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Pompano Beach, FL...August 10, 2019...Joe Kroll, one of the highly respected and likable horseman in harness racing, passed away on August 8 at the age of 61. Born in Pittsburgh, PA on November 17, 1957, Joe had a long an storied career in harness racing since moving to Florida with his wife, Shawna, in 1983. While he did have success with Florida Stakes winners, including Indigo Swirl, J S Victory and Goucher, Joe played a huge roll in the success of big name stables and trainers such as Continental Farms and Team Nordin. His first notable success was with the world champion Tarport Frenzy, which solidified his reputation as a dedicated trainer with patience, passion and gentle hand that calmed even those horses that could be difficult to train. After his horse, Indigo Swirl, won a Florida Sunshine Stakes event in 2007, he was asked if he felt winning the major share of a lucrative event like that was like winning the lottery. In his typical and humble style, he said, "I won the lottery the day I met my wife!" Joe spent the last eight years working with Jim McDonald with that trainer paying homage to Joe Kroll by lamenting, "Time might be important on the racetrack but, around the barn, time was never important to Joe. In other words, he worked until he was satisfied that every horse in his care was satisfied to his high standards. "A typical example of that was, over the past two winters, he played a big role in the care and training of the great McWicked, last year's Horse of the Year. He, truly, was one of the great ambassadors of harness racing and contributed to the success of many great horses and horsemen. Besides his wife, Shawna, survivors include his sister, Susan Sichko (frank(, his brother, Mike (Denise), nieces and nephews. A memorial will be held at a later date. Anyone wishing to help defray medical costs can do so through Zelle using phone number 561-577-4596. by John Berry for the FSBOA  

Pompano Beach, FL...April 1, 2019...No kidding! Caviart Reagan upset the applecart in Pompano Park's Sunday night harness racing feature while Panocchio won for the 42nd time over South Florida's five-eighths mile oval--one of five wins for leading driver Wally Hennessey. Caviart Reagan, owned and trained by Jim McDonald, was driven to victory by Dave Ingraham, who escaped trouble when the leader, the 4 to 5 favorite Brigadierbronski A, suddenly made a miscue around the final bend on the lead. As Brigadierbronski's pilot, Wally Hennessey, searched for clearance to avoid further situations developing, Ingraham took the pylon route on through and opened up a daylight lead, eventually scoring by 1 1/2 lengths in 1:51.4, a seasonal best time. Second choice American Hustle, with Bryce Fenn in his sulky, rallied to finish second while Mc Mach, handled by Rick Plano, finished third after suffering a bit of interference trying to avoid the breaker. Windsun Gotham finished fourth while Brigadierbronski managed to pick up the minor award in the classy quintet. In a post-race interview, driver Dave Ingraham said, "well, it was just one of those things. When Wally's horse went up in the air, I was lucky enough to find some room inside and saving that ground was the difference. The five year-old gelded son of Bettor's Delight now has a 3-2-3 scorecard in 13 starts, good for $19,460 for the year and $152,480 lifetime. Off as fourth choice at 8 to 1, Caviart Reagan paid $19.60 to his faithful. Hennessey, though, was not silenced on the Sunday program, competing in five other races on the program and winning all five, including a conditioned event with the track record holder, Panocchio. This gallant nine year-old altered son of No Pan intended took command after a demanding opening panel of :26.4 and led every stride thereafter to score in 1:52.1 for his second win of the year and 65th of his illustrious career--42 of those at Pompano Park. Spirit Shadow, handled by Andy Santeramo, finished second, 2 1/4 lengths away, while Pointsman, driven by Jim Meittinis, was next. Major Starlight and Impressive Art picked up the final awards in the sextet. Panocchio now has banked $580,628 to go along with his track record of 1:48.3 at Pompano Park achiened four seasons ago. Off at 1 to 5 on the tote-board, Panocchio paid $2.60 to his multitude of backers. Racing continues on Monday night with a Super Hi-5 finale sporting a carryover of $75,242.   by John Berry for Pompano Park

Every career and every job has this factor. It is the thing that keeps the job going and keeps the consumer interested. It may be a service or a product. It is the reason people do, people buy, and people watch. Harness racing has many different factors that keep the fans in the stands and the horsemen in the barn. It is the lights and camera at the end of the race, the cheers of the crowd in the grandstand, the anticipation and excitement in the paddock at post time. It is watching with tears and screams of joy as the horse you own or the horse you bet on win. More importantly, it is the animal that makes the sport what it is. The horse that is carefully and slowly trained for days, weeks, months, and years. The horse that is cared for on a 24/7 basis with a specific feeding schedule, training regimen, and equipment list. Each horse is treated and cared for individually. The sport of horse racing is plagued by stereotypes that depict the game to be inhumane and cruel. Rumors and lies are spread that convey the sport as abusive to the animal. The uninformed believe the bits and the equipment, the driver and the whip, the stall and the gates, and more are harmful to the wellbeing of the horse. The purpose of each of these and the behind the scenes in the barn is seemingly only known to those who have actually experienced it and lived it. The bit fits comfortably in the mouth where it does not make contact with the teeth. It is used for steering and control. Each piece of equipment is specific to the horse to ensure safety in the race. At a young age, these horses are trained to become accustomed to their harness and equipment. Trainers work slowly with them so that they understand their job and so that they are ready and fit to race. The whip that the driver uses is hit against the numbered saddle pad that the horse wears producing a sound, not pain. The stall a horse sits in is reasonably sized for the animal. It is for the protection and safety of the horse. There is a reason for everything that horsemen do – the only solid and most commonly shared reason is that these are here for the safety of everyone involved (horse, trainer, driver) and for the comfort of the horse. Horses are beasts of power and strength. They are capable of enduring long distances at fast speeds or short distances at even faster speeds. They run courses, go over jumps, race around barrels, and more. They are equally as intelligent as athletic. They have the ability to communicate through movement. Their ears, their eyes, and their nose communicate specific emotions. A simple gesture of the ears forward or back to indicate whether or not best to stay away or come close. The eyes moving directionally or as a retaliation of fear or anger when white. The nose flaring due to activity and motion or fear. They cannot verbally communicate with us but we have the ability to understand them. Harness race horses are individually cared for in the sport. Horsemen do what it takes to adjust them to their stable and their routine. Horsemen understand the personalities and quirks of these animals. They know what the horse’s favorite treat is, whether or not the horse likes a certain grain, how much water they drink, or what allergies they may have. They find the right equipment, right shoes, and right medicine. And, when it is time, they find the right home for the horse after their racing careers have come to an end. These horses power our sport and they have had a significant mark in history while continuing to write it. They are our horses, our pets, our family. No matter if they are a trainer or owner or groom, horsemen do what it takes to ensure the comfort and safety of their horses and a forever home after racing. Hyperion Hanover, now a 15-year-old pacing bay gelding, out of Cam Luck and Hattie. As a two-year-old, Hyperion was purchased out of the Harrisburg sale for $75,000. The trainer lightly raced him and put him back in the sale. Trainer-driver Jim McDonald purchased the colt for $5,500 for SSG Stable. He was shipped to Florida and retrained as 3-year-old. He was a stubborn horse with no good work ethic, according to McDonald. He was schooled multiple times and qualified three times. They started him five times with two wins, one in 54 and last quarter in 27.3 with driver Wally Hennessey. He was shipped to Rob Fellows in Ontario and won his first sire stake in 52. Then, he was shipped to Rod Hennessey in Western Canada where he won the Western Canada Pacing Derby. He made $300,000 as a three-year-old. He continued in Ontario and became an open pacer for another year. He went back to Jim McDonald in Florida and was given the winter off then, qualified, and sent back to Ontario. Once again with Fellows, he won in 1:50 flat. Until 2012, Hyperion continued to be a preferred type horse. He was shipped back to Florida and campaigned with the Open Pace for two more years. At age 12, he began to lose stamina and paced in only 53 and change. Owner Ed James decided rather than putting the horse in a claiming race and continuing to race him, he would retire at age 12. He was turned out in a two-acre paddock at a farm in Florida - Smiley Farms owned by Gary and Caroline Smiley. That farm was sold three years later so the Smiley couple called James and asked him to find the horse a new home. Ed James decided to put him on a truck to a facility in Canada that James is familiar with and has brood mares at already. He paid $1,500 to ship him from Florida to Canada for his new and forever home at Killean Acres in Ingrasall, Ontario. Hyperion Hanover was turned out with other horses upon arriving, the farm owners being wary of how he would act with the others. Within ten minutes he had found himself a buddy. He was never made into a riding horse because of his disposition and because the owners felt he earned his right to retirement. Overall, Hyperion Hanover had 301 lifetime starts (52 wins, 49 seconds, 42 thirds) and over $1.2 million in earnings lifetime with a record of 49.1. Ed James is the owner of Hyperion Hanover and the owner of SSG Gloves and Glasses. He has been involved in harness racing throughout his life, mostly as an owner. He was very active in the Ontario program and is the owner of McWicked. He contributes to the USTA retirement fund and is active in post-racing. He is also supportive in other equine facilities, including the hunter-jumper divisions in West Palm Beach. If a rider is wearing SSG gloves when they win a category in the show, he donates a set amount of money to a charity. A horse with a solid record and an owner with a well-known business, SSG Gloves and Glasses. Despite the large cost to transport the horse from Florida to Canada, Ed James was willing to do whatever it took to bring the horse to his retirement home. Five years ago, Michelle Crawford built her retirement farm. She built it for her love of the horses and great interest in developing a good life after racing for them. “It became this fire in the belly to just make sure they went to good homes,” she said. Michelle has a history of working as an advocate for rescuing and rehoming Standardbreds, including in the involvement of retiring racehorses. She has worked with Standardbred Retirement Foundation and has helped rescuing tons of horses. She had already had some retirees and a breeding farm, but expanded to build the retirement farm. A thousand acres and beautiful facilities that would be forever homes to numerous horses. She has 35 current retirees at her farm, including retired broodmares. It depends on the age, if the horse is young enough and has potential if it is either sold or moved to the retirement farm. “The hardest part is that some of these horses still have purpose, more than to just stand in a field for their lives. Especially, if they are young, but if there isn’t a better option for a better home, it is better they stay in place.” There are Standardbreds and Thoroughbreds at her farm, some that may be broke to ride in the near future with the help of a local woman. Michelle Crawford purchased Fifty Shades Darker as a yearling. He had gotten an injury to his foot that his first trainer rehabbed, but was unsuccessful in getting him back going again. He was finally good enough to be able to race again. The decision was now to race him up and down in the conditions or put him into a claimer. The trainer suggested putting him into a claimer, under the impression that no one would claim the colt. The first race in a claimer and he was claimed. “It broke my heart. I waited a year and a half after that hoping to get the horse back, but he wasn’t in a claimer,” Crawford said. “I watched every race and finally, he was in to go in a claimer at Pocono Downs. I didn’t know anyone there to claim him, but got in contact with trainer Chris Oakes to claim him so I could just retire him.” Chris Oakes convinced Michelle to allow him to try to race him which resulted in winning the first four starts. He made too much money and was back to square one with the decision to jam into the conditions or be put into a claimer again. The decision was made to retire him. He now lives in a paddock with a Clydesdale and four old broodmares. “Everybody loves him. They can just jump on his back. He is just a lovable and wonderful horse. A treat hog and a carrot hog. He was just one of those horses with this distinctive brow line that really set him apart. I just loved him so much and wanted him back for retirement,” Michelle said. Crawford also retired Classic Conway, a horse that she was able to watch being born. It was her “first child coming into this business”. She kept the trotting gelding from birth to retirement, where he now resides at her retirement farm. He is now a nine-year-old pasture mate to other horses at her farm. According to Michelle, Classic Conway had this special personality. He would hear her voice and come running. “He knows he is special,” she said. He won a lot of sire stakes as a two-year-old and had a lot of potential. In his three-year-old year, he hurt himself. Michelle began to nurse him back to health. He was trailered to Morrisville for the spa and towed on the grass for soft footing. He came back and won the final that year. Classic Conway was later retired due to a suspensory. He was and is Michelle’s most special horse with Fifty Shades Darker being right behind him. One horse that could continue racing and one that could not share a great life after racing on the same farm. “I am a huge, professional corporate, but found a place in the horse world to serve a purpose. I want to leave a legacy in making a difference to help animals and to save the Standardbreds or any horse. I hope that we can stop slaughter. I’ve made it my mission to gather troops to promote and do right by the industry and help in the after-racing world.” Michelle was introduced into the business 11 years ago after meeting her husband. She has an owners license and a breeding farm and now, retirement farm. Her farms have 80 broodmares, their 80th mare just being bred and 300 horses of babies, yearlings, and more. She is also a proud owner of Atlanta, the recent Hambletonian winner. Casie Coleman is currently an owner-trainer and former driver in the harness racing business. She was born and raised into it and she says it is all she has ever done. At just the age of 38, her lifetime stats include earning just under 60 million and over 2,000 wins. She has won Canada’s trainer of the year five times. Coleman claimed Our Lucky Killean (“Luck Dog”) when he was three years old out of an allowance claimer that went for $60,000. The pacing bay gelding went on to make over a million dollars in purse money, winning the Molson Pace, Des Smith Classic Pace, and other open events. “He had a mind of his own, a hundred percent,” Coleman said. “He was the boss. If things weren’t done his way or if we fought it, he would tie up easily or just get sour and race poorly.” “When you would walk him to the race track hooked to the jogger, he had days that it would take nearly an hour because he would just stand still, watching the other horses jog by. He wouldn’t move until he was ready to. “Other times he would literally go backwards in the jog cart. One time, he took me up a large hill and tried going backwards. I did my best not to tip over the jog cart!” Casie Coleman retired the gelding when he was ten years old. He was still sound and in great shape, but just wasn’t performing the way he used to. “I didn’t want to cheapen him and I didn’t want him in a claimer,” she said. She found a home with a friend of hers, Jennifer Connor, who worked for Blue Chip Farms at the time. He is now 17 years old and she still has him. “He has an amazing home. I don’t even want to know what stall rent is at the barn he is at, it is gorgeous.” Connor shows “Luck Dog” at Standardbred shows. Coleman found this new and wonderful home with the help of sharing a post about her search on Facebook. Jennifer contacted Casie expressing great interest for the horse. “I knew she would give him this unreal home, so I sent him out to New York,” she said. “He lives like a king now.” Casie is able to see him every him every once in a while, when she is in the area in New York. “Lucky, as I call him, or Luck Dog as Casie calls him is one of the classiest horses I have ever had the privilege to be around,” Jennifer Connor said. “He walked into the indoor arena the day after he arrived and I was able to get right on him. He marched around the arena like he had been doing it his whole life. And he never looked at any of the jumps that were scattered around the arena. “He exudes confidence. He has never refused anything that I have asked of him. He has shown in-hand, under saddle, jumped, been driven, hunter paced, recently went on a camping trip, and was part of a commercial shoot for Chase Bank at Blue Chip Farms. “I love this horse so much. He would jump a table if I asked him to. He walks, trots, and has a pretty decent canter for a pacer. He likes to work and prefers to be stabled with all the amenities like a fan in the summer. He’s always professional. He might not be the most affectionate horse, but he tolerates a lot!” she said. Jennifer Connor grew up in harness racing. She showed jumpers and equitation in most of her childhood. She attended University of South Carolina and rode on the NCAA Division I Team. Lucky is the first Standardbred she has ever retrained for a second career. “He is by far the easiest horse I have trained!” Casie Coleman contributes to retired race horse charities and funds. She even, recently, discovered one of her former horses that she hadn’t owned for years, Rudy the Rock, was located at a slaughter house. She contacted them and sent $1,200 to bail him out. He was rescued and given to Go and Play Stables. Our Lucky Killean is one of many horses Casie Coleman has retired. “Way too many to remember them all,” she said. “I always try to find good homes for them.” Michelle Crawford and Casie Coleman have high profile stables in the racing business. They have done whatever it takes to help provide current and former racehorses with forever homes. Owner-driver-trainer John Hallett and owner-trainer Michelle Hallett are New York and Florida horsemen and, also, my parents. They have both been in the business throughout their entire lives. They began their stable, Hallett Racing Stable, in 1991 and have since raced along the East Coast, more recently out of their stables in Tioga Downs and Pompano Park. Typical New Yorker was short in stature with a thick build. He had a black coat with a small white star in the center of his face. He earned his name as he was a “typical New Yorker”. Across the Tappan Zee bridge, the population of New York City is riddled with the stereotype that they have this overly pompous attitude. They are home to the Bravest and the Finest. New York City is the Big Apple, the land of dreams. The skyscrapers are big, the personalities are big, the attitudes are bigger. If you have ever had the pleasure of traveling across into the city, you understand where all of these notions originate. New York City has definitely earned their title and respect. It is a big and beautiful city. Yet, it is shaded by those ideas that they are better than everyone. A “look at me” attitude surrounded by the fact that they must be the center of the world. Typical New Yorker was nothing short of that. He was small but captured the attention of everyone around him. His name earned him multiple features in Justin Horowitz’s filming of ‘Inside Harness Racing’. If you ever looked into the eyes of this two-year-old colt, you would’ve seen the attitude just flourishing within. His eyes pointed like daggers at everyone around him; except, of course, in the face of a camera or in the presence of Michelle Hallett. New Yorker was her pride and joy. He was spoiled from day one. Of course, all of our horses are spoiled with treats and toys and more; but, this one was different from the start. He had reined her in with his demeanor. He was fed pudding and more. His favorite flavor was Butterscotch. He would eat anything put in front of him. He was extra spoiled when one of his owners, Roger Doire, brought him oranges. He even had a special “New Yorker” lead chain that him and him only could use. John Hallett purchased the yearling out of the Harrisburg Sale in November of 2009. John and Michelle began breaking him to race, trained him, qualified him, and then entered him into the New York Sire Stakes (NYSS) once he reached the age of two-years-old in the summer of 2010. He won his first five sire stakes races in a row as a two-year-old. “He was a tough little bugger – fat, but definitely had a lot of heart and strength,” John said. “He was a tough guy until he saw a bird – white birds particularly. He was a perfect gentleman to jog or walk, but once one of those white birds flew by or landed, he was gone. He would take off and throw himself. He was funny like that,” Michelle said. Typical New Yorker was still able to race, but John and Michelle Hallett along with partner Michelle Oglesby agreed that retiring the ten-year-old would be the most beneficial option for the horse, avoiding the possibility that the horse reinjures his leg. He was retired at Tradewinds Park Stables as a trail riding horse for the staff and public. I remember the first time I tried to ride him and, with his attitude, he tried to throw me off. He was, however, a barn favorite at Tradewinds and very well-mannered to ride and go on the trails. “We chose this farm because it was a beautiful facility with practically all-day turn out with a few hours of ‘work’ time as a trail horse. Other Standardbreds were here as well and we knew workers and volunteers at the farm. However, it was the hardest decision to make. It was an easy decision to make to retire him, but so hard to watch him leave.,” Michelle said. From about eight in the morning to four in the afternoon, the horses are pulled from their turnout paddocks and moved into their stalls. They only go on one or two rides on the trail per day, depending on the day. Then, they are moved back to their fields where they spend the rest of the day and night. Their life is easy and comfortable. They have other Standardbreds at the facility. Whenever they have an open stall, they love to get retired Standardbreds due to the ease of transition into saddle. John and Michelle Hallett have shared a lifetime in the business. Michelle Hallett was born into the business with her parents being trainers Bruce and Linda Aldrich. Her brother, Bruce Aldrich, Jr. is a racehorse driver in the tracks of New York. John Hallett was introduced into the racing world at six-years-old and continued throughout his life working for various trainers, primarily Wally Hennessey, until creating his own stable with Michelle. They have two kids, Jonathan (John) Hallett and Jessica Hallett (me). They are currently training this summer at Tioga Downs. Typical New Yorker is just one of numerous race horses they have retired to happy and forever homes. Bruce Aldrich, Sr. is a lifetime horseman in the harness racing business. Since the beginning of his journey into the racing world and the beginning of his stable, he has seen and trained many horses. Of all the horses that every horseman has come across in Standardbred racing in general, there are always the select few being the favorites. For Aldrich, it was the trotting colt named Samsawinner. Samsawinner is a 12-year-old trotting gelding. Throughout his career, the horse had 62 wins with a record of 56. The gelding has always been a goofball with a special kind of personality, according to Aldrich. When he was turned out in the paddock at the top of the hill at Monticello Raceway, he was hard to catch. He would swerve and bounce out of reach to avoid being caught. He thought he was funny. Sam wasn’t racing to par, unable to go anymore, and would be forced into a claiming race, so instead he was retired. He is now at a farm in upstate New York living the pasture life. He had a good card with a lot of wins and a lot of money made. Owner Woody Hoblitzell agreed to retire the colt. Bruce Aldrich, Sr. started in the business when he was 12 years old when he cleaned stalls for Bob Tisbert. He has worked and trained for numerous stables in his career, include Carl Allen and Mickey McNichol among others. He has had his own stable as well for many years. He has trained for Woody Hoblitzell for over 20 years. Samsawinner is his first retired horse. Cheri Clarke and her husband, trainer Edgar (Sparky) Clarke, trained racehorse No Monkeys Allowed. “It’s quite humorous don’t you think? Not your typical tough, regal racehorse name and not your typical racehorse,” Cheri Clarke said. No Monkeys Allowed was originally named Issuer Blue Chip. “Someone must have seen his playful attitude and legally changed it to something to fit his personality,” Cheri joked. They got him at the age of four in 2011 for owner Robert Orr of Deerfield Beach, FL and took a career record the following year of 1:50.3 at Vernon Downs. The Rocknroll Hanover gelding with earnings of $358,624 lifetime was retired at age 11. No Monkeys Allowed, or “Monkey”, was very fat, according to Cheri as well as what other people have told her, too. He ate very well and always knew when treat time and lunch time was. “If you are headed to the paddock and it generally takes about ten minutes to get up there, give yourself 20 with Monkey,” said Cheri. He was a very nosy horse and needed time to stop and look around as they would walk to the paddock. He also had this personality that he would just know when to behave, when to stay calm, when he could get away with acting up, and then when to be a racehorse. He would let you know with his eyes if something was not right. Yet, nothing bothered him. He wasn’t afraid of anything. He was just calm and collected. The Clarkes favorite memory of Monkey was pacing in 49 and finishing second in Vernon. As time went on and Monkey got older, as all things do, his pace grew slower. Instead of putting the gelding in a claiming race, they decided to search for a new home, a new life after racing. They checked local farms with no luck due to no space available. Finally, they discovered a horseman with connections in need of a horse for trail riding. Putting the horse in a claimer and if he had been claimed would have led Cheri to wonder and worry. When any horse is claimed, especially a barn favorite, every horseman agrees to just have this thought in the back of their mind, wondering how they are doing or how they are being treated, what is going on in their new lives, where they are. With the home Cheri and Sparky found, there was no worry or wonder. They are updated regularly with pictures and stories. He is a really good riding horse and goes out on trail rides on his own or with other horses just fine. His new home was on a farm in Texas. “Although my career is short by most standards of horsemen, my husband grew up in the business with his brother, Bruce. He has had 1,500 wins and $6.3 million in purse earnings. His father, Roy (Rod) Clarke, was a predominate trainer in the Maritime provinces of Canada,” said Cheri. Sparky and Cheri are currently training at Tioga Downs for the summer and in the winter, Pompano Park. No Monkeys Allowed is their first retired horse. My Sweet Mandy was racing in her two- and three-year-old years when she was discovered by Mandy Lareau. “I wanted her and I followed her through her early years of racing. She was not a claimer, though. “I had family in the grandstand at Tioga Downs at one point and they saw this mare and her name in the race and knew I should have her. “It was a dream for me to have this horse, to get her. She shared my name and I have always wanted a grey horse,” Mandy said. The grey pacing mare was put into an auction in Delaware where Gaston and Mandy Lareau had planned to buy her, but was later taken out. She was moved to Florida where she was entered into a claiming race for her first start and claimed by the Lareau Stable. They kept her for three years until she injured her foot. The veterinarian had said it was an infection and that the horse would need to be put down, a definite no by Mandy Lareau. Four months were put into rehabilitation by Mandy. The mare was able to be brought back to the track again. Yet, the Lareau’s decided to retire her to avoid re-injury to the foot. They started by talking to Laurie Poulin for turnout at her farm. After some time, the final decision was made and now, at eight-years-old, she is a broodmare at Poulin’s farm in Florida. “She’s a sweetheart. I think she will be a great mother. She has taken care of an orphan baby at Laurie’s farm already. She just has a great personality,” said Mandy. Every horse has their own personality. Their own quirks and traits that make them individual and unique. No different than people, they have this character that makes them, them. According to Mandy, the mare has the greatest personality, just her own personality. She didn’t like anything tough on her. No lead chain over the nose. She would kick and squeal when you put the harness on. She was bad to jog. She loved treats. She didn’t wear any equipment at all, didn’t like it. The less equipment the better she would race. She would fight you to race. The easier you were on her, the better she was to you. She had a record of 53. She was a good race horse. She is good to people she is used to. She did not connect with certain people, but, according to Mandy, she loves Laurie Poulin’s granddaughter. At Tioga Downs, My Sweet Mandy was in the first stall. But, at Pompano Park, she took the second stall so that, as Mandy worked on the cross ties, the mare could play with her. If Mandy was put on the trailer second, she would not go on. She was spoiled and loved attention. She always got her way. If you showed her the lead chain she would talk. “In a way, she was like me. I wanted to be like her. She was a free spirit and just happy all the time. “My Sweet Mandy was just a joy. I loved seeing her in the morning. It would make me smile and I miss her, but I know she is in a better place now at Laurie’s farm,” said Mandy. Gaston and Mandy Lareau have each been a part of the business for over forty years. Gaston has owned, trained, and driven. “He is a horseman who loves horses and tries to figure them out, a real horseman,” according to Mandy. They have been together for thirty-eight years. “When he says something, I already know what he’s going to say.” My Sweet Mandy is their first retired horse. Typical New Yorker, Samsawinner, No Monkeys Allowed, and My Sweet Mandy were equally alike in being the barn pets and favorites for the Hallett, Aldrich, Clarke, and Lareau Racing Stables. John and Michelle Hallett; Bruce Aldrich, Sr.; Sparky and Cheri Clarke; and Mandy and Gaston Lareau did whatever it took to bring their cherished babies to a happy and forever home. Michelle MacDougall, D.V.M., is an active advocate in the race to helping find racehorses homes after retirement. She has helped place horses and has been a member on the board of Futures for Standardbreds. She has had quite a few of her own horses that she had placed in forever homes as well. Handleyourscandal is a ten-year-old mare that was retired from racing due to breathing complications while racing. Since retirement, she has foaled three, but was not being bred for the 2018 season. “In early March of 2018, I learned about a good friend, Laurie Poulin, losing her mare shortly after foaling. “I had Scandal at the farm and was not planning on breeding her this season, so I offered to try inducing lactation. Despite cautious optimism from a colleague, he provided a protocol and Scandal was able to produce milk in only four days,” said Doc MacDougall. On March 7th, Scandal was introduced to her foster filly and there wasn’t a moment’s hesitation. “A few nickers back and forth and the filly immediately latched on and successfully nursed,” Doc MacDougall said. “Laurie sent a video of the moment and I actually shed a happy tear or two.” Since then, there hasn’t been a single awkward moment, according to Michelle. The two are inseparable and have joined the broodmare herd. “There are even reports that Scandal has adopted a second colt in the field. Apparently, he prefers to spend time with her rather than her birth mother and Scandal happily nurses both fosters as if they are her own. She is such a wonderful mare.” Michelle MacDougall has also had six other retired horses – Handle My Scandal (4, P, Bay, Mare – $1,830 – Retired 2017), Overseer NZ (15, P, Bay Gelding – $125,296, 1:52.0F – Retired 2013), Twin B Flirt (8, P, Bay, Gelding – $121,080, 1:52.1M – Retired 2017), Surprise Ending (18, P, Bay, Mare – $107,734, 1:54.4 – Retired 2010), Gilbralter (18, T, Bay, Gelding – $129,598, 1:55.3F – Retired 2012), Glors Boy (18, P, Bay, Gelding – $623,421, 1:50.4M – Retired 2012), and To The Point (12, P, Bay, Mare – $80,447, 1:53.0Z – Retired 2012). Handle My Scandal (“Ms. Piggy”) was bred by Michelle MacDougall. A full body scan at the age of two revealed a microfracture in both knees and left tibia and so, the mare did not make the races. Despite the injuries, the only symptom was getting rolly and making breaks at speed in the turns. She was given time off and restarted in her three-year-old year. Another full body scan influenced Michelle to retire the mare. She is now in Maine. She participated in a youth program and graduated and was adopted by one of the youth program kids. Overseer NZ (“Lou”) was a talented racehorse whose career was cut short from a soft tissue injury, according to Michelle. She rehabbed him for over a year before breaking him to ride in the winter of 2014. Michelle set her sights on endurance riding and he was the perfect mount. “He was small, light on his feet, quick, nimble, and would rack and canter when asked,” she said. An injury to Michelle prevented her from participating in her endurance debut, despite tirelessly training Lou. He now serves as “Uncle Lou” in her breeding program where Michelle weans foals from their mothers into the paddock with him. He has raised four years of weanlings for her. Twin B Flirt (“Flirt”) suffered two separate soft tissue injuries. According to Michelle, during her time racing the colt, he was a significantly fun-loving, happy horse with all kinds of spunk and play. He had successful rehabilitation, yet the decision was made to retire him when he faced a Lasix reaction. Michelle decided that best for his health would be to retire him. He is now in a home with a novice reins man, Keith Gordon, president of Blue Star Equiculture that provides home and sanctuary to draft horses at the end of their careers. Flirt enjoys a life of pleasure driving around the farm in Massachusetts; although, at first, Michelle had warned him that driving a draft horse versus a Standardbred is the difference between a Mack Truck and a Maserati. Surprise Ending (“Prize”) suffered a slab fracture in both knees as a 3-year-old, but successfully continued racing for many more years. She was retired when the aches and pains were taking too long to recover after a race. She had a great attitude for life so Michelle decided a second career as a pleasure horse would fit her well. She has been broke to ride and spends many hours pleasure driving down the carriage paths of Arcadia National Park with now owner, Barbara Pretorious. Gibralter (“G-Money”) was a hard-hitting horse with a huge desire to race, but unfortunately was plagued with poor conformation which caused him to interfere at speed one the aches and pains of being an aged racehorse changed his gait. Changing track sizes did not help so the horse was retired. Michelle broke him to ride in 2012 and kept him for two years as a trail horse, riding through the Ocala National Forest. She offered him to New Vocations for placement. He now participates in 25- and 50-mile endurance rides with his new owner. Glors Boy was an incredibly successful racehorse who participated in and won some of the most prestigious races in harness racing. He was well-deserving of a great life after racing and was retired in 2012 as a riding horse for Michelle. She rode him for the next three years through the Ocala National Forest during her winters in Florida. In 2015, she contacted Futures for Standardbreds and Robyn Cuffey to find anyone interested in a “husband horse” because he was so good at being babysitter on the trails. He was placed in a home in the spring of 2015 and even showed and won in a local dressage competition with his new owner. He is now shared as both a trail and show horse throughout southern Maine. To the Point (“Big”) was a super talented free-legged pacer, but was plagued with lameness issues throughout her career. From a young age, she suffered from progressive white line disease and often required significant breaks from racing to allow the hoof to grow out properly. In 2012, she was retired to Michelle’s broodmare program, but, unfortunately, could not carry a foal to term so Michelle broke her to ride. She played around with her in the Ocala National Forest until 2015, when she was donated to Robyn Cuffey to become part of a competitive driving herd. Big was perfect as a singles driving horse, but was unable to relax in the pair due to her competitive nature. She was adopted as a companion to Glors Boy. Doc MacDougall is also a participating member of Racing Under Saddle (the R.U.S) as well as a competitor in the New Jersey National Standardbred Horse Show. She has trained horses to ride under saddle for the RUS and in dressage, hunt-seat, and more for the horse show. Michelle MacDougall, D.V.M., plays an important role in life after racing for harness horses. She has placed her own horses as well as others, contributed as a member of societies for placement, and has trained horses for the transition into new careers after racing. We will be competing alongside each other at the National Standardbred Horse Show in New Jersey at the end of this summer. It is a large venue that gives the opportunity to showcase the talent and flexibility of the Standardbred. It features the transition from harness and race bike to saddle and show ring. From dressage to hunt-seat to jumping, these horses can do it all. Their handlers and trainers do what it takes to ease a transition into a post-racing career. Twelve-year-old trotting gelding Red Victor was claimed to a stable that Rebecca Segal worked for six years ago, at the age of six. During this ownership, the chestnut broke down, taking a year and a half to get back going. Once he was ready to race again, the owner died, causing the horse to be put into the sale. Segal bought the eight-year-old out of the sale and has kept him ever since. She spent six months bringing him back to race ready and qualified him, where he won. “It was the most exciting part of owning him and my favorite memory that he was able to come back after all that time,” Segal said. He was very full of life, according to Rebecca. He had quite the personality, very loving and just cool. “Once the cart was on, he would rear up and just be ready to go,” she said. He didn’t race much and eventually stopped racing due to a broken bone. They were told they would have to put him down. When it came time to actually having to do it, he was moved to the house of a veterinarian and then to another place to actually help him get better. Rebecca got the horse back six months later and has kept him ever since. He travels with her; wherever she goes, he goes. Keeping a retired horse is not entirely cost effective for a groom. Rebecca ensures to keep the utmost comfort for the horse; maintaining up-to-date shoeing, vaccinations, and more. She finds a local farm, within 20 minutes of her at most, where she can board him while she works at the track, from Batavia to Buffalo to Tioga to Pompano. Rebecca finds the farms based off of good references and people that she knows and trusts. She is very specific of where she keeps him and the farm needs to match her views on good horse care, because everyone has their own style and way of doing things. “It is important to me that he has a good life being retired. I have been lucky to have been able to find people that are willing to help us. We have been able to find deals on boarding and shoeing and more that really help us out a lot,” Rebecca said. Rebecca Segal was born into the business and has been in it for all 27 years of her life. Her family is also involved in the harness racing business. She is a groom at Tioga Downs this summer and in Pompano Park in the winter. She just got her owners and trainers license. Red Victor is her first retired horse and she has done whatever it took to keep him comfortable and close-by. His new life involves traveling and a career in casual or pleasure horseback riding on the farm. Regardless if you are a groom, trainer, owner, veterinarian, or anything else, we take care of our horses, our pets, our family.  There are options for racehorses after retirement. From being a trail riding horse to a show horse or a driving horse to a pasture mate, broodmare, or stud, our racehorses have a wide spectrum of opportunity for life after racing. They can be easily broke to ride and are very adaptable to a new environment. Every horse has their own personality, quirks, and traits that make them special, that make them who they are. We, as horsemen, have our favorites. We have small stables and big stables, one horse to a full farm. We are all unique in the way we care for our horses. From the time of day we feed to how we train to how we schedule a race night in the paddock, we all have our own way. But, one thing is for sure, and that is how we treat our horses and that is in the best way possible. We make sure they are comfortable. We show up seven days a week and give them all the attention and care they need. The best part of racing happens behind the scenes. It is when the horseman puts in all the time and effort and does what it takes to keep the animal happy and safe. These horses may or may not be able to continue racing; yet, regardless, their owners and trainers take the time to make the best decision for them whether it be to continue or to sell or to retire. These are only a few of the examples of life after racing and horsemen doing what it takes to give them a forever and happy home for life. by Jessica Hallett, for Harnesslink

Pompano Beach, FL…November 22, 2015…Pompano Park hosted four F.S.B.O.A. sponsored Melvyn Aylor Memorial events for two year-olds with Gold Star Brianna, Rexamillion and Prairie Sweetheart taking the three non-wagering events and Gleneagles annexing the harness racing event on the pari-mutuel program. Gold Star Briana took the Aylor for the trotting fillies in 1:58.4—Wally Hennessey guiding the daughter of Basil to a 4½ length victory over the pacesetting Trotting Missmissy (Donald Dupont), that cut serious panels of :28.3, :57.4 and 1:27.4 before succumbing to the winner turning for home. Trottine Fool (Walter Ross, Jr.) was third, 26 ½ lengths away, while Mitzie and All Star Fame were next in the quintet, the latter doomed by a miscue at the start. Trained by Dan Hennessey for owner Kevin Kelly, Gold Star Briana has an unblemished record—six-for-six—thus far in her career, good for earnings of $34,638. Rexamillion, a gelded son of Proud Bushy owned by Richard Dunmire along with Jay and trainer Kim Sears, was a wire-to-wire winner for Bob Roberts, leading every step of the mile off of panels of :31.2, 1:01.2 and 1:31.2 before stopping the tele-timer in 2:01.4 for his fourth straight win. His winning margin was 2¼ lengths over Trottime Splendor (Wally Hennessey) with Fifty Fifty Ninety (Jason Mac Dougall) next. Savin Rock finished fourth while Proud Joe T picked up the nickel. Rexamillion now sports a 4-1-1 scorecard in six lifetime starts with earnings of $31,831. The final non-wagering Aylor Memorial for pacing fillies went to Prairie Sweetheart for trainer driver Mike Deters, who co-owns along with John Spindler and Laurie Poulin. This daughter of Royal Millennium, now undefeated in six lifetime starts, covered her mile in a lifetime best 1:53.3, pinning yet another defeat on another daughter of Royal Millennium, Caitlin’s Romance (Rick Plano) with Gold Star Love Bug (Walter Ross, Jr.) next. Diamond Lily was fourth and Gold Star Mysti fifth in the sextet of youngsters. Prairie Sweetheart now boasts earnings of $35,974. With the victory, driver Mike Deters improved on his lofty .889 UDRS coming in—that figure now approaching .900 based on a 13-4-0 record in 17 drives this fall semester. After the race, Deters had nothing but praise for his filly saying, “she’s been well within herself every start—even tonight with that 1:53.3 mile.. I’m kinda blessed to have a filly like this in the barn. But let’s not take anything away from Bob’s (trainer Barker) filly (Caitlin’s Romance). She’s a very excellent filly, as well.” Caitlin’s Romance has chased Prairie Sweetheart home in five straight events. The final Melvyn Aylor Memorial event was held on the betting card and, for the second straight week, Gleneagles, with Wally Hennessey in the bike, eked out a narrow photo finish win over arch rival Conman’s Dream (Jason Mac Dougall)—this time in 1:54.3, a new lifetime mark. This son of Mysticism, trained by Jim Mc Donald for the Pinhook Stable, zipped out of the gate from the outside seven post and carded panels of :27.4, :58.1 and 1:26.3 before a :28 finale held off Conman’s Dream—barely—the official margin a head. R Chism (Ed Hensley) was third while ICU Diamond T was fourth. Trottime Diamonds picked up the final award in the field of seven. Gleneagles now has a 5-1-2 scorecard in 10 starts with earnings of $45,048. As the 1 to 5 tote-board favorite, Gleneagles paid $2.60 to win. Many of these same combatants will be in action as the F.S.B.O.A. presents Super Night at Pompano Park next Sunday night. Also on Sunday night, the $10,000 Open Handicap Pace was contested with Bandolito making his South Florida debut a winning one for Kevin Wallis, who was in the bike for owner-trainer Jenny Bier. This outstanding five year-old son of Ponder earned his 10th win of the year in near gate-towire fashion, stopping the clock in 1:51.4. Starting from the outside post seven, Bandolito looped his way into the lead midway around the initial turn and carded fractions of :26.3, :55.2 and 1:23.3 before reporting home a winner by an unthreatened 1¼ lengths over Duc Dorleans (Donald Dupont) with Play It Again Sam (Dan Clements) just another nose back in third. Lyons Johnny, bottled up in the lane with nowhere to go, finished fourth while Next Thing Smoke’N closed to pick up the final award in the septet. The win was the 24th lifetime for Bandolito in just 57 starts, sending his career bounty to $423,110--$141,275 of that this year. As the even money tote-board favorite, Bandolito paid $4.20 to his many followers. The Florida Amateur Driving Club held two events on the Sunday night program with Celtic Merchant and Good Friend winding up in the winner’s circle. Celtic Merchant, the 12 year-old warrior with 40 lifetime wins and $334,502 in bounty coming into the action, made it 41 with a gate-to-wire win in 1:58.2 for Mitch “Sky” Walker, by far his seasonal best time. This 4 to 5 chance cut fractions of :27.3, :56.1 and 1:26 before finishing three lengths clear of the 77 to 1 shot Starbux Eden (Jeff Schaefer) with Tymal Recap (Billy Muggleston) next. Owner and trained by Steve Oldford, Celtic Merchant paid $3.80 to win. Good Friend, with owner-trainer Tony Dinges in the bike, took top honors in the 4th race Pentafecta event, covering his mile in 1:59.3 and paying $15.00 to his faithful. The win was the nine year-old’s first success of the season and broke a dry spell of 29 races dating back to his last trip to the winner’s circle on November 19 of last year at Dayton. The win sent this nine year-old’s lifetime bounty to $334,134. Rel Cash Clown (Sky Walker) finished second while Lukie Duke (Jamie Marra) finished third. Good Feeling and Vari Forgetful were next, significant because not one single ticket was sold on the 1-4-5-10-3 Pentafecta necessitating a carryover into Monday night’s fourth race Pentafecta of $2,785 and a guaranteed pool of $7,500. Post time for Monday night’s card is 7:30 p.m. by John Berry for Pompano Park 

Pompano Beach, FL...June 24, 2015...My Revenuer and Mach Me Not scored impressive harness racing wins their respective "Winners Over" feature events at Pompano Park on Wednesday night (June 24).   My Revenuer kicked off the mid-week festivities by scoring a minor upset for Tom Sells in the $9,000 Winners Over event for the trotters, upsetting the 1 to 5 tote-board favorite, Dominum Deo in 1:55.4. Tug River Dylan, last in the quintet turning for home, rallied for third for Wally Ross, Jr. while Lugar and pacesetting Illusionsndreams completed the parade through the wire.   It was Illusionsndreams who took charge, carding panels of :28.3 and :58.2 before things began heating up on the backside.   With Dominum Deo on the move from the back of the pack, driver Sells was forced into a first-over journey from My Revenuer with that one pulling on even terms with Illusionsndreams through an official :28.2 third quarter--his about :27.4.   Turning for home, My Revenuer began edging clear and easily held off Dominum Deo in the final stages, scoring by 1 1/4 lengths.   In a post race interview, driver Sells said, "Ya know, when this trotter feels like it, he can turn on the engines pretty good...and he sure did tonight. He was very determined."   Owned and trained by Tom Petri, My Revenuer, a seven year-old son of Revenue S, won for the third time in 20 starts this year, good for $33,817 in bounty. Lifetime, he has 21 career wins and $167,592 in earnings to go along with a mark of 1:53.4 at Vernon Downs last season.   Third choice in the betting, My Revenuer paid $12.40 to his faithful.   The companion event for pacing wares was kind of a carbon copy of last weeks event as Mach Me Not, driven by Bruce Ranger, scored a repeat win--this time in 1:53.4 over stablemate Artful Impulse, again handled by Andy Santeramo. As in last week's event, Goldstar Rockette finished third. Keystone Christa and Lady Ideal completed that event.   When the Hummer's wings folded, Artful Impulse and Mach Me Not got into a bit of a fray around turn one with the latter taking charge right at the opening marker in :27.1.   Mach Me Not, a nine year-old daughter of Mach Three, continued to lead the parade through panels of :56.4 and 1:26.1 with Artful Impulse in the garden spot.   Turning for home, as she did last week, Mach Me Not began drifting wide allowing Artful Impulse plenty of real estate to close to her inside...but Mach Me Not was just too strong--her final panel of :27.3 good enough for a victory measuring just short of a length.   After the race, Ranger joked, "Well, we proved one thing...this mare care pace as fast going sideways as she can going forward! She's a game thing, that's for sure!"   Owned by the S S G Stables and trainer by Jim Mc Donald, Mach Me Not won for the third consecutive week--35th lifetime win--to send he seasonal earnings to $49,024. She's banked $345,046 career-wise to go along with her mark of 1:51.1 mark at Hoosier Park.   Mach Me Not, heavily favored at 2 to 5, paid $2.80 to win.   Another noteworthy performer on the Wednesday card was Gold Savage in the "Winners Over 2" trot.   This five year-old son of Keystone Savage, trained by Mark Friedman for the Polo Stables, got a picture perfect journey from Mickey Mc Nichol to score in a lifetime best 1:54.3.   With Pilgrims All In setting up a quick pace through panels of :27.1 and :56, Gold Savage nestled in second from his outside post, left the coziness of his pocket around the final turn and went on to score a win measuring almost six lengths over favored On The Tab (Bruce Ranger) with Skyway Pippen next. Pilgrims All In did hold on for fourth while American Superman, suffering a miscue prior to the start, picked up the minor award in the sextet.   As second choice in the betting at 3 to 2, Gold Savage paid $5.00 to win.   Racing continues on Saturday night with the season's final program of 10 races.   Post time is 7:30p.m.   by John Berry for Pompano Park          

Harness racing trainer Jim Mc Donald held the hot hand at Pompano Park on Wednesday night (June 17), sweeping both features en route to hitting the "grand slam" with four winners on the program.   While Mach Me Not and Dominum Deo won their respective $9,500 pacing and trotting Winner's Over events, it was Mc Donald, himself, getting the festivities underway by piloting Pacing Pretty Stables four year-old Looney ($3.00) to a come from behind win in a lifetime best 1:58.2.   Two races later, the nine year-old Mach Three mare Mach Me Not, trained by Mc Donald for the S S G Stables and driven by Bruce Ranger, nailed her stablemate, Artful Impulse (Andy Santeramo) in the last two strides to score a narrow win--a half length--in 1:53.1 for her second win in a row and 34th lifetime in 201 starts.   Surging to the lead early before yielding to her stablemate, Mach Me Not, though drifting wide in the lane, managed to get up in the late stages on the strength of a :27.2 finale.   Goldstar Rockette (Mickey Mc Nichol) finished third in the mile while Real Nice Girl and Lady Ideal completed the quintet of talented mares.   In a post race interview, Ranger said, "She left like a rocket-ship but then Andy (Santeramo) took his mare (Artful Impulse) and put her on the lead so I did get a good trip back of her. When I pulled turning for home, I guess I must've pulled on the right line a little too hard because she was drifting out pretty good in the lane. But it all worked out at the wire."   Mach Me Not paid $2.40 for her popular win.   The very next event, Santeramo got a bit of revenge on Ranger when he guided The Muscler, also trained by Mc Donald for lessee Carl Mc Donald, to a nose victory in 1:57.1, edging out Gray N Cloudy (Ranger) in the very last stride.   The Muscler won for the fifth time this semester, good for a seasonal bankroll of $19,250. He paid $7.20 to win.   Mc Donald achieved his "grand slam" the very next race when Ranger guided Dominum Deo to a photo finish win over Illusionsndreams (Santeramo) in a lifetime best 1:54.4--that win coming in the Winner's Over feature for trotters.   This four year-old son of Donato Hanover, last halfway through the mile, found some room turning for home and mowed down the competition with a :56 final half complimented by a :28.2 finale.   Dominum Deo, now with four wins for the year, sent his earnings to $20,845 for 2015 and $69,980 lifetime.   Gold Savage (McNichol), prominent all the way, finished third while Tug River Dylan and My Revenuer completed the first five in the sextet.   Dominum Deo, second choice on the board at 9 to 5, paid $5.60 to win.   Racing continues Saturday night with a 7:30 post time scheduled for the eight race program.   John Berry 

Pompano Beach, FL...June 10, 2015...Mach Me Not and Mc Tiny's Hope shared the spotlight at Pompano Park on Wednesday night (June 10), each reaching the winner's circle in their respective co-featured harness racing events.   Mach Me Not, the rugged nine year-old daughter of Mach Three, turned the tables on her stablemate, Artful Impulse, in the $9,000 "Winner's Over" pace for the mares, using a quarter move to the top after Artful Impulse, zipped out of the gate from her outside post to take the field through an opener of :27.4.   With Bruce Ranger handling the lines for trainer Jim Mc Donald and the S S G Stables, Mach Me Not, once reaching the top spot, proceeded to clock panels of :57.3 and 1:25.3 before using a :28.3 finale to hold her stablemate, driven by Andy Santeramo, safe by 1 1/4 lengths in 1:54.1.   Real NIce Girl finished third for Joe Sanzeri while Keystone Christa finished fourth after a menacing backside brush brought her to the flank of Mach Me Not turning for home. Goldstar Rockette finished fifth in the quintet.   After the event, driver Bruce Ranger remarked, "Last week, this mare was full of pace the entire last lap, grinding forward from the back to finish third. In this shorter field, I thought it might be prudent to try and control things, just hoping that Andy (Santeramo) would yield to me so his mare would get the garden trip. It worked out well."   Mach Me Not won for the sixth time in 21 starts, sending her 2015 bankroll to $40,024. She's banked $336,046 lifetime on the strength of 33 career wins to go along with a mark of 1:51.1.   As the very slight favorite at 4 to 5, Mach Me Not paid $3.60 to win.   Despite rain showers in the area, along with some lightning bolts and thunder claps, Mc Tiny's Hope, the only mare in the "Winner's Over" trot, showed impeccable manners in extending her victory streak to three with a 1:55 performance for Ben Mc Neil.   This seven year-old daughter of CR Excalibur, trained by Jack Mc Neil for Ellen Mc Neil, zipped to the lead from her outside five post and broke her first three light beams in :28.3, :57.2 and 1:25.3 before striding home an easy winner on the strength of a :29.2 finale while dodging raindrops all the way home.   Dominum Deo finished second for Bruce Ranger while My Revenuer was next in the quintet. Gold Savage, close up the entire route, finished fourth while On The Tab picked up the nickel.   In a post race interview, the soft-spoken Ben Mc Neil said, "What can I say? She's just very good right now and I certainly wasn't going to fool around changing tactics since she's won the other two in this streak the same way!"   In earning her sixth win of the year in 21 starts, Mc Tiny's Hope sent her bankroll to $44,496 this semester, vaulting her over the $150,000 lifetime--$153,270 to be exact. This was her 27th lifetime victory to go along with her Meadowlands mark of 1:53.3.   As the 1 to 5 post time favorite, Mc Tiny's Hope paid $2.40 to win.   Ranger and Mc Neil were the two driving stars on the program with the Ranger winning three on the card, including the early Daily Double and young Ben Mc Neil sweeping both halves of the late Daily Double.   Racing continues on Saturday with Northern Companion looking to extend his winning streak while Raji's Blue Line, No Bad Dreams, Who's Your Maddy and G P S Legacy seek to knock last week's winner off his perch as current king of the hill."   Post time is 7:30 p.m.   by John Berry for Pompano Park  

Artful Impulse and Count Speed reined supreme in their respective co-featured events at the harness racing meeting at Pompano Park on Wednesday night. Artful Impulse, off at 9 to 1 and patiently handled by Andy Santeramo, kicked things off in the $8,500 "Winners Over Handicap" for pacing mares by shocking the 1 to 20 favorite, Senorita Santanna, driven by Wally Hennessey, in 1:52.4. Winbak Heavenly, with Tom Sells in the bike, finished third while the only other starter in the event, Mach Me Not, finished fourth. Cheap N Easy was a late scratch in the opener, reducing the field to four. As the Hummer wings opened, Artful Impulse and Senorita Santanna left together and engaged in a duel for the first eighth before "Impulse" yielded to the "Senorita," the latter taking the field to an opening quarter in :26.4 with Winbak Heavenly content to stay in third and Mach Me Not already about five lengths away as the trailer. Positions remained stagnant through a half in :56.2 with Senorita Santanna picking up the pace a bit on the backside. reaching the third station in 1:24.4 and with a clear lead turning for home. Once they straightened away, Artful Impulse left the coziness of her pocket and began gnawing away at the leader, drawing on even terms a sixteenth out and edging to the lead near the wire--the winning margin a half length. In a post race interview, driver Andy Santeramo said, "Jimmy (trainer Mc Donald) said she had gate speed and I figured the only way I had a chance of upsetting Wally's (Hennessey) mare (Senorita Santanna) was to leave with mine and try to take a little sting out of her early. " "I thought Wally got away from us a little bit on the far turn but my mare responded very nicely when it counted. She must've come her last quarter under :28--(actually :27.4). Big mile." For Artful Impulse, a four year-old daughter of Artistic Fella owned by Twenty Four Carrot Racing, it was her third win of the year in 17 starts, good for $22,900 this semester. She's banked $113,145 lifetime. As third choice in the betting, Artful Impulse returned $20.20 to win. Count Speed never had an anxious moment as Wally Hennessey guided this six year-old Majestic Son gelding to a handy win--his fifth in a row--over stablemate Verdi, driven by Walter Ross, Jr., in 1:54.4 in the $8,500 "Winners Over" Handicap Trot. My Revenuer, with Tom Sells in the bike, used his typical late rally to finish third while Jailhouse Jessica finished fourth. Adenium picked up the nickel in the sextet. It was Count Speed flashing his usual alacrity as the gate sprung and, after a brief battle with Adenium, took command and led through opening panels of :28 and :57.3. Just short of that second marker, Jailhouse Jessica, fifth early on, began her sprint forward as did Verdi, away last in the early going but now following "Jessica's" live cover. With the pace beginning to pick up three-eighths out, Count Speed maintained a clear lead with Jailhouse Jessica a bit more than a length away, Adenium holding the third spot near the pylons and Verdi fanning widest of all through three-quarters in 1:26.2. In the lane, Hennessey sat confidently as Count Speed gave him a :28.2 sprint to the wire, stopping the clock in that aforementioned 1:54.4. After the race, Hennessey said, "this horse is very sharp right now...super sharp." "He just seems to do what he has to do to get to the wire first." "I was a little surprised to see his stablemate (Verdi) charging into second as he was stepping up to the big time for the first time." Both Count Speed and Verdi are trained by Dan Hennessey for owners Paul and Patricia O'Neil. Count Speed now owns a 5-0-1 scorecard in seven starts with earnings of $21,470. He's won 24 times during his career with a bankroll of $219,870. As the "talk of the tote-board" at 3 to 5, Count Speed returned $3.20 to his many faithful. Finally, in Wednesday's Super Hi-5, the 5-6-8-4-7 winning combo produced 22 winning 20 cent tickets pushing the carryover for Saturday night over $197,000. Post time is 7:30 p.m. Reported by John Berry for Pompano Park    

Pompano Beach, FL...February 23, 2015...With the "Queen Bee"- Just A Bee-out of the lineup this Monday night, J. L. Benson Stables' Senorita Santanna did some stinging of her own in Pompano Park's $12,000 Open Pace for the mares. The five year-old daughter of Santanna Blue Chip, driven by George Napolitano, Jr. for trainer Paul Holzman, led every step of her mile and stopped the tele-timer in a seasonal best 1:51.1, pinning a defeat measuring seven lengths on the late surging De Vins Girl (Jason Dillander) with Southwind Trini (Bruce Ranger) next in the quintet over Always Dee One and Keystone Christa.Carding panels of :27.2, :55.4 and 1:23 along the way, Senorita Santanna never had an anxious moment as the 1 to 5 choice, opening a 2 ½ length lead at the opening quarter and blitzing away from her foes on the backside, enjoying a six length advantage by the time they reached the final turn. In a post race interview, driver George Napolitano, Jr. said, "She (Senorita Santanna) is a very rugged mare that can brush for the whole mile. She was nice and relaxed once we got to the front and, when I asked her for a bit more on the backside, she kind of exploded with pace and that was that!" Senorita Santanna now has a 4-2-1 scorecard in eight starts this young season and $29,185 to show for it. The classy mare now has five wins since she was claimed for $10,000 by the aforementioned J L Benson Stables back in mid-December with bounty of $32,685 since the claim. She paid $2.40 to win. The co-featured $10,000 pace for mares went to Mach Me Not with Wally Hennessey handling the lines. This nine year-old daughter of Mach Three came from well off the pace to score in 1:53 over the late surging Glow Stick (Dave Ingraham) with Market Dynamics (Peter Wrenn) third. Art Frenzy finished fourth while Winbak Heavenly, the 4 to 5 favorite, finished fifth after taking a clear lead turning for home. Owned by the S S G Stables and trained by Jim McDonald, Mach Me Not won for the second time this season and pushed her lifetime earnings to $309,302 on the strength of her 29 career wins. She paid $10.80 to her $2 backers. McDonald also drove the winner of the second race, steering the four year-old trotting gelding Looney to a 38 to 1 victory-his maiden win in 17 lifetime starts. Also on the Monday card was the first leg of the "Happy Wife, Happy Life" Late Closing Event for claiming pacing mares and Taylor B Good, handled by Rick Plano gutted out a courageous first over victory in 1:54.4. This six year-old daughter of Kilowatt, trained by Bernie Wolin for owner Hilda Wolin, was away fifth early as, first, Flying Topless, then, Hot Latte and, then, Newsmaker, traded places for the lead through hot panels of :27.1 and :56.3 with Taylor Be Good grinding first over the entire last lap, reaching the top turning for home and holding off the late charging A and G Covergirl (Ed Hensley) to score by a length. Moon Is On Fire closed from last turning for home to garner show honors while Hot Latte and Newmaker tied for fourth. For Taylor B Good, it was her initial success of 2015 and sent her lifetime bounty over the $80,000 mark. She paid $4.40 to win as the public choice. Finally, the popular Pompano Park Pick-5 went unscathed on Monday night with management guaranteeing a $15,000 pool for Wednesday night's program. Post time is 7:30 p.m. John Berry  

Pompano Beach, FL...May 24, 2014...The Isle Casino Racing Pompano Park concluded its 2013-2014 season on Saturday night with a strong 11 race program highlighted by a trio of feature events, including two late closing finals. The first feature was the $8,000 Late Closing Final of the Florida Amateur Driving Club Claiming Trot and that went, in an upset, to the 13 year-old warhorse Speedy Samadhi, driven by John Campagnuolo for owner trainer Earlon Eugley in 1:58.3.. Making his 248 lifetime start, Speedy Samadhi, the rugged son of Pine Chip, off at 14 to 1, somehow found a small seam of opportunity turning for home to slingshot widest of all in the lane to snare victory from Herecopmesthechief (Dein Spriggs) with Whispur (Leon Cable) third in this action packed event. Muscles To Spare recovered from an early miscue to finish fourth while Pacific Cyclone picked up the nickel in the octet. When the gate sprang open, Now Virginia and Roger Goldstein left alertly for the lead along with VT's Gold Key, handled by Maurice Brooks, Jr. with the latter assuming control at the opening marker in a snappy :27.4 with Speedy Samadhi tucked in third and Peaceful Prince fourth on the outside and grinding forward. Pacific Cyclone was content to hug the pylons around the second turn with an impatient Whispur sent on a double bubble binge halfway through the mile in :58 followed by Herecomesthechief. On the backside, Whispur surged up to take command and opened up some daylight past the third station in 1:28.3 with Herecomesthechief On The Attack with Speedy Samadhi still locked up and looking for that seam of hope. Turning for home, Whispur was all out and couldn't stall Herecomesthechief who surged on by but couldn't hold off Speedy Samadhi who, somehow, shook loose to close widest of all for the win. In a post race interview, driver John Campagnuolo said, "I was very fortunate to wend my way out as the leaders began to tire and Speedy (Samadhi) acted like be was the pebble inside a slingshot and, 'zing,' he was on his way." Driver Dein Spriggs (Herecomesthechief) aded, "I thought I had a chance to hit the wire first but, man, that horse of John's was very impressive tonight. Both Campagnuolo and Spriggs commended the Pompano race office and management for "carding our events on a regular basis so we could continue our mission to help worthwhile charitable causes. The Club has donated in excess of $125,000 from driver's fees on their races. For Speedy Samadhi, it was his 59th lifetime victory with his lifetime earnings vaulting over the $250,000 mark--$251,033 to be precise. As sixth choice among the punters, Speedy Samadhi paid $31.20 to win while the exacta, with the 16 to 1 outsider Herecomesthechief second, paid $493.80. With Whispur third, the 2-7-4 trifecta came back $1,605.20. The $8,000 Late Closing Final for Condition Claiming Fillies and Mares went to the 3 to 5 favorite Goldstar Rockette, handled by Mickey McNichol for owner-trainer Louis Ginesi. The four year-old daughter of Rock On led at every station, carding panels of :27.2, :57.4 and 1:26.1 before sealing the deal with a :29 finale to stop the timer in 1:55.1. I C U Misty, handled by Dave Ingraham and the longest proposition in the sextet at 19 to 1, finished second, 3 3/4 lengths away while the garden sitting Racin For Gold (Andy Santeramo) finished third. Regal Magic and Foxy Ginger also earned awards. For Goldstar Rockette, the win sent her 2014 scorecard to 5-3-2 in 13 starts, good for $17,824 this year--almost three times the amount she earned last season in 17 starts. She's now banked $27,999 lifetime. She paid $3.20 to win. Finally, in the $10,000 Open Pace, S S G Stables Cartoonist, driven by Dave Ingraham for trainer Jim McDonald, ground out a game, first over, photo finish win in 1:52.4, nailing the pacesetting Flight Exec (Kevin Wallis) in the final strides for the victory measuring a neck. Who's Your Maddy (Walter Ross, Jr.) finished third while Rick's Sign picked up the fourth place award. Avantage was fifth in the quintette. For Cartoonist, a consistent four year-old son of Modern Art, it was his fifth win of the year in 18 starts, sending his 2014 bankroll to $36,760, by far his most successful season of his young career. As second choice on the tote-board, Cartoonist paid $8.80 to win. by John Berry, for Isle Pompano Park

Pompano Beach, FL...May 17, 2014...Flight Exec, Who's Your Maddy and Nearly Uncle captured the trio of feature events highlighting the Saturday night card at Isle Casino Racing Pompano Park. Flight Exec, driven by Kevin Wallis for owner-trainer-wife Linda Wallis, took honors in the $10,000 Open. This five year-old son of Western Ideal garnered his second straight success in the top company and third win of the year. A strategic quarter move to the top was the key to victory and, after a :28.1 opener, Flight Exec proceeded on to post "soft" fractions of :57 and 1:25.4 en route to a two length win in 1:53.3 over Neptune Blue Chip (Andy Santeramo) and Cartoonist (Dave Ingraham) with Shamderock fourth and Avantage picking up the nickel in the five horse affair. Said Wallis after the event, "Whenever you can get a horse the caliber of Flight Exec on the front end of things to a half in :57, your chances are always pretty decent. Dave's (Ingraham) horse (Cartoonist) was brushing strongly on the backside but, when my horse heard him, he kinda pricked his ears back and put it in another gear. He was sharp tonight." Flight Exec now has three wins in five starts since his return to the racing wars just a month ago and the win pushed his lifetime bounty to $142,395--$17,358 this year in but seven starts. As the overwhelming favorite at 2 to 5, Flight Exec paid $2.80 to win. The $7,500 Open 2 Pace went to Who's Your Maddy, also superbly handled by Kevin Wallis. The five year-old son of Artiscape was away in good order--third in his quintette--but made a sharp move prior to the opening panel and securing the top spot just past that pole in :28.4. After lolly-gagging to the half in :58.4 and strolling even a tad slower than that on the backside, Who's Your Maddy met a strong challenge from Melvyn (Mickey McNichol), brushing from last to take a short lead past the third station in 1:29.1. Turning for home, Who's Your Maddy understandably had tons left in the tank and fought back sprinting home in :27.3--last eighth :13.1--to score the win measuring three-parts of a length over a very game Melvyn with millionaire pacer Hyperion Hanover (Andy Santeramo) third in the mile timed in 1:56.4. Maxine's Menace and Casey's Lil Harry completed the run-down. For Who's Your Maddy, trained by Jim McDonald for Dan MacIsaac and Twenty Four Carrot Racing, it was his third success of the year in 17 starts, sending his 2014 bankroll to $23,925 and $118,319 lifetime. As the 4 to 5 public choice, Who's Your Maddy paid $3.80 to win. The $8,500 Final of the Isle Casino Racing Late Closer for Claiming Trotters went to Nearly Uncle for Mickey McNichol in 1:59. Owned and trained by Ted Berry, Nearly Uncle was the longest proposition on the tote-board in his quartette at 9 to 2 and scored a decisive win measuring 4 3/4 lengths over the late charging Anton K (Dave Ingraham). Miss Janine (Kevin Wallis) was third while Majestic Valley finished fourth. The winner was well off the pace as the even money favorite, Miss Janine, sizzled opening panels of :28 and :56.1 with Majestic Valley, Nearly Uncle and Anton K strung out behind.. On the backside, Miss Janine began to feel the effects of her hard labor and the field began closing in with Majestic Valley leaving the pocked at the third station timed in 1:27.2 with Nearly Uncle double-bubbled and charging. Turning for home, Nearly Uncle swept into the lead with authority and widened the advantage to the wire with Anton K edging past Miss Janine a couple of strides from the line for the second spot. In a post race interview, driver Mickey McNichol said, "In a four horse field, I really thought that the fractions would be a lot slower, but the :56.1 half kind of played right into my horse's hands--I mean hooves. When the speed came back to us, he just went on by pretty easily." It was only the second win of the year for Nearly Uncle and biggest payday since an Open win at Saratoga in August of 2012. He now has $130,851 lifetime--$9,943 this year. He paid $11.40 to win. by John Berry, for the Isle Pompano Park

Pompano Beach, FL...April 26, 2014...Cartoonist, given a "picture perfect" drive by Kevin Wallis, easily took top honors in Pompano Park's $10,000 Open Pace on Saturday night. The four year-old gelded son of Modern Art stopped the timer in 1:53 after posting front end fractions of :27.4, :57.3 and 1:25.4 along the way--his winning margin just short of three lengths over Rick's Sign, driven by Andy Santeramo. Neptune Blue Chip finished third for Bruce Ranger while McGreat and Shamderock completed the quintet. It was the fourth win in 14 starts for Cartoonist, pushing his seasonal bankroll to $25,560, just a shade below what he earned the entire full season of 2013. In a post race interview, driver Kevin Wallis said, "Since the five post is so advantageous here, I thought it would be good to use this horse's good gate speed and try and control the pace. We got a nice breather during the second quarter so I feelt rather comfortable he could carry his speed the rest of the way...and he did." Indeed, the :55.2 final half mile sealed the deal for the S S G Stables of North Boston, N.Y. Trainer Jim McDonald added, "He's developed into a very solid racehorse over time and he sure is reliable for a :27 and a piece final quarter. He's very consistent and I am hoping the best is yet to come." In somewhat of a betting oddity, the order of finish was exactly as the public predicted with the winner, off at 1 to 2, returning $3.00, the 7 to 2 second choice finishing second, followed by Neptune Blue Chip (6 to 1), McGreat (8.50 to 1) and Shamderock (8.90 to 1). by John Berry, for Isle Pompano Park

The Florida Chapter of the United States Harness Writers Association presented its Caretaker of the Month award to Steve Toth for March and John Hanning for February at Pompano Park Sunday. Toth and trainer/owner Irwin Lubar handled the turnaround of Canadian Touch (5gp Camotion-Little Wild Thing-Apaches Fame) as he recorded three wins, a second and third in March as he moved from the $4k claiming level to $15k and lowered his lifetime record to 1:51f. The Canadian bred pacing speedster has a 2014 slate of 5-3-1 in 12 starts for $17,758, most under the professional care of Steve Toth. Etruscan Hanover (4gt Donato Hanover-Exotic Destination-Dream Vacation) earned three wins in February for veteran caretaker John Hanning and trainer/driver Jim McDonald. Under their patient management (Etruscan is reportedly a head-case of sorts that the reserved caretaker's patience matches effectively, according to trainer McDonald) the lightly raced trotter recorded a career win of 1:55.4f. Etruscan Hanover is owned by the Estate of Angelo Fresetto, Kenneth Klein, Old Block Stables, and Team S Racing. Both caretakers received a plaque and a check for $100 from the Florida USHWA Chapter. by Thomas H. Hicks, president of the Florida Chapter of USHWA

Pompano Beach, FL...February 8, 2014...Northern Companion earned his 34th lifetime victory on Saturday night by scoring a sharp 1:51 victory for Dave Ingraham in Pompano Park's $10,000 Open Pace.   The six year-old son of Cambest, trained by Howard Klohr for owner Dorothy Zarza, wore down the game Lyons Johnny, handled by Wally Hennessey, to score by a length and a half. Hillybilly and Bruce Ranger teamed up to finish third while Eastend Eddie, last in the field for the first half mile, rallied to finish fourth. Who's Your Maddy picked up the nickel in the seven horse field.   Lyon's Johnny out-dueled Electric Lad in the early stages and took the field to the first station in :27.2 with Northern Companion nestled into third and remaining in that position through the opening half in :55.3. On the backside, three-eighths out, Northern Companion left his comfortable surroundings and began gnawing in on Lyons Johnny's lead, cutting it in half turning for home and collaring that one in mid-stretch before drawing clear late.   In a post race interview, driver Ingraham said, "...he had a nice trip but, to tell you the truth, i was concerned a bit when we weren't gaining that much around the turn. Lyons Johnny can't be taken lightly. He gave "Jaguar" (Prairie Jaguar) a good tussle the week before and I wasn't sure we were going to get there but Northern Companion just has that attitude that he wants to win. He's got that winning attitude! It's a great quality in a racehorse--a winning attitude. The draw helped us this week, too, because we were a lot closer from the two post than the previous week from the six."   Northern Companion's scorecard now reads 2-2-1 in six starts and the victory pushed his lifetime earnings over the $200,000 mark--$203,082 to be exact.   As the even money favorite on the tote board, Northern Companion paid $4.00 to win.   The Open 2 Pace went to Freeneasy Hanover, who dug in late for driver Bruce Ranger to hold off Legends Luck and Wally Hennessey by a head in 1:52.2. Avantage (Dave Ingraham) finished third, four lengths away, with McGreat and Restless Yankee garnering the final awards in the octet.   The six year-old son of Western Ideal, trained by Jim McDonald for Ciro Gentile and Twenty Four Carrot Racing, went right to the front and carded an opening panel of :27.1 in thwarting any ideas of an early challenge. After a breather that brought Freeneasy to the half in :56, Ranger throttled his charge a bit on the backside and a :27.3 third quarter brought the pair to the third station in 1:23.3 as Legends Luck left the coziness of the pocket to challenge turning for home.   In deep stretch, the pair raced side-by-side with Freeneasy prevailing in the photo for his second straight success of the year in six starts. He's banked $156,765 lifetime--$10,250 of that so far this young season.   Stepping up from a "non-winners" class, Freeneasy Hanover was the public's fifth choice in the win pool and paid $14.40.   In the $20-$25,000 claiming handicap, Ahead Of the Curve was given a picture perfect drive by George Napolitano, Jr. and captured that event in 1:52 over the late charging Rick's Sign, handled by Simon Allard. The winning margin was 2 3/4 lengths with Red Hot Yankee third after posting red hot fractions of :26.1, :53.3 and 1:22 with Ahead Ofthe Curve right on that one's tail the entire way, only leaving the pocket turning for home and scoring easily from there.   Masters Champion and Mach Wheel also earned minor awards in the field of six.   Trained by Pete Pellegrino for the Baron Racing Stable, Ahead Ofthe Curve, an eight year-old son of Real Desire, won for the 27th time during his career and pushed his lifetime bounty closer to $300,000--now at $298,149.   He paid $3.60 to win as the public choice.   Finally, Fox Valley Griffin, driven by Rick Plano, lit up the tote-board, by scoring at victory in a claiming event in 1:53.1 at odds of 52 to 1.   The six year-old, trained by Richard Macomber for wife Carol and Emilinda Manzi, paid $107.00 to win, keying two dime superfecta payoffs (there was a dead-heat for second) of $945.83 and $756.68.   The big upset also set up a Pick-4 carry-over of over $3,000 going into Sunday's racing program.   Sunday also is the kickoff of Pompano's $20,000 Championship Driver's Challenge, which gets underway with a round one pairing of Dave Ingraham and Rick Plano.   by John Berry, for Isle Pompano Park          

Pompano Beach, FL...December 1, 2013...Up Tempo captured the $13,100 final of the Battleground Late Closer for claiming trotters at Pompano Park on Sunday night by conquering eight rivals and a sloppy racetrack pelted by several hours of rain.   Owned by Maryann Plano and driven by husband Rick, the eight year-old altered son of Boy Band caught some live cover going around turn two, was blind-switched going into the final bend and only found room along the pylons in deep stretch to secure a photo finish victory--the official margin being a "head."   Muscles To Spare (Billy Muggleston) finished second after forging to the lead at the third station with Mailman Bob (Matt Romano) just a neck off the winner at the end of the 1:57.4 mile. Browner Shuttle, the even money favorite, finished fourth while Senator Hall picked up the final award in the field of nine.   Hope Reins Supreme (Fern Paquet, Jr.) won an early battle for the lead, stuffing Senator Hall (Wally Hennessey) In The Pocket past the quick :27.4 opener. Muscles To Spare was away in good order from his rail post and pulled going into the second turn and began his grind toward the leader giving Up Tempo some live cover half way through the mile in :57.3.   As Muscles To Spare pulled on even terms with Hope Reins Supreme, Up Tempo was in pursuit but blind-switched as Mailman Bob made a double bubble move into the far turn and past three-quarters in 1:27.4.   They were stacked three across the track turning for home with Up Tempo still searching for some room and the patient Plano found it a sixteenth out to secure the close victory on the inside.   In a post race interview, Plano said, "...with the track a couple of seconds off, it probably was a good place to be be--out in the two or three path with the track draining in, but, when I got blind-switched, I had to go somewhere...and it just happened to be inside instead of outside. The trotter did this all on his own tonight, I never touched him in the lane one single time."   For Up Tempo, it was his sixth win of the year in 25 starts and 32nd success lifetime, sending his career bounty just a shade under $280,000.   As the 3 to 1 second choice, Ip Tempo paid $8.00 to win.   In the $10,000 Open for fillies and mares, the three year-old Woman Of Terror, catch-driven by Ed Hensley, made a bold rush from dead last in her octet halfway through the mile, swept to the lead around the final turn and went on to score a victory measuring 1 3/4 lengths in 1:53.2 as the 7 to 2 third choice on the tote.   Loretta (Ricky Macomber, Jr.), the longest proposition on the board at 24 to 1, finished second while Godiva Seelster (Wally Hennessey) completed the trifecta. Love You Bye was fourth and Kayla's Dream picked up the final marble.   Love You Bye and Godiva Seelster battled for supremacy early with Love You Bye taking command at the :27.4 quarter and continuing to lead through fractions of :56.1 and 1:24.4.   At that point, Woman Of Terror was on her speed binge and had control of things turning for home with no worries thereafter.   Woman Of Terror now has won all three of her Pompano starts this fall with this victory being the first in this top company.   This daughter of Western Terror, trained by Jim McDonald for owner Steve Elliott, earned her sixth win of the year in 16 starts to send her bankroll in 2013 to $52,624.   Woman Of Terror paid $9.60 to win and keyed a superfecta paying $938.08...for a dime.   by John Berry for Isle Pompano Park  

Pompano Beach, FL...November 30, 2013...Pompano Park was host for the $427,300 F.S.B.O.A. Championship Series for Florida Bred two and three year-olds on Saturday night (Nov. 30). Here is a recap of those events. TOUGH ISSUE TAKES $50,300 2YO COLT PACE Tough Issue, driven by Bruce Ranger, took top honors in the (non-wagering) $50,300 Florida Breeders Stake for two year-old pacing colts and geldings by scoring a handy victory measuring 3 ¼ lengths in1:56.3. Owned by Brenda Komers along and the Verderame Stable and trained by Mike Deters, the gelded son of Tough Sir registered his fifth win of the year in 12 starts by wiring together panels of :28, :58.3 and 1:28.3 before sealing the issue with a final quarter in :28. Goldstar Kenny P (Mickey McNichol) was second with Warlock (Wally Hennessey), expected to be the chief competition to the winner, third in the trio after making a miscue leaving. The victory pushed Tough Issue's earnings to $55,745. SHOWING OFF REDEEMS HIMSELF IN JUVENILE COLT TROT Showing Off and driver Wally Hennessey teamed up to win the $51,600 Breeders Stake for two year-old trotting colts and geldings with a sharp 2:01.3 win in the second of two non-wagering events at Pompano Park. The son of Wewering, owned by Richard and Sandra Dunmire along with Jay Sears, still hospitalized but recuperating from a training mishap a few weeks back, was away cautiously as Gator On Patrol (Tom Sells) carved up early panels of :31 and 1:01.1 with Geronimo Fame (Bruce Ranger) in pursuit. On the backside, Hennessey asked the gelding to roll and roll he did, brushing up from third and using a :29.2 third panel to take command with authority before easily striding home a 2 ½ length winner of Geronimo Fame. Gator On Patrol did finish third while Midnight Michael picked up the minors in the quartet. Showing Off now has a 5-3-0 scorecard in 11 starts, good for earnings of $46,382. After the race, Hennessey said, "...you know, these two year-olds are still learning and haven't become the 'push-button' racehorses yet--you know, he made a break leaving in his last start. So, I let this one settle in early before 'pushing the button' on the backside. He responded great." MARKIE TAKES $55,200 2YO FILLY TROT Jay Sears' filly Markie, handled by Wally Hennessey for trainer Kim Sears, captured the $55,200 Breeders Stake Final by romping home a winner by over Trotting JC Poss (Andy Santeramo) in 2:02. The daughter of Proud Bushy--3 to 5 on the tote-board--was away gingerly avoiding trouble early as two combatants went off stride leaving. Fifth at the opening :30.2 quarter, Markie was out and going three-eighths into the mile, reaching fourth half way through the mile timed in 1:02.1. On the backside, Markie surged from five lengths out of it to a commanding lead of 3 ½ by the third station in 1:31.1. From there, it was a cakewalk as the filly crossed the line 3 ¼ to the good of Trotting JC Poss with Famous Halle (Bruce Ranger) third. Blame Bushy recovered from an early miscue to finish fourth while Goldstar Ginger picked up the nickel in the septet. For Markie, it was her seventh win of the year in 11 starts and pushed her bounty to $57,700. She paid $3.20 to win. TASHIA A PHOTO FINISH WINNER IN $55,400 3YO FILLY PACE Jay Sears picked up yet another Breeders Stake crown when his free-legged filly Tashia, driven by Stephane Lareau, eked out a photo finish victory--a literal whisker--over the 1 to 5 tote-board favorite, Don't Spank Me (Bruce Ranger) in the $55,400 Breeders Stakes Final in 1:54.1. Full of Fame (Joe Pavia, Jr.) finished third after making a bold first-over bid around the final turn. Delray Princess and Track Girl pick up the final awards. The daughter of Six Of Diamonds was last in her field after opening fractions of :27.1 and :57 half way through the mile, wended her way into contention on the backside, fanned four wide turning for home after 3/4s in 1:25.3 and just did nail the pacesetting Don't Spank me in the final stride. After the race, driver Stephane Lareau said, ...this filly is as tough a filly as you'll find on the racetrack. After they took the pants (hobbles) off of her, she became a racehorse and I think the difference tonight was Kim (trainer Sears) giving her a qualifying start a week ago just to keep her tight. The other filly (Don't Spank Me) hadn't been out since early in the month and that just may have been the difference." For Tashia, it was her 11th win of the year, pushing her seasonal bounty to $67,351. As third choice in the betting pool, Tashia paid $14.20 to win. TYREE'S TREASURE TAKES 3YO FILLY TROT The lightly raced Tyree's Treasure, a bridesmaid in her last two outings, finally became the "bride" in winning her $52,800 Breeders Stake for three year-old trotting fillies in a lifetime best performance 1:59.3. The daughter of Famously, off as the 8 to 5 second choice, led every step of her mile for Bruce Ranger, pinning a 2 ½ length defeat on the 2 to 5 favorite Tea Party Express (Rick Plano). Hollys Diamond was third--18 ¼ lengths away--while Piper Pfeiffer and Sweet Loreley completed the quintet. "It was a pretty handy win for her this time around," said Bruce Ranger. "She always has good gate speed but tonight she had a very good kick coming home. Mark (trainer Friedman) did a great job getting her ready for this and a whole bunch of credit goes to him." Friedman, indeed, made a few rigging changes to the filly to make her more comfortable and she responded bravely late in her mile to insure the win--her eight lifetime in only 13 starts. She's banked $94,554 lifetime--$39,729 this year for owners the Polo Stable and Hollie Proesel. Tyree's Treasure paid $5.40 to her $2 backers. HILLYBILLY CAPTURES 3YO CROWN Amante Standardbreds' Hillybilly claimed the Breeders Stake crown for three year-old pacing colts and geldings by scoring a convincing 1:53.4 three length win in the $53,800 final. The son of N Aboriginal, handled by Bruce Ranger, was sent off as the 3 to 5 public choice and defeated Quincy (Bryce Fenn) with 31 to 1 outsider Jose Lightning (Kevin Wallis) third. Goldstar Thumper finished fourth after cutting panels of :28.1, :56.3 and 1:26.2. Wingull picked up the final award in the field of six. Hillybilly left alertly, taking a garden seat back of Goldstar Thumper, and left the cozy pocket around the final turn and easily took command at the head of the stretch and drew off in the lane for his ninth win of the year in 22 starts. After the race, Ranger said, "...he's such a handy horse. He can leave...he can close...he's just a pleasure to handle. Last week, when he made a rare break, he just kind of outpaced himself. Tonight, he was well within himself all the way. The victory pushed Hillybilly's lifetime bankroll over the $100,000 mark--$104,434--and enriched his $2 backers to the tune of $3.20. GOLDSTAR JESSICA TAKES 2YO FINAL Goldstar Jessica, handled by Kevin Wallis, proved her maiden win of a week ago was no fluke as she waltzed off with the top prize in the $53,700 Breeders Stake Final for juvenile pacing fillies in 1:56.1. This daughter of Rock On left alertly and was away third as Sandalonia (Mickey McNichol) and Voluminous (Mel Turcotte) battled violently through panels of :28.3 and :57.4. On the backside, J D Eleven Bell's (Rick Plano) surged from fourth into the lead past 3/4s in 1:27.2. All the while, "Jessica" was searching for room and, at the top of the lane, found some and roared on by on the strength of her :28.2 finale. Sandalonia gamely held on for second over the late charging Limelight (Ed Hensley). J D Eleven Bells (Rick Plano). Heather picked up the final award in the field of nine. Owned and trained by Tom Audley, Goldstar Jessica was the 7 to 5 public choice and returned $4.80 to win. For Mr. Audley, though, the win was worth $26,850 and vaulted the filly's earnings from $14,735 to $41,585. RAILEE KWIK TAKES 3YO TROT FOR THE COLTS Railee Kwik, trained by Jim McDonald for owner Joe Pennacchio, got a picture perfect drive from Bruce Ranger to win the $54,800 Breeders Stake final. The son of Basil, in the garden spot from the word "go," picked up the pieces after Sky Crest (Stephane Lareau) set hot fractions of :27.2 and :57.2 and held off the late surging Goucher (Bryce Fenn) to win by a neck in 1:59.3. Tim T (Tom Sells) was third with Sky Crest fourth. Proud Expression recovered from an early miscue to pick up the final award. After the race, driver Ranger said, "They were going hot the first part--hotter than normal for these--and I thought I'd better try and get a jump on them turning for home. Bryce's horse (Goucher) was flying late so I had to get into my guy a little bit at the end...but he held on." The win nearly doubled Railee Kwik's earnings for the year--$28,483 coming in and $55,883 going out. It was Ranger's third Breeders Stake win of the night. CRUIZIN K C TAKES OPEN IN 1:50.1. Mark O'Mara's Cruizin K C earned a hard fought 1:50.1 victory in Pompano Park's $10,000 Open 1 Pace on Saturday night. The five year-old eked out a narrow decision over Lyon's Johnny (Wally Hennessey) and took a new lifetime mark in the process. The son of Mach Three earned his ninth win of the year and sent his seasonal bounty to $83,933. Red Hot Yankee was third for Ed Hensley while Panocchio, who took the lead after a :26.4 quarter and proceeded to put up number of :54 and 1:21.4 finished fourth. B N Bad picked up the nickel. Cruizin K C, second choice in the betting, paid $7.40 to win. by John Berry for Isle Pompano Park    

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