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The 2014 racing season at Clinton Raceway came to a close on Sunday afternoon (August 31), and six $18,000 Ontario Sires Stakes Grassroots divisions were contested on the program. The star of those races was Thinkofagameplan, who moved into sole possession of the top spot in the Grassroots point standings with a 1:57 track record performance in the third split. With Randy Waples handling the driving assignment, Thinkofagameplan overtook leader Pan Street USA (Doug McNair) from first-over past three-quarters and then drew away in the stretch to win by four lengths in the new track record clocking. Pan Street USA wound up second with Pair Of Deuces (Paul MacDonell) back in third. The 1:57 effort dropped the track record for a two-year-old pacing colt by a fifth of a second. It had belonged to Front Row since he won a Grassroots division in 1:57.1 on September 21, 2003. Thinkofagameplan, a Ponder colt who scored his third win (all in Grassroots competition) from six attempts and pushed his bankroll to $36,660, is a homebred for trainer Bob McIntosh of Windsor and Al McIntosh Holdings Inc. of Leamington, Ontario. The winner is the second foal out of the Camluck mare Noshameinmygame. She was a Grassroots winner at both two and three. In other action three horses picked up their second Grassroots wins of the season. The first to do it was Moonwards Hanover (Paul MacDonell), who backed up his victory last Sunday at Georgian Downs with a 1:59.2 tally in the Grassroots opener. He was followed up by Twin B Scandal (Joe Hudon), who bagged the fourth section in 1:58 after a two-hole trip, and The Fire Within (Jody Jamieson) was the last to double up as he snagged the fifth flight in 1:58.4. Trainer Jack Darling’s stable of Cambridge, Ontario, owns Moonwards Hanover, a son of Sportswriter. Darling purchased Moonwards Hanover, who is now two-for-five in the win column with a bankroll of $30,500, for $35,000 at last year’s Standardbred Horse Sale. The Hanover Shoe Farms Inc.-bred is the third foal out of the Western Ideal mare Mouse Hanover, a half-sister to the likes of Mt Vernon Hanover (Rustler Hanover, $623,067), a two-time OSS winner. Joe Hudon, who resides in Acton, Ontario, also co-owns Twin B Scandal, a gelded son of Mach Three-Twin B Intrigue (McArdle), with partner R A W Equine Inc. of Burlington, Ontario. Twin B Scandal now has a pair of triumphs from seven efforts, and he has banked $28,440. The dam of Twin B Scandal is out of Daylon Magic, who won 18 times in Ontario Sires Stakes competition between her two- and three-year-old seasons. Twin B Scandal, who brought $32,000 at last year’s Canadian Yearling Sale, was bred by Twinbrook Limited and James Kirk. The Fire Within is a gelding by Whosurboy and out of the Big Towner mare Mollie Hanover ($311,480). The half-brother to millionaire Illusionist picked up his third win from six attempts and ran his rookie season earnings to $23,620 for breeder, owner, trainer Fred Drouillard of Dutton, Ontario. Also winning in Grassroots competition today were: --Star Cover (Jody Jamieson, 1:57.3). This son of Royal Mattjesty is owned and trained by Blake MacIntosh of Waterdown, Ontario. Star Cover has won twice from seven trips behind the gate, and he has put away $14,060. He was bred by Winbak Farm and fetched $4,500 at the 2013 Forest City Yearling Sale. Star Cover’s dam is the Dexter Nukes mare Armbro Rosebud ($721,057), an Ontario Sires Stakes superstar who won 11 times from 14 attempts during her OSS career. --Charlottes Colony (Trevor Henry, 1:58). An Art Colony colt, Charlottes Colony broke his maiden in his fifth try and boosted his output to $16,800. Charlottes Colony is trained by Richard Moreau for owners Thomas McGuffog of Hanwell and Geoffrey Macneish of Douglas, New Brunswick. Charlottes Colony, whose dam is the Mohican Pride mare OGs Starlett ($536,647), was bred by Dan Belliveau and was hammered down for $4,200 at last year’s Atlantic Classic Yearling Sale. The next Ontario Sires Stakes Grassroots event for rookie pacing males will take place on September 12 at Mohawk Racetrack. From the Ontario Sire Stakes and Clinton Raceway

For over a hundred years, standardbred breeders in North America have heavily patronized the Hanover Shoe Farms harness racing breeding operation. It has long had a reputation for quality and excellence and it is a reputation that they continue to build on to this day. To reach the summit in anything in life is the easier part of the equation. To stay there over a long period is the difficult thing to achieve which is why the longevity and strength of the “Hanover” brand is something to be marveled at. Every year pundits wonder aloud if this might just be the year that Hanover Shoe Farms slips from atop its pedestal in the North American breeding scene. Every year they are disappointed as the Hanover juggernaut rolls on. As is the norm every year, several two year olds with the Hanover name have been starring in some of the early stakes action. Three of those two year old horses have really taken our eye over the last few weeks and appear poised to bring further success to the Hanover brand. First up is the two year old gelding Piercewave Hanover who was sold at Harrisburg last year for $57,000. A son of Donato Hanover from the brilliant racemare Passionate Glide 1:52.2 ($2,131,377), he races out of the barn of Christopher Oakes. So far this season Piercewave Hanover is two for two and has banked $52,577 to date. His latest win at the Meadows on August 5th in a  $58,152 division of the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes in 1:56.1 was very impressive and would suggest we are going to hear a lot more of Piercewave Hanover. The second two year old to have  impressed us this season is Aria Hanover who was sold at Harrisburg last year for $ 80,000. A daughter of Well Said from a half sister to All Speed Hanover 1:49.4 ($830,738), she races out of the Jimmy Takter barn. So far this season Aria Hanover has had four starts for three wins and a second and has banked $114,115 in stakes to date. Her recent win at Pocono Downs on August 6th in a $75,720 division of the Pennsylvania Sires Stakes in 1:53.1 was full of merit and signaled a big future for this freshman filly. The third two year old to have taken our eye is Sassa Hanover who was sold at the Lexington Select Sale last year for $50,000. A daughter of Rock N Roll Heaven from a half sister to Shadyshark Hanover 1:47.4 ($771,172), she races out of the Ron Burke barn. So far this season Sassa Hanover is four from four and has banked $83,933 in stakes. Her recent win at Vernon Downs on August 7th in a $36,556 division of the New York Sires Stakes in 1:52.2 with a last quarter in 26.4 shows Sassa Hanover will be a major player when some of the bigger stakes race roll around. That is just three of the multitude of Hanover bred two year olds strutting their stuff all over North America this season. At the same time as the two year olds have been burning up the tracks, the Hanover based stallions have been having an outstanding year in all the age group divisions of the North American siring tables as the analysis below shows. In the two year old trotting division, first season Hanover based sire Muscle Massive is currently lying second on the North American sires table while Donato Hanover, Explosive Matter and Cantab Hall all sit within the first seven places on the sires table. In the three year old trotting division Cantab Hall leads the sires table from Donato Hall with Andover Hall at fifth and Explosive Matter at sixth which is a fantastic result for Hanover Shoe Farms. In the two year old pacing division, Well Said is currently lying second on the sires table with Somebeachsomewhere back in seventh due to a small third crop of just 67. In the three year old pacing division, Somebeachsomewhere has distanced the competition with Well Said just as clearly second on the sires table. As of today August 9th, horses bred by Hanover Shoe Farms have won 1498 races this season in North America for stakes totaling $15,456,084. The “Hanover” brand has always been synonymous with quality and this years results on both the track and in the stallion barn just add further kudos to the most successful breeding operation in North America.    Harnesslink media  

On Wednesday night the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame inducted its class of 2014 and welcomed its newest members both horses and individuals. Albatross, Dreamfair Eternal and Rocknroll Hanover are the Standardbreds that made up part of the 2014 class. Joining these Standardbreds in the Hall Of Fame are the late Robert Murphy (breeder/owner); Dr. Ted Clarke, in the builder category; trainer/driver Wally Hennessey, and communicator Bill Galvin. Apelia, Cool Mood and Wando are the Thoroughbreds that make up part of the 2014 class. Trainer Horatio Luro, jockey Robert Landry and breeders William ‘Bill’ Graham and Arthur Stollery are also 2014 inductees on the Thoroughbred side. The Induction Ceremony was held at the Mississauga Convention Centre in Ontario. Male Horse Category: Rocknroll Hanover – bred by Hanover Shoe Farms Inc, Hanover, Pennsylvania. Owned by Jeffrey Snyder of New York, New York; Lothlorien Equestrian Centre, Cheltenham, Ontario; and Perretti Racing Stable, LLC, Cream Ridge, New Jersey. RocknRoll Hanover banked more than $3 million during his racing career, for owners Jeffrey Snyder of New York, New York; Lothlorien Equestrian Centre, Cheltenham, Ontario; and Perretti Racing Stable, LLC, Cream Ridge, New Jersey. Career highlights included victories in Canada’s most prestigious races for two and three-year-olds, the Metro Pace for two-year-old pacers and the North America Cup for three-year-olds He then embarked on a second career, becoming one of North America’s most prolific stallions before passing away in 2013. To date, the son of Western Ideal, out of Hall of Fame mare Rich N Elegant, has sired winners of $60.7-million, including eight million-dollar-plus winners. "My job was to bring the best out in my horses and he made it easy, said Sarah Lauren Scott, Rocknroll Hanover's caretaker. "He brought out the best in all of his connections. He was a once in a lifetime horse and his legacy will live on." Female Horse Category: Dreamfair Eternal – bred by Mary and John Lamers, and owned by John Lamers, Ingersoll, Ontario. Dreamfair Eternalretired from racing in 2012 after a seven-year career that included 56 victories, and every major stakes event on the older pacing mare schedule, earnings of over $2.5-million and Horse of the Year honours in Canada in 2010. During that year, she racked up wins in the final of the Masters Series, an elimination of the Roses are Red Stakes, elimination and final of the Milton Stakes, the elimination and final of the Forest City Pace and the Breeders Crown. The daughter of Camluck was bred by John and Mary Lamers and owned by John Lamers of Ingersoll, Ontario. Patrick Fletcher trained her for most of her career. "This is certainly a great honour for myself and my family. 'Eternal' is a large part of our family," said owner John Lamers. "‎I want to thank Pat and Karan Fletcher for the amazing job they've done with Dreamfair Eternal over her racing career. ‎ "‎She's an outstanding race mare and she's equally as good a mother," noting that Lamers has a filly sired by fellow Hall Of Famer Somebeachsomewhere on the ground that might have a "bit better conformation" than her Mom. Lamers hoped that the filly has just as good of a career.‎‎ Veteran Horse Category: Albatross – bred by John E Wilcutts, Aberdeen, North Carolina; Charles A Kenney, Lexington, Kentucky; Elizabeth B Peters, Wilmington Delaware; and Mark Lydon, Abington, Massachusetts. Owned by Hanover Shoe Farms Inc, Hanover, Pennsylvania; George Segal, Versailles, Kentucky; Castleton Farm, Lexington, Kentucky; Hal S Jones, Montgomery, New York. A champion on the track and in the breeding shed,  Albatross was a major influence on the Standardbred breed. He won 59 of 71 starts, including the Cane Pace and Messenger Stakes in 1971, and earned in excess of $1.2 million. Two of his major stakes wins in Canada included the Prix d’Ete and Canadian Pacing Derby. He retired as both the fastest and richest horse in the history of the breed. As a sire, Albatross's thousands of sons and daughters have won more than $100 million, including Niatross, who is considered by many to be the greatest pacer of the 20th Century, and Fan Hanover, who is the only filly to ever win the Little Brown Jug. "This is a very distinct honour for me," said Hanover Shoe Farms' Murray Brown, who was around Albatross his entire life‎. Brown considers Albatross "probably the greatest two-year-old of any breed that's ever lived," recalling how he'd have to race against aged horses in his freshman year. "It's unheard of for a two-year-old to race against aged horses. He did it with regularity."‎ Noting that Albatross was the first sire of any breed to sire progeny with more than $100 million in earnings, Brown called Albatross "the perfect horse" and stated that "his name is a fixture in the breed and will continue to be. ‎" Wally Hennessey, 58, born in Prince Edward Island and now a resident of Coconut Grove, Florida, has more than 8,500 victories to his credit and has banked earnings in excess of $57 million. During the early stages of his career, Hennessey re-wrote the record books, setting new standards in both wins and earnings. In the late 1990s, he enjoyed success with the trotter Moni Maker, a winner of $5.5 million and numerous stakes including the Nat Ray in three different years, the Hambletonian Oaks and Breeders Crown. Throughout his career, Hennessey has been remarkably consistent, winning at least 200 races in each of the last 25 years, and driving horses to earnings in excess of $1 million for 24 straight years. In the summer of 2007, Hennessey was inducted into the Living Hall of Fame in Goshen, New York. "To be inducted takes hard work and dedication from many," said Hennessey. "I was blessed to grow up with four great brothers and sisters. They were very supportive and competitive and loving. We were all on each other's team. "Not to point out one person, but my brother Dan has been with me my whole career. Without Dan I definitely would not be standing here. I had a father I was so proud of. I never wanted to let him down. He was so talented. I learned my early lessons from my father. My greatest influence could not be here. My mom, I wish she was here, but she could not travel to be here. Without her love and what she taught me, I would not be here. To my wife Barb and daughter Christie -- you're my greatest supporters and Barb you hung in with me and that was hard to do. And my daughter is my inspiration." "It's been a journey one could only dream about and I'm so glad dreams do come true." Dr. Ted Clarke is recognized by his peers as a visionary in the horse racing industry. Clarke’s strong and steady leadership has helped guide Grand River Raceway to be a leader in innovation and growth. Prior to Grand River’s opening, Dr. Clarke led numerous initiatives to put Elmira Raceway on the path to stability, including the inauguration of Industry Day, the Battle of Waterloo and the establishment of the Ontario Teletheatre Network. He was honoured for his innovative thinking and leadership with the Lloyd Chisholm Achievement Award in 1999 from the Standardbred Breeders of Ontario Association. "‎The fact of the matter is, with the industry being in the state it's in, it's important to remember the things that got us to where we are," said Clarke, imploring the industry to pull from the same end of the rope going forward.  The late Robert Murphy, a native of Vancouver, British Columbia, was one of Canada’s most respected horse breeders and owners, and was known by his popular ‘Red Star’ moniker. First introduced to racing at Cloverdale Raceway in 1980, he rapidly became one of Canada’s most prolific owners. He averaged 935 starts as an owner each year between 2005 and 2009. In 2007, at the age of 74, Murphy owned more Standardbreds than anyone else in Canada. Murphy had a great impact on harness racing in BC with both his breeding and training centres, but that impact extended across the continent as his horses raced all over North America. William ‘Bill’ Galvin, a native of Arnprior, Ontario and now a resident of Mississauga, Ontario, made a tremendous impact on horse racing in the country as a Canadian horse racing historian, poet, author, publisher, educator, horseman, humanitarian, publicist and former Thoroughbred racing official. Galvin’s promotions transcended racing. He led a charge to bring harness racing on ice to the Rideau Canal and expose the sport to thousands of potential fans. He started the Race for MS fundraiser to gain exposure for the sport, and ran numerous other high profile campaigns dedicated to the well-being of horse racing during his career. He was also the executive editor of Trot Magazine and a member of the Advisory board for the School of Equine Studies at Toronto's Humber College of Applied Arts. "What a special and memorable occasion this is tonight," said Galvin. "I congratulate you all and thank each and every one responsible for this tremendous honour. "This evening is especially memorable with the presence of Dr. John Findlay, who presented to me. I received my an introduction to horse racing in the standardbred sport as a very young lad in Arnprior, Ontario. Those early days at Madawaska Farms with Dr. John Findlay would define and shape my career.  "Tonight, my life comes full circle from those unforgettable country fairs in the Ottawa Valley, to the glory day of Canadian harness racing in the 1980s, to the pinnacle of my career tonight at the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame, with the man who introduced me to the sport‎ - Dr. John Findlay." By Steve Wolf for Harnesslink.com with files from the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame  

East Rutherford, NJ - The $257,700 United States Pacing Championship (USPC) will provide the stage for nine of the finest in the aged pacing division to do battle on Hambletonian Day at The Meadowlands. A testament to the quality of the group is the fact that the combined career earnings of these nine pacers is in excess of $20 million. Among the chief contenders in Saturday's race is Captaintreacherous who dominated his division and was subsequently named "Pacer of the Year" as a freshman and sophomore, a distinction he shares with only the immortal Niatross. Faced this season at age four with graduation into the open ranks to battle the best of the older set was expected to be a daunting task and the competition has been fierce. Captaintreacherous was born to be a star with the pedigree and presence to demand $250,000 at the 2011 Lexington Selected Yearling Sale. He came from the greatly anticipated first crop of champion racehorse Somebeachsomewhere and boasts a very accomplished maternal line. White Birch Farm bred and raised the colt and when Myron Bell and Tony Alagna saw him during their annual farm canvass they agreed he was priority one. The winning bid was made by Bell on behalf of a partnership that included George Segal's Brittany Farms, Marvin Katz, Joe Sbrocco and Myron and Stephanie Bell's Riverview Farm. White Birch proprietor Michael Parisi was offered a stake and remained a partner on the horse as well. They would choose the nom de course Captaintreacherous Racing for this endeavor. Myron Bell has been the racing manager for George Segal's Brittany Farms for more than thirty years. Throughout their relationship many of the sport's stars both on the track and in the breeding shed have campaigned under the Brittany banner. Over the past decade, Myron has managed a number of partnerships that include several high-profile Standardbred owners and breeders with remarkable results. Captaintreacherous represents the culmination of a lifetime spent breeding, buying and racing the best. "My groups, such as Captaintreacherous Racing, are looking for that top horse that we can race successfully at the highest level and then hopefully have a future in the breeding shed. I could not do any of this without their confidence and support," said Bell. "We bought just one colt from Somebeachsomewhere's first crop and our aim was to buy the best one. "Captaintreacherous was the number one colt from that crop, in our opinion. He showed beautifully and offered the best pedigree that I'd seen for years. He had all of the attributes that we seek; conformation, attitude, ability...and he had no weaknesses." Things began well for Captaintreacherous. He seared through his two-year-old campaign with Tim Tetrick joining the team as his regular driver, listing the Wilson and Metro among eight wins in ten starts for over $900,000 and his first "Pacer of the Year" title. Brought back at three with great expectations, "The Captain" exceeded even those lofty ambitions and ran the table with the North America Cup, Meadowlands Pace and Breeders Crown among his thirteen triumphs and $2 million in seasonal earnings. Along the way Captaintreacherous captured the hearts of racing fans with his grit and determination, often appearing on the brink of defeat only to battle back and get to the wire first. His talent and will; coupled with his breeding and imposing presence, drew the attention of several suitors for his services as a stallion. Ultimately it would be industry leader Hanover Shoe Farms whose participation in a syndication agreement led to a decision to stand Captaintreacherous at their Pennsylvania nursery when he goes to stud in 2015. "It is absolutely imperative that you have a strong syndicate when the horse goes to stud," Bell opined. "You need breeders with the right mares to want the horse to succeed and support him with those mares. If they are shareholders they are enhancing their own interests as well as that of the horse. After the first two seasons in the shed, when a new star retires to stud, if you don't have that support, interest wanes and you have a few down years even if the horse hits. "We sold a few shares of the horse to serious breeders after his freshman season to establish value. There was understandably great interest in "Captain" last year and by Lexington we had a few serious offers to stand him. Hanover bought a significant interest in him and they have the type of mares we seek to give him a chance to be his best. We will syndicate him further at the end of this racing season and he will go to stud at Hanover." For his career, Captaintreacherous has won 22 of 31 starts and over $3.1 million, averaging a remarkable $100,000 per start. He won the Meadowlands Maturity his first race this season, but is winless in his last four starts. In Saturday's USPC as "The Captain" looks to move forward off a wicked tune-up in last week's prep, he finds himself starting from post eight, just outside Sweet Lou who has won seven straight and been the star of this division thus far in 2014. "We had no illusions that he was going to go through this season against these types of horses without getting beat. I think he has raced well in each of his starts this year and was fantastic last week, pacing his last half in :52 flat. Sweet Lou has been very good, but I don't fear him. My feeling is that "Captain" is improving in each race and will continue to improve. He needs to get lucky at the draw and you always need racing luck, that's a given. "Tony Alagna and Tim Tetrick have done a marvelous job racing Captaintreacherous. To campaign a horse at that level over three seasons, keep him fit, healthy and sound is a testament to Tony and his crew. Tim handles the pressure that comes with the job beautifully and deserves tremendous credit for his body of work driving "Captain". It truly "takes a village" to campaign a horse like this and I really feel that we have yet to see his best. "One of the most gratifying elements of this ride has been the response to Captaintreacherous by the harness community and particularly the racing fans," Myron said in closing. "He has given the ownership group many thrills and the enthusiasm shown by his fans is right at the top of that list." The complete field: UNITED STATES PACING CHAMPIONSHIP - $257,700 1. GOLDEN RECEIVER CoCallahan JaHuff 2. STATE TREASURER DaMiller IaMoore 3. THINKING OUT LOUD JCampbell RoMcintosh 4. SUNFIRE BLUE CHIP ScZeron JiTakter 5. FOILED AGAIN YaGingras RoBurke 6. BETTOR'S EDGE MaKakaley RoBurke 7. SWEET LOU RoPierce RoBurke 8. CAPTAINTREACHEROUS TiTetrick ToAlagna 9. CLEAR VISION BrAMiller RoBurke   The US Pacing Championship is race five on Saturday's All-Star Hambletonian card and clearly one of the most anticipated races of the day. The fifteen-race program begins at noon, gates open at 10:00am with the annual Hambo hat giveaway. The Hambletonian may be viewed on CBS Sports Network from 4:00 to 5:30pm. Find more information including access to a free Hambo Day program by visiting The Meadowlands website. by Nick Salvi, for the Meadowlands  

Three of the two-year-old trotting fillies competing in tonight’s third $70,000 Ontario Sires Stakes Gold division at Grand River Raceway came into the contest riding two race winning streaks. Danielle Hall and Juanitas Fury had both won a division of the first Gold event for this group of the 2014 season while newcomer Muscle Baby Doll was making her first appearance in Ontario after starting her career on the Indiana Fair circuit. In their division Muscle Baby Doll left sharply from post five for Doug McNair and easily obtained the lead. Jody Jamieson sent Danielle Hall up to take over just past the :30.1 opening quarter. She continued on top by the 1:01.1 half but just past that point Bistrobistro Taj came to call and had a head in front by the 1:31 three-quarters. Those two fillies battled it out around the final turn while McNair tipped his filly three wide and cruised on by to win in 2:00, the fastest of the three divisions tonight. Danielle Hall (Deweycheatumnhowe) was second with Bistrobistro Taj (Pilgrims Taj) taking third. This was the first start for Muscle Baby Doll under her new ownership of Frank Bellino and Sons Stable of New York and trainer Tony O’Sullivan. The Bellinos purchased the daughter of Muscle Mass–Have You Ever last week. Another recent acquisition for the Bellinos and O’Sullivan is Youre Majestic who won her first outing for her new connections in the first OSS Gold test last week at Mohawk. She raced very well tonight but had to settle for the bridesmaid spot. That division saw Amoureuse Hanover and Randy Waples gain early control to head the fillies by the opening marker in :29.2. Just past that point she was overtaken by Ditcherquicknhide and Jack Moiseyev who trotted by the half in :59.4. Waples pulled his filly back out from second and she hit the three-quarters first in 1:30.2. Three wide and driving on through the final turn was Youre Majestic but she could not catch the leader who tripped the timer in 2:00.3. Youre Majestic (Majestic Son) was second followed by Sumthintotalkabout (Muscle Mass). It was the first win in three lifetime starts for Amoureuse Hanover, who finished second and third in her previous outings. Trained by John Smith for Brian Peterson of Port Hope, Ontario, the daughter of Pilgrims Taj was bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. The second split saw favourite The Grand Filly make a break just before the opening quarter while trying to overtake Desis Dream who hit that point in :30.3 and the half in 1:00.3. She had pressure at that point from Magical Gem but that filly miscued, taking herself out of contention. Just past the 1:30.3 three-quarters Gee Okeeffe came out from second for James MacDonald and flew by Desis Dream to win by more than six lengths in 2:00.3. The Grand Filly (Muscle Mass) recovered to take second while Mischief Smile (Majestic Son) was third. It was the first lifetime win in three starts for Gee Okeeffe who finished second in her first two tries. From the first crop of Holiday Road, the filly is trained by Chris Beaver who co-owns with breeder Wilbur Lang, both of Ohio. The rookie trotting fillies will next meet for Gold action on August 10 at Rideau Carleton Raceway in Ottawa. From the Ontario Sire Stakes

Dancin Yankee (Yankee Cruiser - Dancewiththebest) returned to Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs after his victory in the Invitational Pace on Sun Stakes Saturday, and made another trip to the Hanover Shoe Farms Winner's Circle. The 6-Year-Old, trained by Amber Buter and driven by Tyler Buter, left from post 7, taking the lead just past the quarter, and never looked back. With fractions of 26.4; 54.4; and 122.3, Dancin Yankee tripped the timer in 1:49 for the Preferred Handicap, winning by 1 ¾ lengths. Abelard Hanover finished 2nd; followed by Digital Z Tam, 3rd. The win is the 12th this season in 19 starts for Dancin Yankee, who paid $3 to win, and topped an Exacta of $14.80. He now has earnings of nearly $300,000 this season. In a Condition Event earlier in the card, Scott Rocks (Rocknroll Hanover - Plant A Kiss) equaled the National season's mark for 4-year-old Pacing Geldings on a 5/8 mile track with a 1:48.3 mile. Racing resumes at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs on Sunday with a Post Time of 6:30pm. by Jennifer Starr, for Pocono Downs  

World Champion Miss Easy passed away at her home at Hanover Shoe Farms this morning. She was 26. Miss Easy was bred and raised by Stoner Creek Farm. She was purchased as a yearling by Rose Guida and Royal Palm Stables for $30,000. She was broken and trained by Bruce Nickells and was primarily driven by John Campbell throughout her racing career. As a two year old she was voted "Two Year Old Pacing Filly of 1990". She won 15 of 17 starts and earned $1,128,956. At 3, she was voted "Three Year Old Pacing Filly of 1991" She won 10 of 15 starts, earned $648,700 and concluded her racing career with two and three year old earnings $1,777,656. Unfortunately her success on the racing front did not carry forth to her career in the breeding shed. At best, her achievements as a mother of quality racehorses could be considered to have been moderate. So great was the perceived disappointment in her that January of 2002 found her being offered for sale in the Meadowlands Winter Sale as a barren broodmare. Jim Simpson of Hanover Shoe Farms was there together with Farm Manager Dr. Bridgette Jablonsky and P.R. Director Murray Brown. Dr. Jablonsky mentioned the disappointment that a mare who was as great as Miss Easy was going to be auctioned and would likely just bring a relative pittance. The three decided that if indeed that would transpire, Hanover would purchase her and she would be guaranteed a forever home. At the time, the thought was that she would be retired and turned out with Hanover's noted group of retired mares. When booking season came along Dr. Jablonsky said that Miss Easy was in great shape and suggested that she be booked along with the rest of Hanover's active mares. After all, she was still the one and only MISS EASY!! That happened and she subsequently produced eight foals for Hanover bringing a total of $220,500. She never became the great producer that she was as a racehorse. But she spent her remaining years enjoying the good life that she had earned and deserved. Miss Easy was laid to rest in the Farm's cemetery opposite its main entrance From Hanover Shoe Farms

CAMPBELLVILLE, June 25 - Where's The Beach, dam of the great Somebeachsomewhere, sadly passed away on Friday, June 13. The 16-year-old mare was humanely euthanized at Ohio StateUniversity EquineHospital following colic surgery. Owned by Stephanie Smith-Rothaug of West Jefferson, Oh, Where's The Beach foaled a Well Said weanling earlier this year and was bred to A Rocknroll Dance prior to passing. "It was certainly a sad day," Smith-Rothaug said. "'Beach' was like part of the family and she certainly has been a life changing mare for me and for that I'll forever be grateful. She had tremendous presence to her and took care of her babies very well. She will be missed." Although never stepping foot on the racetrack, Where's The Beach, a $20,000 yearling, proved to be much more valuable in the breeding shed. Her fourth foal, Somebeachsomewhere, is arguably the greatest pacer of all time as he suffered defeat once in 21 career starts and was inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame just nine months after his final career start. His lone defeat came in the 2008 Meadowlands Pace to Art Official, which was arguably 'The Beach's' best race. Somebeachsomewhere, trained and co-owned by Brent MacGrath, amassed over $3.2 million in career earnings. His sophomore earnings of $2,448,003 compiled in 2008 was a new record for single-season earnings. Along the way, he set four world records, including the fastest mile in the history of the sport (1:46.4) and recorded sub-1:50 miles in exactly half of his 20 wins. The Ontario-bred son of Mach Three retired to a lucrative stallion deal at the famed Hanover Shoe Farms. He was the unanimous choice as Canada's horse of the year in 2008 and shared the honour in 2007 - as a two-year-old - with sophomore pacer Tell All. He has also become arguably the sport's top stallion. Commanding a $30,000 stud fee, Somebeachsomewhere has produced the likes of Captaintreacherous, Sunshine Beach, Somwherovrarainbow and Apprentice Hanover, just to name a few. Where's The Beach has stamped herself as one of the games top broodmares. She has produced a number of $100,000+ yearlings, including Myrtle Beach (2006 -$100,000), Star On The Beach (2007 - $150,000), Someheartsomewhere (2008 - $210,000), Someofthebeach (2010 - $430,000) and Bring On The Beach (2012 - $155,000). Smith-Rothaug confirmed that Where's The Beach has been cremated. by Greg Gangle, for WEG

It’s beginning to look like Ake Svanstedt’s trotter Sebastian is so superior to the competition that he’s racing only against the clock. There was a time when time was privileged over purse money in the pursuit of assessing a stallion or mare’s suitability for the breeding ranks, but those days are long gone. Bob Marks never had much use for them, although he says he did “use them occasionally to get marks on horses that could never accomplish much in actual races.” Flip through the latest edition of the Breeder’s Book and you’ll find a couple of pacers with time trial marks—Jereme’s Jet and 26-year-old Cambest—and the Indiana stallion Jailhouse Jesse on the diagonal side. How sweet it would be to see Sebastian take to the track during the Red Mile meet with a pair of t-breds or pacers behind him and a jacked-up crowd cheering him home. He’d surely rid us of the 1:50 burden as well as Enough Said and his Colonial Downs asterisk. Fifty years ago just about every premium stallion and mare was measured against the clock at some point. Rodney, Fancy Crown, Most Happy Fella, Scotland, Yankee Lass, Bullet Hanover, Bye Bye Byrd, Dancer Hanover, Cheer Honey, Dayan, Hickory Pride, Elma, Isle Of Wight, Steady Beau and Sampson Direct all carry time trial marks. Some drivers specialized in handling the time trialing horses, while others were good with the prompters. When Adios Butler knocked two ticks off Billy Direct’s 22-year-old mark, which was set the day before Greyhound’s at The Red Mile on October 4, 1960, owner Paige West drove the 4-year-old while Del Miller and trainer/driver Eddie Cobb drove the t-bred prompters. When the 4-year-old Cash Hall went after Pine Chip’s 1:54 world record at Delaware in 2006, John Campbell drove the son of Self Possessed while Dave Palone chased after him with the Real Artist mare, Valentine. Cash Hall annihilated the mark with a 1:51.1 mile. On the trotting side, Greyhound’s TT1:55 ¼ mark, set on September 29, 1938 for Sep Palin, held fast for 31 years, until Nevele Pride dropped it to TT1:54.4 for Stanley Dancer at Indianapolis on Sunday August 31, 1969. Twelve thousand enthusiastic fans were in attendance that day. Coincidentally enough, a longstanding pacing mark of 1:55 was also set at that same Lexington meet in 1938: Billy Direct time trialed free-legged in 1:55 for Vic Fleming on September 28, 1938. That mark remained untouched during the 1940s. Frank Ervin put a 1:57.1 mark on 5-year-old Adios in a time trial when he was offered $500 to break the track record, and four years later another great progenitor, Gene Abbe, time trialed in 2:00.3, also at age five. But it took a race mark of 1:55 from Adios Harry in the American Pacing Derby at Vernon Downs on July 16, 1955, with the owner’s son Luther Lyons in the bike, to match Billy Direct’s mark. Adios Butler undercut the 1:55 standard five years later in the time trial referenced above. That 1:55 barrier was finally shattered. The great Speedy Crown didn’t break any records when he time trialed in 2:01.2 as a freshman in 1970, but after winning just four of eight starts and earning a paltry $2,000, he did prove that good things were on the way. Actually the first significant time trial for trotters in the 1970s came from Arnie Almahurst, a crazy fast son of Speedy Scot, who pretty much won every start he didn’t break stride in. He had little in common with his paternal brother, Speedy Crown, who never broke stride—not ever. Arnie time trialed in 1:57.2 at The Red Mile for Joe O’Brien and became the sixth fastest trotter behind Super Bowl, Nevele Pride, Ayres, Speedy Scot and Speedy Crown. Nine years later his 3-year-old son Arndon trotted the fastest mile ever by a trotter when he hit the wire in TT1:54 for Del Miller at The Red Mile. And twelve years after that Arndon’s 4-year-old son Pine Chip became the world record holder when he time trialed in 1:51 for John Campbell at Lexington. Arndon and his dad both retired as the fastest ever. Another important trotting time trial in the ‘70s was ABC Freight’s TT1:57.1 as a 2-year-old for Joe O’Brien at Hollywood Park in 1976. The sire of Garland Lobell topped Nevele Pride’s 1:58.2 freshman mark and became the fastest 2-year-old trotter ever. ABC set his lifetime mark of 1:56.3 the following year in a time trial. The market for blockbuster trotting time trials pretty much dried up after that, although Cash Hall did crush the half-mile mark with that 1:51.1 mile for John Campbell at Delaware in 2006 that was referenced above. The time trials involving Standardbred trotters under saddle has been less prevalent, nonetheless, it has played a prominent role due to the horses and people involved. In 1940 Greyhound ended his racing career under saddle at Lexington. Frances Dodge rode him to a world record of 2:01 ¾. That mark stood for 54-years, until Preferential and Brooke Nickells broke it in 1994 with a 1:58.2 mile. And six years later the mighty Moni Maker, like Greyhound, ended her career under saddle at The Red Mile. Jockey Julie Krone, with Jimmy Takter and Wally Hennessey following with prompters, trotted in an incredible 1:54.1. In the pacing camp it was up to Bret Hanover to continue the assault on the longstanding 1:55 standard that his paternal brother, Adios Butler, had begun. In early September of 1966, 4-year-old Bret, who was within a few months of being retired, time trialed in 1:54 at Vernon Downs for Frank Ervin with a single prompter chasing him. Five weeks later in Lexington Ervin put the TT1:53.3 mark on the big guy that would serve as his lifetime mark. Dancer preferred to put race marks on Albatross so there are no flashy time trials on Super Bird’s resume. He did become the fastest ever in a race when he won both heats of the Tattersalls Pace at The Red Mile in 1:54.4, topping Adios Harry’s race mark, which Bret had matched. He also won in 1:55.3 at Delaware, matching Adios Butler’s time trial mark and eclipsing Bret’s 1:57 half-mile track race mark. Steady Star, a free-legged son of Steady Beau,  who was a year older than Albatross, cornered the time trial market in that era. At three he circled The Red Mile in 1:54 for Joe O’Brien and the following year, on October 1, 1971, he time trialed in a head turning 1:52. Later on, in 1976, 4-year-old Nero time trialed in 1:55.1 and the following year Warm Breeze was race timed in 1:53.1 at Golden Bear in Sacramento. Two years later Meadow Skipper’s son Falcon Almahurst became the fastest 3-year-old pacer ever with a 1:52.2 time trial at Lexington for Bill Haughton. Only Steady Star had gone faster. Then came the game changer: 3-year-old Niatross’s TT1:49.1 at The Red Mile on Oct 1, 1980. It was the sport’s first sub-1:50 mile and, while it parallels Adios Butler’s breach of the 1:50 point, it was so much more. The closest thing to it was Steady Star going 1:52, but the sleek son of Steady Beau didn’t win a single open stakes race during his career—not so for Niatross. His son Nihilator was later positioned to outdo dad in a time trial at Springfield but the weather didn’t cooperate and he was unable to lower his 1:49.3 race mark in a time trial at DuQuoin.  Matt’s Scooter went after the 1:49.1 mark at The Red Mile in 1988 and knocked four ticks off of it. His 1:48.2 time trial for Mike Lachance established a new world record. Matt’s Scooter beat Niatross’s mark but 5-year-old Cambest blew it out of the water with his 1:46.1 time trial at Springfield. The problem was that he wasn’t tested afterwards and not long after that his 1:52.1 win in the Senior Jug was disqualified due to elevated bicarbonate levels. Cambest was slated to stand at Hanover Shoe Farms but in light of the controversial final chapter of his career they passed. So stick Jimmy Takter and Bernie Noren behind a couple of fast pacers and let’s see if Ake can wheel Sebastian around The Red Mile in a time that will cause the crowd to gasp the way they did for Steady Star’s 1:52 mile and Niatross’s 1:49.1. Speed has always sold in this game; time to pump it up via the time trial. by Joe FitzGerald, for http://viewfromthegrandstand.blogspot.com/

Ralph Lemmon, the long time treasurer and controller of both Hanover Shoe Farms and the Standardbred Horse Sales Company has announced his impending retirement effective in early July of 2014. Mr. Lemmon began working for Standardbred Horse Sales working the bid board in the late 60s. At the time he was employed by the Hanover Shoe Company. When the shoe company was sold to the C&J Clark Company in 1978, Mr. Lemmon, came to work full time as Assistant Treasurer and Controller at Hanover Shoe Farms and Standardbred Horse Sales. He gradually rose to the position of Treasurer of both companies. He was also the President of Garden State Horse Sales Company from 2000 to 2010. . Ralph and his wife, Jean, have purchased a home in Beaufort, South Carolina where they hope to spend a great deal of time with their two daughters Donna and Nicky and their respective families. Ralph also expects to be a frequent presence on the golf courses in the area. Jim Simpson, Hanover's president said "They say that nobody is irreplaceable, but Ralph Lemmon comes pretty close. He will certainly be missed around here. He won't be leaving completely. He has promised that he will be back to work the Harrisburg sale where he is a fixture. We wish Ralph and his family nothing but health and prosperity in his well earned retirement." by Murray Brown, for Hanover Shoe Farms  

So at 1:00 pm on Friday, May 10, where was Dave Cochrane? “I was on my computer looking for the live video feed for Harnesslink’s Name The Foal Contest,” Dave said. “I then realized it was not really live so I decided to take a nap and an hour later when I woke up I looked on Harnesslink and there was the name I picked! Beach Showoff!I knew there were others that came up with the same name so I started to read the story and then saw I had won. I was jumping for joy!” Dave has been a devoted Standardbred fan and an active participant in harness racing for most of his life. “I am semi retired now,” Dave said, “I had a 40-year career as a Training Seminar Developer and Speaker. Over the years I have owned more than 50 Standardbreds and drove most of them myself. I was also the backup announcer to the late Hank Fenno at Scarbourth Downs and did a simulcasting handicapping show with him for ten years. I also hosted a horse racing radio show at Plainridge Racecourse in 2001 for an ESPN station in Rhode Island. “I also loved competing in the CKG Billings Series for more than ten years and was a Vice President for the association,” Dave said. So what does Dave have planned for the prize money? “The $1,500 prize will enable me to take an immediate "extended" vacation trip to New England,” Dave explained, “and return to my love of jogging horses in the morning, and warming them up for some busy driver and trainer  friends  in the afternoon and evenings.  My plans include Scarborough Downs, Plainridge Racecourse and Bangor Raceway. All tracks where I was very present at in the years 1995 through 2006. “As you can imagine,” Dave added, “I am quite proud of having my name selected. I have sent out emails to many friends and acquaintances and in my email I gave them a link to Harnesslink to see the story and video. “I want to thank Richard and Joanne Young, the Somebeachsomewhere Syndicate, Hanover Shoe Farms and Harnesslink for sponsoring and coming up with this great contest,” Dave said. “I think events like this are great for promoting our sport and creating interest. I am glad that the name included both the sire and dam. Let’s now hope Beach Showoff will race as well as her parents did!” Here are the final winners in the contest. $1,500 Grand Prize Dave Cochrane, Mississauga, Ontario $250 prize Melissa Keith, Halifax, Nova Scotia $250 prize Blanche Satterfield, Wyoming, Delaware $250 prize Wayne Stapley, Christchurch, New Zealand $250 prize Richard Lease, Jr. Glenville, Pennsylvania By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink.com

PUT ON A SHOW’S FILLY GETS A NAME

On Thursday, May 22, 2014, the PA Dept. of Agriculture's Harness Racing Commission will hold its monthly meeting at Hanover Shoe Farms. This is a public meeting to discuss issues related to Pennsylvania harness racing.   In addition, our staff at Hanover Shoe Farms will be on hand for a guided tour prior to the meeting. We welcome you to join harness racing enthusiasts, officials from the Dept. of Agriculture, legislators and their staff and invite you to experience Hanover Shoe Farms, one of the largest Standardbred horse breeding farms in the world.   The tour starts at 10:00 am and the meeting gets underway at 11:00 am.   To RSVP, please contact Jackie Barham at (717) 637-8931 or via email at jbarham@hanoverpa.com   From Hanover Shoe Farms

Drawing May 9 at Hanover Shoe Farm

The Meadows Standardbred Owners Association reminds horsemen that auctions for breedings to the Pennsylvania stallions Crazed and Tom Ridge, end tomorrow.   The breedings were donated by Hanover Shoe Farms and Ted Tomson, respectively. Money raised by the auctions goes directly to the MSOA's Collegiate Scholarship Fund.   The auctions are being conducted by the website www.ongait.com, and additional information is available there. The auctions end at 12Noon eastern on Tuesday, April 15.   by Jeff Zidek, for the MSOA

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