Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 16 of 1441
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to charges issued by HRV Stewards against licensed trainer-driver Brett Cox. Mr Cox was issued with two charges under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 241, which reads as follows: A person shall not in connection with any part of the harness racing industry do anything which is fraudulent or corrupt. The particulars of these charges were that Mr Cox acted fraudulently in relation to receiving payment for the training of the standardbred horses ‘Lis Mara Shadow’ and ‘Life Sign Shadow’ between February and April 2017, when these horses were spelling and not being prepared for racing at the relevant time. Mr Cox also acted fraudulently in advising the owners in August 2017 that these horses were present at his registered training establishment when they had been removed. In addition to the above charges, Mr Cox was also issued with a charge under AHRR 243, which reads as follows:  A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not behave in a way which is prejudicial or detrimental to the industry The particulars of this charge were that Mr Cox provided false information to licensed trainer-driver Kate Attard which lead to ‘Lis Mara Shadow’ and ‘Life Sign Shadow’ being given away in July 2017 without the consent of the owners and the horses ultimately being destroyed. Mr Cox was also issued with two charges under AHRR 187(2), which reads as follows: A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry of investigation. The particulars of these charges were that Mr Cox, in an interview with HRV Stewards on 22 November 2017, gave false and misleading information in relation to an investigation being conducted by HRV Stewards into this matter. Mr Cox was also issued two charges under AHRR 96A(3), which reads as follows: Where a registered horse has been retired from racing or a decision has been made to not race the horse, the owner or trainer of the horse at the time of its retirement must, within one month of the horse’s retirement, notify the Registrar by lodging the relevant form prescribed by the Registrar. The particulars of these charges were that Mr Cox failed to notify HRV that ‘Lis Mara Shadow’ and ‘Life Sign Shadow’ had been retired from racing and did not lodge the relevant form with the HRV Registrar.   Mr Cox pleaded guilty to all charges. In respect of the charges pursuant to AHRR 241 and 243, Mr Cox was disqualified for a period of 3 years, which is effective immediately. In respect of the charges pursuant to AHRR 187(2) and 96A(3), Mr Cox was issued a fine of $750 for each breach, resulting in a penalty of $3000 in total. In determining penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered the serious consequences which resulted from the conduct of Mr Cox, the importance of animal welfare and the need for specific and general deterrence to protect the harness racing industry.  In addition, the HRV RAD Board took into account Mr Cox’s guilty plea and his regret in relation to the matter. HRV RAD Board Panel: Alanna Duffy (Chair), Hugh Millar, Nicholas Rolfe. Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board       

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 241 against Angela Gilbert (unlicensed participant). AHRR 241 reads as follows: A person shall not in connection with any part of the harness racing industry do anything which is fraudulent or corrupt. The charge under AHRR 241 issued by HRV Stewards against Ms Gilbert related to the movement and rehoming of standardbred horses in July 2017.  Acting on information from an industry participant that two standardbred horses were available to be rehomed, Ms Gilbert attended a registered harness racing property of the industry participant in Victoria where she collected the standardbred horses. The horses were given to Ms Gilbert for free and she advised the industry participant that these horses would re-educated and rehomed.  Ms Gilbert initially advised HRV Stewards that the horses were re-educated and rehomed, but later confirmed that she had in fact sold the horses to the Echuca Horse Sales, from where they were purchased by an abattoir and destroyed shortly thereafter.  At the hearing the HRV RAD Board determined that Ms Gilbert, despite being an unlicensed person and not being a registered owner, was carrying on activities that related to the harness racing industry and therefore was bound by the rules because of the operation of AHRR 299. AHRR 299 reads as follows: All persons (a) licensed under these rules; (b) carrying on or purporting to carry on activities related to the harness racing industry; or (c) who in some other way are affected by the rules; are deemed to have knowledge of and be bound by them and of all the things done under them. Ms Gilbert did not appear at the hearing. The HRV RAD Board considered submissions from HRV Stewards relating to recent communication with Ms Gilbert and notification of the charge and hearing date and determined to proceed in her absence under Victoria Local Rule 50(1)(a). The HRV RAD Board, after hearing evidence from HRV Stewards and after taking into consideration all relevant material including interviews, statements and exhibits, found Ms Gilbert guilty of the charge issued under AHRR 241. After considering submissions from the HRV Stewards in relation to the importance of animal welfare, specific and general deterrence and the need to protect the harness racing industry, the HRV RAD Board imposed a disqualification period of 18 months against Ms Gilbert, which is effective immediately. Ms Gilbert was also fined $810, which equates to the amount that was earned in selling the standardbred horses to the Echuca Horse Sales. HRV RAD Board Panel: Alanna Duffy (Chair), Hugh Millar, Nicholas Rolfe. Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 243 against licensed trainer-driver Kate Attard. AHRR 243 reads as follows: A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not behave in a way which is prejudicial or detrimental to the industry. The particulars of the charge were that Ms Attard permitted the standardbred horses ‘Lis Mara Shadow’ and ‘Life Sign Shadow’ to be given away for rehoming in July 2017, without notifying the owners and without their consent, which led to the horses ultimately being destroyed. Ms Attard pleaded guilty to the charge. The HRV RAD Board fined Ms Attard $5000, of which $2500 was suspended for a period of 2 years. In determining penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered the serious consequences which resulted from the conduct of Ms Attard, the importance of animal welfare and the need for specific and general deterrence to protect the harness racing industry. In addition, the HRV RAD Board took into account Ms Attard’s guilty plea and the mitigating circumstances in relation to her involvement in the matter. The HRV RAD Board was also mindful of Ms Attard’s cooperation throughout the investigation, her good record and her positive standing in the harness racing industry. HRV RAD Board Panel: Alanna Duffy (Chair), Hugh Millar, Nicholas Rolfe. Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board     

Harness Racing Victoria CEO David Martin will conduct seven public forums at clubs throughout Victoria between April and June to update the industry on all matters. The HRV CEO Annual Roadshow 2018 will take in Hamilton, Shepparton, Melton, Cranbourne, Bendigo, Ararat and Mildura and all interested industry participants, stakeholders and fans are encouraged to attend their nearest forum. "The first roadshow last year involved several public forums across Victoria and that was an incredibly important opportunity to be transparent with the industry about the challenges we faced and our approach to turning things around," Mr Martin said. "The HRV CEO Annual Roadshow 2018 will be a chance to provide a quick review of where we were at in early 2017, how we've performed as an industry since, and of course the all-important consultation about what our priorities should be for 2019 and beyond. "I'm really looking forward to this Roadshow and the genuine input from passionate trots people across Victoria, so we can continue working together to take the industry forward." The table below outlines the venue, start time and date for the HRV CEO Annual Roadshow 2018. HRV CEO Roadshow 2018 Location Time & Date Hamilton 7.30pm Friday, 6 April 2018 Shepparton 7.30pm Wednesday, 11 April 2018 Melton 7.30pm Monday, 30 April 2018 Cranbourne 7.30pm Tuesday, 1 May 2018 Bendigo 7.30pm Tuesday, 8 May 2018 Ararat 7.30pm Tuesday, 22 May 2018 Mildura 7.30pm Friday, 1 June 2018 Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) has agreed to trial a sprint lane extension at Tabcorp Park Melton following a submission from the Victorian Trainers and Drivers Association (VTDA). The sprint lane will be extended by 40 metres for an initial one-month trial. The basis of the trial is to assess the pattern of racing and evaluate whether the extension provides horses with greater opportunities to win. The new sprint lane will see the red peg positioned at the 190m mark and the sprint lane completely open at 168m. The initial trial will run from Wednesday March 14 up to and including Friday April 13. HRV is encouraging feedback from all industry stakeholders, including participants and punters during the trial. To have your say, email info@hrv.org.au and include ‘Sprint Lane Trial’ in your email subject.  Harness Racing Victoria

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) against licensed trainer Maryanne Laffan. AHRR 190(1) reads as follows: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances.  The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Ms Laffan related to a post-race blood sample collected from the horse ‘Westvillageemily’ after winning Race 4, the ‘Great Northern Super Crisp 3YO Pace’, on 25 July 2017 at the Kilmore harness racing meeting. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the blood sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely alkalinising agents as evidenced by a total carbon dioxide (TCO2) concentration in excess of 36.0 millimoles per litre in plasma. This analysis was confirmed by referee analysis of the blood sample at the Racing Science Centre in Brisbane. Ms Laffan pleaded not guilty to the charge before submissions were heard from HRV Stewards and Mr Andrew Peace, acting on behalf of Ms Laffan.  The charge against Ms Laffan was subsequently found proven by the HRV RAD Board In determining penalty the HRV RAD Board considered the following: The serious nature of this particular rule breach, which was evidenced by a very high TCO2 concentration of greater than 39 millimoles per litre in plasma; Ms Laffan’s not-guilty plea; Ms Laffan’s disciplinary record, which included a previous TCO2 matter; Previous penalties for similar offences and the need for consistency; Specific and general deterrence; Ms Laffan’s personal circumstances put forward by her representative. In considering all of these matters, the HRV RAD Board disqualified Ms Laffan for a period of 12 months, deemed to commence immediately. The HRV RAD Board also ordered, under AHRR 195, that ‘Westvillageemily’ be disqualified from Race 4 at Kilmore on 25 July 2017 and the placings amended accordingly.  HRV RAD Board Panel: John Doherty (Deputy Chair), John Kearney, Kerry Willcock Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

After feedback and consultation with industry participants, Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) announces the following changes to stake payments effective from the stake payment on March 2, 2018:   1. Stake payments for races with prizemoney of $10,000 and below will no longer have to wait for the release of swab results and will be paid in the next stake payment following the race;   2. The frequency of stake payment has been increased so that a payment will now occur each fortnight opposed to the previous schedule of twice per month (in some previous months it could be up to three weeks between stake payments).   “These changes will result in the vast majority of industry participants receiving stake payments earlier, more frequently and at regular intervals,” HRV General Manager Finance Luke Spano said.   “We understand the importance of this for participants managing their cash flows.”   Mr Spano also advised that because 51 per cent of participants are still receiving printed stake payment notifications by the post (even though HRV has email addresses for 95 per cent of participants), the fortnightly cost to the industry is about $2000 – and annually about $50,000.   HRV will advise these participants via letter that unless HRV is advised why a paper notification is required, future payment notifications will be sent via email to the current email address on record, thereby enabling a cost saving that can be redirected into other areas that will provide greater benefit to the industry. HRV reminds all participants to ensure that their contact details are up to date.   Cody Winnell

Ninety-five per cent of Victorian trots race meetings will be covered by head-on camera footage following a Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) initiative jointly funded by the State Government's Racing Infrastructure Fund (VRIF). Twelve country trots venues (Charlton, Cobram, Echuca, Geelong, Hamilton, Horsham, Maryborough, Mildura, Shepparton, Stawell, Terang and Warragul) will have head-on cameras installed as part of the $200,809 project. The Daniel Andrews Government will contribute $100,405 to the project under the VRIF. Full story at TheTrots.com.au   CODY WINNELL MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER    

Introducing HQ, the latest podcast from Trots Media at Harness Racing Victoria (HRV). This podcast is a little different. It is all about lifting the curtain on the projects and plans, initiatives and goals of HRV so that the industry participants gain a stronger understanding of the who, what, when, where and why behind HQ. Each week hosts Michael Howard and Cody Winnell will deliver key interviews with HRV colleagues, beginning with General Manager of Marketing Andrew English. It's a big year for HRV with the Inter Dominion to be hosted in Victoria for the first time in 10 years, so Andrew's insights into the direction of marketing will be of great interest to trots fans. Subscribe to Trots Media via iTunes or Apple Podcasts - or however you access your podcasts - so that you don't miss notification when new content is published. And you can join the HQ discussion on social media using #TheTrotsHQ hashtag.  CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO HQ Trots Media

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) against licensed trainer-driver Josh Aiken. AHRR 190(1) reads as follows: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Aiken related to a urine sample taken from the horse ‘The Defiant’ at the Shepparton trial meeting on 29 August 2017. The definition of a ‘race’ within the AHRR includes an official trial. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that the analysis of the urine sample revealed it to contain the prohibited substances levamisole and aminorex. The Racing Science Centre (RSC) in Queensland confirmed these findings in the reserve portion of the relevant urine sample.  Mr Aiken pleaded guilty to the charge before submissions on penalty were heard from the HRV Stewards and Mr Aiken.  In deciding an appropriate penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered Mr Aiken’s cooperation throughout the investigation and guilty plea at the earliest opportunity, his good record in the industry, the references he presented, his remorse and the steps already taken to ensure that he does not commit another similar offence. The HRV RAD Board also emphasised the purpose of the rules in relation to prohibited substances, the dangers associated with horses competing with these substances in their system and the substance in question not being registered for use in horses in Australia. Mr Aiken was subsequently fined $5000, of which $2000 was suspended for a period of 12 months. The HRV RAD Board also ordered that, under AHRR 195, ‘The Defiant’ be disqualified from Trial 3 at Shepparton on 29 August 2017. HRV RAD Board Panel: Alanna Duffy (Chair), Hugh Millar, Rod Osborne Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

On 21 February 2018, the Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board considered a charge issued against trainer Nick Tardio under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1). AHRR 190(1) reads as follows: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances The charge related to a pre-race urine sample collected from the horse “Kissed Flush” at Mildura on 4 April 2017. “Kissed Flush” finished ninth in Race 8, the “Mark Gurry and Associates Cup (2nd Heat)”. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely cobalt, above the allowable threshold of 100 micrograms per litre (µg/L). The reserve sample analysis by the Racing Science Centre (Qld) confirmed the result. Mr Tardio was represented by Mr O’Dea (solicitor) and pleaded not guilty to the charge. Mr O’Dea and Mr Tardio participated in the hearing by telephone. Mr Svanosio appeared for the HRV Stewards. Mr Paul Zahra (Scientific Manager at RASL) gave evidence and was cross-examined. Preliminary issues In correspondence sent to HRV late on 20 February (received on 21 February) Mr O’Dea indicated that he would argue that Mr Tardio had no case to answer relying on rule 191(7) (set out below) and requested “copies of any certification that RASL and QRIC have with regards to their instruments used to obtain the results presented in the brief”. Documents showing the accreditation of RASL by the National Association of Testing Authorities and the HRV Policy showing approval of the Racing Science Centre (Qld) as an analytical laboratory were provide by Mr Svanosio at the commencement of the hearing. Mr O’Dea submitted that the evidence of the results of the urine sample should be excluded because they did not comply with section 10 of the National Measurement Act 1960 (Cth) and the relevant regulations, particularly regulation 73. Section 10 provides: When, for any legal purpose, it is necessary to ascertain whether a measurement of a physical quantity for which there are Australian legal units of measurement has been made or is being made in terms of those units, that fact shall be ascertained by means of, by reference to, by comparison with or by derivation from: (a) an appropriate Australian primary standard of measurement; (b) an appropriate Australian secondary standard of measurement; (c) an appropriate State primary standard of measurement; (d) an appropriate recognized-value standard of measurement; (e) an appropriate reference standard of measurement; (f) 2 or more standards of measurement, each of which is a standard of measurement referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d) or (e); (g) an Australian certified reference material; (h) a certified measuring instrument; (i) one or more standards of measurement, each of which is a standard of measurement referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d) or (e) and an Australian certified reference material; (j) one or more standards of measurement, each of which is a standard of measurement referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d) or (e) and a certified measuring instrument; or (k) one or more standards of measurement, each of which is a standard of measurement referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d) or (e), an Australian certified reference material and a certified measuring instrument;  and not in any other manner. Mr O’Dea submitted that the hearing was judicial in nature and that the evidence of the urine sample results relied upon by the Stewards had to comply with section 10(h). Mr O’Dea provided written submissions and other material in addition to his oral submissions. He referred to Breedon v Kongras (1996) (unreported, Supreme Court, WA, Owen J, 25 September 1996).  Mr Svanosio submitted that there was no requirement that RASL or the Racing Science Centre (Qld) use testing equipment that complies with the National Measurement Act. He provided copies of and relied upon two decisions of the South Australian Racing Appeals Tribunal (Trotta, RAT 11/2017 and Borg, RAT 2/2017). In relation to this issue, the HRV RAD Board decided that it was not satisfied that there is a requirement that testing equipment be calibrated or otherwise approved under the National Measurement Act and noted that Mr O’Dea could not point to any specific requirement. Therefore, the Board did not accept that the evidence of the sample readings from RASL and the Racing Science Centre (Qld) should be excluded. The HRV RAD Board is not a court of law and the current proceedings are not a prosecution. The Board is established by legislation and operates pursuant to its own rules, which include VLR 50(1)(g) which provides that “the rules of evidence as generally applied in a court of record shall not apply”. Further, even if the National Measurement Act does apply, subsection 10(a) only requires that a measurement of a physical quantity “be ascertained by means of, by reference to, by comparison with or by derivation from (a) an appropriate Australian primary standard of measurement”, which is the case here. Mr O’Dea then sought an adjournment so that Mr Tardio could lead expert evidence. The expert that he proposed to call was not available immediately. This application was opposed by Mr Svanosio who submitted that Mr Tardio had not complied with VLR 50(5) which requires an expert witness report to be served 7 days prior to the hearing and states that a party may not otherwise call an expert witness without the consent of the HRV RAD Board.  The Board refused the application for an adjournment and did not grant consent for an expert witness to be called by Mr O’Dea, noting that the hearing had already been adjourned twice at the request of Mr Tardio’s legal representatives (16 November 2017 and 12 December 2017) and that there had been ample opportunity for Mr Tardio and his representatives to prepare his case. Submissions and evidence as to the charge Mr Svanosio referred to the material in the brief of evidence, which was tendered. Mr Zahra was called and gave oral evidence.  Mr O’Dea took issue with the certificates (marked HRV 8 and HRV 11) because they indicated that the cobalt concentration was greater than 200µg/L, rather than an exact amount. He cross-examined Mr Zahra on this issue. Mr Zahra explained that the calibration range for the instruments used for testing the sample only goes to double the allowable threshold of 100 µg/L, that is, 200µg/L. Mr Zahra gave evidence that the results were accurate and that he was able to estimate that the actual reading was 215µg/L. Mr O’Dea submitted that the certificate was not accurate because it did not show the actual reading; therefore the certification procedure was materially flawed and rule 191(7) applied. The Board took into account the evidence contained in the brief, the oral evidence presented at the hearing and the provisions of rule 191, which states:  (1) A certificate from a person or drug testing laboratory approved by the Controlling Body which certifies the presence of a prohibited substance in or on a horse at, or approximately at, a particular time, or in blood, urine, saliva, or other matter or sample or specimen tested, or that a prohibited substance had at some time been administered to a horse is prima facie evidence of the matters certified. (2) If another person or drug testing laboratory approved by the Controlling Body analyses a portion of the sample or specimen referred to in sub rule (1) and certifies the presence of a prohibited substance in the sample or specimen that certification together with the certification referred to in sub rule (1) is conclusive evidence of the presence of a prohibited substance. (3) A certificate furnished under this rule which relates to blood, urine, saliva, or other matter or sample or specimen taken from a horse at a meeting shall be prima facie evidence if sub rule (1) only applies, and conclusive evidence if both sub rules (1) and (2) apply, that the horse was presented for a race not free of prohibited substances.  (4) A certificate furnished under this rule which relates to blood, urine, saliva, or other matter or sample or specimen taken from a horse shall be prima facie evidence if sub rule (1) only applies, and conclusive evidence if both sub rules (1) and (2) apply, that the prohibited substance was present in or on the horse at the time the blood, urine, saliva, or other matter or sample or specimen was taken from the horse. (5) Sub rules (1) and (2) do not preclude the presence of a prohibited substance in or on a horse, or in blood, urine, saliva, or other matter or sample or specimen, or the fact that a prohibited substance had at some time been administered to a horse, being established in other ways. (6) Sub rule (3) does not preclude the fact that a horse was presented for a race not free of prohibited substances being established in other ways. (7) Notwithstanding the provisions of this rule, certificates do not possess evidentiary value nor establish an offence, where it is proved that the certification procedure or any act or omission forming part of or relevant to the process resulting in the issue of a certificate, was materially flawed.  The HRV RAD Board found Mr Tardio guilty of the charge, accepting that rules 191(1) and (2) applied and that it had not been proved “that the certification procedure or any act or omission forming part of or relevant to the process resulting in the issue of a certificate, was materially flawed”. Penalty Mr Svanosio submitted that it was a serious offence, that the rules in relation to prohibited substances are to ensure that the integrity of harness racing is protected and that racing is conducted safely and fairly. He also referred to other HRV RAD Board and VCAT decisions in relation to penalties for cobalt offences and Mr Tardio’s record, which includes a recent disqualification for a cobalt offence in South Australia. He submitted that an appropriate penalty in this case was a 2-year disqualification. Mr Svanosio stated that Mr Tardio did not hold a current licence, which was not contradicted by Mr Tardio. Mr Tardio addressed the Board in relation to penalty and asked that any penalty be backdated to the date of the offence. In determining penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered Mr Tardio’s record, specific and general deterrence, the serious nature of the prohibited substance rules and penalties in relation to other cobalt cases. Mr Tardio was not eligible for a reduction in penalty for a guilty plea or cooperation with the Stewards.  Taking all of these matters into account, the HRV RAD Board imposed an 18- month disqualification to commence at midnight on 21 February 2018.  The HRV RAD Board also ordered (under rule 195) that “Kissed Flush” be disqualified from Race 8 at Mildura on 4 April 2017 and that the placings be amended accordingly. HRV RAD Board Panel: Alanna Duffy (Chair), Rod Osborne Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board                         

If you or someone you know has ever considered an exciting career in the trots, the Harness Racing Training Centre Bendigo and Gippsland Harness Training Centre can make your dream a reality. Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) today launched a social media advertising campaign ('Saddle up for a career in the Trots' and 'Want to make a career out of horsing around?' aimed at highlighting the opportunities for secondary school students, and others, to secure a career in the trots. The two industry training centres, Bendigo and Gippsland, are offering a range of industry training programs in 2018. Government funding is available for eligible students and fees may be further reduced for eligible Health Care card holders. Participation in these courses may also enable Youth Allowance or Austudy for eligible students. Certificates I, II and III are suitable for all levels of horse and industry experience and the centres will work with students to determine the best pathway in relation to current skills and knowledge. The Certificate IV courses require some experience with horses and/or racing. Importantly, courses are open to students who are still attending secondary school as either a School Based Apprentice/Trainee (SBAT) or a full fee for service student (no government funding). In either case the course contributes units to the successful completion of a student’s VCE or VCAL. The training programs and qualifications on offer this year are: Harness Racing Victoria Online Licence Course Certificate I in Racing  (Stablehand) Certificate II in Racing (Stablehand) Certificate III in Racing (Advanced Stablehand) Certificate IV in Racing (Racehorse Trainer) Certificate IV in Racing (Harness Race Driver). The certificate courses can be completed in the following ways: Full or part-time student Full or part-time in a harness racing workplace As an apprentice or trainee. For more information, contact Vicki Moro at vicki.moro@hrtcbendigo.com.au for Harness Racing Training Centre Bendigo queries and Jenni Lewis at Jennifer.lewis@ccg.asn.au for Gippsland Harness Training Centre. The certificate level qualifications have national recognition and may attract Victorian and/or Commonwealth funding for eligible students. Trots Media - Cody Winnell

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Kevin Mark under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) which states:    A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances    The Australian Harness Racing Rules provides the following definition:    “Race” means a race or official trial or official time trial or event in which  harness racing horses race or participate. It is alleged that Mr Mark presented ‘Annaflex’ to race at Shepparton trials on 29 August 2017 when not free of the prohibited substance heptaminol. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

Ballarat and Cranbourne clubs will each host 2018 Inter Dominion heats, providing a significant boost to both local economies. Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) today announced the two clubs had been selected to host the second and third rounds of the Inter Dominion series, which returns to Victoria for the first time since 2008. General Manager of Racing Glen Canty said HRV was delighted with the quality of the seven submissions from clubs wishing to host Inter Dominion heats. “The Board was in no doubt that each of the seven clubs could successfully host the heats, but ultimately only two clubs could be selected,” Mr Canty said. “The Board wishes to convey its appreciation for the quality of club submissions, which bodes well for the future when the Inter Dominion returns to Victoria in 2021 and 2024.” In further exciting Inter Dominion news today it was also revealed the Trotting Inter Dominion would make a return for the first time since 2012. “The trotting population now comprises almost a quarter of the total harness population in Victoria, so it was vital to recognise that appropriately. The 2018 Inter Dominion will now showcase both gaits,” Mr Canty said. Cranbourne and Ballarat were ecstatic to receive the news they would play a key role in the 2018 Inter Dominion. “We’re very excited and proud that our magnificent facility has been chosen to host the penultimate night of this time-honoured series,” Cranbourne President Bill Hutchison said. “The Ballarat Club is extremely excited to be given the opportunity to participate in the 2018 Inter Dominion to be conducted by Harness Racing Victoria. The club has a proven track record of hosting premium events and hopes to capitalise on the exposure of the 2018 PETstock Ballarat Cup experienced in a record-breaking year,” Ballarat CEO Paul Rowse said. “We’re looking forward to working closely with HRV and the City of Ballarat to showcase the best of harness racing and at the same time sharing the spotlight with Ballarat’s world-class tourist attractions.” Tabcorp Park Melton will host the first round of Inter Dominion heats on Saturday December 1 before the action heads to Ballarat for the second round on Wednesday December 5. The third round of heats will be run at Cranbourne on Saturday December 8 before the Grand Final night back at Melton on Saturday December 15. Racing conditions are yet to be determined, with discussion points in coming weeks to include the possibility of Ballarat installing a temporary sprint lane if required. Trots Media - Cody Winnell

On 7 February 2018, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) heard the application for review of former licensed trainer-driver Brian Sylvia in respect of the decision of the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board of 18 September 2017 to impose various penalties upon Mr Sylvia regarding breaches of the Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR). The details of the HRV RAD Board hearing of 18 September 2017 can be viewed here. Mr Sylvia pleaded guilty to all charges at the HRV RAD Board hearing and his application for review was in relation to penalty only. Background The rule breaches relate to the observations of HRV Stewards at the registered stable of Mr Sylvia on 6 April 2017. Mr Sylvia was observed stomach tubing the horse ‘Elslatsy’, prior to that horse’s engagement in Race 1 at Mildura that evening. Mr Sylvia subsequently denied stomach tubing ‘Elslatsy’ and refused to produce stomach tubing equipment when requested to do so by HRV Stewards. Further directions to present the horse at the Mildura harness racing meeting at an established time on 6 April 2017 for the purpose of obtaining swab samples were also not complied with by Mr Sylvia. VCAT Hearing On 11 October 2017, Mr Sylvia applied to VCAT for a review of the decision of the HRV RAD Board from 18 September 2017. At the VCAT Hearing on 7 February 2018, the presiding member, Senior Member Gerard Butcher, heard submissions from Elizabeth Brimer, on behalf of the HRV Stewards, and Lance Justice, on behalf of Mr Sylvia. Upon consideration of these submissions, Senior Member Butcher affirmed the decision of the HRV RAD Board to impose the following penalties:    Charge 1 – AHRR 193(1) – 15-month disqualification    Charge 2 – AHRR 187(2) - $500 fine    Charge 3 – AHRR 187(2) - $500 fine    Charge 4 – AHRR 187(2) – 3-month disqualification (to be served concurrently with Charge 1)    Charge 5 & 6 - AHRR 187(3) - $1000 fine In handing down his decision, Senior Member Butcher stated that penalties for conduct such as this should be a deterrent and demonstrate to others that standards and compliance with regulations must be upheld. Senior Member Butcher also said that the integrity of the racing industry is vital and the public are entitled to understand that participants are competing on a level playing field. Harness Racing Victoria

The appointment of Adam Kilgour to the Board of Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) has been approved by the Minister for Racing, Martin Pakula. Mr Kilgour, a corporate affairs practitioner, brings to the harness racing industry an extensive background in leadership positions throughout Australian business and government. Mr Kilgour has also spent time in the racing industry as Chair of the New South Wales Racehorse Trainers Association. “Clubs and participants across Victoria all need HRV’s strategic support, open collaboration and good communication. My sense is that it is heading in the right direction,” Mr Kilgour said. Mr Kilgour said he understood the vital importance of integrity in the racing industry and he was looking forward to playing his role with the Board to help punters and owners have confidence in the industry. HRV Chairman Dale Monteith welcomed the appointment of Mr Kilgour and said he was “grateful for the Minister’s prompt response to the Board’s request for someone with Adam’s skill set”. “I’m pleased to welcome Adam to the HRV Board. We’re very much looking forward to his insights and I’m sure his experience and skills will be of great benefit to the harness racing industry,” Mr Monteith said. “The HRV Board will benefit greatly from Adam’s extensive background in strategic planning roles, including public policy and as Chair of the NSW Racehorse Trainers Association.”  Harness Racing Victoria

1 to 16 of 1441
1 2 3 4 5 Next »