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The Standardbred Association Queensland Inc (SAQ) is excited to launch its 2019 Corporate Partnership Program, which will assist in raising much-needed funds for SAQ’s Rehoming and Adoption Program and save even more Standardbreds following their harness racing career. In 2002, SAQ started their Rehoming and Adoption Program, which was the first not-for-profit association in Queensland to focus specifically on retraining and rehoming retired racehorses. SAQ now rehomes between 80 and 120 Standardbreds each year after their career in harness racing - with the rehoming of the 1,100th Standardbred due to occur in the very near future. SAQ President, Owanna Francisca, said the Corporate Partnership Program was a very important element to SAQ’s annual revenue stream and helps to raise money for the Rehoming and Adoption Program. “To continue doing the important work that we do as a well-established Not-for-Profit providing a second chance for these wonderful horses, the SAQ sources grant funding and runs regular yearly events like the Track to Hack Series and our State Harness & Hacking Championships. We also partner with the business community in the form of mutually beneficial sponsorship opportunities” said Ms Francisca. SAQ is building on the success of last year’s Program by expanding the number of partnership opportunities available and is now seeking new Corporate Partners to join the SAQ family in 2019. SAQ Grants & Fundraising Office, Mark Hrycek, said “when you partner with SAQ, we ensure that the benefits don’t just flow to SAQ from your generosity. We implement strategies to provide your business and products with exposure into a key target market to help you build brand awareness, grow your customer base and/or increase your sales. “While at the same time, our Corporate Partners know that their invaluable support is also helping to provide a life after racing for the many Standardbreds who come through our Rehoming and Adoption Program” said Mr Hrycek. SAQ are keen to hear from any organisation interested in a small-investment/high-return Corporate Partnership opportunity that includes, logo/key message promotion, multiple advertising opportunities and numerous recognition of the partnership across various media elements - just to name a few. Further information on SAQ’s 2019 Corporate Partnership Program can be found by clicking here. Mark Hrycek WHAT SAQ’S 2018 MAJOR CORPORATE PARTNERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THE PROGRAM:

The 85th annual ARCI Conference on Racing Integrity and Animal Welfare will be held in Arcadia, California on April 2, 2019 - April 5, 2019. Registration is now open on Eventbrite. For those of you who need to pay by check, please contact me for an invoice. I will register you for the conference once payment is received in the ARCI office. Register on Eventbrite The event hotel will be the Embassy Suites in Arcadia. We have once again arranged a room block at the area per diem of $173 per night (not including tax.) Embassy offers free parking, a complimentary shuttle that will travel within a seven mile radius of the hotel, free breakfast, and a complimentary evening beer and wine reception. The room block is primarily set for Tuesday through Friday evening. If you attempt to book earlier and run into issues, please contact me and I'll assist you with making a reservation. Embassy Suites by Hilton Arcadia Pasadena Area 211 East Huntington Drive, Arcadia, California, 91006, USA TEL: +1-626-445-8525 FAX: +1-626-445-8548 The reservation link for the ARCI rate is below: https://secure3.hilton.com/en_US/es/reservation/book.htm?execution=e1s1 The preliminary agenda for the meeting is attached. Please contact me with any questions you have. We're looking forward to seeing you again at this year's conference! Rebecca Shoemaker Assistant to the President & CEO Association of Racing Commissioners International  

Cream Ridge, NJ - 1/21/19 - Eight harness racing trotters and pacers in need of homes are now tagged and on the manifest to ship to the Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses. The Standardbred Retirement Foundation, (SRF) is pleading for homes, other organizations for help, foster homes, and sponsors to get them out of these horrific “kill pens”.   Down from 35 in need, the remaining 8 are:   1.    Rookthatiscastling - or Fire Island (waiting on confirmation) Likely about 14 yr old. Gelding 2.    First Season, 14 yr. old mare. May only be able to walk under saddle. 3.    Bonnie Caviar may not be identified correctly-kill pen volunteer did not have time, may be Spartan Justice, 11 yr. old (not sure if g or m yet). Appears sound. 4.    DG’s Turnaround, 16 yr. old mare about 16.1h, appears sound. (Listed as deceased on her registration but incorrect) 5.    Have It Your Way, 14 yr. old mare, 15.2 needs hoof care immediately, appears sound. 6.    Naomi Blue Chip, 15 yr. old mare, 15.1 mother of 4 babies who earned $250,000. Appears sound. Scared in the pen. 7.    Taylor’s Design, 18 yr. old gelding, big handsome trotter, sore in back likely due to pulling weight much heavier than able to. 8.    Walk Of Shame, 14 yr. old mare, appears sound, may be blind in right eye but she appears to see the world.   Party Lights 13 yr. mare, is injured and being attended to, she has dropped suspensory, she is paid for, has a sponsor, but she needs a home. She has a heart on her forehead. Funny Girl - safe but needs an experienced home for mom and baby due in April.   In these pens the horses are rarely provided for any of their basic needs, shelter, water and feed. The harsh weather has made things much more difficult, however it also gave these horses a few more days of hope for homes, but the deadline is today at 5pm. SRF is beyond full, and it’s not just the large number of horses under SRF’s care that is blocking the help, it’s the financial restrictions. SRF has no regular funding, not privately, publicly, or from the racing industry. Some people feel humane euthanasia is better than shipping hundreds of miles to the borders to be slaughtered, even if that was an option, it is beyond the financial ability of the SRF. It is approximately $500 for the veterinarian and renderer to put a horse at peace.    SRF and everyone who has taken a horse or has contributed to help these animals is begging for help for the remaining eight. Two thousand two hundred dollars ($2,200) is still needed for bail, and eight homes, however, if homes are not found for all, sponsorship will help. In general, a horse will cost SRF $2,400- $4,200 annually, any part of a sponsorship monthly or for a year will save one of these horses.   To offer a home, a foster home, to sponsor a horse, make a donation please call SRF immediately at 609-738-3255, or email Tammy at SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com.                                 ‌             About Standardbred Retirement Foundation       Standardbred Retirement Foundation provides human care and services for horse in need of lifetime homes, and in crisis. Through rehabilitation, training, adoption, life-long follow--up or life time sanctuary and offering therapeutic equine opportunities for children and adults.   Tammy Cailliau Phone: 609-738-3255 Email address:SRFHorsesandkids@gmail.com  

AN on-course veterinarian at this week’s Mildura Harness Racing Club’s meeting has moved to allay concerns about the welfare of horses due to extreme heat. The club pushed back the start time for the first race to 7.30pm when the temper­ature was still 41.6C and the mercury failed to drop below 35C until well into the eight-race meeting. Mildura GP Gerald Murphy described a decision to proceed with the meeting on Tuesday – which recorded a maximum daytime temperature of 45.8C – as “totally ­unacceptable”. By Allan Murphy Reprinted with permission of The Sunraysia Daily

MILTON, December 21, 2018 - Woodbine Entertainment would like to extend condolences toharness racing trainer Mark Steacy and the connections of the five Standardbreds lost in Friday morning's tragic barn fire at nearby First Line Training Centre. In this time of emergency, Woodbine Mohawk Park has made available its backstretch barn area for the surviving horses. As of Friday morning, a total of 26 horses trained by Mark Steacy are currently being stabled in Mohawk Park's Barn Eight. "Everyone at Woodbine Entertainment was devastated to wake up Friday to the news of the barn fire at First Line Training Centre," said Jessica Buckley, President of Woodbine Mohawk Park. "We're grateful that so many horses survived the fire and that we can make our barn area available for the horses and the Steacy stable during this difficult time. "Woodbine offers our sincerest condolences to all the connections of the horses lost and everyone impacted by this tragic event." The five horses lost in Friday's barn fire were Pearl Blue Chip (three-year-old pacing filly), Mademoiselle Tammy (two-year-old pacing filly), Rap Royalty (two-year-old gelded trotter), Miss Wheely (yearling filly) and Irma (yearling filly). Woodbine Mohawk Park will hold a moment of silence in memory of the horses lost ahead of Friday evening's card of live racing. Mark McKelvie Woodbine Entertainment

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – “Feeding and Care of Mare/Foal, Stallion, and Growing Horse” is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. The seminar, scheduled from 8:30 am – 3:45 pm on Sunday, February 10, 2019, will feature presentations by several equine experts. “This year we selected a topic that we have not covered during any of the previous Horse Management Seminars. Even if you don’t currently breed horses, the presentations will have lots of information for everyone!” says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center. “Our goal for this workshop is to bring in the leading experts in each of these topic areas. This includes broodmare and growing horse nutrition, care of the stallion, and new reproductive advances. We will also highlight some of the current, and future, research from Rutgers Equine graduate students.” Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as the leading experts in their field to offer perspectives and personal insight. The morning will start with “Stallion Care” and “Recent Advanced in Equine Reproduction” by Dr. Ed Squires from University of Kentucky’s  Gluck Equine Research Center. “Dr. Squires leads the country in his contribution to the field of equine reproduction” says Williams, “we are honored to have him here at Rutgers courtesy of Vetoquinol USA.” The morning will also include Dr. Dan Keenan from Foundation Equine, a local veterinarian specializing in equine reproduction. Dr. Keenan will present “Care of the Mare and Foal Pre and Post Birth.”  The afternoon will start off with Dr. Amy Burk, who leads the equine breeding program at the University of Maryland, presenting “Feeding the Pregnant/Lactating Mare”, followed by “GI Development and Nutrition of the Growing Horse” by Dr. Paul Siciliano from North Carolina State University. Closing out the day will be a panel discussion from the three main speakers, moderated by Williams. Following the panel Dr. Williams’ doctoral student, Jennifer Weinert, will give a short presentation on some of the current research taking place on campus, as well as what future research has been planned. In addition to these presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities with industry companies and area organizations, and ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day’s presenters. The complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu, as well as the registration site at: http://bit.ly/2019HMS . Space is limited, and the early bird discount for registration ends on January 28th, so be sure to register early! For questions, please contact Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, carey.williams@rutgers.edu. About Rutgers Equine Science Center The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu.   ================================================== Carey A. Williams, Ph.D. Equine Extension Specialist Rutgers University 84 Lipman Dr., Bartlett Hall New Brunswick, NJ 08901   PH: 848-932-5529 Email Replies to: Carey.Williams@Rutgers.edu =================================================

Columbus, OH - Beginning with the harness racing foal crop of 2019, the primary means of USTA horse identification will be the microchip. "Microchipping provides a more safe, efficient and reliable way to identify horses," said USTA Director of Registry T.C. Lane. "The microchipping process is less stressful for the horse than freeze branding or a lip tattoo. In addition to its identification capability, the Merck microchips also can read the horse's body temperature quickly in a non-invasive fashion, which is a great benefit in monitoring the horse's health." To watch a video explanation and demonstration of the microchipping process hosted by the USTA's Wendy Ross with Midland Acres' doctors John Mossbarger and Bob Schwartz, click here. Not all horses will need to be microchipped immediately, but by 2021, all horses that race in the United States at all USTA member tracks (including county fairs) will be required to be identified with a microchip. All USTA ID Technicians are trained to implant microchips and will also continue to collect a DNA sample from each horse to send to the approved laboratory. All horses that have been previously freeze branded by the USTA will be required to be microchipped by a USTA ID Technician. Horse owners have the option to microchip stallions as well as broodmares. For foals of 2019, the microchipping fee is incorporated into the registration. All others with an existing freeze brand (racehorses, broodmares, stallions, etc.) can be implanted for a fee of $35 per head. The USTA has agreed to allow those that choose to continue to freeze brand the foals of 2019 to do so. That $75 fee must be prepaid to the USTA in addition to the normal registration fee and there are no discounts for multiple horses at any location with this arrangement. All USTA extended pari-mutuel racetracks will be equipped with readers to identify horses and county fair officials that will be responsible for identifying horses will be required to have them as well. As a USTA Member Benefit through our partnership with Merck Animal Health/HomeAgain, Bio thermal Scanners are available at the discounted, introductory rate of $279 for a BlueTooth model and $69 for the smaller standard unit. Industry participants (tracks/individual members/associations) can purchase a universal scanner for their own purposes at a reduced rate via our supplier by contacting the USTA at 1.877.800.8782 or by ordering via myaccount.ustrotting.com. In addition, Merck has agreed to partner with the USTA, for free, a lifetime subscription to their HomeAgain rescue services, which is a proactive network of veterinarians, rescue facilities and volunteers who are immediately notified in an attempt to help locate lost animals. The program maintains owner contact information that proactively prompts owners to update it during the annual membership renewal process and through other member communications. This is an added benefit for horses that are in need of rescue or connected via the USTA's Full Circle program. There are multiple reasons why microchips are a superior means of identification including: • Microchips in general offer a faster/more efficient and less stressful means of identification and require less time to implant than freeze branding or lip tattooing, providing greater convenience for farm visits. • Can measure a temperature in only a few seconds compared to rectal reading that might take several minutes. • Is a safe, unobtrusive way to uniquely identify individual horses. • Provides a less stressful way to alert owners of health problems through temperature sensing (EHV-1), which makes preventive care easier. • Allows for monitoring temperature during and after surgery or procedure, where minimal disturbance is desired. • Alerts owner to possible sub-clinical indications of potential infectious diseases. • Ideal for both young and pregnant stock. Improved technology has eliminated the concerns about the microchip moving after implantation. With Merck’s patented Bio-Bond® process, the microchips are encased in an insert micro-capsule made of bio-compatible material. The process enables the animal's tissue to permanently anchor the microchip at the desired anatomical site. HomeAgain/Destron Fearing microchips stay where they should for the health of the animals and for reading convenience. Any registration or identification question can be addressed by contacting the USTA Member Services team at memberservices@ustrotting.com or by calling the USTA office at 1.877.800.8782. U.S. Trotting Association | 6130 S. Sunbury Rd. | Westerville, OH 43081-3909  

A quintet of Ohio-based, practicing racetrack veterinarians provided the Ohio State Racing Commission members with their thoughts on out of competition testing at the OSRC's monthly meeting, Nov. 29, in Columbus. The veterinarians-who between them have over 150 years of experience-included: Dr. John Piehowicz, Cincinnati (Thoroughbreds/Standardbreds); Dr. John Reichert, Grove City (Standardbreds); Dr. Barry Carter, Lancaster, (Standardbreds); Dr. Dan Wilson, Cleveland, (Standardbreds); and Dr. Scott Shell, Cleveland (Thoroughbreds). All five veterinarians agreed that clients in their respective practices were in favor of out of competition in the Buckeye State. "We need to establish a simple process, whereas a public training center or private farm would be able to be easily licensed by the OSRC," Dr. Barry Carter stated. "By being licensed, it would allow the OSRC to walk onto a property at any time and test and/or examine any racehorse. "The race secretaries would only accept horses from licensed facilities," Dr. Carter added. "And the licensing fees should be nominal, so everyone would be encouraged to get licensed." "My major concern is, what will we test for?" said Dr. Dan Wilson. "The RCI protocol is currently burdensome and we need to narrow the focus of testing and test for street designer drugs such as neuro-toxins, blood doping agents and venoms. "Also, we'll have to deal with horses coming in from neighboring states such as Michigan and New York. At Northfield we have a ton of horses coming from these areas every night and have anywhere from 640 to 740 horses stabled on the grounds." "Out of competition testing will eliminate the 'shooting star' trainers, as well as the gossip and innuendoes that are a backstretch constant," Dr. John Piehowicz acknowledged. "Out of competition testing also serves as a strong deterrent to those few bad apples we have in the racing industry. "Racing is a privilege, just like driving, and protocol will need to be set well in advance," Dr. Piehowicz continued. "We're going to need to establish who does the testing? What criteria is that person going to have to be authorized to test horses? What about out of state competitors? How do we handle them? We're going to have to work closely in cooperation with surrounding states. "The penalties need to be stiff too-ten or 15-year suspensions or a life ban for medications that are injurious to the welfare of the horse," Dr. Piehowicz stressed. "This year at Belterra Park we had 900 horses on the grounds and 30 to 40% of those on race day are ship-ins, so a slap on the wrist for a drug that has no business being in a horse's system isn't appropriate." "I'm firmly in favor of out of competition testing but the RCI model as it currently stands is just way too large," said Dr. Scott Shell. "There are drugs out there right now that have no business being in a horse: venoms, toxics and blood-doping agents like synthetic EPO. However, there are a lot of drugs on the RCI list that we use as healing agents and we need to narrow the scope to those harmful agents. "Out of competition testing will also help to eliminate excess testing expenses," Dr. Shell continued. "In order for me to keep my veterinarian license, I'm required to be accountable for every drop of medication that goes into every horse and when and where I performed that service. Therefore, a trainer needs to be able to produce a vet record of his or her horses so that regulators have a clear idea of what is therapeutic and what isn't. "For instance, anabolic steroids are a controlled substance that we, as veterinarians, use therapeutically, and we need to establish the difference between when medications are used therapeutically and when they are not." "Out of competition testing has become a necessity," Dr. John Reichert admitted. "The majority of trainers are operating within the rules, but because of the few bad apples we need out of competition testing and we need to establish accurate testing. I'm talking about agents that have long term effects on a horse's system: blood doping, venoms, etc. We need an effective narrow scope of testing, and the accuracy of testing is paramount to establishing severe penalties for the cheaters. "We also need to think about legal concerns," Dr. Reichert continued. "For instance, do we do random testing, or do we pick the obvious cheaters? There's not many trainers who operate on a 400 to 600-win average. But we're also going to have to think about horses that throw in bad races for reasons such as flipped-palates and tying up, and then dramatically improve when in the hands of a new trainer who can help alleviate those issues. "I also think that logistically we'll have to figure out how we're going to cooperate amongst the other states who already have out of competition testing in place," Dr. Reichert noted. "For instance, different states have different testing procedures. Are we going to test the horses in the state they're currently in or do we bring them to a central location? The manpower to do the testing has to be credentialed and capable as well." "In my opinion, out of competition testing is the biggest deterrent to illicit drug use in this industry," Dr. Barry Carter concluded. "Obviously, out of competition is a multi-faceted issue which needs to be discussed further," stated Robert Schmitz, OSRC Chairman. "At our January 2019 meeting I'm asking the Ohio Department of Agriculture's testing lab to be on hand to lend their insight into this issue." by Kimberly Rinker, OSDF Administrator 

Sixteen horses died on Racing NSW tracks between January 1 and June 30 this year, The New Daily can reveal. Another 13 have been euthanised after being injured in a race. There have also been three cases of sudden death due to cardiovascular failure associated with racing, according to figures obtained by NSW Greens animal welfare spokesperson Mehreen Faruqi under freedom of information. Two horses died on Harness Racing NSW tracks between January 1 and August 6, and another two were euthanised due to their injuries. The numbers were revealed after the Information and Privacy Commission told the racing agencies they must comply with freedom of information laws, as reported by The New Daily last month. Racing NSW said 67 horses were so injured in the first half of this year they either retired or took prolonged time off. “It should be noted, 10,572 individual horses started in races with 53,245 starts between them in the 12-month period to 30 June 2018,” Peter Sweney, General Counsel of Racing NSW said in his response to Dr Faruqi. Ninety-four horses were injured in harness racing as at August 6. Harness Racing NSW chief executive John Dumesny told The New Dailyhorses collectively raced about 34,500 times a year. Dr Faruqi called for a special commission of inquiry into the industry. “Whenever animals and gambling are mixed, animals always come last by a long way,” she said. “When animals are treated as disposable commodities and valued only for their profit, unfortunately injuries and euthanasia seem to be all too common. “We need to get to the bottom of how many horses die for the sake of a bet.” A spokesperson for NSW Racing Minister Paul Toole said the industry was leading the nation on animal welfare initiatives. “The Greens should just be honest and admit they want to shut down the racing industry, something that would put thousands of working people out of a job.” Horse retirements in Racing NSW Mr Sweney said Racing NSW has “the most comprehensive and robust retirement program for racehorses” in Australia. Overseer Janelle Bowden prepares Memphis at St Heliers Correctional Centre. Photo: NSW Justice / Colin Lavender Horses are re-trained to ensure they are equipped to be re-homed for jumping, hacking, eventing, polo, dressage and pleasure riding. Inmates at St Heliers Correctional Centre – at Muswellbrook in the Hunter Valley – care for up to 80 horses at a time under a partnership with Corrective Services NSW that has been running since 2012. “This operation has proven to have positive outcomes for both the horses and the inmates, with improvements in inmate behaviour and reduced recidivism rates,” Mr Sweney said. NSW RSL also operates a similar Homes for Heroes program for returned servicemen with physical and mental health issues at Picton, southwest of Sydney. Horse deaths on racing tracks are notified in public steward reports but not recorded in the Racing NSW annual report. Harness Racing NSW Mr Dumesny reiterated Harness Racing NSW was transparent and accountable and provided information when requested. “We take care of the horses in the most humane way and veterinarily [sic] practical ways,” he told The New Daily. Where we can we save these beautiful horses. “Unfortunately these things do occur.” In his response to Dr Faruqi, Mr Dumesny said the number of horse deaths and injuries would be detailed in the 2018 annual report. The 2016-17 annual report did not provide information on deaths and injuries. Harness Racing NSW horses collectively race about 34,500 times a year. Photo: Getty It said about 80 per cent of standardbreds were “re-homed in areas of leisure activities and breeding” nationally on retirement. Mr Dumesny told Dr Faruqi that horse deaths and injuries are reported by stewards onto an internal portal, which registers on a national database. The Regulatory Veterinarian reviews the reports and refers them to him, he said. Dr Faruqi also made similar inquiries in questions on notice in the Legislative Council. Information Commissioner Elizabeth Tydd wrote to both racing regulators on June 13 to tell them they were accountable to the public and needed to comply with the GIPA (Government Information Public Access) Act. Dr Faruqi will be sworn into the federal Senate this week after resigning from state parliament. Racing NSW declined to comment. By Rachel Eddie Reprinted with permission of The New Daily

Leading horse feed manufacturer, Mitavite, has launched the Centaur Feed Assurance Program. This is a feed testing program that will provide an increased level of assurance for trainers who use Mitavite Premium race feeds. Mitavite have partnered with UK based lndependent Equine Nutrition (IEN), a specialist, equine focused, state of the art analytical laboratory to provide a regular Feed Contamination and Herb, Spices & Plant Screening program. In stage 1 of the program samples of Mitavite Athlete+, Sustaina and Formula 3 will be routinely tested for prohibited substances. Cobalt levels will also be tested. The Feed Contamination screen is extensive and includes theobromine, caffeine, theophylline, morphine, codeine, oripavine, thebaine, noscapine, papaverine, atropine, hyoscyamine, scopolamine, sparteine, lupinine, bufotenine, methylbufotenine, dimethyltryptamine, coumarin and ractopamine. The Herb, Spices & Plant Screen (HSPS) is designed to reflect the differing risks presented by novel herbs, spices or other plant based ingredients and includes: ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, synephrine, nicotine, cathinone, cathine, quinine, quinidine, digoxin, digitoxin, salicylic acid, valerenic acid, ibogaine, lobeline, harmaline, reserpine, yohimbine, ajmaline, ajmalicine, capsaicin, dehydrocapsaicin, nonivamide, cocaine, THC, cannabinol, cannabidiol, colchicine and vincamine. Mitavite General Manager, Colin Price was pleased to be announcing this industry leading program. “As the provider of feed and nutrition programs to many leading trainers throughout Australasia, Asia and the Middle East we believe it is important that we take every step to ensure that to the best of our knowledge our feeds are safe to use and contaminant free. This program will add to the already extensive testing program undertaken on all our feeds and raw materials at our own laboratory. Our partners IEN are acknowledged internationally as leaders in the provision of equine feed screening services.” Mitavite Feeds that are included in the Centaur Feed Assurance Program will, over time, carry the distinctive Centaur logo on each bag. With the Program now under way trainers can be assured that Athlete+, Sustaina and Formula 3 are included in the testing program. Trainers can register to receive regular feed test reports at www.mitavite.com/centaur or by emailing mitavitecentaur@inghams.com.au Colin Price General Manager - Mitavite | Mitavite (A Division of Inghams Group Limited) 3 Pile Road, Somersby NSW 2250 Australia Ph: +61 2 4340 9609 | Mob: +61 407 297 967 | Fax: +61 2 4340 1708 Email: cprice@inghams.com.au | Website: www.mitavite.com

The Association of Racing Commissioners International's Board of Directors has approved the latest revisions to its Model Rules of Racing, including protocol for when riders sustain concussions, best practices when lightning is in the area and raising the scale of weights in Quarter Horse racing. The model rules provide the template for racing regulatory entities and the framework under which the sport has made significant gains toward uniform regulations among jurisdictions. The updated model rules can be viewed at and downloaded by using the button at the bottom of this message. The ARCI Model Rules Committee recommended the updates, which then went to the full board for approval at ARCI's 84th Conference on Equine Welfare and Racing Integrity in Hot Springs, Ark. The committee is chaired by the South Dakota Commission on Gaming's Larry Eliason. "The Model Rules are a living document that we amend as needed to provide our regulatory members the most up-to-date blueprint for best practices in all areas of conducting pari-mutuel racing," said ARCI President Ed Martin. "Concussions are at the forefront of all sports, and these additions to the Model Rules make sure racing participants get proper evaluation when the possibility of a concussion occurs and do not return to racing prematurely. At the heart of all these changes is the well-being and safety of our human and equine athletes." The changes: ARCI-007-020 (A)(5)(b) and (A)(10) -- The concussion protocol for jockeys was amended to mandate that at least one of the previously-required medical professionals on site (physician, nurse practitioner or paramedic) must be adequately trained in diagnosing and assessing concussions. The updated rule requires racing associations to adopt, post and implement protocol approved by the regulatory authority for the diagnosis and management of concussions sustained by jockeys. Such protocol is to include an assessment with a minimum of a SCAT-5 exam by an individual trained in concussions, which could be the track physician, paramedic, nurse practitioner or athletic trainer. Additionally, a return-to-ride guideline must be established in order to clear a jockey who has been concussed, or is believed to have been concussed, once he or she is declared fit to ride. ARCI-007-020 (M) and 014-025 -- Tracks are required to develop an approved hazardous weather and lightning protocol, including access to a commercial, real-time lightning detection service with strike distance/radius notifications. When lightning is detected within eight miles radius of the track, racing or training will be suspended and participants alerted to seek shelter. Racing or training can resume only after a minimum of 30 minutes has passed since the last strike is observed within an eight-mile radius. ARCI-010-020 (D)(3) -- The scale of weights jockeys carry in Quarter Horses, Appaloosas and Paints was increased four pounds in each age class, with the minimum weight to be carried now 124 pounds for 2-year-olds, 126 for 3-year-olds and 128 for older horses.   DOWNLOAD THE MODEL RULES OF RACING   Ed Martin 1510 Newtown Pike Lexington, KY 40511   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -  

Guelph, ON, May 10, 2018 - Ah Spring; when countless materials are covered in shedding horse hair including your clothes, car, perhaps even your couch if you don’t change out of barn clothes immediately when you get home. But what if you are not covered in your horses shedding coat? Delayed shedding or regional hypertrichosis can be early warning signs of Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID) – a metabolic condition that suppresses the immune system when high cortisol levels increase blood sugar levels.  Look for abnormal hair coat including patches of long hair on the legs, wavy hair on the neck, changes in coat colour or shedding patterns and unusual whisker growth.  Equine Guelph’s Senior Horse Challenge healthcare tool contains useful resources to practice identifying metabolic issues.   Did you know horses seen for laminitis have frequently been found to have PPID or Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)? Laminitis can be a sign of both metabolic issues yet it is often treated without identifying the underlying cause.   There is a fair bit of confusion in the horse world over mixing up PPID and EMS as they share many of the same clinical signs. Horses with PPID may also have some of the features of EMS. Equine Metabolic Syndrome had many previous names: peripheral Cushing’s Syndrome, pseudo Cushing’s syndrome, hypothyroidism, and insulin resistance syndrome.   Horses with EMS do not display hypertrichosis (excessive hair growth) or delayed shedding. New research studies are investigating changes in gut microflora as another possible early warning sign of EMS. PPID cases are more common in horses over 15 where EMS tends to be seen in horses over 5 years of age. Laminitis and obesity are often the first clues in identifying both disorders. Working with a veterinarian who can perform diagnostics is necessary to conclude which disorder you are dealing with and determine the best treatment options. Early warning signs can be subtle and of course early diagnosis is important.   “Every year Boehringer Ingelheim sponsors a PPID testing campaign in partnership with Animal Health Laboratory in Guelph,” says Guillaume Cloutier, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health. “In 2017, out of the 442 horses that were tested, 273 (62%) had a positive result for PPID.”   To learn more about detecting early warning signs for metabolic issues and other important factors in maintaining health as your horse ages, visit Equine Guelph’s Senior Horse Challenge Healthcare Tool, kindly sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim.   by: Jackie Bellamy-Zions

The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has advised Harness Racing New South Wales that meloxicam has been detected in the blood sample taken from CORRINYAH CONMAN following its win in race 5, the HUTCHEON & PEARCE PACE (2000m) at Temora on Friday 9 March 2018. The “B” sample has been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) in Victoria. Trainer Mr S. Hillier has been advised that HRNSW will continue its investigation into this sample and an inquiry will be conducted in due course. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 183A, it has been determined that CORRINYAH CONMAN, the horse subject of the certificate, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an Inquiry or investigation.    Florist – positive sample THE Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has advised Harness Racing New South Wales that synephrine has been detected in the urine sample taken from FLORIST following its win in race 5, the DONGES SUPA IGA PACE (1720 metres) conducted at Young on Tuesday 27 February 2018. The “B” sample has been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) in Victoria. Trainer Mr M. Johnstone has been advised that HRNSW will continue its investigation into this sample and an inquiry will be conducted in due course. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 183A, it has been determined that FLORIST, the horse subject of the certificate, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an inquiry or investigation.    MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRANT ADAMS | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gadams@hrnsw.com.au

Intense exercise is a hazard to racehorses in Ontario and has been linked to hundreds of deaths within the industry, according to a new study from the University of Guelph. Peter Physick-Sheard, an emeritus professor of population medicine, examined 1,709 deaths in Ontario's horse racing industry between 2003 and 2015. "Training and racing at top speed within a short amount of time and space is a health risk for horses," said Physick-Sheard of his study that was released this week in Equine Veterinary Journal. Damage during exercise to the horses' musculoskeletal system, such as fractures, dislocations and tendon ruptures, is the most common underlying problem in the deaths, the study says. The study notes that the immediate cause of death for 97 per cent of those injured horses is euthanasia that occurs shortly after. Dying suddenly ranks second and is closely affiliated with exercise, with those horses either dying on the track, or very shortly after a workout. Since 2003, Ontario has maintained a registry of racehorse deaths that occur within 60 days of a race or trial entry, which provides insight into mortality rates, the study notes. Physick-Sheard studied thoroughbreds, standardbreds and quarter-horses and looked at the differences in mortality both between the breeds and within them. He and his team examined data from about three million race starts — each time a horse starts a race — and official recorded work events along with necropsy reports, the bulk of which were done at the university after a racehorse dies. Thoroughbreds have the highest mortality, the study says, and notes that exercise represents "a far greater hazard for thoroughbreds than standardbreds" with a risk of dying up to eight times higher for thoroughbreds. "The best example is the very high mortality for very young horses, especially stallions, on the thoroughbred side and is associated with exercise, which is an area we should focus on," he said. On the standardbred side, Physick-Sheard said "it's the high mortality that tends to occur off the track. That's really interesting and suggests something procedural and cultural." The study says the rate of deaths off the track for standardbreds is still about half that of thoroughbreds off track. He said his study highlighted important structural factors within the industry that need to be examined more closely, especially those within the thoroughbred world. An oft-stated euphemism within horse racing goes as: standardbreds race to win and thoroughbreds race to breed. That has real world implications on the horses, Physick-Sheard said. Standardbred horses, those used in harness racing, are focused on winning over a long period of time, he said, noting that most begin racing at three years old and can race until they are about 14 years old. "Their type of work and training is much more progressive, much more gradual," he suggested as a possible reason for the lower death rates of standardbred horses. Those horses will often run upwards of 1,000 kilometres before they enter their first race. Standardbred horses have a high mortality that tends to occur off the track, pointing to another area that should be examined, Physick-Sheard said. "That's really interesting and suggests something procedural and cultural," he said. Thoroughbreds are different. "Thoroughbred racing is more intense and progressive, but shorter in duration," Physick-Sheard said. There is more money to be made in thoroughbreds through breeding, rather than from wining races, he said, and making money is more intense for thoroughbreds younger than five years of age. Thoroughbreds generally train with relatively short distances to minimize damage that is punctuated by short, intense bursts on the racetrack. The management of young thoroughbreds, especially those aged two years old, is another area the racing industry should examine further, he said. Physick-Sheard said the study is the "first of its kind" to compare mortality in three racing breeds. The death registry is held by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario, a Crown agency that regulates the horse racing industry. The AGCO granted the professor access to the data. The AGCO said it has just begun to examine the study. "There is an initiative to review the rules of racing and we're looking at what can be improved and what can help," said Mike Wilson, the manager of racing operations with the AGCO. "The findings (of the study) will be useful in the AGCO's current review." The AGCO said an official investigates every time a horse dies or is injured or there is an incident. "Any time a horse goes down, it's one horse too many," Wilson said. By Liam Casey Reprinted with permission of The Canadian Press

Millstone Township, NJ - April 25, 2018 -  The last three of the 21 trotters and pacers in the kill pens the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) is trying to keep from slaughter, have a reprieve, but do not have homes, Valid Moment, Native Avenue, and DeMartini. They do have donations to care for them until SRF can hopefully find them homes. Secret Impression who has a home is now sick and injured. A veterinarian has been called. Her home is now pending.   SRF expresses its heartfelt gratitude for the support received for these horses. It's been a stressful six days trying to pull it all together, very sad to have had to do this at all, but a few sweet things have come from this effort. Four horses had their past owners take them home, and help came from a horse that was considered rescued himself, St. Elmo Hero, who went on to earn nearly $800,000 for his owner John Barnard.   Josh Green, one of 21 owners of Skedaddle Hanover, during his racing career, owning him for just 6 months,stated, "I don't understand how people can be in racing and not fall in love with and appreciate how hard these horses try for us." Eric Goodell and Josh Green took Mr. Mystic N, one from this group, home on the same day they heard he was in trouble.    We were surprised that the United States Trotting Association, (USTA) chose not to pick up SRF's press releases, as their readers are people more closely associated with these animals than anyone, especially past breeders, owners, trainers, and fans. These are the people who should have this information. The USTA states that they do not have a policy on slaughter. It is well known that some of the directors oppose it and some are pro slaughter. We suggest that when members vote their new directors in that they pose that question before casting a vote.    Homes are still needed.       To offer a home, make a tax-deductible gift to help any of the other 390 horses inSRF's program, or to sponsor one, contact SRF 732-446-4422 or email SRF.Horseandkids@Adoptahorse.org. To see some of the other 390, to sponsor one, adopt one, or make a gift click here AdoptaHorse.org/Donate.    Standardbred Retirement Foundation | AdoptaHorse.org | Judith Bokman

Millstone Township, NJ - April 23, 2018 - Since Friday, April 20, 2018, of the 21 horses weighed and tagged to ship for slaughter, Mr. Mystic N was helped by his past owner, Eric Goodell, and trainer Joshua Green, and is being returned to Mr. Goodell; Jeremy Sharky was helped by Linda Maine, and being returned to her; DC Piggy Bank left to go to another organization in Indiana; Captain is going back to his owner Dr. Claude Gedreau in Canada; Forward Action has found a loving home in Kentucky by a dear friend of SRF;  two others have been offered a home at a rescue/sanctuary in NJ, that will be confirmed today. Two adoption applications have been received and will be screened. That leaves 14 others still in need of homes, and donations.   Funds have been raised for all expenses to help 2 more horses, but they do not have home offers. Should SRF need to find a place on their roster they can afford to do so with these donations, but by securing homes for them, donations can go to others in great need.   "We have asked for an extension beyond Tuesday's deadline, but we worry that the kill buyer will again pull a few from this group to fill his truck, should he have empty space," noted Paula Campbell, SRF's President. "This effort needs a collaboration of good, kind and generous people to get it accomplished. These horses worked hard when racing and most have had a miserable life afterwards. Slaughter is unacceptable."   The Standardbred Retirement Foundation(SRF) is presently paying for the all the care, board, and medical needs on 390 horses. It is stretched, and concerned about its financial situation, and without a farm of their own, the concern is even greater. "Since 1989 we have managed to follow-up every horse in the program for life, secure more than 4,000 adoptions, and care for those still not homed," shares Judith Bokman, SRF's Executive Director. "  We need so much more help to give these animals a little dignity. It shocks me that we have survived this long.  If it wasn't for a few small bequests over the years we wouldn't be here today trying to help these 21."   Here is how you and SRF can save these horses:   1. If you choose to take a horse back that you bred, owned or trained or wish to help a horse, SRF will assist with the facilitation. The list with their prices is available in the group of photos. 2. For horses with a home offer, but the home is unable to pay for the horses and the shipping (often to rural parts of the US), SRF will collect donations to help. 3. For a horse without a safe place to go, if donations cover all expenses, the price of the horse, shipping to quarantine, then shipping again to a boarding facility for rehabilitation and retraining for adoption and several months of board, SRF will consider whether it can take on the responsibility of another horse. This is approximately $3,000. 4. For horses with no help at all, the controversial option that is being considered is humane euthanasia. The cost is, the kill pen's purchase price, in addition to shipping to a facility, the veterinarian and rendering, approximately $550.   To offer a home, make a tax-deductible gift to help SRF Facilitate a horse to a home being offered, or to send a gift for SRF to afford taking on one, contact SRF 732-44604422 or SRF.Horseandkids@Adoptahorse.org.  CLICK HERE TO DONATE: https://www.adoptahorse.org/donate OR  https://www.gofundme.com/save-22-horses-from-slaughter - GoFund Me page. The list of horses is included in the group of photos.   A choice can be made whether a horse leaves the earth by the heinous act of slaughter or through humane euthanasia. Should some horses not receive help and you wish to provide a more peaceful passing please call us to discuss. To contact by telephone- 732-446-4422, email SRF.HorsesandKids@AdoptaHorse.com.         TAG # NAME SEX AGE TATTOO EARNINGS   PRICE SIRE/   DAME 1871 Mister Mystic N G,16 ZH205 $403,984 $800 In The Pocket-Seafield Mystic-Nero's Bebe 1877 Yankee Fur OR Stubling G, ? ? ? $720   1864 Nole G, 14 1BE96 $54,911 $810 Yankee Glide-CR Seminole Sister_Royal Trubador 1865 T-N-T Dozer G, 20 T4635 $23,102 $910 Sir Taurus-Midnight Oasis-Desert Night 1866 Forward Action   G, 15 4AE47 $761 $810 Save and adopted into a loving home  1868 Valid Movement G, 14 4DB75 $31,602 $800 Towner's Big Guy-Chevie Sprints-Sport Master 1863 Artistocracy G, 14 9BD28 $56,013 $810   Artiscape-Expensly Ashley-Expensive Scooter 1867 Loutopia M, 18 WC096 $0 $660 Sir Taurus-Golden LOu-Baltic Speed 1869 Demartini (formerly Whitsand Predator) G, 17 XR713 $0 $835 Grinfromeartoea r-Filly Bahama-Matt's Scooter 1880 Us Invader G, 20 T0018 $38,784 $660 Balanced Image-Picaboo Flame-Keystone Flame 43 Dale G. 15 8AC46 $10,454 $892 Inquirer Mandalay Bay-Overcomer No Tag Native Avenue G, 7 2J771 $3,460 $940 All American NAtive-Lady Welagin-Walton HAnover 688 Indiego G, 21 SC361 $0 $892 Die Laughing-Nude Indigo-Abercombie No Tag DC's Piggy Bank G, 15 5A679 $589,811 $675 Saved by another organization in Indiana. No Tag Hillbilly Style OR Letsgo Dort G, ? ? ? $650   No Tag Bob J L G, 15 9CN42 $48,026 $600   Dauntless Bunny-Etoile De Mai-Rumpus Hanover N/A Captain G, 13 9C641 $1,540 $700 BREEDER SAVED Him and Took Him Home. No Tag RC Kettle Chip G, 11 4EC77   $12,099 $1200   Dream Vacation-Malhana Gunilla-Bonefish No Tag Jeremy Sharky G, 15 4A407 $255,982 $750 Saved by Linda Maine and took him home. No Tag Secret Impression M, 14 4B682 $49,380 $625 Go Get Lost-Tuf Tonya-TZ 760 Casimir Army Patrol G, 20 TR315 $0 $700 Shre Patrol-Casimir Mooky     Standardbred Retirement Foundation | AdoptaHorse.org | Judith Bokman       Standardbred Retirement Foundation, 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101, Millstone Twp., NJ 08535    

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