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Post Time with Mike and Mike presented by Bet America has a fantastic program lined up for Thursday (July 7) at 7:00 PM Eastern. Legendary Track Announcer Larry Lederman will be joining the program. Known for his quick wit and entertaining race calls, Larry will talk about some of his memorable moments of his career. He was also give us an update on his health, as he was diagnosed with brain cancer a few years back. Also joining the program with be The Editor and General Manager of the Horseman and Fair World Kathy Parker. She will talk about her career in harness racing and the rich history of the Horseman and Fair World publication.   Helene Gregory will also be joining the show, as Mike and Mike continue their discussions on racing under saddle. Our ongoing series with Running Aces Casino and Racetrack continues, as Track Announcer Darin Gagne sits down with veteran trainer/driver Steve Wiseman to talk about his career in harness racing. We will also find out what's coming up next week at the Minnesota oval. Post Time with Mike and Mike presented by Bet America can be heard each Thursday at 7:00 PM Eastern live on their website at posttimewithmikeandmike.com, or on-demand at https://extra.betamerica.com/betamerica-radio-network/ From the Mike & Mike Show Media Department

MANALAPAN, NJ -- June 13, 2016 -- Leo C. McNamara III, a third generation harness racing horseman and executive administrator of the Standardbred Breeders and Owners Association of New Jersey (SBOANJ) for the past 15 years, died early Sunday morning, June 12. Mr. McNamara died of complications following a hard fought battle with cancer, just two weeks short of his 61st birthday. Born June 30, 1955, in Carmel, Ind., Mr. McNamara was the son of Leo McNamara Jr., whose father, Leo, founded Two Gaits Farm in Indiana, where Adios was foaled and the pacing stallion Hal Dale stood at stud. Leo C. McNamara was also a founder of the U.S. Trotting Association, the Hall of Fame of the Trotter in Goshen, N.Y., and at one time an owner of The Red Mile. The McNamara family moved east in the late 1950s and Mr. McNamara III spent some time as a youngster at Hanover Shoe Farms, where his father served as farm superintendent. The McNamara family returned to Carmel before selling the family farm and moving east again when Leo McNamara Jr. joined Pine Hollow Stud Farm in New York. While living in Pine Bush, N.Y., Mr. McNamara III began working on the Pine Hollow Stud Farm. After graduating from high school in 1973, he continued on at Pine Hollow Stud Farm, becoming an assistant manager. Mr. McNamara III moved to Kentucky's Bluegrass horse country and worked at Dan Hollibaugh's Holly Lane Stud in Lexington, serving as manager there from 1981-1985. Mr. McNamara's next stop was Almahurst, where he served as farm superintendent of the breeding nursery's flagship farm outside of Lexington during the era when it was one of the sport's showcase operations. Mr. McNamara III left Almahurst in 1988 to run the new Dreamaire Farm nursery in New Jersey founded by Bob Boni and partners. Boni knew Mr. McNamara III from their days together at Pine Hollow Farm. Leo's family moved to New York in 1973 when I was the yearling manager at Pine Hollow Stud Farm and as a high school senior he became my weekend and then summer help, said Boni. We forged a great friendship over the next 40-something years, regardless of where our travels took us, and he will forever be one of the most special people I have ever known. Leo was a great advocate for the horsemen and horsewomen of New Jersey in so many ways and always with the fairness and decency that characterized his personality. He loved and adored his wife Cathy and his daughter Celeste and he will be missed by anyone fortunate to have known him. After Dreamaire closed its operations, Mr. McNamara III re-established Two Gaits Farm in New Jersey and bred and boarded horses. In 2001 Mr. McNamara III began working for the SBOANJ, becoming executive administrator in 2006. During his years with the SBOANJ, Mr. McNamara III worked with racetracks in the Garden State to keep tabs on the purse accounts, becoming an astute expert of analyzing handle from various sources with various percentages going to purses. I've been a director of the SBOA for 10 years, and Leo was invaluable, said Mark Ford, president of the SBOANJ. I don't think the horsepeople in New Jersey can realize how invaluable he was advocating for horsemen and horsewomen and protecting our interests. He always brought knowledge and commonsense to the table and could always come up with a commonsense approach or solution. Because of Mr. McNamara's knowledge of the purse account and percentages of handle earned, he played a significant role in Jeff Gural's acquisition of the Meadowlands from the state of New Jersey. Leo was a straight shooter and a great guy to work with, said Jason Settlemoir, CEO and general manager of the Meadowlands Racetrack. He's going to be missed from both an industry standpoint and as a friend. Mr. McNamara III is survived by his wife, Cathy; a daughter, Celeste, assistant professor of history at University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom; two stepchildren, Dr. Daniel J. Dooley and Katie Pidge Decker; his mother, Irene; one brother, Joe (Meg Booth); eight sisters, Anne Slosky, Coleen (Frank) Benedett, Bridget (Jeffrey) Fenessy, Kate (David) Smith, Mary Coleman, Kelly (Patrick) Kennedy, Celeste (Brian) O'Neill and Jane (Glenn) Taylor; 14 nieces and nephews; and more than 100 cousins. Visitation will be held Thursday, June 16, from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. at Peppler Funeral Home, 122 Crosswicks St, Bordentown, N.J., 08505. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Mary's Church, 45 Crosswicks St., in Bordentown. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Harness Horse Youth Foundation, 16575 Carey Rd., Westfield, IN 46074. By Kathy Parker, The Horsemen and Fair World

It's a long time from April to August, but it is never too soon to dream Hambletonian dreams. Trainer Norm Parker hopes his dream can become a reality with Breedlove. Breedlove was a slow-to-develop 2-year-old who saw his 2015 season cut short by sickness. Now at age 3, the colt has won two preliminary rounds of the Classicality Trot Series at The Meadows and is the 5-2 morning line favorite in Tuesday's $33,100 final. Following the series, Breedlove is expected to compete in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes. If all goes well, a trip to the Meadowlands for the $1 million Hambletonian Stakes on Aug. 6 could be in his future. A long shot? Perhaps. But that's what dreams are made of. "You can't always be the one who has the favorite going into those races," said Parker, who trains Breedlove for Neil and Pamela Kelly's Shaleni Farm LLC. Pamela is the sister of Parker's wife Paulette. "If everybody only raced when they had the favorite, you wouldn't have a race. You go and buy these horses and you have to dream big. "The home run race is the Hambletonian. It's a long way to go to get there, but it's out there and it would be a dream. I don't know if he's that good, obviously, but he's got a lot of potential. We all have those dreams, so we took a shot. He's going to have to get faster and make quite a bit of money before we would do it, but I would love to race in it." Breedlove is a son of stallion Cantab Hall out of the mare Siren Hall. He was purchased for $34,000 at the 2014 Standardbred Horse Sale. He is a half-brother to Evil Urges, who won three preliminary divisions of the New York Sire Stakes in 2011 and finished second in the final. Breedlove's dam is a half-sister to two-time Kentucky Sire Stakes champion Shaman Hall as well as overseas winner Angelo. "We were looking for a trotter," Parker said. "We had a bunch of them picked out and found we weren't able to spend enough money on some of the other ones we wanted. We came to him. Our limit was $30,000 at the time, but we decided we had to spend a little bit more if we want a horse like this. "We liked what he looked like and his pedigree was pretty nice. Being a Cantab; I had (trotter) Chef Lee and liked him a lot. I thought I'd like a Cantab if I could get one, which everybody does of course. I loved the way (Breedlove) trotted on the video and just took a shot." Parker owns Cantab Hall-bred Chef Lee, who last year finished second to Jacksons Minion in a division of the Arden Downs Stakes one week before Jacksons Minion finished fifth in the Hambletonian. Chef Lee wasn't eligible to the Hambletonian, but after seeing Jacksons Minion's performance Parker was left to wonder what might have been. "I thought, that would be such a thrill; a neat thing," Parker said. Breedlove finished off the board in his first two races last year, but then started to show improvement. By the time the colt won in 1:57.3 in his sixth start, Parker began thinking the colt might be open-stakes worthy, even toying with the idea of entering the Breeders Crown if the horse continued to make positive strides. But Breedlove was found to be sick following his next start, finishing sixth in a division of the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes, and was unable to return to health in a timely manner so Parker decided to stop with him. "He was a very slow comer," Parker said. "He's had some issues being around other horses, to get comfortable trotting around the other horses. It took a while for me to get the equipment on him that he needed. When he started racing he was a little green in doing things so we brought him along slowly. When he won his maiden race in (1):57.3 he did it real handily and we thought we were going in the right direction. We thought we could get him back (from his illness) but he didn't come out of it well so we just shut him down. "We didn't get as much out of the year as we expected but I still thought I had a really nice horse to bring back this year," he added. This year, Breedlove finished fifth in his seasonal debut --- and was found to be sick again --- but bounced back with consecutive victories in the Classicality Trot Series. He will start Tuesday's final from post No. 3 with regular driver Mike Wilder at the lines. "He's so good gaited," Parker said. "He's got a good attitude. I just think there's a lot of upside to him. Everything is working to plan so far, using this series as a good experience and hopefully making some money and then taking a shot in the sire stakes. I know there are some nice horses there, but I think he's got the ability to trot with them." Parker is thankful for the Classicality Trot Series and the opportunity to get more experience for Breedlove. "It's a very good thing because you're not racing the older horses (in conditioned races) that have more experience," Parker said. "In a series like this, you can kind of educate (the horse) while racing your own kind. I think the tracks need to keep them going. "You spend a lot of money on young horses to try to make them into solid racehorses that also are feeding our overnight races, and if you get lucky and get a stakes horse you can reap the benefits. That's where our racehorses come from; people buying young horses and developing them. Our sport needs more of them, so these are good races for that." As for the Hambletonian, a trip to the Meadowlands on Aug. 6 could be a family affair in more ways than one. In addition to training Breedlove for his sister-in-law and her husband, Parker's sister Kathy has a well-regarded 3-year-old female trotter named in her honor. Kathy Parker, the person, is the editor of The Horseman And Fair World magazine and a member of the Harness Racing Communicators Hall of Fame. Kathy Parker, the trotter, earned $343,797 for trainer Jimmy Takter and is eligible to the Hambletonian Oaks. "Wouldn't that be exciting; I don't know who would be more nervous, me or Kathy," Parker said about the possibility of Breedlove and Kathy Parker both racing in Hambletonian events. "It's just pretty exciting to have a nice horse like this. It's a good family bonding thing and everyone enjoys it." by Ken Weingartner, for Harness Racing Communications  

Goshen, NY--- Joe Thomson, founder and co-owner of the expansive Winbak Farms breeding operation, was inducted into the Living Hall of Fame during ceremonies at the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame Sunday night (July 5). Also receiving honors on the night were Living Horse Hall of Fame inductees Somebeachsomewhere and Deweycheatumnhowe; Communicators Hall of Fame inductees Bob Marks and Kathy Parker; Immortals Jimmy Jordan and Garland Lobell; Hall of Fame broodmares Art’s Vintage and Presidential Lady; amateur driving champion Steve Oldford; and 2014 Horse of the Year JK She’salady. Thomson and his wife, JoAnn, started Winbak Farm in 1991. Headquartered on nearly 3,000 acres in Chesapeake City, Md., Winbak Farm has been ranked the leading breeder more than 20 times in three different states or provinces and was U.S. Harness Writers Association Breeder of the Year three times in a single decade. In light of his success, Thomson was quick to point out that he has a crack staff at his operations in four states and Ontario. “I often think to myself, ‘What would you do without that staff?’” he said. “Well, you wouldn’t be able to do a lot of business. I would make an analogy to be like a guy in a canoe, in the middle of a lake, without a paddle. [He’s got] lots of ideas, but a failure to execute.” Thomson was introduced by fellow Hall of Famer Jim Simpson, president of Hanover Shoe Farms, making him a rival on the breeder leaderboard and an ally when the duo travel to Harrisburg, Pa., to remind state legislators of the benefits of alternative gaming revenue to the horse racing industry. “He built an outstanding broodmare band, well over 350 mares,” said Simpson before adding, tongue-in-cheek, “I’ve asked him how many mares he has. He won’t tell me.” Somebeachsomewhere and Dewewycheatumnhowe were 2008 Pacer of the Year and Trotter of the Year, respectively, with “The Beach” taking Horse of the Year. Brent MacGrath, who trained and co-owned Somebeachsomewhere with James Bagnell, Pamela Dean, Reg Petitpas, Garry Pye and Stuart Rath, marveled at how consistent the horse was during a two-year career in which he won 20 of 21 races, $3,221,299 in purses, and took a mark of 1:46.4 at The Red Mile at 3. “It really made me feel good that in his last race he appeared to be as good as he was the first day he stepped on the track,” he said. Local boy Deweycheatumnhowe was trained, driven and co-owned by Ray Schnittker, who kept the horse at his barn a stone’s throw from the Museum at Historic Track. He noted that the winner of $3,155,178 in purses, who he co-owned with Charles Iannazzo, Ted Gewertz and Frank Baldassare, was a favorite among his connections and even his competitors. “When ‘Dewey’ won the Hambo, Kelvin Harrison said that the roar from the grooms and second trainers in the paddock at the Meadowlands, he’d never heard that before,” he said. “It was a great honor that everybody was rooting for the horse.” Marks is a longtime writer, pedigree analyst and yearling marketer, and was introduced by fellow Communicators Hall of Famer, Murray Brown, of Hanover Shoe Farms. Parker, editor and general manager of The Horseman and Fair World magazine, was introduced by fellow Communicators Hall of Famer Moira Fanning of the Hambletonian Society/Breeders Crown. Immortal inductee Jordan was a leading driver at Roosevelt Raceway in the 1940s and '50s. Horse Immortal inductee, Garland Lobell, was best known for siring the "Trotting Triumvirate" of Andover Hall, Conway Hall and Angus Hall. Broodmare inductees to the Hall of Fame were Art's Vintage, dam of world champion Vintage Master, Great Vintage and Ideal Vintage; and Presidential Lady, dam of 2014 Horse of the Year, JK She'salady, and North America Cup winner JK Endofanera. Oldford was honored as 2014 Amateur Driver of the Year, his fifth such award. The connections of JK She’salady were presented with the 2014 Delvin and Mary Lib Miller Horse of the Year award. by T.J. Burkett, Executive Editor, Hoof Beats

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