprentice Hanover." Apprentice Hanover is trained by Benjamin Wallace and won the race in a time of 1:52.1 at Northfield Park. "There were big races where I came in second or third, but it wasn't the win." Jody admits. Jody is happily married to Stephanie and Jody has a daughter Hailey who is 11, a son Jett who is 2 and a baby girl on the way who is due in July. As much success as Jody's had over the years, he is now racing for his family, not just for him and this means ensuring his family can live happily. "I have a young family and I am recently married and I want to be a part of their lives to... I'm going to spend the best time with my family and I am not going to change anything. I'm going to be prepared as ever, more prepared than I've ever been to go on the race track every night." Jody says, "Before it was about wins and putting up big numbers, now it's about making a great living and being able to provide for my family down the road." "I had the one year where I broke the wins records in Canada. I drove right until the end of the year and then I quit for a month and just relaxed, it gets really stressful.... I had that one (great) year and I thought I want to treat myself a little bit." Jody adds, "I want to be the top guy and make enough money to enjoy life." Jody also missed some time away from the track to attend the O'Brien awards and Jody flew to Finland to be the ambassador of Canadian harness racing. To add to Jody's time away was the volcano eruption in Finland where the dust had to settle before Jody could fly back home. So at what point did Jody change his outlook? Or at what point did a light go off where Jody realized it was more than just about him? "When you're in it, running from track to track winning races and having some success, you don't think of anything until you're laying on a beach in Mexico... you don't think of it until then." Jody points out. Throughout his career, Jody has grown close to many people who have supported him and who always believe in his talents. "Mark MacDonald and I used to be thick as thieves and as best friends off the track and fierce enemies on the track." Jody continues, "We'd do anything to beat each other and Mark moved away and we haven't kept in touch as much, but definitely Mark was a huge influence in my career. He helped me learn my craft and have a better mindset on the race track for sure." Jody loves what the new Meadowlands racetrack is doing, "they're doing incredible work" he says and at one point in Jody's career, the idea to go to the big M did cross his mind, but home is where the heart is. "I'm from Moffat, Ontario, Canada and this is where my family is and this is where my family's family is. This is where I'll be unless something worse happens like what is happening with this Liberal government." "In 2011 the Standardbred industry received $176 million dollars to operate harness racing in Ontario. In 2014 harness racing will be lucky to have $70-$80 million." Jody points out. The money the racing industry received is from an agreement between the racetracks and the Ontario Lottery Gaming Corporation, (OLG) which is a Government entity, based on revenues brought in from the creation of the SLOTS programs at each racetrack. With the racetracks already established, the OLG agreed to give a percentage of all revenue to the racetracks so the OLG could put in slot machines and the money given to the tracks would go towards purse money to create a higher level of competition within the province. Anthony Macdonald, who is a horseman, is running as a PC provincial candidate hoping if an election takes place, the standardbred industry will have a stronger voice at Queen's Park, (the provincial legislator). Jody is a strong advocate and supporter of Anthony and his efforts to bring more awareness to the standardbred community and Jody is willing to help anywhere he can. "Anyone who knows Anthony, you can't tune him out and I am going to campaign hard to help get him elected." Jody states. "We have 3 or 4 candidates who are pro harness racing on the Conservative side." Jody feels strongly that the Liberal government has messed up several industries outside of harness racing, such as the gas industry, the powers sector and even the teachers union. "Horses don't speak" says Jody, "they are nice to look at and people love them but they don't speak. We need to do a better job speaking for them.... The OLG's revenue was around a billion dollars and we were only getting around 20 percent, maybe less. Now the OLG is taking in the full 100 percent in revenue. We are in trouble and this money, (the $500 million/5 year proposal from the Liberals), it has kept racing open but we are on a life line and we are bleeding badly." Away from the politics and the tracks, Jody is the type of guy who likes to help others where and when he can. Jody would love to help the Toronto Maple Leafs, maybe try and get them a Stanley Cup sometime soon! "I'm so aggravated with this season, I like Randy Carlyle. He's a horse guy who started in the horse racing business before he was drafted." As you can tell, Jody is a massive hockey fan and aside from the Leafs, his favorite team is the Jamieson Jets, an adult men's hockey team. One thing to point out is Jody's son Jett was not named after the hockey team, even though some people make that connection. However if the dad who named the son said it wasn't, there's nothing to discuss. If Jody had a man cave, it would be filled with Toronto Maple Leaf paraphernalia and his entire top win photos including the North America Cup pictures, the Battle of Waterloo and Breeders Crown pictures. To date, the second heat of the 2007 Little Brown Jug is Jody's most memorable race. In that race he was driving great horse Tell All. "I could remember my heart beating the whole time."Jody says. "The half was in 56.1... I kicked the ear plugs on him around the last turn and he dug in, but he really didn't dig in like I thought. Brian Sears slipped off of David Miller's back going three wide in the stretch and I didn't know half way down the stretch if I could hang on. So I hit the wire not knowing if you have a clear cut win. It was the best ever (feeling)... I'll never forget him." "I would love to win the Hambletonian. I've been fortunate to win big races and I'd love to win them all again. Just because I won them, doesn't mean they're off my bucket list." Jody adds, "It would mean a lot to me to win any of those races again, they're special, special races." Jody enjoys interacting with fans. "I love meeting fans...they message me of Facebook and Twitter. I think its wild and I thrive on it, I love meeting with the fans and doing whatever I can to meet fans." Jody says. A few summers ago, Woodbine asked Jody to go to a Jack Astor's opening in Toronto as the restaurant was doing simulcasting. "I went in my driver suit, not a soul knew who I was, not a soul and I had my suit on and they knew what I did at the end of the day they loved it. I loved it and meeting people who want to get to know me. Like I said, horses can't talk but I can and I want this industry I love to survive and prosper." By: Roderick Balgobin www.supernovasportsclub.com Twitter: ScSupernova  

With the Elitloppet just six weeks away, interest is stirring as to the possible invitees for the big race, with American imports, which are trained in Sweden, coming under the spotlight. Already last year's entrant, Shaq Is Back, has impressed many with a comfortable victory in Karlstad recently in the time of 1.10.4, which was the fastest winning time in Sweden so far this season and trainer Daniel Reden has acknowledged another start in Sweden's great race is on the son of Credit Winner's agenda. "Of course I'm aiming for Elitloppet. He has gained a lot of muscles this winter and become a totally different horse. If things continue like this, I'm hoping he will go really fast,"  said Reden, who imported the horse as a 3YO from the barn of  Ray Schnittker, for whom he ran second in the $200,000 New York Sires Stakes final. There are five US imports lining up this weekend in the Malarpriset in Sundbyholm and they will be looking to earn a ticket to one of the world's glamour races, although that will be through the Olympiatravet At the top of the list is Formula One, who was bought as a yearling by Finnish owners Onkel Invest Oy and trained initially in Sweden by Stig Johansson, now trained at Solvalla by Reijo Liljendahl . The son of Yankee Glide was a Elitloppet finalist last year and has won 19 of his 34 starts including the a Group One UET Masters Series Jamtlands Stora Pris. Not only has he made the Elitloppet final, he is also a heat winner of two international Group One races in Italy and Sweden, with a third in the final of the Group One Konung Gustaf V'S Pokal (Gr1) at Aby. Trainer Reijo Liljendahl told ATG's website Formula One feels great in training ahead of his first season start Saturday. "We had him on layoff early last fall so he should be well prepared for this season. He has gone through hard training during winter though and it feels like he is in good shape," Liljendahl said. "We hope that he will stay healthy and continue his great form. I hope he can have his peak at the end of May and hopefully get revenge for last year's Elitlopp. "Even if that race isn't our main goal for the season," Lijendahl said,  "I hope he can perform well there. Last year the qualification race was messy and in the final he got stuck and still had a lot of power when he crossed the finishing line." SJ's Caviar's son, Fawkes, was trained in the United States by Jonas M Czernyson and was good enough to race in the Hambletonian as a 3YO. He is from the family of Pearsall Hanover, a successful sire in Sweden and Muscle Memory who ran third in the Hambo. Exported to Sweden as a late 3YO to Ake Svanstedt's barn, he has been lightly raced but has won the prestigious Group One Konung Gustav V's Pokal and was third in Group One Sprintermästaren in Sweden. Since Svanstedt moved Stateside he has transferred to Peter Untersteiner's stable and will also be making his seasonal debut at Sundbyholm after only racing three times last season with one win. Kash's Cantab a son of Cantab Hall, has also been plying his trade in Sweden from the Stig Johannson barns, since he was a 3YO and is the winner of 8 of his 54 starts. While he hasn't won a Group race yet, the now six year-old he has placed in group races in Italy and Norway and he is a tough old campaigner who also has Bjorn Goop in the cart. Other US imports in the race include the Yankee Glide gelding, Tidied, racing out of Stefan Melander's barn, and a Bronze Division V75 final winner while Solvato is an imported son of Donato Hanover who was formally trained in the States by Trond Smedshammer. Daniel Reden's other entrant also has US connections, being top mare Dilleval Kall who is a daughter of Muscles Yankee. MÃLARPRISET, Sundbyholm 12/04/14 V75 Gold Division 2140m 1 Kash's Cantab (h Cantab Hall - O'cala Kash) Dr: Bjorn Goop Tr: Stig H Johansson 2 Formula One (h Yankee Glide - Ferrari Of) Dr: Orjan Kihlstrem Tr: Reijo Liljendahl 3 Kaffir Face (g Dahir de Prelong - Elegance Ok) Dr: Lutfi Kolgjini Tr: Lutfi Kolgjini 4 Perfectly Enough (h Express It - Just About Enough) Dr: Erik Adielsson Tr: Stig H Johansson 5 Porthos Amok (h Orlando Vici - Baroness Amok) Dr: Stefan Melander Tr: Stefan Melander 6 Solvato (h Donato Hanover - Solveig) Dr: Veijo Heiskanen Tr: Veijo Heiskanen 7 Tidied Accelerator (g Yankee Glide - Cookout) Dr: Per Lennartsson Tr: Stefan Melander 8 Fawkes (h Sj's Caviar - Up Front Peg)  Dr: Peter Untersteiner Tr: Peter Untersteiner 9 Dileva Käll (s Muscles Yankee - Leva Kroll) Dr: Daniel Reden Tr: Daniel Reden 10 Macho Gossip (g Love You - Fox Valley Anabell) Dr: Ãke Lindblom Tr: Ãke Lindblom by David Sanders, for Harnesslink.com

The Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the 2014 inductees. A total of 14 horses and people have been elected to the Hall of Fame.   Wando and Horatio Luro are among the three horses and four people representing Thoroughbreds. Rocknroll Hanover and Wally Hennessey are included on the list of three horses and four people representing Standardbreds. The Thoroughbred Inductees are: Male Horse Category:  Wando - bred and owned by Gustav Schickedanz, Schomberg, Ontario Female Horse Category:  Apelia - bred and owned by Steve Stavros, Knob Hill Stables, Newmarket, Ontario Veteran Horse Category:  Cool Mood – owned by David Wilmot, Kinghaven Farms, King City, Ontario           Veteran People Category:  Horatio Luro – Argentine-born trainer of Northern Dancer           Jockey Category:  Robert Landry - Toronto, Ontario           Builder Category:  William (Bill) Graham - owner of Windhaven Farms, Caledon, Ontario and Lexington, Kentucky           Builder Category:  Arthur Stollery, owner Angus Glen Farms, Unionville, Ontario The    Standardbred Inductees are: Male Horse Category:  Rocknroll Hanover – bred by Hanover Shoe Farms Inc, Hanover, Pennsylvania. Owned by Jeffrey Snyder of New York, New York; Lothlorien Equestrian Centre, Cheltenham, Ontario; and Perretti Racing Stable, LLC, Cream Ridge, New Jersey.            Female Horse Category:  Dreamfair Eternal – bred by Mary and John Lamers, and owned by John Lamers,                 I ngesoll,      Ontario Veteran Horse Category:  Albatross – bred by John E Wilcutts, Aberdeen, North Carolina; Charles A Kenney, Lexington, Kentucky; Elizabeth B Peters, Wilmington Delaware; and Mark Lydon, Abington, Massachusetts.  Owned by Hanover Shoe Farms Inc. Hanover, Pennsylvania; George Segal, Versailles; Castleton Farm, Lexington, Kentucky; Hal S Jones, Montgomery, New York           Trainer/Driver Category: Wally Hennessey, Coconut Creek, Florida           Builder Category: Dr. Ted Clarke, Elmira, Ontario           Builder Category:  Robert Murphy, Vancouver, British Columbia           Communicator Category:   Bill Galvin, Mississauga, Ontario    T        The seven Thoroughbred representatives in the 2014 class include: Wando, one of only seven horses to ever win the Canadian Triple Crown was Canada’s Horse of the Year in 2003 for breeder owner Gustav Schickedanz, an honoured member of the CHRHF.  Trained by Mike Keogh, with Patrick Husbands as his primary jockey, the Langfuhr son retired from racing with 11 wins, eight of them in stakes, in 23 starts and earnings of $2.5 million.  He began his career as a stallion in 2006, first in Kentucky before returning to his birthplace in 2011. Wando’s progeny have earnings in excess of $5.2 million and include Grade 1 winner Turallure.   Apelia, a very fast filly owned and bred by Steve Stavro's Knob Hill Stable, was named Canada's Sovereign Award champion sprinter in 1993.  Conditioned by Hall of Fame trainer Phil England, she won half of her 24 career starts and was a stakes winner at the highest level for three consecutive years.   A winner in New York, Kentucky, New Jersey, as well as Ontario, Apelia was ridden by Hall of Fame jockeys Larry Attard and Don Seymour in all her races except one.  Apelia is the dam of champion mare Saoirse. Cool Mood, herself a daughter of Northern Dancer, won the 1969 Canadian Oaks for Hall of Fame Builder D.G. Willmot, and went on to become one of Canada's most influential broodmares. In fact, she produced two fillies who in turn, would both produce Canadian Triple Crown winners. Her daughter Shy Spirit was the dam of Izvestia, and daughter Passing Mood was the dam of With Approval. The latter is an equine member of the Hall of Fame along with his half-brother, Belmont Stakes winner Touch Gold. Argentine-born trainer Horatio Luro, nicknamed “El Gran Senor” was hired as a trainer by E.P. Taylor and was best known in Canada for training Northern Dancer in 1964, 50 years ago.  During his career, Luro trained 43 Stakes winners including three Queen’s Plate winners. Named Canada’s outstanding jockey in 1993 and 1994, Robert Landry’s stats over a 29 year riding career include 17,656 mounts with purse earnings of $69.7 million and over 2,000 wins.  Of note was his 1999 Atto Mile win on Quiet Resolve, as well as the 2004 Queen’s Plate aboard Niigon.  He rode five consecutive Canadian Champion two-year-old fillies from 1996-2000.   The 2003 Avelino Gomez Memorial Award winner for lifetime achievement as a jockey, Landry has also made significant contributions to the promotion of racing, including participating as a board member for LongRun Thoroughbred Retirement Society.  W. (Bill) D. Graham has been an integral participant in the horse racing industry for almost half a century as an outstanding breeder, owner and racing executive.  He is the owner of Windhaven Farms which operates in both Caledon, ON and Lexington, KY, and has bred many Sovereign Award-winning horses throughout his career including the 2012 Canadian Horse of the Year Uncaptured.  Graham also bred U.S. Grade I winner Joyful Victory who was victorious in the 2013 Santa Margarita Stakes at Santa Anita.  Arthur W. Stollery was the owner and breeder of two of Canada’s most celebrated racing stars, both CHRHF inductees:   Kennedy Road, named after the location of his Unionville based Angus Glen Farms, dominated Canadian racing for three years.  He was named Champion 2-year-old in 1970 and again Champion as a 3 year-old the following year; 1971. This was followed by more accolades including Canadian Horse of the Year in 1973.  Kennedy Road was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000 and has a stakes race, which is contested annually at Woodbine, named after him.  Laurie's Dancer, named after Stollery’s daughter, was an outstanding racing daughter of Northern Dancer. She captured the Canadian Oaks in 1971 on her way to being named Canada's Horse of the Year. During that season, she was also victorious in the very prestigious Alabama Stakes at Saratoga.  Laurie's Dancer was enshrined in to the Hall of Fame in 2006.            Standardbred inductees include: Rocknroll Hanover banked more than $3 million during his racing career, for owners Jeffrey Snyder of New York, New York; Lothlorien Equestrian Centre, Cheltenham, Ontario; and Perretti Racing Stable, LLC, Cream Ridge, New Jersey.   Career highlights included victories in Canada’s most prestigious races for two and three year olds, the Metro Pace for two-year-old pacers and the North America Cup for three-year-olds  He then embarked on a second career, becoming one of North America’s most prolific stallions before passing away in 2013.  To date the son of Western Ideal, out of Hall of Fame mare Rich N Elegant,  has sired winners of $60.7 million including eight million-dollar-plus winners.  Dreamfair Eternal retired from racing in 2012 after a seven year career that included 56 victories, and every major stake event on the older pacing mare schedule, earnings of over $2.5 million and Horse of the Year honours in Canada in 2010.  During that year she racked up wins in the final of the Masters Series, an elimination of the Roses are Red Stakes, elimination and final of the Milton Stakes, the elimination and final of the Forest City Pace and the Breeders Crown.  The daughter of Camluck was bred by John and Mary Lamers and owned by John Lamers of Ingersoll, Ontario, while Patrick Fletcher trained her for most of her career.    Wally Hennessey, born in Prince Edward Island and now a resident of Coconut Grove, Florida, has more than 8,500 victories to his credit and has banked earnings in excess of $57 million.  During the early stages of his career, Hennessey re-wrote the record books setting new standards in both wins and earnings.  In the late 1990s, he enjoyed success with the trotter Moni Maker, a winner of $5.5 million and numerous stakes including the Nat Ray in three different years, the Hambletonian Oaks and Breeders Crown.   Throughout his career, Hennessey has been remarkably consistent, winning at least 200 races in each of the last 25 years, and driving horses to earnings in excess of $1 million for 24 straight years.  In the summer of 2007, Hennessey was inducted into the Living Hall of Fame in Goshen, New York. Dr. Ted Clarke is recognized by his peers as a visionary in the horse racing industry.  Clarke’s strong and steady leadership has helped guide Grand River Raceway to be a leader in innovation and growth.  Prior to Grand River’s opening, Clarke led numerous initiatives to put Elmira Raceway on the path to stability, including the inauguration of Industry Day, the Battle of Waterloo and the establishment of the Ontario Teletheatre Network.  He was honoured for his innovative thinking and leadership with the Lloyd Chisholm Achievement Award in 1999 from the Standardbred Breeders of Ontario Association. The late Robert Murphy, a native of Vancouver, British Columbia, was one of Canada’s most respected horse breeders and owners, and was known by his popular Red Star moniker.  First introduced to racing at Cloverdale Raceway in 1980, he rapidly became one of Canada’s most prolific owners.   He averaged 935 starts as an owner each year between 2005 and 2009.  In 2007, at the age of 74, Murphy owned more Standardbreds than anyone else in Canada.  Mr. Murphy had a great impact on harness racing in BC with both his breeding and training centres, but that impact extended across the continent as his horses raced all over North America. A champion on the track and in the breeding shed, Albatross was a major influence on the Standardbred breed.  He won 59 of 71 starts, including the Cane Pace and Messenger Stakes in 1971, and earned in excess of $1.2 million.  Two of his major stakes wins in Canada included the Prix d’Ete and Canadian Pacing Derby.  He retired as both the fastest and richest horse in the history of the breed.  As a sire, Albatross's thousands of sons and daughters have won more than $100 million, including Niatross who is considered by many to be the greatest pacer of the 20th Century, and Fan Hanover who is the only filly to ever win the Little Brown Jug. William (Bill) Galvin, a native of Arnprior, Ontario, and now a resident of Mississauga, Ontario,  made a tremendous impact on horse racing in the country as a Canadian horse racing historian, poet, author, publisher, educator, horseman, humanitarian, publicist and former Thoroughbred racing official.  Galvin’s promotions transcended racing.  He led a charge to bring ice horse racing to the Rideau Canal and expose the sport to thousands of potential fans.  He started the Race for MS fundraiser to gain exposure for the sport, and ran numerous other high profile campaigns dedicated to the well-being of horse racing during his career.   He was also the executive editor of TROT Magazine and a member of the Advisory board for the School of Equine Studies at Toronto’s Humber College of Applied Arts.            The Induction Ceremony will be hosted at the Mississauga Convention Centre on Wednesday, August 6, 2014             From the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame

Lexington, KY --- Steve Brown, 81, who operated Dunroven Stud on historic Walnut Hall Farm in Lexington, Ky., with his wife, Martha, and previously managed Walnut Hall Farm, died April 6, 2014, after battling cancer. Mr. Brown and his wife bred 2012 Kentucky Futurity winner My MVP, 1997 Hambletonian Oaks champion Must Be Victory, and many other stakes winners over the years. He also raced young horses, particularly fillies who were retired to the Dunroven broodmare band. That practice put the filly Madam Cool in the Dunroven broodmare band and she produced the stakes-winning Bold Dreamer 3,1:55 ($531,258), who has gone on to produce the winners of $2.6 million, among them $1.6 million winner Pampered Princess. Born April 25, 1932, in Whiteburg, Ky., Mr. Brown was the son of the late John T. Brown and Eliza N. Brown. He served in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1955, where he served a three-year tour of duty in Germany. He was a 1960 graduate of the University of Kentucky. To read the rest of the story click here.

April sustaining and nominating payments for Hambletonian Society stakes are due Tuesday, April 15, and per USTA Rule 12 section 4, must be postmarked by midnight on Wednesday, April 16. With the exception of the Bobby Quillen Memorial Pace at Harrington Raceway, the only payments due on April 15 are those that required previous payments in March. An additional $1,500 payment due April 15 has been added this year for continuing eligibility to the $500,000 Breeders Crown Pace and Trot to be raced Saturday, Nov 22 at Meadowlands Racetrack. The Historic Stake No. 47, the E. H. Harriman Cup for two-year-old trotting colts, originally scheduled for Monday, October 13 at Harrahs Philadelphia will now be raced on Sunday, October 12. Eligibility lists for races that had a final payment on February or March 15, 2014 are posted on the website. Race conditions, payment forms and much more information is now available online. For additional information call the Society offices at (609) 371-2211. Payments are due for the following stakes: Ben Franklin Breeders Crown Bobby Quillen Memorial Pace Carl Erskine (was Oliver Trot) 3-year-olds Earl Beal Jr Memorial Trot The Elevation 2-year-old Pacing Colts Dayton Derby 4 & Older Kentuckiana Stallion Mgt. Filly Pace & Trot (for 2YO Fillies) Madison County 2-year-olds (was Circle City) Matron Series (2-year-olds) Matron Series (3-year-olds) Carl Milstein Memorial 3-year-olds Monument Circle 3-year-olds By Moira Fanning, for the Breeders Crown

The racing season is fast approaching and stables based at Sunshine Meadows have and are readying excellent older (three year-olds and up) players for stakes and northern track overnights. Several that have caught our attention are profiled below. Spider Blue Chip (4gt, Andover Hall-Southwind Catlin-Muscles Yankee) - Charles Sylvester 3, 1:51.3, $1,178,099, 12 time winner in 28 starts. Owned by David Mc Duffee and Melvin Hartmanand bred by McLain L. Ward, Brewster, NY. Hambletonian elimination winner in 2013 along with Breeders Crown and world record win in the Colonial. Acapulco Hall (3ft Deweycheatmnhowe-Ali's Cat-Meadow Road) - Fred Grant Unraced in 2013. Classy filly owned and by Walnut Hall Limited, Lexington, KY. Dam has produced Amigo Hall (3, 1:54, $928,183), Ally Hall (2, 1:57.1s, $384,595) and Great Challenger (3,q1:55.3, $182,471) and four other sub-2:00 record performers. Sorrento Hall (3gt, Groton Hall-SB's Fuscia Image-Balanced Image) - Fred Grant 2, 1:58, $134,090. Bred and owned by Walnut Hall Limited, Lexington, KY. Kentucky Sires Stakes Final winner in 2013. Starfall Winner (3ft Credit Winner-Myth-Lindy Lane) - Robert Bencal Stable. Sixth foal of Myth, dam of Mythical Lindy (3, 1:53.2, $629,104), Mythical Hall (5, 1:55f, $345,283) and Valbruna (3, 1:56.1s, $116,142). Sunshine Meadows trainees are rapidly gearing up for the 2013 racing campaign. On Saturday, Jonas Czernyson's band of female trotters qualified at the new Meadowlands in fine fashion- Maven, 1.56.1; D'orsay, 1:56.3; Ma Chere Hall, 1:56.4; Coffeecake Hanover, 1:57.3 and Mistery Woman, 1:57.4. At Pompano Park, Bob Bencal's Sina (4mt Cantab Hall-Third Reef-Conway Hall) was a qualifying winner in 1:57.3f for reinsman Michael Marx, Jr. Fred Grant piloted his trainee Somenicebeach (3mp Somebeachsomewhere-Up Front Gal-Dragon Again) to a 1:56.1f win and followed that with a 1:56.2f victory behind Shamballa (4hp Somebachsomewhere-Bolero Takara-Life Sign). Two other Sunshine trainees won "for money" events at Pompano. Dewayne Minor scored with Mitey Savage in 2:00.2f and Francisco de Cid reined Broadway's Fortune to a 1:58.1f victory. Others yet to start for money, but worth watching, include Master of Law and Lindy's Tru Grit from the Lindy Farms barn trained by Domenico Cecere, Ken Oscarsson's Scacco Matto (a Kentucky eligible three year-old colt), and Jarold Hawks' Jack Litten (a Muscle Mass colt that qualified at Pompano). by Thomas H. Hicks

LEBANON, OH. - With a month left in its inaugural season, Miami Valley Raceway is pleased to announce it has attracted a stellar list of nominees for its first-ever Grand Circuit races on closing night, Sunday, May 4. The Chip Noble Memorial, for older pacing mares, has attracted 19 nominations with combined lifetime earnings over $9.5 million. The Miami Valley Distaff, for older trotting mares, has 29 nominees with a combined lifetime bounty over $10 million. A pair of millionairesses remain eligible to each of the much-anticipated events. Rocklamation ($1,771,329) and Camille ($1,020,591) are the richest pacers on the list which includes a half-dozen who have won quicker than 1:50. The pair recently finished a neck apart in a photo finish leg of the Blue Chip Matchmaker Series for female free-for-allers at Yonkers. At least five other nominees are currently competing in the prestigious Blue Chip Matchmaker Series including multiple leg winners Somwherovrarainbow and Yagonnakissmeornot. Other notables on the Chip Noble Memorial nomination list are Shebestingin, who won 12 races in 2013 including the Nadia Lobell, Matron and Glen Garnsey stakes and was favored in the Breeders Crown championship; Betterluvnexttime, who triumphed an amazing 17 times last season; Jerseylicious, who finished third in the 2013 Jugette; American Girl, who has won back-to-back mares Invitationals at Hoosier; and Miami Valley track record holder Ohmybelle, whose current 1:53.3 track standard will definitely be in jeopardy on May 4. On the trotting side, Maven ($1,423,969) and Cedar Dove ($1,177,330) sport the largest lifetime bankrolls, partially due to their one-two finish in last year's Breeders Crown divisional championship. Fifteen other nominees, however, all have earnings in excess of $250,000 and a total of eleven of the mares nominated to the 'Distaff' have winning trot records under 1:53. D'Orsay finished third in the aged Breeders Crown race and won the Muscle Hill in 2013. Ma Chere Hall was last year's Matron winner and runnerup in the Kentucky Filly Futurity; Mistery Woman won the Zweig; Classic Martine finished second in the Hambletonian Oaks; and Frau Blucher was second in the three-year-old Breeders Crown and won a division of The Buckette. Perfect Alliance is currently a perfect seven-for-seven in 2014 including a clean sweep of the Singer Memorial series at The Meadowlands; while Daylon Miracle has won five of her last six starts in open preferred company at The Meadows. Estimated purse for the Chip Noble Memorial pace is $50,000. The Miami Valley Distaff trot will race for approximately $60,000. The top nine 2013-14 money winners that enter will comprise the fields for these Grand Circuit races with any other qualified mares that enter and don't get in the races entitled to a berth in an open event on the same program or a refund of their nominating and sustaining payments. From the Miami Valley Race Office

April 6, 2014 - HANA Harness is pleased to announce additional sponsors (one new and one returning) to the 2014 HANA Harness Grand Circuit 'Shoot-Out' Handicapping Contest presented by The Hambletonian Society, DRF Harness, Meadowlands Racing & Entertainment, Northfield Park, Tioga Downs, and Vernon Downs. New as a Silver Sponsor this year is the Central Ontario Standardbred Association (COSA) which presently represents horsemen at WEG tracks. Returning for a third year of sponsorship at the Silver level is Red Shores Racetrack and Casino at Charlottetown Driving Park. As Canadian sponsors, their donations will be used to benefit Canadian Standardbred rescues. We encourage all followers of the handicapping challenge to visit our sponsors' websites by visiting the contest website and clicking on their logos. Sponsorship opportunities remain available. Tracks, horsemen associations, racing stables, and those vendors who market to the harness racing industry and/or fans are welcome to become sponsors. For additional information regarding sponsorship, click here. HANA is also pleased to announce the roster of handicappers has been finalized with the addition of Brian McEvoy. McEvoy, works for Harnesslink in various capacities. This will be his first appearance in a HANA handicapping contest and he will be playing for Horse Rescue United. The first leg of the 2014 Grand Circuit 'Shoot-Out' is scheduled for April 26, 2014 when the finals of the George Morton Levy Memorial Pace and the Blue Chip Matchmaker Series will be contested at Yonkers Raceway. A complete list of contest days may be found here. by Al Schott, for HANA

When it comes to siring your first winner, it rarely comes more impressively than Primz Luck. The talented two-year-old trotter easily accounted for a field of maiden trotters at Alexandra Park last night and looks set for the upcoming age group features. Driven by trainer James Stormont, Primz Luck, who is currently the only New Zealand qualifier by The Pres, settled in the one-one before pouncing quickly on his rivals in the home straight and racing away for a comprehensive 2 & ½ length win. The speedy youngster, who looks a natural two-year-old type, is now third on the Harness Jewels Leader Board, and looks set to carry on the family tradition and qualify for a Jewels Final. Primz Luck, who is out of Sundon mare Howz Lucky, is remarkably the younger half-brother of four trotters who have qualified for Jewels Finals including Madisonz Luck, who finished second to Kylie Ree in the 2YO Ruby in 2010. The Pres, who won four races in America from just nine starts, is a son of champion sire Andover Hall out of Hambletonian Oaks winner Southwind Allaire (Valley Victory). The Pres recorded a best time of 1-55.1 when winning at Pocono Downs in June of 2008 and currently has multiple two-year-old winners in the USA. He currently stands at Wai Eyre Farm for a fee of $3,250 plus GST. Stormont also enjoyed success at Alexandra Park last night with promising three-year-old Mum’s Pride, while Letz Elope claimed the feature Kumeu Stakes at Group Three level. By Mitchell Robertson

With the first Group Swedish one of the season, the 300,000 euro Olympiatravet or Olympia Trot only three weeks away, the big guns of Scandinavian racing are emerging, including Noras Bean, the winner of this year's French group one Prix de France, who will take his place in the LC Peterson-Broddas Minneslopning at Jagersro this weekend. Axevalla trainer Ulf Stenstromer will line up his son of Super Arnie for the first time since his lightning raid to France in February, where he carried off the second of the prize jewels of the French triple crown, with another Swede, Maharajah, of course, winning the first, the Prix d'Amerique. He has drawn two which will give him well placed to get off to a flying start in this 2140m race, a sprint in Scandinavian terms, and the same distance he won the Prix de France so brilliantly. Reigning Swedish champion On Track Piraten will have Erik Adielsson at the helm for Rattvik trainer Hans R Stromberg and will be looking to continue the excellent recent form. "The Pirate" capped off a breakthrough 2013 year when he captured his first international group one with a win in the Grosser Preis Von Deutschland(G1) in Hamburg, which he added to his first group two in Sweden, the C.L.Müllers Memorial before capping it off with his win in the Svenskt Mästerskap(Gr2) or Swedish Championshiop in Aby in December. The altered son of Kool du Caux then travelled on to his sire's birthplace France in January and picked up two meritorious second placings in rich international group three races in Vincennes, to take his earnings past the 600,000 euro mark. This will be his first race since returning to Sweden for a short spell although he has drawn the outside of the front line. Jorma Kontio will be aboard last year's Group one Copenhagen Cup winner Mr Picolet a son of former Hambletonian winner Scarlet Knight. Mr Picolet , who had three wins and three placing from seven starts last season proved his sharpness when he ran second in his first start back for 2014 at his home track Axevalla a fortnight ago to US import Shaq Is Back. Something of a late bloomer, as many of these Franco-Americans are (there is not one pureblood US standardbred in the race), the now seven-year-old Mr Picolet has won exactly half (18) of his 36starts and accumulated just over 380,000 euros. Anders Svanstedt, whose father Ake won this event last year with Sebastien K, lines up with New Line, a Danish-bred son of King Conch who ran second in the Hambletonian, and a successful siring half-brother to Swedish supersire Viking. Group one winner Deuxieme Picsous will have Johnny Takter this week in the bike for Johan Lejon and will be looking to improve on March 15th seventh placing in the gold division heat. Also in that race was tough German horse Bagley, who will also line up here for Conrad Lugauer and will be better for his two recent runs . LC Peterson-Broddas Minneslopning at Jagersro 05/04/14 V75 gold division 2140m 301,500SEK (33,816.69 EUR) 1 Kaffir Face (g Dahir de Prelong - Elegance Ok) Dr: Christoffer Eriksson Tr: Lutfi Kolgjini 2 Noras Bean (h Super Arnie - Easy Bean) Dr: Stefan Söderkvist Tr: Ulf Stenstromer 3 New Line (g King Conch - Pa'en Igen Frökjär) Dr: Orjan Kihlström Tr: Anders Svanstedt 4 Lord Capar (h Varenne - Foxy'n Rowdy) Dr: Thomas Dalborg Tr: Mats Karlsson 5 Bagley (g Bartali Ok - Novel Boshoeve) Dr: Conrad Lugauer Tr: Conrad Lugauer 6 Mr Picolit (h Scarlet Knight - Good Enough) Dr: Jorma Kontio Tr: Raoul Engblom 7 Deuxieme Picsous (h In Love With You - Carmela Strömline) Dr: Johnny Takter Johan Lejon 8 On Track Piraten (g Kool du Caux - Monrovia) Dr: Erik Adielsson Tr: Hans R Stromberg 9 Juggle Face (h Viking Kronos - Rakel Sund) Dr: Lutfi Kolgjini Tr: Lutfi Kolgjini by David Sanders, for Harnesslink.com

After a couple of hiccups at the start of the season, last year’s top two-year-old trotting colt One Over Da Moon looks back on track as he heads towards the $80,000 New Zealand Trotting Derby on April 11. This was highlighted by the three-year-olds emphatic all of the way victory last night at Addington against older C2 & faster trotters. “He was having a few issues with a knee around Hambletonian time, but I have treated that and now only work him on soft surfaces during the week,” advised trotting maestro, Paul Nairn. “He seems right back on top of his game at the moment, and should take further improvement out of last night’s run,” he added. Nairn now plans on racing One Over Da Moon at Addington again next week, before tackling the Group One feature. “The 2600 metres will be right up his alley,” says Nairn confidently. “But there are a few nice ones who he is going to have to beat including Majestic Time, who seems to have come back really well.” “Still, I think my fella is as good as any of them,” he added Nairn also enjoyed success last night with smart trotting mare Lotalov, who will now contest next week’s $25,000 4-5YO Trotters Championship. But, while both Nairn and Mark Jones enjoyed doubles on the card, it was the Purdon and Rasmussen team that stole the show, winning five of the eleven races. Among those winners were smart types Alleluia and Linda Lovegrace, both of who look set for very big seasons. Meanwhile, the career of champion trotter Stig looks in jeopardy, with a decision to be made on his racing future on Monday. By Mitchell Robertson

Chris Christoforou is one of the premier names in harness racing, and if a fan does not recognize his name it's most likely they are new to the sport. Chris has quite the extensive resume from winning the Little Brown Jug in 2000 with Astreos, to winning the Breeders Crown in 1993 aboard Earl. Chris won the Breeders Crown two more times, in 1999 and 2002. Chris has won pretty much every major stake race between Woodbine Racetrack, (Toronto, ON) and Mohawk Racetrack, (Campbellvile, ON). This includes the Canadian Breeders (twice), the Don Mills (twice), the Oakville Stakes (twice), the Burlington, the Fan Hanover and both the Champlain Pace and Trot which combining both Champlain series wins gives him a lucky seven victories (4 times in the Pace and 3 times in the Trot). Acknowledging these major wins is the tip of the iceberg and there's at least two dozen more stake wins. That's a pretty big iceberg that could take down the Titanic once again. What is left for Chris to win? Pretty much every race where he's driving and despite the success, Chris maintains a strong and focused drive to continuously reach the Winner's Circle. "The Hambletonian..." says Chris, "...is one I would love to win given the opportunity." With the future uncertainty that looms for harness racing in Ontario, (with the Ontario Government cancelling the slot revenue agreement), Chris remains passionate about wanting to stay close to home. "It depends on the future here in Ontario," Chris says, "but I have no plans to leave. I'd really like to stay here, it's my home, it's my family... and hopefully I can. "I enjoy my life, I enjoy my career and we make a living." Chris explained, "It's tough at times but I would never discourage anyone from wanting to get into the (racing) business." Chris is fine with the thought of his children following in his footsteps as well as his father's. Chris won his first race in 1990 at Flamboro Downs driving Delias Star to the Winner's Circle. In all this time, Chris continually keeps it fresh by maintaining a positive attitude and keeping things light whenever possible. "I find if you are enjoying what you are doing, people catch that vibe from you and it rubs off on them." Chris explains, "The guys I drive with, we all get along and it's a good group of guys here (at Woodbine Racetrack). It's not easy when you are competing with guys night in and night out, but I thing we do a really good job of (having fun)." Asking Chris if he had a memory of a special time where the drivers meshed cohesively and were quite successful, he says "It was strong in the WEG circuit (Woodbine Entertainment Group), in the 80's and up til now it's been very strong." "The top 5 or 6 guys here can drive with anyone in the world as far as I'm concerned. From Campbell to Sears to Lachance, just because we drive here (at Woodbine/Mohawk), it doesn't mean we are any less skilled. Put up Jody Jamieson, Randy Waples or Paul MacDonnell and they can drive with anyone and they have proven that in the past." Talking with Chris is quite fulfilling, and not in terms of generic terms or metaphors, but the open honesty of how good his fellow drivers are, no matter where they race. A perfect example is Chris paying respect to Dave Palone who drives predominantly at the Meadows (located in Washington, PA). Yes, it is a different size track than others, it's a 5/8th mile oval but according to Chris regardless of the type of track, Dave Palone can drive with the best no matter where. Chris is quick to point the good and talent in others. With Chris you get the sense that there is always a silver lining. "Take the top 50 drivers in North America and it's a very slim margin as to who is better." Chris looks to the horses that make up the difference, "Give the 50th guy the best horse and the top guy the fifth best horse and I am pretty sure, 90% of the time the guy with the best horse wins. To that point, it's all horse power." When driving any horse, Chris looks at past performance to see how to best deal with the horse during the race. However "...tactics can switch in a split second. If the horse is moving from a low percentage barn to a higher percentage barn, you are more likely to be more aggressive." "An extreme chess match" Chris says, "very very fast chess game." Horse racing has its strains like any other career, and Chris is grateful to his wife, Camilla, for being so supportive. "It's tough when the kids are off for two months in the summer and I'm busy racing." Chris says. How does Chris balance the intensity of work with family, "every now and then in the summer if I'm in a slump, we'll jump in the car for two days and go to Niagara Falls, ON, change things up and get a refresher." It's all about quality time. In any job, business and career one thing that's constant is communication. Flat out, it's a requirement. During a race when fans are standing at the fence, the sound of the horses charging to the wire is intoxicating. Along with the ground vibrating you can hear faint sounds coming from drivers, but not all the discernable. At the start of the race, Chris explains very little, if any is being said. "You hear drivers hollering down the stretch for sure but the only thing a driver hears, and I don't think drivers even realize it, you can hear if a horse is getting rough, or if his gait is changing." Chris explains, "The sound pattern the horses make when their gait is changing, short stepping. A lot does get blocked out, you're in the zone." "At Woodbine, if a driver's horse is getting rough, he starts screaming and it's usually a sound of panic so everybody knows what's coming and tries to avoid that guy. We all know what each other's voice sounds like, so even if you can't see him and he's three or four horses ahead of you, you know who it is." When it comes to pacers or trotters, Chris would have taken the pacer over the trotter in his early days. Now with his experience, Chris will opt for racing a trotter, not only for the strategy but for the technique involved. When it comes to any game outside of horse racing, Chris' favorite sport is soccer and he loves the English Premier League. His team is Manchester United aka the Red Devils. "We're having a tough year, with a new manager and the team wasn't left in the best shape. There's some older players that need to retire, it's been a slow process." Chris thinks Manchester United will give team manager David Moyes a couple of years to figure things out. "Ferguson (Sir Alex Ferguson was the previous manager) has his back and picked him as his replacement. So they will give Moyes time to work things out." If you're planning to come over to his place to watch the Derby where rivals Manchester United and Manchester City square off, you better be wearing the right colors. No City fans allowed. Ok well, Chris being the nice guy he is may let you in but I think that's just the Canadian politeness poking through. Let's just say United fans only. With a laugh Chris says there's a driver/trainer at Flamboro Downs, Anthony Haughan, who gives Chris a hard time as Anthony is a supporter of another Manchester United rival, Liverpool. "He sent me about 5 messages yesterday about how bad my team is. We have a lot of fun with it." Chris says. Being the soccer fan he is Chris is cheering for England in the 2014 World Cup taking place in Brazil. "My mother is English... so I got to cheer for them. I think Germany has the best team this year and are probably the favorites and Brazil to." What's the one sporting event Chris has on his bucket list that he definitely wants to cross off? It's the World Cup. It's tough for him to go, because June is part of the peak season for horse racing, but when he retires, that's one of his first trips. So long as it's taking place somewhere warm! By Roderick Balgobin, www.supernovasportsclub.com Twitter: ScSupernova  

The Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame is pleased to announce its 2014 ballot. A total of 36 horses and people, including 18 Standardbred racing candidates and 18 Thoroughbred racing candidates have been selected to appear on this year’s ballot. A 20-person Election Committee for each breed will declare the winners in their respective categories.  Results will be announced Tuesday, April 8.   On the Standardbred ballots representing this year’s six voting categories are as follows: Male horse category, Blissfull Hall, J M Vangogh and Rocknroll Hanover In 1999, Blissfull Hall captured harness racing’s elusive Pacing Triple Crown.  Owned by Ecuries Daniel Plouffe, Inc. of Bromont, QC, this champion was trained by Ben Wallace with Ron Pierce as regular driver.   A 31 race career over two seasons amassed a record of 19-4-6, a mark of 1:49.2 and earnings of $1.4 million before embarking on a successful career as a stallion. J M Vangogh, purchased as a yearling for $4,500 by Paul Chambers of Harrington, Delaware, made a remarkable recovery from an accident in the Ontario Sires Stakes Gold Final as a two year old to earn $2.28 million in 206 starts over 8 seasons and the nickname “The Comeback Kid”.  Rocknroll Hanover banked more than $3 million during his race career, for owners Jeffrey Snyder of New York; Lothlorien Equestrian Centre, Cheltenham, ON; and Perretti Racing Stable, LLC.  Career highlights include victories in Canada’s most prestigious races for two and three year olds, the Metro Pace and the North America Cup.  He then embarked on a second career, becoming one of North America’s most prolific stallions before passing away in 2013. Female horse category: B Cor Tamara, Dreamfair Eternal and J Cs Nathalie Before embarking on her second career as a broodmare, B Cor Tamara enjoyed a productive racing career, earning more than $185,000.  Bred and owned by Peter Core of Dresden, ON, the daughter of Dream Of Glory was the dam of 19 foals, including star trotter B Cor Pete, and granddam of two champion juveniles, Banker Hall and Broadway Hall.  Her offspring have earned in excess of $2.7 million. Dreamfair Eternal retired from racing in 2012 after a career spanning seven years, 56 victories, including every stake event on the older pacing mare schedule, earning over $2.5 million and being named Canada’s Horse of the Year in 2010.  The daughter of Camluck was bred, raised and owned by John Lamers of Ingersoll, ON with Patrick Fletcher receiving training credit. As a broodmare, J Cs Nathalie has produced two millionaires for owner John Lamers of Ingersoll, ON -- pacing colt Dreamfair Vogel, and pacing mare Dreamfair Eternal.  Dreamfair Vogel was a winner of 19 races and over $1.1 million with a mark of 1:49.3.  Dreamfair Eternal, a winner of 56 races and over $2.5 million in purse earnings was Canada’s Horse of the Year in 2010. The trainer-driver category: Yves Filion, William Gale, and Wally Hennessey. Yves Filion, 67 of Saint-Andre-D’argent, Quebec was one of his province’s premier trainer-drivers for close to 30 years driving in almost 18,000 races with 4,362 wins and $26.5 million in earnings.   Training credits include 248 winners and horses earning in excess of $3.4 million.   Pacing colts Runnymede Lobell and Goliath Bayama each became millionaires with Filion responsible for both training and driving. William Gale, 65 of Woodstock, Ontario, was one of Canada’s leading drivers for a period that spanned the 70s, 80s and 90s. Between 1982 and 1997, Gale recorded 16 consecutive $1 million+ seasons.  During his career, he won 6,375 races, started 32,134 times and earned $42.1 million. Wally Hennessey, 56, of Prince Edward Island, has more than 8,200 victories to his name and has banked earnings in excess of $55 million.  In the late 1990s, he enjoyed success with the trotter Moni Maker, a winner of $5.5 million and numerous stakes including the Nat Ray in three different years, the Hambletonian Oaks and Breeders Crown.  In the summer of 2007, Hennessey was inducted into the Living Hall of Fame in Goshen, New York. Candidates in the builders’ category: Dr. Ted Clarke, John B. Ferguson and Robert Murphy. Dr. Ted Clarke is recognized by his peers as a visionary in the horse racing industry.  Highly regarded for his thoughtful insights, Clarke’s strong and steady leadership has helped guide Grand River Raceway to be a leader in innovation and growth.  Before Grand River, Clarke led numerous initiatives to put Elmira Raceway on the path to stability, including the inauguration of Industry Day, the Battle of Waterloo and the establishment of the Ontario Teletheatre Network. John B. Ferguson may be best known for his time in the National Hockey League, but his passion for Canadian horse racing was drawn from early years spent with his father and grandfather at old Hastings Park in Vancouver, BC.  In addition to his role as a very active owner and breeder, Ferguson also took a role in track management.  He was hired by Blue Bonnets in Montreal and after leaving hockey became the President of Windsor Raceway.  He was also one of driving forces behind the formation of the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. The late Robert Murphy, a native of Vancouver, BC, one of Canada’s most respected horse breeders and owners, was known by his popular Red Star moniker.  First introduced to racing at Cloverdale Raceway in 1980, he rapidly became one of Canada’s most prolific owners.   He averaged 935 starts as an owner each year between 2005 and 2009.  In 2007, at the age of 74, Murphy owned more Standardbreds than anyone else in Canada. Outstanding Standardbreds: Albatross, Artsplace, and Happy Lady Albatross was voted US Harness Horse of the Year in 1971 and 1972.  He won 59 of 71 starts, including the Cane Pace and Messenger Stakes in 1971, and earned in excess of $1.2 million.  As a sire, Albatross's thousands of sons and daughters have won more than $100 million. Artsplace was the1992 O’Brien Award and Dan Patch Award winner as Horse of the Year following an undefeated four-year-old season.  He was a two-year-old world record holder winning the Breeders Crown in a time of 1:51.1 at Pompano Park in Florida, soundly defeating champion Die Laughing.  He won 37 races and bankrolled over $3 million during his racing career which saw him race many times in Canada before becoming a world class sire. Happy Lady, a daughter of Most Happy Fella, raced in 1977 and 1978 for owners Myra Masterson of St. Catharines, ON and Linda Lockey of Ridgeville.  Though her race career was brief, she won $528,825 in purse earnings and attained a mark of 1:55.2.  Trained and driven by the late Jim Rankin, she was almost flawless in her juvenile campaign, winning 15 of 16 races.  As a sophomore she won 19 of 24 starts. Communicators category selections: Harry Eisen, Bill Galvin and Frank Salive. The late Harry Eisen spent a lifetime loving and covering horse racing in Ontario.  As a lifelong journalist, he spent many years exposing the sport to the public, including the majority of his 40 years at the London Free Press.  Eisen who once said he saw his first harness race when he was “three or four years old”, sold tip sheets at Dufferin Park Racetrack as a boy.  He was inducted into Western Fair’s Wall of Fame in 1980. As a publicist, promoter and author, Bill Galvin, a native of Arnprior, ON made a tremendous impact on horse racing in Canada. Galvin’s promotions transcended racing.  He led a charge to bring ice horse racing to the Rideau Canal and expose the sport to thousands of potential fans.  He started the Race for MS fundraiser to gain exposure for the sport, and ran numerous other high profile campaigns dedicated to the health of horse racing during his career. Leamington, ON native Frank Salive was known for over 35 years as “The Voice” of Canadian harness racing.  During his career it is estimated he called over 100,000 races, becoming a fan and industry favourite for his knowledgeable and informative calls and silky voice.  Frank’s career as a track announcer began at Sudbury Downs in the late 70’s and continued at tracks throughout Ontario,  includin  fourteen years at Ontario Jockey Club/Woodbine Entertainment Group harness tracks and concluding at Pompano Park, Florida.  Salive was also a regular writer for the Canadian Sportsman for several years. From the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame

Harness driver Tony Hall has a pretty prestigious win column. Earlier this year, Tony notched his 4,000th career victory. The way he is racking up so many wins is quite remarkable but to achieve that level of wins, it sure takes a lot of time and Tony being a family man, he always manages to create a fine balance within the daily grind of work and family. "My wife (Ashlee) has a few horses she trains and I work with her" Tony explains. "Right now we are based at the Meadows in Pennsylvania and we are stabled off track. So that's where I am 90% of the time. I help her in the morning with the horses." For the winter season, with Tony driving at the Meadows, he hasn't had to do much traveling thanks to good planning. "Through the week, I work with her horses and as far as my son, when he is done school he comes and stays with me in the summer." Tony says. As for quality time with family, on off days, Tony always ensures they go out for an activity that is not horse related. "I have a 14 year old son, so I try to be involved with him as much as possible.... Try and take tropical vacations whenever possible." Tony says he never went to college and he hopes his son will go to college and find a career he truly enjoys. "I've always tried to lead him to something that is more stable, more consistent. In our business it's very up and down, I've had years where I've made close to $300,000 and years where I make less than $100,000. (The business) fluctuates so much... I'd like him to have the opportunity where (business) can only go up and not worry about things going down." The sense of security Tony wants to provide his family is touching, doing all he can so his son can focus on the positives and not heed the negatives. Away from the track, Tony enjoys the outdoors becoming one with nature. "I like to fish and deer hunt. I mostly get to do that in the fall, mainly deer but sometimes turkey but mainly white tail deer." Tony hasn't gotten his trophy kill yet, as he's been limited on time, but does admit he's had some close encounters. This coming Saturday, Tony will be venturing to the Meadowlands for a driver's series. The series is six Saturday nights. When at the Meadowlands, Tony predominantly drives for trainer Ron Burke's stable and if possible, try and catch on where possible. "Once I confirm with Ron that I'm going to go (to the Meadowlands), word spreads around that I'm going to be there. So truthfully, it's all word of mouth and when you commit to one guy, word spreads around." Tony explains. "One good thing about New Jersey is they have a good publicity office. Once they get the word, they spread it." Since Tony will be driving Saturday nights at the Meadowlands, he's is planning on driving at Pocono Downs on Sundays. "I'll do that for a while, so long as the opportunity is there. Pretty much, I will go wherever I am needed." Horse racing and the purses for that matter are built on gambling and the revenue from gambling patrons. Everyone has their opinion on gambling, the pros and cons and everything in between. For Tony, simply put he is not a gambler, with the exception of putting himself at risk every time he gets on to the racetrack. "Honestly, I hate gambling of any sort." Tony openly says. "If I go to a casino, it's to eat at a restaurant or go to a bar at a casino with a group of friends. I've never been one to gamble, you hear people talk about it, but I just ignore it." Tony doesn't condemn anyone nor does he look down on anyone who gambles, it's just not his cup of tea. "The way I look at it" Tony says, "to each their own and just because I don't do it, there's a million other people that do." "I understand that keeps us going but I am being honest from my standpoint as an individual. I don't consider (gambling) a disgrace." Reflecting on the idea of Tony's risk when racing doesn't really play on his mind, "I've been doing this my whole life so I don't even think about it." Tony admits. "I've been in accidents where I come back 24 hours later and drive a full card. It doesn't register, it's a part of the business that something can happen." With over 4,000 wins under Tony's belt, he says "I want to keep getting better, do the best I can do in the career I chose... and find ways to better my stats and in other ways that strengthen my weak points and I can only do that by driving more races." In all of Tony's trips, one memorable race he recalls in particular was when he was driving in a stakes race at the Meadows in 2006. "It was in the Adios, I got beat by a nose in the opening race of the Asioa in the eliminations and missed the finals. To be that close to a race of that stature was definitely it, a big moment for me." (The 2006 Adios was won by 20-1 shot, Cactus Creek, driven by Mike Lachance and trained by Erv Miller.) If Tony had a choice between driving pacers or trotters, hands down Tony would choose to drive trotters. "The trotter was the first of the Standardbreds, back in the day; the trotter was more of the natural gait. They can be more of a challenge, with a trotter you really have to watch how you handle them compared to a pacer." "A good bred trotter, when the breeding is there and it's with a good barn, it's an unbelievable feeling." Tony explains. "Just a natural that's quick on its feet is hard to find. When you do (find one), it's unbelievable and a great feeling." One trotter Tony mentions that he liked was Deweycheatumnhowe, but there isn't one currently that he can pick out and feel the same about. The race Tony hopes to win most is the highly regarded Hambletonian. Tony's other milestone he'd like to achieve is 5,000 wins. "I've always said to myself, if I could have 5,000 wins that would be a huge milestone for me and whatever happens after that would be a bonus. I never expected to be at this number (of wins) at this age when I was young." Tony continues, "I would love to win one prestigious race on the grand circuit and if I could pick, it would be the Hambletonian. It would be a great achievement." It would be tremendous if Tony won the Hambletonian as his 5,000th win. Tony expresses he is not a cold weather person and when it's time to step away from racing, he'd like to relocate somewhere warm, like Florida where his biggest decision would be where to fish. By: Roderick Balgobin www.supernovasportsclub.com Twitter: ScSupernova  

Orjan Kihlstrom today piloted Panne de Moteur to victory at Solvalla in the featured Kentucky Fibber. The pair covered 1640 meters autostart in 1.13.5kr to secure the first prize of 100,000SEK. The winner now has 16 career wins for earnings of 6.79SEK million. Panne de Moteur is owned by Travkompaniets Stall (owner of Maharajah) and Menhammar Stuteri and is a six year-old son of Credit Winner from Hambletonian Oaks winner Jalopy by Donerail. At Jagersro (Sweden) Dreams Take Time, a five year-old son of Andover Andover, took the featured Kvallspostens Marspokal in 1.13.4kr over 2140 meters autostart. Johnny Takter teamed the winner to his 17th career win in 35 starts. He earned 70,000SEK first money with this victory. Propeller (by SJ's Photo) was second for Kenneth Haugstad. by Thomas H. Hicks, for Harnesslink.com

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