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Seaford, DE --- A fire that started around 7 a.m. Monday (Aug. 7) in the main barn at Trotter Farm, known to many as Dillards, in Seaford, Del., (Seaford is a city located along the Nanticoke River in Sussex County, Delaware) killed five harness racing racehorses trained by Mike and Brittany Bounds. They were 8-year-old pacing gelding In Front Charlie p,1:53f ($158,523), 2-year-old pacing filly My Lil Tater Tot, 2-year-old pacing filly Gangster Granny, 3-year-old pacing filly Standtuecemewin and 2-year-old pacing colt Ezekiel Kandu. Seven horses were rescued from the barn, which had housed horses for a handful of local trainers. by Charlene Sharpe, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent       

The registrations are starting to roll in since Equine Guelph announced its popular Horse Behaviour and Safety online course is now available for youth (14 – 17)! This October, the young and keen will have their own special community to learn the language of horses. The adult offering, also available this October, has brought together horse enthusiasts from across Canada and all over the globe in past offerings. “Through learning how horses perceive the world around them, their human handlers can develop safe best practices for working with them,” says Gayle Ecker, director of Equine Guelph. A hefty percentage of horse related injuries are due to human error and could be prevented if the handler had basic education in safety. TheHorsePortal.ca community has plenty to say so far about the Horse Behaviour and Safety course: Internationally recognized, past and future guest speaker for the adult offering, Dr. Rebecca Gimenez is no stranger to importance of preparedness and awareness around horses. Bringing her wealth of experience from Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Inc (TLAER), she has plenty of illuminating stories to share. Gimenez says, “The best part of teaching in these online courses is imagining their faces - you can practically SEE their AH-HA! moments over their participation - they really start getting it when they read all the threads and comment on each other's experiences.   I actually had a student contact me personally about meeting me when I came up to Guelph for the course - he had experienced so many of these situations in his working life at a racetrack and eventing barn then western gymkana / barrel racing situations. It was neat to put a name to a face and discuss these in person!” Omar from Orangeville, ON attests to the quality of instruction and is a firm believer in the continuing learning required in the horse industry. “The Horse Behaviour and Safety online course was a great introduction to equine education. Being able to connect with likeminded equine enthusiasts only made me enjoy my passion more. The instructors were excellent and laid out a lot of very important and enlightening material that could easily be managed while tending to outside work within the few weeks of the course period. They were always on top of any questions the class had and encouraged discussions. The expert guest speaker was wonderfully selected.   Taking part in discussions from day one, she made it her goal to be a part of the class and not just as a guest speaker for the few days she was scheduled for. I've been in and around the equine industry in some way for the past 25 years, and I'm still having myths dispelled and fresh points of view brought to light by a course like this. Clearly, I haven't stopped learning! I definitely made the right choice in taking part in the short course!” Julie from Australia looks forward to more from TheHorsePortal. “I really enjoyed the short course; the course material was insightful and easy to read. The quizzes were a great way to go over learned information and the guest speaker was quite helpful. All in all I am really happy with the course and will be looking at taking more.” Sharron from Ashton, ON, already an Equine Guelph lifetime learning student, found great value in this short course. “I am a graduate of the Equine Science Certificate and also a graduate of the Equine Science Diploma. I gained knowledge from this course which was new and useful...you can never know too much nor do you ever know everything!” Sorrel from Armstrong, BC vouches for the broad audience for this and all Equine Guelph courses. “The courses offered by Equine Guelph are invaluable to anyone who is involved with horses, from beginners to experts. I'd recommend them to anyone.” Thanks to a grant from the Grand River Agricultural Society, the adult and youth offerings of Horse Behaviour and Safety will run October 2–22, 2017 Equine Guelph has partnered with all English-speaking equestrian federations across Canada and a special 10% course discount is available for both adult and junior members. In addition, 50 free courses are on offer to 4-H Ontario Horse Club Members and 50 for Ontario Equestrian Federation Junior Members on a first-come-first served basis. Join the Herd, go to TheHorsePortal.ca. Equine Guelph is the horse owners' and care givers' Centre at the University of Guelph. It is a unique partnership dedicated to the health and well-being of horses, supported and overseen by equine industry groups. Equine Guelph is the epicentre for academia, industry and government – for the good of the equine industry as a whole. For further information, visit EquineGuelph.ca. By Jackie Bellamy-Zions

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) has announced an extension of its employment assistance program to benefit all industry players. HRV People and Culture Manager Isabella Galati described the HRV Industry Assistance Program (IAP) as a confidential, professional, coaching and support service delivered by Davidson Trahaire Corpsych (DTC). “The service is available at no cost to all licenced industry participants, including trainers, drivers and HRV, Tabcorp Park and country club employees/volunteers,” Ms Galati said. “The IAP can assist with a wide range of personal and work-related issues, including but not limited to anxiety, stress and depression, bereavement, grief and loss, personal trauma, dealing with change and career planning.” View the IAP information document online for all services provided (link) “One of our core values is empathy, which reflects our genuine care for the health and wellbeing of our participants,” HRV CEO David Martin said. “Today’s announcement provides confidential access to support for industry participants experiencing hardship, and I thank Isabella for her work on this.” Victorian Trainers and Drivers Association (VTDA) president Lance Justice welcomed today’s announcement. “We welcome this decision because the industry’s greatest assets are the people involved,” Justice said. “Trainers and drivers work long hours and it is hard work. That takes its toll and it is important our people have access to help when they need it and I’d encourage anyone feeling overwhelmed or in need of a helping hand to reach out. It’s important they know they’re not alone.” The Association of Country Clubs also welcomed the announcement. “We applaud HRV for making this service available across the Victorian industry,” association CEO Toby McKinnon said. “Being on the front foot regarding the welfare of our people is a very sensible strategy and we wholly support this announcement.” Find out more about the HRV IAP or contact DTC (link) Cody Winnell (HRV Media/Communications Manager)

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards advise that Petacular has successfully trialled to the satisfaction of the Stewards tonight at Geelong. Petacular was stood down in accordance with the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 101B(2) after it was determined that the filly bled from one nostril subsequent to her winning performance in the Empire Stallions Vicbred Super Series 3Y0 Fillies Semi-final at Tabcorp Park Melton on 30 June 2017. AHRR 101B(2) states: “If the Stewards determine that a horse has bled from one nostril the horse shall not be eligible to race until it has trialled to the satisfaction of the Stewards.” Veterinary examinations conducted prior and subsequent to tonight’s trial by HRV Veterinary Consultant Dr Richard Cust have failed to reveal any abnormalities.  Accordingly Petacular is now cleared to take her place in this Saturday nights Empire Stallions Vicbred Super Series Final for the 3Y0 Fillies to be conducted at Tabcorp Park Melton. Harness Racing Victoria

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards provide the below information regarding Soho Tribeca and Petacular, which are engaged to compete in next Saturday night’s (08/07) Vicbred Super Series Finals, in light of the veterinary findings identified subsequent to their Semi-final performances. SOHO TRIBECA - EMPIRE STALLIONS VICBRED SUPER SERIES (4YO ENTIRES & GELDINGS) (FINAL) A post-race veterinary examination of Soho Tribeca revealed the horse to be lame in the off foreleg and as a result Soho Tribeca has been stood down from racing pending a veterinary clearance being tendered. The HRV Stewards will monitor this situation and if necessary Soho Tribeca will be examined by an independent HRV Veterinary Consultant prior to competing next Saturday night. PETACULAR - EMPIRE STALLIONS VICBRED SUPER SERIES (3YO FILLIES) (FINAL) A post-race veterinary examination of Petacular revealed the filly to have bled from the offside nostril. In accordance with Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 101B(2) Petacular will not be permitted to start in the final until trialling to the satisfaction of the Stewards on one occasion.   AHRR 101B(2) states: If the Stewards determine that a horse has bled from one nostril the horse shall not be eligible to race until it has trialled to the satisfaction of the Stewards. Michael Stanley, trainer of Petacular, has advised the filly will trial at Geelong on Tuesday night (04/07). Petacular will be examined by a HRV Veterinary Consultant at the completion of the trial to determine whether the filly has successfully passed the embargo. Harness Racing Victoria

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered a charge issued against licensed trainer Mr Boris Devcic under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 193(1) relating to a stable inspection conducted by HRV Stewards on 4 January 2017.  AHRR 193(1) states:  A person shall not attempt to stomach tube or stomach tube a horse nominated for a race or event within 48 hours of the commencement of the race or event.  The particulars of this charge were that on 4 January 2017 Mr Devcic stomach tubed the horse ‘Flagbearer’ which was engaged to race at the Mildura harness racing meeting that evening.  Mr Devcic pleaded guilty to this charge and after considering submissions regarding penalty the HRV RAD Board imposed a 9 month disqualification, to commence at midnight on 18 June 2017.  In determining penalty the HRV RAD Board considered the following: Mr Devcic’s early guilty plea and co-operation with the Stewards. Mr Devcic’s awareness of the relevant rule Previous penalties for similar offences.  Specific and general deterrence.  That breaches of this rule are serious offences and the need to send a message that such offences are unacceptable. The Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board (RADB) is established under section 50B of the Racing Act (1958). The RADB is an independent Board established to hear and determine appeals in relation to decisions made under the rules to impose penalties on persons and to hear and determine charges made against persons for serious offences.  HRV RAD Board – Boris Devcic 

In 2013, a devastating outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus One caused four confirmed cases in Thoroughbred and Standardbred horses and three confirmed deaths.   The development reinforced Equine Guelph's sense that the Ontario horse racing industry - one filled with high-value animals and frequent movement - was in need of further education on biosecurity and infectious disease prevention.   Accessing funding through the Agricultural Adaptation Council, Equine Guelph developed and delivered 'BIOSECURITY - Spread the word not the germs.' The first-of-its-kind campaign targeted infectious diseases in the Ontario horse racing industry. The initiative changed the equine industry's approach to biosecurity and delivered lasting resources still used today.   In order to reach such a broad community, Equine Guelph used a peer-to-peer educational approach to bring the industry together.   In April 2015, Equine Guelph started by educating horse racing officials. Ontario Racing Commission investigators, judges and stewards received training on biosecurity, arming the officials with the resources needed to visit all 10 Ontario race tracks in the spring and summer of 2015 to spread the word on biosecurity. On their visits, officials discussed how to improve biosecurity and provided an assortment of training materials.   The biosecurity campaign is more than just a communications success story; it created tangible resources for the equine industry, both racing and non-racing. The training content used has been added to Equine Guelph's equine biosecurity two-week online eWorkshop and has been modified and distributed to a general equine audience across Canada.   The project was funded in part through Growing Forward 2 (GF2), a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. The Agricultural Adaptation Council assists in the delivery of GF2 in Ontario.   Now available on TheHorsePortal.ca - all horse owners and care givers can learn Canada's biosecurity code for Equines.   You can also access Equine Guelph's free Biosecurity Calculator to evaluate the biosecurity risk on your farm. In 10 minutes you can be on your way to a biosecurity plan utilizing simple ways to protect your horse from infectious disease.      

On April 6, 2017, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) released a Memorandum to the Canadian horse racing industry. "The CPMA would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations." On April 21, 2017, the CPMA released another Memorandum with additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds. "Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse." A copy of these CPMA memos are attached to this bulletin. As a result, effective May 1, 2017 Amended General Directive No. 2/2015 (attached) addressing enhanced testing for cobalt, is no longer in force. Please refer to the attached GENERAL DIRECTIVE NO. 2 - 2017 - Rescinding Enhanced Cobalt Testing Directive. The AGCO issues this Information Bulletin as a service. AGCO licensees are expected to know the Rules of Racing, closely review all memos from the CPMA, and keep up to date on the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs. Disponible en français. Additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds – April 21, 2017 Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse. As you may know, several provinces have been testing for cobalt for the past couple of years. The provincial testing of cobalt was in blood only, using a threshold of 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL). The CPMA added cobalt to the list of quantitatively prohibited substances (section 2 of the schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations) in February of this year. After much research and collaboration with international regulators, it was determined that the thresholds for cobalt would be 25 ng/mL in blood and 100 ng/mL in urine. These levels are consistent with thresholds used in many other international jurisdictions. The CPMA's research indicates that vitamin supplements, when used alone and according to label directions, should not increase cobalt levels enough to cause a positive test. In addition, our research indicates that when horses were allowed free access to cobalt-containing salt blocks, there was little to no effect on the horse's cobalt levels. Cobalt levels may build up over time when given repeatedly, and its elimination from the horse can take an extended period of time. It is always good practice to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie   Implementation of cobalt testing under the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's Equine Drug Control Program – April 6, 2017 The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. It should be noted that cobalt testing in Canada will move from provincial oversight to the CPMA under its official Equine Drug Control Program as of May 1, 2017. The CPMA would also like to advise the horse racing industry that the quantitative threshold for cobalt testing will decrease from 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) to 25 ng/mL in blood and that a new threshold of 100 ng/mL will be implemented in urine. These thresholds are published in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. The CPMA would like to remind industry participants to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie

In January 2016, Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards were aware of an incident that occurred at an agistment property in Avoca, whereby the Standardbred horse ‘Loveyougoodboy’ was required to be humanely euthanised. In January 2017, following an investigation by the RSPCA, which culminated in the RSPCA issuing criminal charges against licensed person Mr Chris Angove, HRV Stewards enabled Mr Angove the opportunity to provide submissions as to why the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 183 should not be invoked. After considering such submissions, on 31 January 2017, HRV Stewards suspended Mr Angove’s trainer and driver licences in accordance with the provisions of AHRR 183. At the Maryborough Magistrates Court on 16 March 2017, Mr Angove was issued a fine of $1000 without conviction in relation to the applicable charges, as a result of breaching the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1986, specifically Section 9(1)(c) and Section 10(1). On 3 April 2017, Mr Angove appeared before the HRV Stewards in relation to the proceedings before the Maryborough Magistrates Court. After considering all relevant information and being provided with submissions in relation to this case, HRV Stewards considered invoking AHRR 267(1) which states: Subject to sub-rule (2) the Stewards may for such period and on such conditions as they think fit, disqualify a person who is found guilty of a crime or an offence in any State or Territory of Australia or in any country, After careful consideration, HRV Stewards invoked AHRR 267(1) and imposed a twelve (12) month term of disqualification upon Mr Angove, which was backdated to commence at midnight 31 January 2017. When assessing penalty in this instance, HRV Stewards acknowledged the following factors: The serious nature of this matter and the absolute need to uphold high standards in relation to horse welfare in line with community and industry expectations; The responsibility upon all persons involved in the harness racing industry to demonstrate adequate and appropriate care for horses; Prior penalties that have been issued under similar circumstances; That in comparison to other horse welfare related cases, this occurence was an isolated, although preventable incident; Mr Angove’s admittance to this incident, long-standing and exemplary record over a period of some 43 years and; The impact of a period of disqualification upon Mr Angove and his immediate family. Harness Racing Victoria

HRV RAD Board Hearing – William Galea. The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed trainer Mr William Galea.  AHRR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Galea related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Rocknroll Dancer’ at the Bacchus Marsh trials on 14 November 2015. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. Note: Australian Harness Racing Rules definition of ‘Race’- means a race or official trial or official time trial or event in which harness horses race or participate. Mr Galea pleaded guilty to the charge before submissions were heard from HRV stewards and Mr Galea.  In deciding an appropriate penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered the general sentencing principles, the nature of the substance involved, other previous cases involving the substance throughout Australia, Mr Galea’s guilty plea and his co-operation throughout the investigation.  Although noting that Mr Galea has had previous offences in relation to prohibited substances these were taking within the context of the sentencing principles outlined in the High Court decision of Veen v the Queen (No.2) [1998]. Mr Galea was subsequently fined $5000 of which $2500 was suspended for a period of 12 months.  Rocknroll Dancer was also disqualified from the relevant trial under AHRR195. ...................................................   HRV RAD Board Hearing – Allan Lousada The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed trainer Mr Allan Lousada. The charge related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Fiftyshadesofbrown’ after it won Race 2 at the Warragul harness racing meeting on 19 January 2016.   Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the hearing, Mr Lousada and Ms Georgina Coram (owner of Fiftyshadesofbrown) requested an adjournment to enable them to obtain further advice in regard to the matter. After considering this submission, the RAD board adjourned the hearing to a later date.   For more on Arsenic click here. And this is an interesting article!

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regard to two charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 218 against Mr Geoff Crilly (Former Licensed Trainer)  AHRR 218 reads as follows; A person having responsibility for the welfare of a horse shall not fail to care for it properly.    The first charge under AHRR 218 against Mr Crilly related to his failure to provide the necessary veterinary care and attention to an unnamed two-year-old colt, which was identified by HRV Stewards at the property of Mr Crilly on 8 September 2016.    The second charge under AHRR 218 related to Mr Crilly’s failure to care for his horses properly between 8 May 2015 and 8 September 2016, by not providing adequate feed, water, stabling, fencing, veterinary and farrier attention.    The HRV RAD Board determined that Mr Crilly, despite being unlicensed for a small part of the relevant period (following the completion of the 2015-2016 racing season), was carrying on activities that related to the harness racing industry through his breeding and ownership activities and therefore was bound by the rules for the entirety of the period.    Mr Crilly did not appear at today’s HRV RAD Board hearing, however after considering submissions from HRV Stewards relating to recent communication with Mr Crilly and acting under Victorian Local Rule 50 (1)(a) the hearing proceeded in his absence.    The HRV RAD Board, after hearing evidence from Stewards and after taking into consideration all relevant material including all interviews, statements and exhibits found Mr Crilly guilty of the both charges issued under AHRR 218.   After considering submissions from the HRV Stewards in relation to the importance of animal welfare and taking into account specific and general deterrence and to protect the harness racing industry, the HRV RAD Board formally imposed the following penalties against Mr Crilly:    Charge 1 – Disqualification of 3 years;    Charge 2 – Disqualification of 2 years.    The HRV RAD Board ordered that these penalties be served cumulatively; therefore Mr Crilly is disqualified for a period of 5 years, to commence immediately.   The HRV RAD Board further ordered, under the provisions of AHRR 258, that the remaining horses be removed from the care, control and management of Mr Crilly forthwith.   HRV would like to remind all industry participants of their duty of care to adequately protect the welfare of all horses in their care and the serious approach taken by HRV to any breaches of that duty.   HRV RAD BOARD – Geoff Crilly   Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards commenced an Inquiry on 5 October 2017 into the results of the following out-of-competition blood samples taken from horses in the care of trainer Mr Shaun (Anthony) Simiana: FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 17 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 17 April 2016 FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 3 May 2016 Those samples were reported to contain the prohibited substance Peptide VNFYAWK. On 5 October 2016, HRNSW Stewards issued eight (8) charges against Mr Simiana and adjourned the Inquiry to allow Mr Simiana to consider those charges. The Inquiry resumed on 7 December 2016 at which time Mr Simiana’s legal representatives made a number of requests and further applications. Following correspondence between the parties, due to the fact that no submissions were received from Mr Simiana in response to the charges issued by 20 January 2017, HRNSW Stewards considered the matter on the evidence that was before them, in the absence of any submissions. Mr Simiana was found guilty of all charges and advised through his legal representative of that decision. Mr Simiana was provided with an opportunity to provide submissions in relation to the matter of penalty by COB 3 February 2017. Following an extension until COB 7 February 2017, no submissions were received and HRNSW Stewards considered the matter of penalty. Mr Simiana was issued with the following penalties: In relation to Charges 1,2,3,4 & 7, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(a), Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of six (6) years to be served concurrently; In relation to Charges 5,6 & 8, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A(1)(i) & (2) Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of ten (10) years to be served concurrently. HRNSW Stewards ordered that the two (2) periods of disqualification imposed be served cumulatively. Therefore Mr Simiana was disqualified for a total period of 16 years to commence from 28 July 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. HRNSW Stewards also considered the disqualification of the subject horses pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(b) as follows: AHRR 190A         (1)  When a sample taken at any time from a horse being trained or cared for by a licensed person has detected in it any prohibited substance specified in sub-rule (2):- (b)  The horse may be disqualified from any race in which it has competed subsequent to the taking of such a sample where, in the opinion of the Stewards, the prohibited substance was likely to have had any direct and/or indirect effect on the horse at the time of the race. Consequently, Stewards ordered the following disqualifications: FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 5 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 2 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 30 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its fourth place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its second place at Dubbo on 29 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its third place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 May 2016. In addition, HRNSW Stewards ordered that Mr Simiana pay to HRNSW within 14 days of being advised of the Steward’s Decision, the sum of $15,000 as costs pertaining to the analytical tests that were costs borne by the Controlling Body in relation to the prohibited substances from his horses, pursuant to NSW Local Rule 256A as follows: NSWLR256A       (1)  The Stewards, having determined after an inquiry or investigation to impose a penalty upon a person for a breach of, or offence under, these Rules, may make such order as they think fit as to the payment of costs by that person in part or full of any costs and expenses incurred by the Controlling Body in connection with that inquiry or investigation.                 (2)  A costs order made under this Rule is additional to, and does not form part of, any penalty imposed upon the person.  However the order as to costs does form part of the decision made by Stewards, and is not intended to be protected from any rights of Appeal the person may have. (3)  A costs order is payable as a debt to the Controlling Body within 14 days of notification of the quantum of the order, whether orally or in writing, to the person.  Failure to comply with the terms of payment, or to enter into a payment arrangement satisfactory to the Controlling Body, may lead to the person being placed on the Unpaid Forfeit List. Mr Simiana has lodged an appeal. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY OFFICER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Harness Racing New South Wales Stewards advise that two runners from the Mark Purdon stable will undergo a veterinary examination at the Menangle Park Training facility tomorrow morning. OUR DREAM ABOUT ME: "HRNSW Stewards advise that on Tuesday afternoon at Tabcorp Park Menangle they spoke to a representative of the Purdon stable and information was provided in relation to the horse's condition and recent treatment," reported HRNSW Chairman of Stewards Graham Loch. "Following review of the two recent trials of Our Dream About Me at Menangle, having noted that the mare last raced on 31 December, 2016, and having regard to comments made this morning by Mr Purdon on Perth radio, we have advised the trainer that we require our HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian to examine the horse tomorrow morning." HAVE FAITH IN ME: HRNSW Stewards have received information from a number of New Zealand-based Veterinary Surgeons regarding a kidney condition sustained by Have Faith In Me. It appears that the condition was identified and treated prior to the horse racing successfully in Australia last season. "It is our position that we possibly should have been provided with the information in the past but in light of recent performances and public speculation HRNSW Stewards are attempting to gain an understanding of the condition and what, if any, issues may affect performance," said Loch. Loch added that Mr Purdon has been advised to present the horse tomorrow. ULTIMATE MACHETTE: HRNSW Stewards have also received the results of pathology tests undertaken from Ultimate Machete after racing at Tabcorp Park Menangle last Saturday night. Following the race Mr Purdon had expressed disappointment in the performance. Wollondilly Equine Clinic Veterinary Surgeon Dr Andrew Argyle has advised the pathology results were normal other than indicating that Ultimate Machete was exhibiting signs of post virus recovery. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY OFFICER (02) 9722 6600 GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600                AMANDA RANDO   MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER       HARNESS RACING NEW SOUTH WALES   22 Meredith Street Bankstown NSW 2200   PO Box 1034 Bankstown NSW 1885   T: 02 9722 6600 E: arando@hrnsw.com.au T: @Amanda_Rando   W: www.harnessmediacentre.com.au | T: twitter.com/hrnsw_harness | F: facebook.com/hrnsw              

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1)  against licensed Tasmanian trainer Mr Rohan Hillier.  AHRR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Hillier related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Ryley Major’ after it had been presented to race at the Melton harness racing meeting on 7 July 2016 in Race 1, the ‘Empire Stallions Vicbred Super Series (3YO Colts and Geldings) Bronze Pace.   Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the investigation Mr Hillier explained he had not used any arsenic based product upon Ryley Major and that the only explanation he could provide for the finding was fence posts which had been chewed or some pine shavings which had been used as floor covering where the horse was stabled.  Subsequent analysis of relevant samples revealed the fence posts contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing the need for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic.  Mr Hillier pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  The HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Hillier guilty though imposed no penalty in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as tonics that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne and the analysis of the fence posts from Mr Hillier’s property.  The RAD Board also noted Mr Hillier’s guilty plea and his previous record. The RAD Board considered Mr Hillier’s lengthy involvement in the sport with a training career stretching over 25 years and involving more than 1,400 horses being presented to race.   The RAD Board considered the principles of the High Court decision of Veen v the Queen when taking into account Mr Hillier’s prior matters.  The RAD Board also considered other precedent cases involving the substance, including the matter of Rasmussen in Queensland in 2015 whereby no penalty was imposed for such an arsenic case.    The HRV RAD Board ordered under AHRR 195 that ‘Ryley Major’ be disqualified from Race 1 at Melton on 7 July 2016, and that the placings be amended accordingly.  Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing Victoria Stewards and veterinarians have been collecting out of competition blood samples from yearlings scheduled to be sold at the upcoming Australian Pacing Gold (APG) Sales in Melbourne on Sunday 5 February 2017. All blood samples collected have been subjected to testing by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) on their steroid screening test, which covers over 40 substances, and is understood to be the most comprehensive screening test in operation in Australia. RASL report that all of the analysed samples are clear of steroids. HRV wish to acknowledge the significant support of APG in assisting HRV’s efforts to ensure compliance with the national harness racing rules, introduced in May 2014, which banned the use of steroids at all times. Harness Racing Victoria

Australian harness racing is banning the abuse of whips in training and racing from 1 September 2017 in a world-leading animal welfare initiative that improves the industry’s image and enhances its sustainability. The decision sets the pace in animal welfare and for the long-term support and sustainability of the industry. It aligns with high expectations of the community, fans, and industry participants in harness racing. The announcement which followed the jewel event on the Australasian harness racing calendar yesterday – the Inter Dominion in Perth – makes Australia the first country in the world to voluntarily ban the whip. The whip ban broadens Harness Racing Australia’s (HRA) world leadership position in the industry, which is already established through a wide-ranging welfare agenda, including zero-tolerance to prohibited substances in racing. The Chairman of HRA, Mr Geoff Want, said today: “The whip ban decision was not taken lightly, but was made on our own initiative because we believe it is the right decision at the right time. We have been moving down this path for six years by limiting its use with a strong focus on health and welfare of horses. “We see the ban as a vital way of demonstrating our responsibility as an industry, and to earning and maintaining the social acceptance and sustainability of harness racing”. HRA Executive meeting yesterday unanimously agreed to the implementation details of the ban, following the proactive initiative of members at the Annual General Meeting of Harness Racing Australia last October. The Executive also gave detailed consideration to the likely effect of the ban on harness racing audiences and the punting public. “We are strongly of the belief that the improved image of our sport will add to the appeal of our racing product and be broadly welcomed by fans,” said Mr Want. “We are confident that wagering turnover will not be impacted and indeed a number of professional punters have indicated support for the ban”. The implementation of the ban from 1 September 2017, will allow for a program of awareness, education, and research and monitoring to be undertaken across the industry. The program will embrace the education of drivers and horses. It will also include a major research task to ensure safety is maintained when drivers do not have a whip to control unexpected horse movements. Mr Want said many drivers were concerned that control over a horse would be curtailed without a whip, especially when horses shy (leap sideways) or back up. He said HRA Executive accepted the challenges the ban presented for ensuring safety was maintained for drivers, people, horses, trainers, stablehands, and people nearby. “Between now and the implementation of the whip ban, we will consult widely in the industry, especially with drivers and trainers, and with animal welfare advocates, such as the RSPCA,” Mr Want said. “Whatever tool evolves from this process it will only be allowed to avoid or guide a horse out of a dangerous situation to itself, other horses, drivers or anyone nearby. “It will definitely be banned from use to urge a horse to better perform, and strict penalties will apply for any breaches of its use. “Undoubtedly, some people may resist change, or feel the decision limits competitiveness in harness racing. We are confident they will be proved wrong and will eventually see the merit of banning the whip,” he said. "We know some drivers are concerned about safety issues, but we feel the process of developing a tool to maintain safety will allay concerns. “There is ample evidence the whip is not needed in our industry and that its use to enhance racing performance is questionable,” he said. “If no driver uses a whip then no driver has a perceived advantage – each race will be conducted on a level playing field, have a fair winner and horse welfare will be enhanced”. Mr Want said animal welfare would continue to be addressed during the transition to banning the whip, and the industry would seek input from the RSPCA going forward. CEO of the RSPCA Australia, Ms Heather Neil, commended the HRA’s leadership, and said: “This is a powerful sign that the harness racing industry is both listening to its stakeholders, and acknowledging the concerns of the wider community. “As Harness Racing Australia has recognised, racing should celebrate quality horsemanship, breeding and training - whips shouldn’t come into it.” Mr Want said: “Our members have a considerate and ethical equine welfare agenda and rules, and we do a great deal to enforce rigorous animal welfare protocols. The whip ban is part of continued improvements. “For example, we have just appointed our inaugural Equine Health & Welfare Coordinator to benchmark states, review policy, manage disease and quarantine, and clear international horse movements”. Australia’s leading driver – and 11-times winner of the national drivers’ championship – Chris Alford said he supported the ban. “Drivers are very sensitive to their horses and appreciate and support moves to ensure high standards of animal welfare that are aligned with community expectations,” he said. “We also know that a shying horse is a danger to itself, drivers, people and other horses nearby. I fully support the decision to ban the whip, plus maintain safety for all involved”. For information or interviews contact: Alex Messina – 0413 316 478 Robert Masters – 0413 147 080

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