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CHESTER, PA - 2019's Two-Year-Old Pacing Filly of the Year, Lyons Sentinel, continued her preparations for the imminent stakes season with a 1:54.3 qualifying win at Harrah's Philadelphia early Tuesday afternoon. The daughter of Captaintreacherous, who was also last year's leading moneywinning freshman at $801,809, made a frontward move at the half and hung up successive :28 quarters to post an easy 2½ length victory, giving her now two wins and a second in preseason qualifying action. Threelyonsracing owns the Jim King Jr. trainee, who was driven as usual by Tim Tetrick. In two-year-old qualifying action, two pacing colts tied for fastest mile of the day by winning in 1:57.2. The Somebeachsomewhere - Swinging Beauty gelding Whichwaytothebeach went down the road from the rail, stepping home in :57.2 - :28.1 for trainer/driver Roland Mallar and owners Alan Johnston, Northfork Racing Stable, and John Craig; matching that clocking was the Always B Miki - Don't Deny Me gelding Dontpassme Hanover, a pocket rocket for driver Art Stafford Jr. and trainer Mark Harder, the latter also co-owner with Rick Phillips. In the trots for babies, speed honors went to the Bar Hopping - Up Front Annika gelding Ginger Tree Knox, who made every pole a winning one in 2:00.4 for trainer/driver Steve Cook and the partnership of Sam Beegle, Ginger Tree Ventures LLC, Double D Racing Stable and the Reber-Chasen Stable. From the PHHA / Harrah's Philadelphia  

No one needs to worry about Shartin N resting on her laurels, although she might get to relax a little more this year than her previous two seasons. In 2018, Shartin N made at least one start in every month from January through November on her way to the first million-dollar season for a pacing mare and a Dan Patch Award for best older female pacer. Last year, she made at least one start in every month from March through November. She won 15 of 19, finished second on three occasions, earned $982,177, set the record (1:46.4) for the fastest mile ever by a female pacer, and was named top pacing mare, Pacer of the Year, and Horse of the Year. She became the first pacing mare in history to be named Horse of the Year, as well as the first horse bred outside North America to receive the honor. The 7-year-old New Zealand import is already working toward her return to the races, which is expected to come next week at Dover Downs. Then it's off to Yonkers Raceway's Blue Chip Matchmaker Series, a six-week event that Shartin N has won each of the past two years. Following the Matchmaker, which begins March 13 and ends April 18, trainer Jim King Jr. will look to give Shartin N some time off. "We've decided to try to give her a split year instead of trying to go all the way through the year," King said. "If that works out, when we get done with the Matchmaker hopefully we can give her a pretty good break and then get her back ready to take off from there. It won't be a real long break, but there are some races that we're going to try to miss. "If she can be good early and be good late, she can still accomplish a lot. That's a lot to ask of a horse that you just got done racing for 10 months, twice. But so far, she hasn't minded me doing foolish things." Shartin N, bred in New Zealand by Grant Crabbe, was purchased in the fall of 2017 by Richard Poillucci. She is now owned by Poillucci, Jo Ann Looney-King, and Tim Tetrick LLC. Since arriving in North America, Shartin N has won 34 of 43 races and $2.03 million. "It's just absolutely amazing for us to be in a position to buy a Down Under mare and become Horse of the Year," Poillucci said. "I was just hoping for a nice open mare. This has far exceeded all expectations. What she's done at that level of racing is unbelievable. To keep them on their toes in those kinds of miles is a very difficult task. "I think that's what most impresses me, her ability to carry speed the way she does and standout in races where they're going (fast fractions) and she's still charging. Horses don't do that stuff on a regular basis." Tetrick has driven Shartin N in all her North American starts. "She was pretty tough (to handle) when she started," Tetrick said during this past Sunday's Dan Patch Awards banquet, when the Horse of the Year announcement was made. "But she had big lungs and you couldn't get her tired. When she was on her game she was as good as any horse I've ever sat behind. She has a ton of speed and grit. She had a mind of her own, but she worked with us and we got it done." Shartin N qualified on Feb. 19 at Dover Downs, winning in 1:51.3. Poillucci called the qualifier "absolutely perfect." "Here it comes again," King said, referring to a new season. "Every indication is that she's come back very good." Shartin N will attempt to become the first horse to repeat as Horse of the Year since trotting mare Moni Maker in 1998-99 and the first pacer to repeat since Cam Fella in 1982-83. She finished second to McWicked in balloting for 2018 Horse of the Year and, according to noted harness racing historian Bob "Hollywood" Heyden, is the first since Matt's Scooter in 1989 to be runner-up one year and come back the next season to receive Horse of the Year. "I just want to say thank you to all the voters, and most of all thank you to Shartin," King said Sunday at the banquet, adding later, "She's definitely been life changing for us." by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Trenton, NJ — Just three years shy of age 70, Jim King Jr. is coming off a 2019 harness racing season that could make him the subject of an AARP magazine cover story. The popular trainer conditioned two Dan Patch Award winners in pacing mare Shartin N and 2-year-old female pacer Lyons Sentinel, and Shartin N is one of the favorites for Horse of the Year, which will be announced Feb. 23 at the Dan Patch Awards banquet in Orlando, Fla. The King Stable, where Jim trains alongside wife Jo Ann Looney-King, won a career-record $4.27 million in purses last year, smashing its previous mark of $2.88 million set just one year earlier. He also had a career-best 168 victories and notched career triumph 1,000 in early December at Dover Downs. And in late December, King was named winner of the U.S. Harness Association’s Good Guy Award, which his wife had won previously in 2015. Again, this all happened at age 67. “It’s almost unbelievable,” King said. “These things don’t usually happen to old men; I’ll be 68 next month. Usually that’s on a downwind. And heck, outside of the age number, it doesn’t look to be like it’s going to be anything any different for a time to come.” The reason he’s sticking around is not just because of his recent good fortune. King will be in the barn as long as it’s feasible, no matter how few or many wins he collects. “This is what I always wanted to do to start with,” King said. “(Success) doesn’t want to make me do it any more or less. It doesn’t change anything about me, except I probably smile a lot more.” And this from a guy who is known for smiling a lot. He’s a good-natured, good-hearted soul who people enjoy being around, and he is proud to be known as a Good Guy. “That’s one of those awards that I don’t think the name suits the award,” King said. “It doesn’t sound like as much as it really is. It’s quite a thing to win that award for what it means. Of all the people that could possibly be chosen, I was, and my wife was in the past. I think that’s kind of special. “It’s a lot more than talking to reporters. The reporters get info from other people as well. It’s more than just I took the time. It’s that that other people in the business had good things to say about us. I think that plays into it. We always care about that sort of thing.” They also care about the sport itself, which is why King feels it’s important to serve as an ambassador. Then again, his general character make-up is being nice to those beyond the Standardbred business. He likes people in general. “Absolutely,” he said. “Sometimes my wife teases me about talking to total strangers about the business. She says, ‘They don’t know what you’re talking about.’ I say, ‘That’s OK, some day they will maybe.’ But anything that will catch a person’s ear and make them pay attention to it helps. I think it’s important to be a person that’s approachable, to be outgoing to people in and out of the business. It kind of lays out the way I like my lead my life. It’s not always about the gain. Sometimes it tends to be, but it’s not about the personal gain.” If the gain comes along, however, King won’t argue. With his dynamic duo of Dan Patch Award winners, opportunity knocked with a couple of heavy hooves. “Those are really nice horses, top quality, no doubt,” he said. “I don’t know if it took a genius to get the accomplishments done with them. Fortunately, I got to go along for the ride. They’re just really good horses. With a little luck, maybe we’ll do it again.” He had a known commodity with Shartin N, who had another outstanding season on the heels of her 2018 Dan Patch Award-winning campaign. Shartin N won 15 of 19 races last year at age 6 and earned $982,177 on her way to her second honor as the sport’s top older female pacer. She finished second to pacing stallion McWicked in the voting for 2018 Pacer of the Year and Horse of the Year and is in the hunt for both awards again for 2019. “I was kind of disappointed she didn’t get it last year for whatever it’s worth, but she didn’t,” King said. “It’s hard for a mare to do; it’s got to be even harder for a foreign mare to do. Statistically I felt she had it last year, statistically I feel like she had it this year. I guess it’s not all about the numbers. I’ve never had anything like her before. There’s nothing like having something like her and owning part of a horse like her.” Then there was the newcomer, Lyons Sentinel, who surpassed expectations according to her trainer. She won nine of 14 races, was never off the board, and earned $801,809 to lead all 2-year-olds. “She didn’t just jump out as being the big dog, or being the best,” King said. “But each time I’d race her I would see traits that are very likeable. She liked to race, she’s not necessarily a run-off-and-leave-them type of girl, but she likes to win. Her will was just tremendous along with her ability.” And while that’s all in the recent past, it’s enough to keep King fired up for the immediate future as he is looking for another big year from the two of them and, hopefully, a few other horses who could make names for themselves. “They’re both a year older,” he said. “I’m hoping they both come back just somewhere close to where they were. At present time they both look real good. I’ve started them both back up and they’re very likeable. They kind of put themselves back together after a long year. “I don’t feel like I have any other horse the caliber of those two, but I’ve got a pretty nice bunch of horses as far as the stable goes. It’s exciting.” To hear King talk, last season’s excitement bordered on the sublime. “Things happened you just never felt could possibly happen,” he said. “It’s almost like the sky’s the limit. It’s amazing what you can do in this business. My wife and I lived in a tack room some years ago and then we go and win the Breeders Crown. I like to say I’ve walked every street.” Whether it’s another smooth street or a rocky road this year, King will continue to be a good guy and Jo Ann will remain a good gal. In fact, maybe the two of them should be the AARP cover story. They can safely be termed the “Good Couple” of harness racing. “I guess we are,” King said. “We’ve been together for 44 years now. It’s a real team at the stable. I’ve got quite a crew around here, and the support of my family (including Standardbred TV luminary Heather Vitale). It’s just kind of special. There is no such thing as Jim anymore. It’s Jim and Jo Ann. That’s the way it’s written, and it is definitely by choice.” A choice made by two good people. by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent  

Dover, DE – Bettor Trix N was impressive tonight for harness racing driver Tim Tetrick at Dover Downs in a filly and mare condition event. It began with Valuable Art and driver Corey Callahan who left alertly from post 8 and led the field to the quarter. Bettor Trix N and Tetrick decided to take the pocket trip. The field raced single-file until Shezza GNP N pulled first-over nearing the half for Montrell Teague. Valuable Art and Shezza GNP N battled to the three-quarter pole, pacing a 26.3 quarter. Bettor Trix N and Tim Tetrick, benefited from the speed duel and powered their way in the stretch to victory. Bettor Trix N was sent off as the 6/5 race favorite.  This win gave her a new lifetime mark of 1:51.3.   Bettor Trix N, is owned by Jo Ann Looney-King and trained by her husband Jim King Jr.  Valuable Art finished a gallant 2nd, for trainer Nick Callahan. Sweet Bobbie finished a ground saving third for trainer Kay Gannon and driver Jonathan Roberts. Tim Tetrick picked up four wins on the night. Wiggle It Jiggleit and Slick Tony continue their rivalry in tomorrow’s 12th race. by Alex Kraszewski, for Dover Downs  

HARRISBURG, PA - The remaining winners of Dan Patch Awards in the human and broodmare categories, as voted on by the membership of the United States Harness Writers Association, the sport's leading association, have been announced. The Rising Star and the Breakthrough Awards are for up-and-coming stars in harness racing, in the trainer/driver and non-trainer/driver category respectively; the Good Guy Award is given to someone who thinks and speaks positively about the sport and has a good relationship with the media, while the Unsung Hero is someone performing important tasks for the sport out of the spotlight. In grouping these four awards and their winners for description, the combinations of the foursome falling on male and female lines, as expressed in the title, is interesting. Dawnelle Mock is the Director of Marketing for the Meadows Standardbred Owners Association. In her three years at the western Pennsylvania track, she has been the spearhead for the MSOA onto multiple digital platforms. She has shepherded several successful charity events; she has reached out to form a partnership with the Pittsburgh Penguins ice hockey team, a project with a large crossover potential; and she has been the MSOA liaison with the operators of The Meadows' racetrack for a number of successful promotions, which contributed to a 6% year-over-year rise in handle at the track. Mock "works well with others," but much of her success has been born of her own initiative and vision. Wanda Polisseni has long campaigned harness horses under the name Purple Haze Stable with success, mostly in her home state of New York. She has founded a humanitarian organization to improve the standard of living - education, human services, civic improvement - in Upstate New York. Long an advocate for the after-track life of racehorses, on both the Standardbred and the Thoroughbred side of racing, Polisseni has now undertaken to buy a farm in New York that will serve as a home and a base for the Purple Haze Standardbred Adoption Program, for state-bred horses, that will also be the headquarters of the Harness Horse Breeders of New York State. If Wanda Polisseni can help, you can count her in; like Mock, she makes things happen. Both Bob McClure, based in Ontario, and Jim King Jr., who races out of the state of Delaware but competes at all the major tracks, come from generations of horsepeople, and as such are not the type to seek the spotlight, though they cooperate with the media when attention comes their way. Attention came to McClure in a big way during 2019, when he won the most prestigious harness race in North America, the Hambletonian, with Forbidden Trade. The victory was the culmination of a decade of continuous growth for the graduate of smaller raceways to the Grand River-Georgian Downs-Western Fair circuit and then right to the "A" class of his province's racing at Woodbine at Mohawk Park, where he ranks among the colony's top drivers. He earned over $5 million (Can.) for the first time in 2019, despite suffering a broken pelvis on April 25 - he was back racing in less than a month, using the cutting-edge technology of a hyperbaric chamber to aid his recovery. Jim King Jr. has a reputation as a "ladies' man," but only in the best sense. In addition to having in his family two of the sport's best spokespeople - wife Jo Ann Looney-King, a former winner of the Good Guy Award, and the self-proclaimed "harness racing firecracker," awardwinning communicator Heather Vitale - King seems to have a particular touch with the pacing ladies, as evidenced by his two 2019 stars: the free-for-all Shartin N, who won over $2 million in 2018-19, and the precocious two-year-old Lyons Sentinel, North America's biggest earner as a freshman while banking over $800,000. In keeping with his winning the Good Guy award, King will give honest, thoughtful answers to the media's questions, never assuring success, but conscious of the power of the stable that his talents has built. Brittany Farms LLC, breeders of the 2019 "Millionaires' Row" of Bettor's Wish, Manchego, Six Pack, and American History among other top trotters and pacers, was voted as Breeder of the Year by USHWA. Also earning honors was the dam of Manchego, Secret Magic, who was picked as the Trotting Broodmare of the Year. Brittany Farms, owned by Hall of Famer George Segal, was purchased in the late '80s and has been among the leading nurseries in the sport throughout Segal's ownership. In 2019 Brittany ranked third among breeders with offspring winning over $12 million, despite a much lesser number of produce racing than many other establishments. Brittany bred three Breeders Crown winners in 2019 - American History, Manchego, and Reflect With Me - to raise their all-time total to 25 Crown champions, one behind Hanover Shoe Farms. As noted, the Cantab Hall-Chorine Hanover matron Secret Magic earned honors as Trotting Broodmare of the Year, primarily because of the $2 million world champion Manchego, but also contributing was In Secret, a ten-time winner and $200,000 earner against Open company. Brittany bred Secret Magic, raced her, and then kept her as a broodmare until selling her early in 2019 to Hanover. The Art Major-Precious Beauty matron Precocious Beauty has only two foals of racing age - the powerful, Breeders Crown-winning freshman pacing colt star Tall Dark Stranger and the filly Beautyonthebeach, a winner of $540,428 who lowered her mark to 1:49.2 during 2019. These two sharp stakes performers were enough to secure Pacing Broodmare of the Year honors for Precocious Beauty, herself a racetrack winner of $838,004 and with ever-increasing prospects as a broodmare for James Avritt Sr., who bred her, raced her, and continues to own her as a broodmare. This release completes the announcement of the Dan Patch Awards in the human and broodmare categories. The twelve racehorse divisional champions will be announced this Friday, January 3, at 6:30 p.m. on The Meadowlands' "pre-races" show, with media releases following (availability to view that announcement will be released shortly). All of the honorees in this release and their connections will be honored at USHWA's annual Dan Patch Awards Banquet, celebrating the best and brightest of harness racing in the past year. The banquet honoring the champions of 2019 will be held on Sunday, February 23, 2020 at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort in Orlando FL, the climax of a weekend that also finds USHWA holding its annual national meetings. The Trotter of the Year, Pacer of the Year, and Horse of the Year will be revealed for the first time at the Banquet. Tickets for the Dan Patch Awards Banquet are $180, with a filet mignon dinner featured; "post times" on February 23 are cocktails at 5:30 p.m., with dinner to follow. Tickets, and other Banquet-related information, can be obtained through Dinner Planning Committee Chair Judy Davis-Wilson, at zoe8874@aol.com or 302 359 3630. Hotel reservations for those attending can be made through USHWA's website, www.ushwa.net; a link to the hotel's computer is on the front page of the website. Those who would like to take out congratulatory ads for awardwinners in the always-popular Dan Patch Awards Journal can do so by contacting Kim Rinker at trotrink@aol.com or 708 557 2790 (the 2019 journal is online at the writers' website). From the U.S. Harness Writers Association

Q’s Cruise defeats Slick Tony in the $27,500 Blue Hen Open Handicap for Delaware Owned or Bred harness racing  pacers Thursday at Dover Downs In a thrilling stretch duel, Q’s Cruise, the pocket rocket out sprinted Slick Tony to the wire. Driver Dexter Dunn changed tactics and blasted out of the gate with Slick Tony.  Q’s Cruise and driver Tim Tetrick parked and then released Slick Tony at the quarter pole. Slick Tony cut fractions of :26.4, :55.2, 1:23 with a final time of 1:51.  Benefitting from that perfect trip, Q’s Cruise and driver Tim Tetrick, for trainer Jim King Jr., tip toed up the inside and won by a neck.  They were the 4/5 race favorite. Slick Tony for driver Dexter Dunn and trainer George Leager was second. Owosso Flash for Tony Morgan and trainer Don Brittingham finished third. Duplicated N and driver Tim Tetrick for trainer Jim King Jr. braved the cold and wind to win the $25,000 Open pace at Dover Downs. Duplicated N left alertly and was fully extended to the quarter as Victor Kirby aboard Sicily released him and accepted the two hole. Larry Karr pulled 1st up into the wind but could not gain on the leader. Duplicated N cut fractions of :26.3, :54.4, 1:22.2  and in a final time of 150.4, winning by three quarters of a length. Duplicated N. was sent off as the 3/5 wagering favorite. Sicily and driver Victor Kirby for trainer Wayne Givens, sat the pocket and finished 2nd. Bo Mach and driver Dexter Dunn for trainer Dylan Davis was third. Driver Tim Tetrick won six races on the night Trainer Jim King Jr. won 4 races and trainer Josh Green won 3 races. Driver Tim Tetrick will be heading to the Arctic Circle and compete in the first Arctic Horse Race event.  The event takes place on December 14 in Rovaniemi, Finland. by Alex Kraszewski, for Dover Downs

DOVER, DE - On a freezing, cold evening, a field of seven were set to dethrone the queen of harness racing, Shartin N.  The combined lifetime earnings of the participants was over $6 million dollars. Caviart Ally upset Shartin N in her last two starts.  Trainer,Jim King Jr. could not tell which Shartin N would show up after her warm up drills.  All except Shartin N’s sole driver Tim Tetrick.  As the race unfolded, Apple Bottom Jeans (Corey Callahan) left alertly through a 26.4 opening quarter.  Caviart Ally (Andrew McCarthy) lingered on the outside then made her move as Apple Bottom Jeans yielded the lead.  Shartin N settled in fourth through a pedestrian 55.3 half. At the five-eights pole Shartin N took her cue, as Tetrick stormed past Caviart Ally reaching the three quarters in 122.1. It was all over from there for the field as Shartin N glided to a powerful victory in 1.49.4. The well respected field and fans tipped their cap to the queen Shartin N. Kissin In The Sand( Nancy Johansson) and driver Dexter Dunn bravely tested Shartin N, pulling first up took the place spot. Caviart Ally (Brett Pelling) and driver Andrew McCarthy held for third. The next chapter will be in the TVG Classic for Mares at the Meadowlands.   by Al Kraszewski, for Dover Downs

Dover, DE — Shartin N and Caviart Ally renew their harness racing rivalry and have drawn outside posts in the $40,000 Mares Invitational at Dover Downs on Wednesday (Nov. 13). Shartin N set a world record of 1:46.4 earlier in the season for trainer Jim King Jr. and has bankrolled more than $2 million in purses lifetime. Caviart Ally upset Shartin N in the Breeders Crown for trainer Brett Pelling and has earned more than $1.7 million lifetime. Kissin In The Sand, trained by Nancy Johansson, finished third in her last two starts against Shartin N and Caviart Ally and drew the rail on Wednesday. Divas Image (for trainer Jen Bongiorno) enters off a qualifier and has been limited in her starts this year. Apple Bottom Jeans and trainer Dylan Davis) finished second at Dover in her last start, but was away from the races six weeks prior. She has earned more than $300,000 this year. Delishka N, a Wayne Givens trainee, upset Apple Bottom Jeans in her last start. Trainer Ron Burke’s Reclamation has been in the money 14 out of 16 starts this year and has a seasonal mark of 1:50. Click here for the complete field and post positions. by Alex Kraszewski, for Dover Downs  

Shartin N, the No. 1-ranked horse in harness racing's weekly poll, returned to action for the first time in a month on Tuesday, winning a harness racing qualifier in 1:52.3 at Harrah's Philadelphia with trainer Jim King Jr. in the sulky. Following the race, regular driver Tim Tetrick texted King's wife Jo Ann and asked how big King was smiling when he came off the track. "It was pretty good, you betcha," a laughing King said. "I never thought I'd drive a horse like her and I'm just thankful to have my hands on her now, for sure. She's pretty special." King last drove Shartin N in a qualifier on Jan. 10, 2018 as the New Zealand-bred mare prepared to make her North American debut. At the time, Shartin N was known as much for her rambunctious behavior as for her potential. Since then, Tetrick has been credited with helping the 6-year-old develop into a more relaxed racehorse. "She was really pleasing," King said about her qualifier on Tuesday. "Her manners have changed an awful lot since I drove her last. Timmy's handling has made a difference in her. She was just very kind out there and that's a long way from where we started. She did everything she was supposed to." Shartin N was sidelined because of sickness but is ready to resume her chase for $1 million in seasonal earnings. She has won 14 of 15 races this year (with a current 13-race win streak) and banked $826,427 for owners Richard Poillucci, Jo Ann Looney-King, and Tim Tetrick LLC. Last year, Shartin N became the first mare in harness racing history to reach $1 million, finishing the campaign with $1.05 million. She is being pointed toward Sunday's Allerage Mare Pace at Lexington's Red Mile, the Breeders Crown at Woodbine Mohawk Park, and the TVG championship at The Meadowlands to complete her 2019 season. Shartin N, who won 19 of 24 races last year, was the 2018 Dan Patch Award winner for best older female pacer and runner-up for Horse of the Year to male pacer McWicked. "Hopefully she can end up with over a million (dollars) again and we sure would like to be on the stage with her as Horse of the Year," King said. "But we know we have to finish up the year good. It's a big wish. "She doesn't appear to have any health issues now, everything seems good. We gave her good recovery time and she got a good mile before her race coming up, so we feel pretty good about that. We're just hoping to finish up the year the way we started and get the old girl some notoriety and try to enjoy it." The “first half of the Daily Double”  qualifiers was won by 2018 Yonkers International winner Cruzado Dela Noche, in likely his last prep before defending his title at the Gotham oval on Saturday, October 12. The son of Muscle Massive sat third at the race’s midpoint, then came his own last half in 56.2 to post a 4¼ length victory in 1:55.2. Marcus Schoen, who recorded his first lifetime driving victory at Philly last week, handled the horse for trainer Marcus Melander. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

WASHINGTON, PA, Aug. 8, 2019 -- When Hanover Shoe Farms bred Western Ideal to A And G'sconfusion, it named the ensuing foal Adriano Hanover to honor Adriano Sorella. And why not? Sorella is one of harness racing's most prominent owners with such stars as millionaire pacer Jimmy Freight in his portfolio. Yet when Adriano Hanover walked through the sales ring at Harrisburg, Sorella passed up the opportunity to purchase him. Instead, that honor went to trainer Jim King, Jr. representing owners Jo Ann Looney-King and Joseph Palermo, who gave $60,000 for the youngster. Now, Sorella must watch from the sidelines as his namesake tries to extend his career unbeaten streak to four in Saturday's Tyler B, a $182,052 Pennsylvania Sires Stake for freshman colt and gelding pacers, at The Meadows. Adriano Hanover competes in race 8, first of three Tyler B divisions, leaving from post 6 for regular pilot Tim Tetrick. First post is 1:05 PM. Here's how Adriano (the horse) slipped by Adriano (the horseman). By the time the Harrisburg sale rolled around, Sorella already had purchased just about all the yearlings he wanted to buy. "They told me they named him for me," recalls Sorella, who is based in Guelph, Ontario. "I looked him over and even took a picture with him. But I was planning to buy only two Ontario-breds at Harrisburg. I wanted to get something ready for Andrew Harris to prepare and Richard Moreau to train, so I bought two for $100,000 each. Right now, Adriano is better than the ones I bought." Indeed, he's marched through PASS and Arden Downs splits, both at The Meadows, and Jim King indicates his colt has improved with experience. "He has kind of a bouncy gait, so we've been working on that," King says. "I think he's one of the better ones. He's eligible mostly in Pennsylvania this year, but he has a lot next year." The saga took an ironic twist when, in that PASS event, Adriano Hanover faced a colt named Aethon, who's co-owned by none other than Sorella. Did that set up something of a conflict for Sorella? Root for the horse you own? Root for your namesake? "I gotta cheer for the horse that I pay the bills on," Sorella says. "But if I could ever get a piece of the horse that's named for me . . ." King responded in a similar light-hearted vein: "If he says he'd trade me straight up for Jimmy Freight, I'm not up for it." At least we think they were joking. Saturday's card also features a $60,000 PA Stallion Series event for 2-year-old colt and gelding pacers. On the wagering front, the program offers a carryover of $4,545.21 in the Pick 5 (races 2-6) and a $190.24 carryover in the final-race Super Hi-5. By Evan Pattak, for The Meadows Standardbred Owners Association                                                            

East Rutherford, NJ -- Pacing and trotting harness racing mares met at The Meadowlands on Saturday (Aug. 3) in respective stakes on the Hambletonian Day program.   In the mares trot, the $186,000 Dr. John Steele Memorial, Manchego won her second straight, taking her foes wire-to-wire in a stakes record 1:50.   Dexter Dunn took Manchego to the top off the gate, while Hannelore Hanover settled in second and Top Expectation followed in third. There was no movement behind the leader as Manchego cut fractions of :26, :55.2 and 1:23.1 and Darling Mearas S rushed up first-over, attempting a duel.   Manchego held strongly to pass the wire first, with Hannelore Hanover getting some late foot to finish second over Darling Mearas S.   Manchego is trained by Nancy Johansson for owners Black Horse Racing.   In the mares pace, the $183,000 Lady Liberty, Shartin N continued to dominate the division while setting a world record of 1:46.4 with Tim Tetrick in the bike.   It was never in doubt that Shartin N was in control, taking the top over a quick-leaving Apple Bottom Jeans and paving the path to victory with a :26 first quarter. Kissin In The Sand led the second tier with a slight challenge, as Youaremycandygirl made a move and swung three-wide as the half went in :53.4 and three-quarters was posted in 1:21.   Then, Shartin N sprinted away from the field, with Caviart Ally closing on the rest to follow, while Shower Play passed tired ones to pick up the third spot.   Shartin N is trained by Jim King Jr. for owners Richard Pollucci, JoAnn Looney-King and Tim Tetrick LLC.   by Frank Cotolo, for the Hambletonian Society

Harness racing's "hottest mare in the land" Shartin N was just far too good in the only $35,000 elimination of the Roses Are Red at Woodbine Mohawk Park on Saturday night. Trained by Jim King Jr. the daughter of Tintin In America with Tim Tetrick aboard drove to the front just after the 26.2 first quarter and jogged easily to a smart 1:48.4 winning her 33rd race from just 45 starts, Shartin N now has earnings of $1,561,155 in the bank. With a 26 second last half off the front Shartin N made it difficult for any other horse to make ground. Caviat Ally ran second and Yourmycandygirl ran third. Two eye catching runs behind Shartin N were Bettor Joy, who stormed home from 14 lengths behind at the first quarter mark to record one of the fastest quarters recorded, a 25 second final burst to get up for a fast closing close fifth and Seaswift Joy who came home strongly in 25.2 to finish fourth. The field for the Final next Saturday is already drawn as below. 4 -- Pace, purse $330,000 (EX, P3, SU, TR, Y4) ROSES ARE RED - FINAL - FILLIES & MARES - 3 YEAR OLDS & OLDER. Post time: 07:30 P.M. Lasix: 03:15 P.M. Horses Entered: 11 1 Tequila Monday(L) M Kakaley H Oakes 2 Caviart Ally(L) A Mccarthy B Pelling 3 Youaremycandygirl(L) Y Gingras R Burke 4 Shartin N(L) Ti Tetrick J King 5 Bettor Joy N Ti Tetrick J King 6 Dont Think Twice A B Sears A Harris 7 Alexis Faith B Mcclure C Coleman 8 Bettors Up(L) M Kakaley N Surick 9 Seaswift Joy N(L) D Mcnair T Alagna 10 Kissin In The Sand S Zeron N Johansson 11 Double A Mint(L) L Roy R Moreau

CHESTER PA - All three defending champions will be on hand Sunday afternoon at Harrah's Philadelphia, as the southeast Pennsylvania track hosts its Super Stakes Sunday of $100,000 Invitationals - the Betsy Ross Pace for mares, the Maxie Lee Trot, and the Commodore Barry Pace, going as races ten through twelve respectively on the 12:40 card. Each of these races will also count towards the pointstandings for the summerlong Great Northeast Open Series (GNOS), in which many of these harness racing stars have been competing. The giant card also has three divisions of the third preliminary leg of the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes for three-year-old pacing colts. Here is a look at all four groups: $100,000 BETSY ROSS MARES PACE (12th edition; stakes record 1:48.3, Southwind Tempo, 2009.) Combined earnings of field: $7,202,760. Average lifetime mark: 1:49.3 (five in 1:50 or less). The defending champion in the Betsy Ross is the great New Zealand import Shartin N, last year's North American mares divisionwinner who is carrying on in final style so far in 2019 - five wins in six starts, including the Blue Chip Final, and earnings of $319,500, second only to Levy Final winner Western Fame. And it's hard to imagine Shartin N having more solid connections, especially in this race - trainer Jim King Jr. trained Shartin N to victory last year, and in 2017 wife Jo Ann Looney-King conditioned the victorious Nike Franco N. And their driver (and Shartin N's co-owner) Tim Tetrick has won the Betsy Ross six times: more than all others drivers combined. He also guided Southwind Tempo to the stakes record. Two potential liabilities for Shartin N: drawing post seven in the eight horse field, and not having raced for 22 days, and only twice in 53 days. The mare has seemed to thrive on an intermittent schedule in the past, however. Starting just inside Shartin N will be Tequila Monday, who is merely six-for-six this year and the only double winner in the Great Northeast Open Series so far, with Brian Sears driving for trainer Hunter Oakes, whose father Chris conditioned 2013 Ross winner Economy Terror. Add in the likes of hard-hitting veteran Caviart Ally, last year's top three-year-old filly, Youaremycandygirl, and other fast distaffs, and the Betsy Ross figures to be an interesting chess match. $100,000 MAXIE LEE TROT (12th edition; stakes record 1:50.2, Market Share, 2014.) Combined earnings of field: $9,424,706. Average lifetime mark: 1:51.1 (three sub-1:51, one sub-1:49). The defending champion of the Maxie Lee, a race honoring the superb area trainer for many years, is Will Take Charge, who will be guided from post five by Scott Zeron for trainer Jeff Gillis. Will Take Charge looks to be coming up to peak form right now, fresh off a win at Yonkers, but it is likely others will draw more mutuel attention than he will. Take, for instance, The World's Fastest Trotter, Homicide Hunter (1:48.4 at Lexington last year), who this season is guided by the Burke Brigade (who has won this race four times: once by patriarch Mickey, and the last three by the recordsetting Ron). Homicide Hunter just won his second start of the year, at Pocono, last week, taking a GNOS contest in 1:52.3, and the early sheet says he will be getting a driver change to George Napolitano Jr., with whom Homicide Hunter won the 2018 Breeders Crown (Yannick Gingras will be in Sweden this week, competing in the World Driving Championship). Guardian Angel AS, starting from post two, has also been a GNOS winner this year, and his chances will be helped by the sulky presence of Tim Tetrick, who has won the Maxie Lee five times, including with stakes recordholder Market Share. $100,000 COMMODORE BARRY PACE (5th edition; stakes record 1:47.3, Wiggle It Jiggleit, 2016.) Combined earnings of field: $5,318,913. Average lifetime mark: 1:49.1 (3 sub-1:48). Filibuster Hanover, the highest moneywinner in the Commodore Barry with just north of $1.5 million in career earnings, is the defending champion in this event, and if victorious would make trainer Ron Burke the first horseman to have two Barry titles - no driver or trainer has won twice in the race's four-year history. In his last start Filibuster Hanover set the pace in a GNOS event here, but was caught up the inside by the upstart Kiwi Tiger Thompson N; this week the "Tiger" has post six and "Filibuster" post seven, difficult assignments in a talented field. Rodeo Rock won last week's GNOS race at Pocono, defeating Tiger Thompson N and posting the fastest clocking of the year at Pocono, 1:49. Last year's highly-regarded sophomore Courtly Choice is in the Barry, and on this Harrah's day you can't ignore a Tim Tetrick-driven horse (though he has yet to win this race); Tetrick will drive the hardhitting Donttellmeagain. PENNSYLVANIA SIRE STAKES 3YO PACING COLTS ($57,218 each in races three, seven, and thirteen). The defending champion in this group is also competing at Philly in Sunday: Proof, a winner of $450,000 and never worse than fourth in thirteen career starts, with six wins and four seconds. But Proof is unlikely to be the favorite in his thirteenth race cut - that honor will go to Captain Crunch, who was the 2018 freshman colt pace champion, and who made his 2019 debut last Sunday at Pocono, winning over a sloppy surface in 1:49.1, fastest mile of the year by a three-year-old regardless of size of track, and with a stinging last quarter of 26, with driver Scott Zeron mostly an interested passenger late. The third race division is topped by Southwind Ozzi, who won a Sire Stake two starts back and then was second behind Captain Crunch last week, only 1¾ lengths back, and Wild Wild Western, a PaSS winner last week. In the seventh race division, you can make a good case for most of the entrants to record their first 2019 Sire Stakes win. With 27 horses who have won in 1:50 or less on the card, plus 30 winners of over $500,000 lifetime, including eight millionaires, the entire Sunday card at Harrah's Philadelphia is an outstanding one.   PHHA / Harrah's Philadelphia Jerry Connors

This Week: Dexter Cup elimination, Freehold Raceway, Freehold, N.J. Schedule of events: The Grand Circuit at Freehold this week features a single $39,650 Dexter Cup elimination for 3-year-old open trotters. A field of eight will go to the gate in race 10 with an approximate post time of 3:30 p.m. (EDT). Complete entries for the race can be found by clicking on this link. Last time: Western Fame was the top horse in the five preliminary rounds of the George Morton Levy Memorial Pacing Series and he proved to be the best again in Saturday's (April 20) $664,000 championship for older male pacers at Yonkers Raceway. The 6-year-old stallion won the final by 4-3/4 lengths over Rodeo Rock in a stakes-record-equaling 1:50.4. More The Better N was third. After an opening quarter-mile skirmish with Anythingforlove A and JJ Flynn, 1-5 favorite Western Fame settled into the lead and never relinquished the top spot from there. The opening quarter was reached in :26.4, the half in :55.3, and three-quarters in 1:22.3. Ideal Jimmy, who started from post eight and was fourth during the early goings, launched a first-over bid at the halfway point, but was rebuffed by Western Fame's :27 third quarter. Ideal Jimmy finished fourth. Dan Dube drove Western Fame, who had four wins and a second in the Levy's five preliminary rounds, for trainer Rene Allard. The duo won the previous two Levy finals with Keystone Velocity and also captured the championship in 2015 with Domethatagain. "Those fractions look kind of fast for him, but he did it nice and easy," Dube said. "Turning for home he gave me another run again. He's so nice to drive. He never gets tired." Western Fame, a son of Western Ideal-Shyaway, has won five of seven races this season and earned $446,300. For his career, he has won 21 of 74 starts and $1.48 million. He is owned by Go Fast Stable, Stephen Klunowski, B & I Stables, and Gilbert Short. His clocking equaled the stakes record set in 1993 by Silver Almahurst. Shartin N became the first repeat champion in the 11-year history of the Blue Chip Matchmaker Series, capturing Saturday's $402,600 final for pacing mares by 1-1/2 lengths over stablemate Bettor Joy N in 1:52.1. Apple Bottom Jeans finished third. Shartin N became the first repeat champion in the 11-year history of the Blue Chip Matchmaker Series. Mike Lizzi photo. Feelin Red Hot and Apple Bottom Jeans exchanged the lead in a :27.2 opening quarter-mile, after which driver Tim Tetrick put even-money favorite Shartin N in motion from fourth place. Shartin N reached the front by the half, timed in :55.2, and was unthreatened the rest of the way. "When I knew (Apple Bottom Jeans) had to go hard to get the lead and let (Feelin Red Hot) go and retake, I thought I would take my chance and make (Apple Bottom Jeans) push the envelope," Tetrick said. "The fractions were still fair and (Shartin N) still ended up on the lead at the wire." Shartin N was last year's Dan Patch Award winner for best older female pacer. She has won four of five races this season and earned $264,500. For her career, the New Zealand-bred daughter of Tintin In America-Bagdarin has won 30 of 42 starts and banked $1.39 million. Jim King Jr. trains Shartin N for owners Richard Poillucci, Jo Ann Looney-King, and Tim Tetrick LLC. "She's got big lungs and she's a tough SOB," Tetrick said. "Week in and week out she shows up. When she puts her head on the gate she wants to race. She's proven that every week." Complete recaps of the weekend races are available at the Grand Circuit website. Grand Circuit Standings: In 2019, the Grand Circuit leaders in three categories (driver, trainer and owner) will once again be tracked on a points system (20-10-5 for the top three finishers in divisions/finals and 10-5-2 for the top three finishers in eliminations/legs). Winbak Farms is the sponsor for the 2019 Grand Circuit awards. Here are the leaders following this past weekend at Yonkers: Drivers: 1. Tim Tetrick - 158; 2. George Brennan - 90; 3. Jason Bartlett - 87; 4. Daniel Dube - 77; 5. Scott Zeron - 75. Trainers: 1. Jim King Jr. - 122; 2. Rene Allard - 77; 3. Ron Burke - 53; 4. Richard Banca - 51; 5. Ross Croghan - 43. Owners: 1. Jo Ann Looney-King - 45; 2. Tim Tetrick LLC - 41.5; 3. D R Van Witzenburg - 40; 4. Robert Cooper Stables - 39.1; 5. Royal Wire Products - 37. Looking ahead: Grand Circuit action will take place next weekend at Freehold Raceway, Meadowlands Racetrack, and Miami Valley Raceway. Freehold has the Lady Suffolk for 3-year-old filly trotters and the Dexter Cup final for 3-year-old open trotters on Saturday (May 4); Meadowlands Racetrack will host the Cutler Memorial for older trotters and the first leg of the Graduate for 4-year-old pacers on Saturday (May 4); and Miami Valley Raceway features the Miami Valley Distaff for older trotting mares and the Chip Noble Memorial for older pacing mares on Monday (May 6).   Paul Ramlow Internet News Manager U.S. Trotting Association

Chillaxin Away is the defending champion on Delaware's harness racing circuit for state-bred male pacers, but Goldberg is ready to try to wrestle the title from him. The two horses meet in Thursday's (April 4) $100,000 Delaware Standardbred Breeders Fund final for 3-year-old colts and geldings at Dover Downs, with "Chilly" a slight 8-5 favorite on the morning line. Last season, Chillaxin Away won both DSBF championships for 2-year-old male pacers, in October at Harrington Raceway and November at Dover, and was two neck defeats from being unbeaten in six races in the series. Goldberg did not race in Delaware last year as he was instead pointed to the Grand Circuit. The colt was limited to only four starts because of a virus but hit the board three times in open stakes action. Chillaxin Away enters Thursday's final off a half-length win over Goldberg in 1:51.2 in the second preliminary round of the DSBF. Both horses were winners in their first-round races. Chillaxin Away starts the final from post four with Tim Tetrick driving for trainer Jim King Jr. while Goldberg, who is 9-5 on the morning line, leaves from post three with Montrell Teague at the lines for trainer Brenda Teague. "We think we've got a pretty good chance," King said about Chillaxin Away, a gelding known as "Chilly" around the barn. "We have to deal with Goldberg. They were extremely high on him. They had some issues, but now they seem to have him squared away. I'm concerned about him. We were able to handle him last week but he out-drew us and is definitely a concern." Chillaxin Away is by Roddy's Bags Again out of Shake Away, a mare who raced at the top levels of the Delaware circuit for King in the mid-2000s. Chillaxin Away was bred by King's wife, Jo Ann Looney-King, who remains the owner of the horse. For his career, Chillaxin Away has won eight of 15 races and earned $170,600. His past five starts away from the DSBF series have all come against fields with older horses. "All of (Shake Away's) male babies have been pretty good horses and this one is as good as any of them," trainer King said. "He's stepped up pretty good. Like all of them, he's got little quirks and little issues here and there but nothing we haven't been able to correct by the next start and go again. "He's a fun little horse. He's got plenty of ability and I like his determination. His raw speed is really good; he can really sprint. For where he's got to go, I don't think there are any that can pace a quarter faster than him or anything like that. Barring anything really silly, I think he's going to be OK in the final. He gets home in 26 and a piece after being first over, that's pretty good anywhere you go let alone for a Delaware-bred." Chillaxin Away will not be doing a lot of traveling, though. He is not staked outside of Delaware. "I'm a little bit stingy," King said with a laugh. "I still don't think he's one of those. He's just a really nice little horse. He doesn't have the size to him, that was the biggest thing. He just didn't appear to be stout enough. I've been close enough to it to know that it's not very likely we're going to bring one out of our backyard to (compete on the Grand Circuit)." Montrell Teague hopes he can eventually return to the Grand Circuit with Goldberg. Teague bred and owns the colt, who is a son of Mr Wiggles out of Chausettes Blanche. The colt has won two of seven career races and earned $47,070. Last year, Goldberg finished second to eventual Dan Patch Award-winner Captain Crunch in a division of the Nassagaweya Stakes and was third behind Captain Ahab and De Los Cielos Deo in his elimination of the Metro Pace. A virus knocked the colt out of the Metro final and sidelined him the remainder of the year. "I just turned him out because I didn't want to ruin him," Teague said. "He showed a lot of promise last year. I was very big on him, but you never know how they're going to come back after catching a virus like that. I'm just happy he came back. "(The timing of the DSBF) is kind of a gift and a curse. I wanted to give him a little more time in the field, but at least I can see what I've got. I staked him up pretty good to give myself options. The main thing is to see how he comes out of Thursday's final." Teague is happy with Goldberg's return so far. "He's a little bigger, stronger," Teague said. "He's a lot smarter, he's quieted down a lot. Last year he was pretty rank and this year I've opened him up a little bit and it's worked pretty good so far. He's letting me drive him; last year he was a little more aggressive and didn't really know what he was doing." The DSBF championship is race 10 on Dover's card. Racing begins at 4:30 p.m. (EDT). For Thursday's complete entries, click here.   Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association www.ustrotting.com      

CHESTER PA – Donttellmeagain, the last horse to have won a race against 2018 Harness Horse of the Year McWicked (at Dayton in late September), came out sharp in his 2019 bow at Harrah’s Philadelphia in a Tuesday morning qualifier, coming his own back half in 53.4 to trip the timer in 1:52.2. Tim Tetrick was behind the Jim King Jr. harness racing trainee, and the pair got away fifth from the outside seven post, then moved with a backstretch flow and retucked third as Sicily brushed to the lead. Donttellmeagain moved out again in the stretch, but the $500,000+-winning Sicily proved hard to overhaul, but overhauled he finally was by the five-year-old Dragon Again gelding, a neck to the good for Paton Racing Stables Inc. Among the three-year-olds who qualified impressively were: -- The McArdle filly Queen Of The Pride, who won her Ohio Sire Stakes Championship last season, coming home in 27.4 to post a 1:52.4 victory for driver David Miller and trainer Kevin Lare; -- Practical Cat, a Muscle Hill $230,000 yearling, who won handily in 1:55.2 for driver Yannick Gingras and trainer Per Engblom; -- And the “Philly fillies at Philly,” Pennsylvania Sire Stakes misses Philly Hanover and Rockn Philly, with the former edging the latter by a half-length in 1:56.3 for driver Dexter Dunn and trainer Ron Coyne Jr.   PHHA / Harrah’s Philadelphia Jerry Connors

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