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The Standardbred Owners Association of New York’s Executive Director, Alex Dadoyan, will be leaving his harness racing position at the SOA of NY to take a position with MGM Resorts Yonkers Raceway as Director of Racing. “MGM having someone with his knowledge of the racing game will be beneficial in both the short and long term for the racing product at Yonkers, our horsemen and the industry,” said SOA of NY President Joe Faraldo. “The SOA of NY has benefited from having Alex these last six years to help us fulfill long term goals that many said were merely pipe dreams, including the initiation of the only regularly scheduled simulcast of American harness racing which took place from Yonkers Raceway to the French PMU,” Faraldo continued.    “Alex helped the SOA of NY to promote and tighten the global bonds that unite horsemen from North America to Europe to our down under partners in Australia and New Zealand.  Alex’s departure from the SOA leaves big shoes to fill, but we wish Alex well in his transition to MGM, and we look forward to a long and productive relationship with Alex and his colleagues at MGM as we build upon our successes of recent years,” Faraldo concluded. Sometime after the International Trot on October 12th the SOA of NY will be canvassing for a new Executive Director whose duties will include general Administration and handling our Welfare and Retirement Funds in conjunction with the officers, directors and trustees of the Association . From the SOA of NY

YONKERS, N.Y. – Monday evening at Yonkers Raceway, Steve Starr gathered in the winner’s circle with about 30 of the track’s drivers, horsepeople, officials, and even the outrider. The group came together in recognition of Starr’s 47-year career at the track, which ended Monday as Starr announced his retirement. Growing up, Starr dreamed of becoming a Standardbred breeder and graduated from Delaware Valley College with a degree in animal husbandry. However, life guided him to Yonkers Raceway, where he took a job assisting Ed Parker and Richard O’Donnell in the race office in the mid-1970s. That job blossomed into a career and Starr soon became the track’s race secretary, a position he maintained through Monday.  Starr reflected on his career, the challenges facing the industry, and looked ahead to retired life with the SOA of NY’s Brandon Valvo Wednesday evening. BV: Congratulations on your career and on your retirement. How does it feel? SS: I’ve been retired for 24 hours and it feels great. I spent most of the day with my wife and my youngest grandchild, and I couldn’t be happier. I’m off on the right foot.  BV: They had a big ceremony in the winner’s circle for you. What was that like for you, how did you feel? SS: It was great. Over the course of the years, there have been so many great people in that winner’s circle and it really was a thrill to be down there. To have all those drivers and trainers and grooms and officials with me, I enjoyed it. BV: What made you decide now was the right time to call it a career? SS: Truthfully, I’ve put 47 years in and I’m going to be 70. I worked for the Rooneys my whole life, and it was great working for them and their family. They couldn’t have treated me any better over the period of 47-years and I have no regrets ever working for the Rooneys and (Vice President and COO) Bob Galterio. When MGM bought the place in late January, I just thought I was too old and too set in my ways to go forward with MGM and adjust to their changes. I spoke to my wife and I wanted to work until we got through the International Trot, but that’s two-and-a-half months away and we’d miss the whole summer, so I decided to get out now while the getting is good. BV: You mention the summer, do you have any plans coming up or anything you’re looking forward to? SS: Just staying local, I have a son and daughter. I live in Pleasantville, they moved to Pleasantville, with my grandchildren. I’m very happy right now. What my wife and I want to do is sell our house, we want to downsize, stay in Pleasantville. So, we have some work to do to keep us busy and once we do that, my new life will begin. This is still business. BV: How did you get involved in racing and how did you decide this was the career for you? SS: When I got out of college, I got the opportunity to work at some stud farms and I took that opportunity. I wanted to stay in the breeding business, that’s what my desire was early in my life. When I got to the farms, I felt they weren’t using me to the best of my abilities, so when an opportunity opened up at Yonkers, their assistant had moved on and I went down to interview for the job and I was very fortunate to start working for Ed Barker and the Rooney family. That was in 1974 and from there, my tutelage was under Ed Barker and Richard O’Donnell. In early 1977, I was given the job of race secretary and I was there in that position ever since. BV: What was it like when you first started working at Yonkers? What was the racetrack like back then? SS: It was great. It was $2 million a night in handle, good attendance. The work was outrageous, I never worked so hard. Ed Barker, he wasn’t a slave driver, but he was meticulous about how he wanted everything done. It was a tie and a coat when you went in to draw in the morning and then when you came back in the evening, it was a tie and a coat. There wasn’t a relaxed atmosphere back then, it was more business than anything else. The ABC system requires a lot more time than conditioned racing and that’s how I started. I worked that system until ’91 or ’92. It was a lot of work then; I can’t even tell you how much work. They days were 10, 12 hours, and those were good days. BV: You would spend a good portion of your day handicapping the horses and trying to classify them appropriately? SS: Yes, I learned that under Ed Barker and Richard O’Donnell. As an assistant, you work a little harder than most, but the whole system was different. You had to really watch those races pretty carefully so you could be sure about what you wanted to do. Move them up, move them down. These guys livelihoods were in your hands. It was important to do things right if you could. I liked it until Roosevelt closed and everyone was doing conditions except me. It was very difficult at that time to do ABC. When Roosevelt, was open, they could go to Roosevelt for a few months, then come to Yonkers for a few months. We both worked the ABC system, so it was easy to keep them classified and know where they were going to race. When we were the only ones doing ABC, every horse that came in had to be reclassified unless they were claimers.  BV: I imagine one of the biggest changes made during your career was the switch from ABC to conditions at that point? SS: Absolutely. It was night and day, like two different jobs. You give the horsemen more latitude to decide where they wanted to go. Your condition racing was by age, sex, money earned. There was a lot of opportunity to decide where you wanted to race, plus the claiming races. It really turned over the racing program more in the hands of the trainers and owners than the race secretary. There were a lot less arguments then, too. BV: What was it like when the casino came to Yonkers? SS: That was something brilliant, that was the greatest thing that happened to harness racing at Yonkers and in the State of New York. We were all in the same boat and the Rooneys kept that place going. When we opened the casino in 2006, it really made all the difference in the world. When we first opened, we got somewhere between $40- and $45 million for purses and that worked its way up to $50 million dollars. That made the biggest difference in the world. It sure made my job a lot easier. BV: Talk a little more about how the game has changed over the last 10 years or so. How has your job changed more recently? Everyone talks about the horse shortage; did you feel that at Yonkers? SS: Before we closed for the casino to be built, we were really struggling because the purses were not good. They still had the shipping to do, they had bridges to cross, and probably a lot of people just didn’t want to come to Yonkers. When we reopened, our purses gradually got much better. At that point in time, we had more horses than we knew what to do with. Eventually, that started to wean itself. The horse population is really bad at Yonkers only because for someone to ship to Yonkers, it costs about $250 and that probably doesn’t include the groom and paddocking, just for tolls and gas just to pull one of those trailers across the bridge. The expense is just exorbitant to get to us. Sometimes when they have to opportunity to race at Chester or Pocono, they race there instead. Now it’s more difficult and the only thing that makes it more difficult is lack of horses, but I’m not alone. I think that’s going to be one of the biggest problem the industry faces in the future. I think the horse population will be more important to deal with than anything else and I don’t think it’s far away, either. I would say probably within 5 or 10 years. BV: You look at entries for the top pacing races at a lot of the tracks, you have 20 or 30 New Zealand- and Australia-bred horses per night.  SS: That’s right, they’re filling these races, really. Especially the better classes. You can’t fill and Open and a Winner’s Over, you can’t fill those two classes. There was a time when you had an Open and two Winner’s Overs and they were pretty good horses. Now, you can’t fill them the same day, with mares, trotters, and the aged pacers. There just aren’t that many horses who can race in those classes. Chester and Pocono, if they didn’t have their series back and forth with the final, if they didn’t have that, they wouldn’t have any high-class races at their tracks. They don’t even try to fill Opens over there anymore. BV: How do you think that problem is going to be addressed? SS: I don’t think they’re taking it seriously right now. They know there’s a problem, but I really don’t think they realize how big this problem is going to be. There’s only one way to address it and that’s to have more horses. I don’t know how you get people to breed. These farms are putting out as much as they can. There really aren’t that many individuals that breed anymore, there’s just a few big farms that do most of the breeding. I don’t see that changing other than them increasing their broodmare bands and producing more yearlings, but I don’t know if they can do that or not. To raise a mare and a yearling and sell it is really expensive. BV: You mentioned the Yonkers International Trot at the beginning of our conversation. Talk about what it was like for you when that race was revived in 2015. What was it like to be a part of that? SS: I was tickled to death. I was scared. I didn’t know how it was going to work, I couldn’t speak anything but English. I was lucky, I was introduced to a guy from Europe. He’s a racetrack operator, but he’s also a friend of the horsemen. His name is Klaus Koch. With his assistance, we were able to put these fields together. When we started in 2015, it was not easy. The purse is $1 million, and you would have thought you weren’t giving them anything but a slice of pizza. It was comical. You have to wait a long time to fill these races because the Europeans don’t make a commitment right away. You have to be within a month of the race before they make a real commitment. It’s getting better now, but in 2015, they just didn’t want to make an early commitment. From the horseman’s side, I can’t argue with them, but as the race secretary, I wish they made up their minds a lot sooner. This year could be the best year ever. It certainly would have been if that French horse (Aubrion Du Gers) didn’t get killed in that accident on the track. He had already made a commitment to come with Dijon, the horse that won the Elitlopp. This was shaping up to be a really good race. Every horse I wanted to come was a grade 1 winner. This was the best year I ever had, it was unbelievable the way this was turning out and it’s still shaping up to be one of the best fields ever. I’m sure Bob Miecuna working with Klaus, they’ll get this race together. If the people who are interested now make a commitment, it will be a great race in 2019. BV: Listening to you talk about the International, it sounds like something you are really passionate about. SS: Oh, I was. When they came back with the race in 2015, it was $1 million. That was the second time we had a million-dollar race, we had an Art Rooney Pace for $1 million once. MGM was gracious enough without knowing much about racing to keep this race going. The SOA of NY of course, they’re very much a part of the race. They contributed 100 percent to the affair. BV: Talk more about the relationship with the horsepeople and the SOA of NY. That must have been a big part of your job as well. SS: It was, and I’ll tell you something, it’s a lot easier to get along with the horsemen than it’s not. Back in the ‘80s when Joe Faraldo and the SOA took over, it was a war zone at Yonkers. I didn’t know if I was going to make it home every night. But as things turned around and things got better, our relationship with the horsepeople got better. My relationship with Joe Faraldo and the SOA is 100 percent sound. They’re great people to work with, they’re reasonable, and if you work together and think together, you can make anything happen. The best way to run your business is to get along. Joe and I, we eventually many years ago started to get along and it really made things a lot better and I think it made the races a lot better, too. by Brandon Valvo, for the SOA of NY

Yonkers, NY--Like fine wine Joe Faraldo just keeps getting better. The driving barrister scored yet another harness racing victory with his old warhorse Tough Get Going when they bottomed-out the field with an impressive 2:00 wire-to-wire victory in the $8000 NAADA Trot at Yonkers Raceway tonight (July 18). "His wonderful ability of leaving like a runner sure helps when we're looking for a good position and tonight he grabbed the lead on the first turn and we were pretty comfortable after that," Faraldo said via phone after the race. After starting from the five hole Faraldo sent his charge to the lead and they had command even before the first turn and they led their competition by the first stanza in :29. Snug on the lead Tough Get Going led the field by the halfway point in 1:00.2 but at that point David Glasser hustled Eyore Haover up alongside Faraldo's charge and the two then raced side by side up the backstretch. As they approached the three quarters Hannah Miller-who was getting a two-hole journey- moved Jacks To Open tighter on Faraldo's back . "Hannah's horse was fresh and with Glasser on the limb I backed into Hannah to keep her in behind me as long as I could. She did shake loose at the top of the stretch but it was too late," Faraldo added. At the wire Tough Get Going rambled home a 1-1/2 length winner over Jacks To Open. Eyore Hanover hung on for the show dough in the non-wagering event. For Smokin' Joe it was his 150th driving victory   by John Manzi for NAADA    

John Calabrese kept the ball rolling with a win at Cesena. For sure for the affable John it was his first on the soil of his ancestors. this harness racing win, coupled with his smile, brought him many female admirers, especially when they somehow heard that he owned five racetracks in the USA. In the next event though the Italians scored a 1-4 placing over a really slow half pulled off by an Italian wall built up front mirroring those built in ancient times. They could have waited no longer to spoil our fun but took the cruelest path to deflate the American plans for a victory party. It did not matter though because the Americans were treated so royally well that if they had been beaten by 100 instead of by a mere six points. Truthfully the Americans were the big winners. With the care the Americans received from their hosts and friends, Stefano, Rafaello, Roberto Piergiovanni, and Daniele Ortello from amateur clubs from Venezia, Tuscano and Emiglia Romano ( Cesena), we certainly came out on top. Two more days until home for the USA team and all the baggage will be jam packed and brimming over with fond memories of the good times and our friends, both old and new. Coming next on the NAADA schedule will be friends from Torino arriving on US soiled in August. Their mission to compete and win some amateur races and see the famed Hambletonian. As Danile Orsini said we need to keep ties between our countries, as Italy and America have a lot in common, like between Phillip Mazzei and Thomas Jefferson. We must keep the game going at home and with our old Italian friends abroad. Italian horsemen have a great spirit in keeping the game going when you learn that purse money is delayed by six or more months. Yet these dedicated people come to Lexington and Harrisburg and they proudly displayed their Chapter Sevens, Donato's, Trixtons, and talked of the many others when displaying them. The American industry, as well as the global industry owes these people a lot. Bona note Bella Italia for now and benvenuti from USA to our guests coming from Torino.. by Joseph Faraldo

After two days on the beach under wispy clouds and 90 + degree heat the USA harness racing team was scooted off to the Padovanella Hippodromo in Padova Italy.   There USA team members Joe Faraldo and Alan Schwartz duked it out down the lane of this historic half mile track. When the dust and shouting was over Joe Faraldo emerged victorious. For Joe it was a return to the place where he got his 1st pari-mutuel win many years ago. Alan took the place dough and the Americans were on top.   In the next event Alan dropped his longshot into the two hole and though shuffled back a bit emerged on the top of the lane to garner yet another second. As a result the USA team had 64 points to Italy's 40. Truly rewarding but as Yogi Berra use to say: "it ain't over till it's over."are e Italians have 4 more races to close the gap and try to surge a comeback which they are very capable of doing. The cherry on top of the cake for team USA was seeing our dear friend Mauritzio Biasuzzi and his lovely wife Marinella and competing and chatting with the former World Champion amateur driver who has nearly 1,000 wins.   The competition moves on to Montecatini then Cesena Thursday and Friday.   by Joseph Faraldo

Yonkers, NY-- Occasionally a harness racing driver fits well behind a certain horse, and that could be said about the special relationship between Joe Faraldo and his trotter Tough Get Going. Tonight at Yonkers Raceway the driving barrister hustled his charge to the front and then made every pole a winning one en route to a 1:59 victory, in the second leg of the NAADA Summer Series. It was their second victory in their last three times together behind a starting gate. After starting from the seven-hole Faraldo hustled Tough Get Going to the lead and they had command when the quarter pole timer flashed :28.1."When he's right he can leave with the car.," Faraldo said. "And tonight he did just that," Together they showed the way by the half in :58.3 as young Brett Beckwith got Dark Poole in high gear and they ranged alongside Tough Get Going as they trotted toward the third quarter. Although Dark Poole didn't clear Tough Get Going it worked out well for Faraldo because with Dark Poole on the limb that kept Tony Ciuffetelli's Someway Same Hall boxed in along the pylons and prevented him from getting a early shot at the leader. However when they headed for paydirt Ciuffetelli's trotter was charging down the passing lane but he ran out of racetrack and had to settle for second money in a tight photo. Dark Pool was just a length behind the top two in third place. Next Thursday the series moves back to Monticello Raceway.   by John Manzi for NAADA

Monticello, NY-- When Tony Verruso is not airborne assisting travelers he enjoys time sitting behind a spirited steed in an amateur race. And on Thursday afternoon (June 6) Verruso, the president of the CKG Billings Harness Driving Series, drove Connie Keeper to a 2:00.1 victory in the NAADA Trotting Series which began its summer harnes racing events today at Monticello Raceway. When the starter said "go" Joe Faraldo gunned Tough Get Going to the led but he was chased by Someway Same Hall (Tony Ciuffetelli, Jr.) and Connie Keeper, eventually yielding to the latter who got first call as the field passed the quarter pole. "They were all leaving pretty good and I figured I'dgo out and look for a hole after the start but it wasn't until Joe (Faraldo) grabbed leather and Tony Ciuffetelli, (Jr.) found a hole with the favorite (Someway Same Hall ) that I cleared to the lead and after that happened I had constant pressure and just kept going," Verruso said. After a :29 first panel Verruso kept the pedal to the metal and Connie Keeper showed the way past the half in :59.2 being challenged now by Joe Lee with Surface Tension, who hung around up the backside before he began to fade when Connie Keeper passed the third stanza in 1:29.4.. At that point Faraldo moved to the outside with Tough Get Going as Ciuffetelli hung along the pylons in third place with thoughts of using the passing lane in the stretch... which he did. But the race for victory was between the top two trotters and both Faraldo and Verruso went to work urging their charges in the deep stretch. "When we rounded the final turn I thought I was home free but after a tough trip on the engine Connie Keeper's strides began to shorten as we approached the finish line. However, the finish wire came up in time and we won it by a head," Verruso said in the paddock as he handed the lines to the horses' caretaker." Sent off at odds of over 6-1 Connie Keeper paid $14.20. With her victory the veteran Muscles Yankee mare raised her lifetime earnings to over $201,000. She is owned by Dr. Scott Woogen and trained by Gary Messenger. For Verruso, it marked his 73rd career win since he began competing in amateur racing in 1999.   by John Manzi for the North American Amateur Driving Association

Yonkers, NY--After 10 grueling legs of the North American Amateur Drivers Association's Spring Trotting Series the $15,0000 final was presented on the betting card at Yonkers Raceway on Thursday, May 23 and when the judges hung the official sign, series founder and its president Joe Faraldo was victorious after guiding Tough Get Going to a 1:59. 4 triumph in wire to wire fashion. "When the gate sprung I kept my eyes on the rail horse (Figi-Dave Offenberg) but he got away slowly so I hustled my horse to the front and we had command on the first turn," Faraldo said via telephone after the race. "But as soon as I had the lead Joe Lee, with the odds-on favorite, Soul Train, came calling on the outside and we passed the first quarter in :28.3. I knew at that point I couldn't let him go so we locked horns by the half in :57.4." After the swift early fractions Joe Lee found room behind Faraldo as they headed for the three quarters and they were one-two past that stanza in 1:27.4. Not being able to gain any ground on Tough Get Going Lee had little choice but to follow the leader and on the final turn they were joined by Bob Krivelin with Permanent Joy. But there was no catching Faraldo as his trotter cruised home a 2-1/2 length winner. Soul Train finished second and Permanent Joy was a half length farther back in third place. Tough Get Going is co-owned by Faraldo and trainer, Richie Banca. He paid $15.00. It was Faraldo's 148th driving victory in the States to go along with a handful in Europe. Currently Faraldo, Alan Schwartz and a NAADA member to be named, will be winging their way to Italy in July for an international driving competition.   by John Manzi for NAADA

Exercise-induced Pulmonary Hemorrage (EIPH) has been a recognized condition in horses since the early 18 century. While the amount of bleeding in horses varies, it is universally recognized that the vast majority of horses in training and racing do indeed bleed. The advent of the flexible endoscope confirmed in studies that in thoroughbreds the stress put upon them, proved that up to 75 per cent of them bleed in training and more so in racing. Other studies done on standardbred and thoroughbreds, after running three races, showed that 100 per cent of these horses bled at least once, evidenced by blood in the trachea. The cause of the bleeding is the amount of pressure experienced that racing puts on the pulmonary veins, four times the normal pressure. The pressure causes fibrosis and in turn Pulmonary fibrosis scars and thickens the tissue around and between the air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs, which decreases the lungs ability to function and decreases the racing life of the horse. I have attended multiple-day seminars with experts from all over the globe on the topic of the race day administration of Lasix. In North America, Lasix is the most popular medication for treating EIPH because studies have shown that it is the most effective treatment in decreasing the amount of bleeding and therefore the scarring and thickening of the tissue around the lungs. In many of the English speaking countries around the world conducting racing, where race day use of Lasix is prohibited, it is nonetheless permitted up to race day because it is acknowledged to have the desired therapeutic effects in controlling EIPH. One has to ask if it is recognized as necessary in training because of its control of this problem, when the stress is not as severe as when a horse competes in a race, then what is the rationale for withholding it on race day, where four times the normal pressure in the racing environment exists? It has been said that when our horses, mainly thoroughbreds, go overseas they compete quite well without Lasix. That is indeed true, perhaps because they have a least had the benefit of controlling pulmonary hemorrhage long enough to achieve success over their foreign competitors. Overseas competition is against horses that are using something far less efficacious than Lasix, or worse nothing at all, to address the long term effects occasioned by the increased stress in racing. Those who want to join the community of Lasix-free racing point to the alleged masking of other substances, but the controlled administration of the substance; the hourly limitation on its use pre-race( 4-4 1/2 hours); the testing for threshold overages of the substance, has put that argument to bed. Now the newest mantra for the elimination of race-day Lasix, is the horrible, horrible loss of life at Santa Anita Racetrack. The false claim being, that while the rest of North America continues to help the horse racing on Lasix, without nay correlation to catastrophes, Lasix is being inexplicably blamed as the proximate cause of those catastrophes. The problem, is the potential for the elimination of a recognized effective tool in controlling and minimizing, EIPH that helps the horse cope with the effects of stress. Santa Anita should be shut down immediately until the true causes of these catastrophes can be accurately determined and corrected. The factors point initially to the track’s surface and under-footing, but the more precise answer must be determined by analyzing all of the multiple possible factors, Lasix, being clearly not the culprit. Without closing down Santa Anita immediately, the industry, thoroughbred and standardbred alike, comes under tremendous pressure from all those looking to eliminate the industry anyway. Santa Anita is providing fuel to a fire that threatens the game, by racing more in the face of its undetermined cause of these catastrophic breakdowns. Allowing continued suffering at Santa Anita is intolerable and unacceptable and should not continue. Enough is enough and if one is looking to blame Lasix, it is suggested that one look elsewhere. Every industry organization needs to be heard on any and every false narrative out there. No benefit can be achieved by being silent on issues that threaten our existence. Joe Faraldo

Yonkers, NY- Joe Faraldo is a happy man. And why shouldn't he be? After all, the veteran amateur driver just won the $15,000 Final of the North American Amateur Drivers Association's fourth and final trotting series with Tough Get Going at Yonkers Raceway on Friday night (Dec. 7). They toured the Hilltop oval in a time of 2:00 to score a one-length victory over Monica Banca and Master of Excuses. When the wings of the mobile gate sprung Banca sent Master of Excuses to the lead from the two hole with Faraldo's charge on the limb pushing the pace after starting from post five. “I wanted to take the lead but Monica wouldn't have it and she said 'get behind me', which I did and it worked out to be the winning move,” Faraldo related by phone after the race. Banca and Master of Excuses passed the first stanza in :28.4 and they were comfortable by the half in :59.4. The leaders then raced one-two past the three quarters in 1:29.1 and on the final turn Faraldo moved Tough Get Going off the pylons. “My horse felt strong at that point and when we straightened for home I knew we'd be the winner,” he said.  Master of Excuses was second best a head in front of third place finisher Multitaskr Hanover in rein to Jennifer Lappe. Tough Get Going has won his last two starts and recently has been at the top of his game. Asked how come the he's currently racing better Faraldo was quick to respond. “He likes the cold weather and he can breath better when the temperature dips,” All things considered ,the veteran 5-year Kadabra gelding has amassed almost $47,000 this season. He's owned by Faraldo and Richie Banca and trained by Banca. Sent off as second choice Tough Get Going paid $6.00 for win. This has been a very prolific season for NAADA. Besides four 10-race series during the year the longtime amateur organization has hosted European amateur clubs from Hungary, Spain, Italy and France. And in September NAADA members traveled to Mallorca to race against the Spanish amateurs on their turf. “We plan to do much of the same next year, too,” Faraldo added. John Manzi        

Monticello, NY--The final leg of the North American Amateur Drivers Association's fourth trotting series of the season went to post at Monticello Raceway on Thursday (Nov. 15) and to the pleasant surprise of those who purchased win tickets on Tough Get Going were rewarded when Joe Faraldo sent the veteran trotter to the lead when the wings of the mobile gate folded and then made every pole a winning one en route to a 2:01.1 victory. And each lucky ticket holder received $47.00 for each two-dollar wager. "The crowd didn't have much faith in my horse's ability in here today but I felt fairly confident that he had good chance to win if things broke our way in the race," Faraldo said as he handed the reins to the caretaker upon returning to the paddock. Tough Get Going has had some trouble behind the starting gate on occasions but today wasn't one of those days. When the starter said "go" Faraldo sent his trotter to the lead and was challenged on the outside by Makin Trouble K and driver Joe Lee, Faraldo played hardball and wanted the front-end so he opened up a hole behind him and Lee took back and found room along the pylons as they passed the first stanza in a soft :29.2. With the field lined-up behind Tough Get Going the venerable trotter led them by the halfway point in 1:01.2 where Jennifer Lappe decided to move the 2 to 5 betting favorite, Winning Princess, out to challenge and they ranged up alongside the leader. "When we passed the half my horse was strong and I felt pretty confident that we had a good chance to win it,"Faraldo related. "And when Jennifer couldn't clear I felt even better." Although Tough Get Going and Winning Princess raced side-by-side as they passed the three quarters in 1:31:1 the former got first call. On the final turn Faraldo's charge had opened a length lead and despite a strong drive by Lappe her trotter hung and Tough Get Going emerged a one-length winner in a 2:01.1 clocking. Four lengths in the rears, in third place went to Makin Trouble K. Tough Get Going is owned by Joe Faraldo and Richie Banca and trained by Banca. The 5-yr-old altered son of Kadabra won for the fourth time this year and raised his seasonal bankroll to nearly $39,000. For Faraldo, a former Amateur Driver of the Year(2000), it was his 145th career win in the USA. by John Manzi, for NAADA

Monticello, NY--To say that the North American Amateur Drivers Association (NAADA) is having a busy year would be a gross understatement. Besides three local 10-race series--the third underway now- the members have hosted three European organizations; one from Spain, another from Hungary and a third from Italy; and now beginning October 8 and continuing thru October 14 they will host their counterparts from France. And just a month ago NAADA members traveled to Palma de Mallorca to compete against the Spainards on their home turf. According to NAADA president Joe Faraldo, one of two Americans who has won a race in France, his members will have to be at the top of their game when the French come to town. "We raced against them here four years ago and we came out on the short end. They're confident in their driving ability and they drive like professionals so we can probably expect another beating." There will be a Competition at Yonkers Raceway on Tuesday, October 9 followed by one at Monticello Raceway on Wednesday, Oct. 10. On Friday, Oct 12th there will be a race--maybe two--at the Meadowlands Drivers for the French team include Jerome Maillard, Ms Sandrine Oyer, Sebastien Campain and Jean Marc Freyssenge. NAADA will field different members at all three venues. "We may win or we may lose but the results are not that important. The camaraderie shared is what is," Faraldo added. "However, either way, everyone will enjoy good food, good wine and a good time." The following is the tentative itinerary: USA/FRANCE Friendship Competition October 8th - October 14th Monday - October 8th 2018... Pick up at JFK airport. Transport to The Bentley Hotel 500 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065 Dinner at Sel et Poivre 853 Lexington Ave 10065 Tuesday - October 9th. Free in the Morning. Pick up at 2:30 PM to get licensed Race at Yonkers Raceway. Dinner in Little Italy of the Bronx Ristorante Zero Otto Nove . Transport back to hotel. Wednesday - October 10th - Pick up at 10:30 AM.. Drive to Monticello Raceway Race at Monticello. Visit Hall of Fame in Goshen, NY en route to Dinner at the River Palm Steakhouse , Mahwah NJ. Transport to Hotel. Thursday - October 11th Pick up at 10 AM.. Professional New York City tour. Tour guide will drop off at Pepolinos about 6:30 PM for dinner 281 W Broadway, New York City Friday - October 12th Morning free. Pick up at 2:00 PM. Drive to Meadowlands for a race or two. Dinner at Il Villagio Saturday--October 13th International Trot and dinner at Yonkers Raceway Sunday - October 14th Don Peppes for dinner then drive to the airport by John Manzi, for NAADA

Manaor, Majorca--The Spain v NAADA Competition ended on September 9 on the 3/8ths mile track in Manacor with the Spanish team racing one-two with Faraldo in the pocket all the way until the wire. The Spanish prevailed finishing first and second with the visitors' Alan Schwartz, third, Joe Lee, fourth, Joe Faraldo, fifth and Paul Minore trailed the field The distance was 2,350 meters or 3 1/2 times around the well banked oval which sports a iron pipe crafted running horse rail. ("There is no way you wanna touch that thing", Faraldo remarked). The sand based track provided a really good surface for the all-French trotting horse field. Once again NAADA ended-up on the short end. The final points: Spain 86, USA 67. During the afternoon the Americans had a tour of the largest Cathedral in Europe and a special delightful lunch of Majorcan cuisine at Celler Sa Premsa in Palma. The evening highlight was the performance of the 6-8 year old children in their colors driving a variety of ponies without a starting gate, with the best ponies handicapped by meters. Afterwards there was festive dinner in a setting of about 400 in attendance, mostly to support the children, "and not the American amateur drivers", Faraldo added. by Joe Faraldo with John Manzi, for NAADA

Four members of the North American Amateur Drivers Association have traveled to Palma de Majorca as guests of the Spanish Amateur Organization and will compete in a Friendship Competition this week. The following is an account of the first days events on September 5 by NAADA president and participant, Joe Faraldo. "The warmest day of the year with races at the unusual distance ( for us) of 2150 meters at the beautiful facility called, San Pardo, began the first installment of NAADA v Spain Friendship Competition. "Despite the beauty of this 1,000 meter oval, the day was about to get even hotter for the Americans. "The first of the two events saw the Americans outnumbered in the heavily weighted 12 horse field, eight Spanish amateurs vs four Americans and the points there killed us ( perhaps we should have applied a curve). The Spanish finished 1-3 with (NAADA's) Alan Schwartz, Paul Minore and Joe Lee following them, 4-6. I (Faraldo) finished last but not disqualified as were two Spaniards. "Event #2, a seven horse race at the same distance, saw me cut the fractions with Schwartz parked for his life and Minore enjoying the two hole trip. As the field turned for home Paul Minore tipped his French horse Cocktail Broniais out and "jiggy jogged" home. Following dutifully were two Spaniards, then Schwartz, Faraldo and Lee. With their being only seven in that second heat the points shook out as follows:Spain 67,USA 48, which precipitated a question; where is that curve when you really need it. "After the races 24 people were hosted to a fabulous lunch at a great restaurant called Nimos in the heart of the thriving Palma de Majorca. The Spanish Federation's head honcho, the affable Juan, had a feast set out for us with Majorcan bread, Spanish burrata, pulpo, chorizo and then the grand dame of all Paella. Juan then provided diet killing deserts and we were carried away. off to the FINCA. A Finca is like an Italian Agro Turismo, basically a farmhouse with horses , other livestock and fresh vegetables that somehow get to our table. "A host of other goodies show up at the Finca via Juan Bassa, the owner and sire of the great Spanish amateur Jaume Bassa. Minore is serving as our champion as of today and he bought the champagne and ten bottles of wine. Everyone is poolside right now pushing a few back. "There will be one race left in Monacor on the 3/8s mile oval on Saturday night. Because of Paul's generosity we are kinda rooting for him but with us leaving early the next morning with no time for him to shop, we just figure we will." by Joe Faraldo & John Manzi, for NAADA

Who said that amateur racing isn't fun? Certainly not members of the North American Amateur Drivers Association. After hosting three different European amateur organizations on American soil already this year four NAADA members; Joe Faraldo, Alan Schwartz,Paul Minore and Joe Lee, and their guests; will soon be winging their way to Palma De Mallorca for an international Friendship Competition with the Spanish amateurs. "Though some may be going earlier than others we are all meeting in Palma on the 4th September and racing will be on September 5th, in the morning, and on the 8th in the evening," noted NAADA Event Coordinator, Alicia (Mrs Alan) Schwartz. According the NAADA president Joe Faraldo,"We have had competitions, almost yearly, with the Spanish amateurs. We hosted them last year in the States and we came out on the short end in the competition. But winning or losing is incidental, what is important is the friendship and comraderie shared during the competitions." Tentative itinerary: Arrive in Mallorca on September 4th. Drive to the Finca for accommodations.-Relax and dinner at Italian Restaurant September 5th; -Races in the morning,-Lunch at the racetrack then back to Finca for a barbeque. September 6th ; Visit the Rafa Nadal Museum-Paella by Xisco and after party with Gin tonics--then back to Finca. September 7th; -Visit Ca'n Axartell Vineyards with wine tastings and tapas. Then visit the Pearls in Porto Cristo followed by dinner in Restaurant Sa Fonda September 8th-- Boat Trip with tapas and cocktails during the day and at night races in Manacor followed by dinner with the horse owners September 9th - NAADA members leave Mallorca; except for Joe Lee who will be staying on a bit longer to enjoy the scenery.. by John Manzi, for NAADA    

Yonkers, NY--"Smokin' Joe" Faraldo is a happy man. And why shouldn't he be? After all, the Queens, NY attorney just won the $15,000 CKG Billings Eastern Region Mid-Season Final tonight (July 28)at Yonkers Raceway when he guided Tough Get Going to a gate-to-wire triumph in a 1:58.4 clocking. "A win tonight and a catch drive on Thursday at Monticello (Raceway) where I finished second, heck, things are really looking up," chuckled the Queens, NY attorney who has been a premier supporter of amateur racing since its resurgence in the early 1980's. Faraldo, a Billings member from its inception and founder of the North American Amateur Drivers Association, is getting to show that he really knows his way around the racetrack. It's true, he was the National Amateur Driver of the Year in 2000 and a winner of 144 pari-mutuel races (2 this year in Europe, also), but the move he put on Wygant Prince's and "Coach Paul" Minore tonight which kept them locked-in until mid-stretch was almost professional and saved the victory for Tough Get Going. "We were on the engine all the way and Paul had Wygant Prnce on my back from the start," Faraldo said. "When we rounded the final turn Annie ("Get Your Gun"Stoebe--with Uriel) was on the outside and I kept backing into her trying to keep Paul's horse from seeing daylight. But finally, in mid-stretch, Wygant Prince shook loose and came charging but my horse hung tough and we won it by neck." Winwood Scout garnered the show dough for David "Poppa" Glasser in the non-wagering contest Faraldo co-owns the Tough Get Going with the horse's trainer, Richie Banca. Meanwhile, later in the evening at Northfield Park in Ohio, a 9-horse field in the mid-west region of the Billings Series went to post and when the judges hung the official sign the odds-on favorite Utopia and driver Steve Oldford rallied late to overtake the pacesetter, Winback Charles M ("Lawbook Larry" Farley) and go on to a 1-1/2 length victory in a 1:57 clocking. In that contest Farley sent Winback Chales M to the lead from the pole position and they rumbled by the first quarter in 28 seconds flat and were still two lengths to the good as they passed the halfway point in :57.2. At that point Oldford got Utopia in high gear and with a three-deep move up the backside they were two lengths off Winback Charles M as the field passed the third stanza in 1:27.2. As they rounded the final turn Farley's trotter braced for Oldford's charge but Utopia was too much to contend with and he went on to victory. Winback Charkes M held on for second money while Michelle"the Belle" Ruvola finished third with Better Call Saul. Unlike the Yonkers Billings the Northfield Park Billings was a wagering affair and Utopia paid $2.60 for win. The 7-year-old Mutineer gelding is owned by Oldford Racing LLC and trained by Terry Deters. For Oldford it was his 5th seasonal driving victory and 135th of his amateur career. by John Manzi, for the CKG Billings Series    

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