Search Results
1 to 16 of 252
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

East Rutherford, NJ - Twelve-year-old Bianca Miceli of Beachwood, New Jersey, piloted Royal Attire to a four-length harness racing victory. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation (HHYF) driving exhibition was held on the Hambletonian card Saturday, August 6. Miceli was assisted by HHYF alumnus Montrell Teague, who is the regular pilot of 2015 Horse of the Year Wiggle It Jiggleit. Ima's Hit was placed second, with Evan White of North Bangor, New York, assisted by HHYF trustee Corey Callahan, while I Want Another, driven by Cammie Lange, ended up third. She was assisted by Hannah Miller. In addition to thanking The Meadowlands, its management and staff, and the horsemen who assisted with the event, HHYF would like to thank Travis Ceppaluni HHYF summer intern, John Reames HHYF summer assistant, HHYF graduate Oscar Kimelman for his help with warming up, and Olivia Kimelman, another HHYF graduate who served as paddock manager. Celebrating 40 years of youth education and service to harness racing, the Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation makes a difference in young people's lives through interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser

After the Harness Horse Youth Foundation finishes its 40th celebration brunch at the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame, the festivities will move next door to the Goshen Historic Track, where HHYF graduate Justin Irvine, 15, will be competing against adults in a matinee event though it won't be Irvine's first time over that surface. Last summer he attended HHYF's Leadership Program which was held at the track. The significance is not lost on the third-generation horseman. Irvine will go postward in the Open Pace, driving the 4 year-old Cruzing Hill. Mark and Kelly Ford, who operate a training center in Middletown, NY, coordinated finding Justin's mount with the blessing of the horse's owners George and Rose Bonomo. "Finding a horse to drive when you are not right there is tough, so I thank the Fords and the Bonomos. It will be different driving at Goshen," Irvine says of his second career start. "On a bigger scale. The Hall of Fame is right there and with all the celebrations, there may be a bit of pressure." Justin's father, Don Irvine Jr., has over 7,000 wins and is enshrined on Northfield Park's Wall of Fame in Ohio, as is Justin's uncle, William Irvine, with over 3,000 driving wins. "I have never felt obligated because of my family's success. It is just what I always wanted to do. That is why HHYF is so great. For me, I want to be a driver and a trainer and I can learn that at the camps. But I also enjoy listening to other people and their dreams. If they want to be a vet, whatever, you can learn all aspects of the sport. You meet people from so many different backgrounds who love harness racing," he says. "My first camp was 2014 at Pocono Downs in Pennsylvania, and it was eye-opening. The Goshen leadership program just built on that initial experience." Keith Gisser

When "horse" is part of an organization's name, it is pretty clear that the equine has importance, and that is certainly the case for the Harness Horse Youth Foundation as "appreciation of the horse" has always been paramount in its programming. The Foundation, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, was founded in 1976 and began conducting harness racing camps in Ohio which spread to other states shortly after that. For many years, the camps relied exclusively on the host location to provide well-mannered Standardbreds which was mostly successful but provided a certain element of uncertainty. Securing safe, reliable horseflesh was needed for long term educational success. Meanwhile, in response to a presentation in 1998 by Mal Burroughs, the idea of a harness racing "little league," was presented. The Harness Racing Youth League debuted at Hoosier Park in 1999 in cooperation with Harness Tracks of America and HHYF. To improve the initial format required a more standardized curriculum and, more importantly, a more dependable supply of horses. It was then that HHYF leadership made a decision that would change the face of HHYF camps going forward. Rather than Standardbreds, the organization would purchase Trottingbreds, a smaller breed of harness racing horse. While part of this decision was financial, it made a great deal of sense for another reason. "Trottingbreds are smaller which makes them easier for young people to work with. Our camps, five days and four nights, were tailored to kids who were 12-14. With some Standardbreds standing over 16 hands, the simple act of checking them was hard for some campers," explains former HHYF President (and 2015 Service To Youth Award winner) Callie Davies-Gooch, one of the driving forces behind the change. "I had been to some races and thought they would fit the bill. I thought minis were too small and regulars too big." HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor was given the task to secure a stable of Trottingbreds that had good attitudes and could pace or trot at a reasonable clip. "That initial shopping trip was an adventure for sure and we purchased all of them privately," Taylor recalls.. "We did very well with Justaway, Black Monday, and Sweet Karen. Those horses sort of spoiled us with their exceptional attributes. As with any endeavor, over the years, we have learned a whole bunch about indicators which are more likely to lead to a horse that fits with the program. Several years ago, I went to a sale and picked up CD's Miss M. I thought my shopping was complete until I saw a pretty refined 3 year old filly being led into the sales ring by a tiny little barefoot girl with 3 brothers and sisters tagging along; I walked right back in to bid thinking to myself that though this filly lacked physical substance, she must love kids. The most important factor is impeccable temperament but that has to be somewhat balanced by athletic ability; it is a tough combination to find sometimes." While many people refer to the HHYF stable members as ponies, they are not. The Trottingbred does carry pony blood - often Welsh, Hackney or Shetland- but it has been recognized as a breed of horse since 1977. Today, no ponies can be introduced into the bloodline, although Standardbred blood is periodically infused to build speed. Trottingbreds cannot compete in races if they stand more than 51½ inches at the withers (under 13 hands) as compared to Standardbreds who have no height requirement. Today, a healthy Trottingbred circuit races each summer in Indiana and Quebec. A large contingent stables at Florida's Sunshine Raceway during the winter which features events during those months. In Bermuda, they race from August through January and they also race in Italy. Trottingbred races are one-half mile heats and are usually classified by time. Several top horsemen including Corey Callahan, the Allard family, and Jay Cross accredut their early careers to participation in Trottingbred racing. Twenty-three horses have carried the HHYF banner as stable members since the beginning of the Harness Racing Youth League concept, and its follow-up format, HHYF Summer Programs. Past members of the HHYF stable include Coupe De Ville, Daddy's Jewel, GF Mr. Mojo, Clypso Dust, Dusty Sensation, Jandi Tuff As Sky, Jandi Iron Lace, Jessica Direct, Justaway, Just Nibblin Gold (Justaway's foal), Little Hicktown, Black Monday, The Wanderer (Sweet Karen's sire), Late MacMother, Cracker Jack, Berita C's Lassie and PV Dot Com. Currently, the HHYF Stable includes original member Sweet Karen, a semi-retired nineteen-year-old palomino with her own Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/HHYFSweetKaren/); CD's Miss M (Missy); the grey Ima's Hit (Homer); I Want Another (Wawa); LR Trixie; and Royal Attire (Roy). HHYF trustees and staff realize the importance of continually improving both the program and the stable roster in order to better serve the next generation of racing participants and are always on the lookout for quality additions. Just recently, a new chestnut gelding named Pokie's Topshot was purchased from Jeremy Delagrange in Millersburg, Indiana. With a bit of luck and some acclimation, hopefully, Topshot will be suitable for a long tenure with HHYF summer programs.   Keith Gisser

Thousands of people have attended Harness Horse Youth Foundation horsemanship camps over the forty years of the organization’s existence. But what do attendees really get from the harness racing camps? Is it a chance to work with horses and meet new people? Sure, but it is much, much more. Dave Brower, 47, is author, track handicapper at Cal-Expo and is a broadcaster with CBS Sports. Renee Mancino, an attorney, is the Executive Director of the Ohio Harness Horsemen’s Association. Angelica Wittstruck, 26, is a forensic mental health counselor. And Harry Landy, 24, is an up and coming trainer/driver.  They have grown up into widely varied careers over a broad time range. Yet their memories of HHYF – and its importance in their adult life – are very similar. With the deadline for 2016 HHYF Summer camps looming on may 15 (details at http://hhyf.org/schedule-applications), they reminisced. Brower, a former Meadowlands track handicapper, attended a day camp at the New Jersey track in 1984. He recalls “attending that camp opened my eyes.  If not for that camp, I would never have left the grandstand. I saw all the other jobs related to racing.” Mancino’s family had always owned horses, but attending camp in the early 1980s at Scioto Downs in Columbus, Ohio gave her a new perspective. “Being on the backstretch with other stables opened up an entirely new world. I saw different ways to do things. And I really learned what the industry was all about.” For Landy, who attended camp at age 9 (the age for campers have since changed slightly), it was a life-altering experience. “I knew I always wanted to be a driver and a trainer even then, but where else can a kid get experience? Working with the Trottingbreds was ideal for me, they are so professional, but also due to their size. I worked with Justaway, and of course, Sweet Karen. I saw the understanding that they had of less experienced kids. There was no doubt about what I wanted to do after that. Because of camp, I actually raced Trottingbreds the next year in Pennsylvania. My parents own a training center in New Jersey and they were very supportive so we bought four Trottingbreds that I drove when I was ten,” he adds. Wittstruck went to camp in Harrington, Delaware in 2003. “We saw so many different aspects of the business,” she says. “We visited a breeding farm, saw farriers at work. It was so thorough. Even at that age, it had a profound effect,” she says. “I wanted to be an equine surgeon like Dr. Patty Hogan. But then I learned I can’t stand the sight of blood.” Wittstruck attended Catholic University of America, graduated with her degree in psychology and philosophy, and then went on to John Jay College of Criminal Justice to earn her Masters degree. Although she is not involved in horse racing on a full time basis, horses play an important role. “I always rode, and I spent a few summers jogging horses for George Casale. I currently work in a program that gives homeless veterans a chance to get riding lessons,” she explains. “There are a lot of innovative programs out there, just like the HHYF camp is. I remember Miss Ellen (Taylor) mentioning that she had worked with at-risk kids. Horses change people. They make them more patient, more kind.” Horses certainly changed Brower. “The exposure to racing, the camaraderie was awesome. I still remember seeing Nihilator with his armed guard. But I was a city kid. My exposure was going to be as a fan, as a bettor. Camp changed that,” he says. He saw an ad for the camp on an MSG (cable network) racing replay show. “I went on to get my journalism degree and did an internship for Sports Eye. At that point, there was no looking back. I did whatever jobs I could.  Teletimer, press box attendant, you name it. After visiting it when I was a kid, who would have thought I would end up in the press box nearly every night? It would never have happened if not for HHYF.” Landy grew up in New Jersey, but attended camp at Saratoga. Ironically that is where he is stabled now.” I currently train twelve. We have had some success. We’ve won Pennsylvania and Maryland Sires Stakes. I really want to train higher end horses.” Mancino’s life has taken many twists and turns.  Not just a former camper, but also a former HHYF scholarship winner, she attended the University of Nevada with an eye toward becoming a veterinarian. “I worked all through college and was working for a casino operator making good money as I was preparing to apply to vet schools – there are none close to Las Vegas, where I lived, so  vet school was going to mean uprooting and moving several states away. My boss suggested I apply to law school and he wasn’t the kind of guy who was easy to say no to. I took the LSAT and scored well. I applied to law school on a Friday and was accepted on Monday. It allowed me to stay out west,” she says. “Attending camp really helped my confidence and I was paddocking horses in the summer starting my freshman year in college,” she continues. “I love the backstretch, but it’s a hard way to make a living. After getting my law degree I had a practice that specialized in equine law – representing horsemen, insurance work, breeding contracts, syndicates and so on. I served as special counsel to the Minnesota Racing Commission starting in 2012, but was commuting back and forth to Las Vegas. My husband wanted to relocate back to Ohio, and the OHHA opportunity came along,” Mancino adds. Her OHHA office is located just a few miles from the track where she first attended camp. While they are all adults in the real world now, each camper still has vivid memories of their youth camp attendance. Brower shared his memory of Nihilator, not just with the armed guard but winning a million dollar race.   Mancino’s Scioto Downs memories are different. “(Hall-of-Famer) Howard Beissinger worked with us at that camp.  We were just a bunch of kids, very few of us had any experience at all and here is this star of the sport helping us,” she remembers. Kind of like having Peyton Manning teach you how to throw a tight spiral or Lebron James teaching you to dribble a basketball.  “We had a variety of kids. Mostly guys, a few girls. I remember we stayed at the fairgrounds. There were some 4-Hers, too.” “Camp was awesome,” says Landy, who was named Saratoga’s up and coming driver two years ago. “It was intense, and we learned about everything. We saw a ball game. But we also had kids with no experience at all. Ellen Taylor does such an amazing job, and we need to get the word out about HHYF. The camp highlight for me was the driving exhibition. I won, but I got to pick who my co-driver was. I picked my dad. That was really cool.” Wittstruck, who attended camp most recently, remembers her first experience with Trottingbred Mr. Mojo  who was one of the original horses purchased by HHYF when they went from borrowing horses at each host track to providing their own horses to campers. “Sitting behind Mr. Mojo, that was my first time in a jog cart,” she recalls. “But most amazing to me was the way everyone came together. Eddie Davis Sr. was an instructor. So was the late Brad Hanners. The whole backstretch community was there to work with us and insure the next generation would have a positive experience. It had a profound effect.” As HHYF moves into the next forty years, it will strive to fulfill the original mission of providing significant hands-on experiences for the next generation of harness racing participants and fans; making a difference in young people’s lives, just as it has since 1976. For more information, contact Keith Gisser at 216-374-1392 or keith@hhyf.org

The Harness Horse Youth Foundation has named John Reames as its Summer Programs Assistant and Travis Ceppaluni as Summer Programs Intern. The pair will travel with harness racing Executive Director Ellen Taylor and the HHYF stable of Trottingbreds throughout the summer, running the organization's summer camps and events. Reames, 59, of Dayton, Ohio has been an active horse owner, breeder and caretaker for over 30 years. He has also attended the USTA adult driving school. A retired aerospace quality engineer, he also has extensive experience as a manger working with teens, running his family's Holiday Acres Christmas Tree Farm. Reames' two sons are HHYF alumni. "If we make learning fun for these kids, although we won't convert all of them to become involved in the industry, we may convert some to enjoy it as we have," he explained. "I look forward to the opportunity to convey the enjoyment, accomplishment and every day pleasure we receive by being part of harness racing." Seventeen-year-old Ceppaluni, of Jackson, New Jersey, already has experience with HHYF. In addition to participating in multiple camps, including HHYF Leadership Program in Goshen, New York, he assisted with the activities for several weeks last summer and also represented HHYF at the Open Space Pace in Freehold, New Jersey last September. Travis is also an accomplished barrel racer who hopes to eventually become a trainer/driver. "I can't wait to take everything I've learned from HHYF and use it on the backstretch. I learned a ton from doing hands-on work, but the guest speakers taught me a lot about the business. I try to take a little advice from everybody and I hope I can pass some of that knowledge on to this year's campers," Ceppaluni commented. "The combined eagerness of both John and Travis is going to make this summer dynamic" Ellen Taylor, HHYF Executive Director believes. "Young people are much more likely to respond positively when their instructors are actively supportive and enthusiastic . Undoubtedly, these two gentlemen definitely have a passion for HHYF and the industry." Celebrating 40 years of youth education and service to harness racing, the Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation makes a difference in young people's lives through interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser  

Westfield, IN- For the first time since 2005, the Harness Horse Youth Foundation has named two winners of its Service to Youth Award, the highest accolade the organization offers. The "horse-racing professor," Chris Wittstruck was honored for his generosity to the Foundation, while former President and Trustee Callie Davies-Gooch was selected for her long-term commitment to HHYF. In announcing the award, HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor said, "Callie's efforts on behalf of HHYF were tireless and creative. She never lacked the willingness to try new ideas or the determination to get them done. When HTA's Stan Bergstein approached HHYF about developing the curriculum for the Harness Racing Youth League, Callie ensured that every aspect of the program was comprehensively implemented. She even traveled on the first road trip to northern Indiana and personally assisted with the original horse purchases including our beloved Sweet Karen." "Chris simply took the Board's collective breath away with his kindness. His bigheartedness is already allowing HHYF to seriously think about ways to make improvements in several areas" explained Ellen Taylor. A full profile of Chris Wittstruck will be released when he is presented with his award at the HHYF 40th anniversary celebration on June 5, 2016 at the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame in Goshen, NY. Callie Davies-Gooch served as Trustee for nearly 25 years and HHYF President for 14 years. She was the driving force behind many groundbreaking HHYF projects including the creation and distribution of 50,000 harness racing career guides to high school guidance counselors across North America. Not only did she secure the mailing lists and organize the entire process, she provided valuable input as the guide was compiled. The Foundation's end-of-summer celebration of its campers at The Meadowlands on Hambletonian Day has always been one of Callie's favorite activities. Each year, she made sure that the volunteer professional drivers were ready and other logistics under control. Callie, who will receive her award at the Dan Patch Awards Dinner in Ft. Lauderdale on March 6, remarked, "It is a great honor to have been selected along with my fellow award winner, Chris Wittstruck. I can only hope that the 23 years of service to the Harness Horse Youth Foundation, has helped to foster a new generation of horse lovers and future owners, trainers, drivers, caretakers and fans. The future of harness racing is youth." For more information on this release, contact HHYF Project Manager Keith Gisser (keith@hhyf.org) or 216-374-1392 Keith Gisser

Westfield, IN- Updated applications are now available for three scholarships offered by the Harness Horse Youth Foundation. Completed applications are due at the HHYF office by April 30, but early submission is encouraged. Log on to www.hhyf.org/hhyf-scholarships to access the applications and each scholarship's eligibility requirements and general information. The scholarships, for students who are at least high school seniors, are awarded based on GPA, financial need, completeness of application and quality of essay (where applicable). "Several of the applications have been revised in order to assure the best candidates. We want to give potential applicants as much time as possible to complete them," explained HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor. "We hope that by posting these before \the holidays, students will have some extra time to put sufficient effort into their submissions." The HHYF scholarships are the Gallo Blue Chip Scholarship, a stipend of up to $15,000, sponsored by Martin Scharf, for children of licensed trainers or caretakers in Pennsylvania, New York or New Jersey; the $2,500 Curt Greene Memorial Scholarship for students who have demonstrated a passion for harness racing and have financial need; and the $1,500 Sweet Karen Scholarship for alumni of HHYF Summer Programs. For questions please e-mail the HHYF office at ellen@hhyf.org. The HHYF website also provides a comprehensive listing of harness racing-related scholarships available through other sources, which is regularly updated. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser    

It was no surprise that harness racing booster and attorney Chris Wittstruck recently won the Team Valor International's Stan Bergstein Writing Award. He has long been a featured, cutting-edge columnist at www.ustrotting.com, but his actions following the announcement were even more cutting edge. Wittstruck immediately announced he was donating the accompanying stipend to the Harness Horse Youth Foundation. "It's an investment in the future," Wittstruck explained. "An absolute no-brainer. My daughter Angelica attended one of the first HHYF camps at Harrington Raceway in 2003 and I have seen the great work they do. Stan Bergstein, who this award is named for, was the first HHYF Service to Youth Award winner (in 1979) so this donation honors him as much as it does HHYF." Wittstruck has done his part to promote the sport, teaching a weekend course in horse ownership and also helping promote the New York legislator races in addition to his writing. He strongly believes that exposing children to harness racing is key to the sport's success. He also understands how important HHYF's past is to the future. He says, "Some of these kids will come to camp and never drive a horse again. And that's fine. Maybe they are riders. But they will have the exposure. For a week, they put down their devices and learn. And down the road, they go to the races and recall the camp and bring their friends. The immersion in the sport - the farriers, the vets, not just the work with the horses - is fantastic because it was done right by HHYF." HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor will meet with the organization's trustees to determine how to best put Wittstruck's largesse to its best use. She explains, "Obviously, we are beyond appreciative of Chris's generosity and kindness. With that appreciation comes a responsibility to honor the gesture in the most appropriate and worthwhile way possible. What a wonderful opportunities lie ahead to further our mission." For more information on this release contact Keith Gisser at 216-374-1392

The Harness Horse Youth Foundation's Drive for Youth, the organization's annual fall fundraiser, is just around the corner, but there is still time for and trainers, drivers, horse owners and others from across the country to participate. Drive For Youth is a week-long national effort, kicking off on October 4 and running through October 10, culminating on Kentucky Futurity Day at The Red Mile. Owners, trainers and drivers can pledge either a percentage of their earnings during Drive for Youth week, or they can pledge a flat amount as Executive Director Ellen Taylor explains. "We always appreciate the support of horsemen at the local level and we invite the horseman across the country to participate. This broad based support ensures the continued success and expansion for our programs including our summer camps and scholarships, as we head into our 40th anniversary year." To make a pledge to Drive for Youth, download the pledge form from http://www.hhyf.org/drive-for-youth, You may also contact Ellen Taylor by phone at 317- 867-5877, or by e-mail: Ellen@hhyf.org for additional information. Additionally, HHYF representatives will be at the Lexington Selected Yearling Sale on Tuesday evening. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser  

Bidders at the the upcoming Lexington Selected Yearling Sale will have the opportunity to bid on one horse who will neither pace nor trot. An unusual horse sculpture, fashioned by a Danville, Kentucky artist  from nearly 1,000 repurposed scrap metal parts, will be auctioned on Tuesday, October 6 at Fasig-Tipton Sales Pavilion in Lexington, Kentucky, to benefit the Harness Horse Youth Foundation. The sculpture will be sold just prior to the start of the second night of the sale. The sculpture stands 31 inches from hoof to withers; 55 inches from hoof to tip of ear and 45 inches long from nose to tail and will be available for inspection at Barn 10 (Brittany Farms) beginning Friday, October 2 at noon. Bids can be made in person or by phone. Potential phone bidders should contact HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor at 317.908.0029 or email ellen@hhyf.org for more information. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with  harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people’s lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser

Westfield, IN - An unusual horse sculpture, fashioned by a Lexington, Kentucky artist from nearly 1,000 repurposed scrap metal parts, will be auctioned on Tuesday, October 6 at Fasig-Tipton Sales Pavilion in Lexington, Kentucky, to benefit the Harness Horse Youth Foundation. The sculpture will be sold just prior to the start of the second night of the 2015 Lexington Selected Yearling Sale. The sculpture stands 31 inches from hoof to withers; 55 inches from hoof to tip of ear and 45 inches long from nose to tail and will be available for inspection at Barn 10 (Brittany Farms) beginning Friday, October 2 at noon. Bids may be made in person, or if you cannot be in Lexington, call HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor at 317-908-0029 or HHYF Project Manager Keith Gisser at 216-374-1392 for details on how to make other bidding arrangements. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. Keith Gisser      

13-year-old Hayley Halloran of Lewes, Delaware piloted Royal Attire to a game1½ length victory in Saturday's Harness Horse Youth Foundation final, held just before the start of The Meadowlands' Hambletonian race-card. Halloran, representing Harrington Raceway, defeated Emily Clemons of Holland Patent, NY, representing Vernon Downs, who drove a fast-closing LR Trixie to second-place. Halloran was assisted by Andy Miller, while Clemons had HHYF Trustee Corey Callahan as her co-pilot. Katilee Dunn of Honesdale, PA, finished a close third with Ima's Hit, while I Want Another, making his first appearance at The Meadowlands, rounded out the field for Jackson, New Jersey's Alexandra Urbanski. Yannick Gingras was Dunn's co-driver, while Urbanski was assisted by Aaron Merriman. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org. For more information this release, contact Keith Gisser via this e-mail or at 216-374-1392. Keith Gisser  

Westfield, IN- Four talented and dedicated young ladies have been selected to compete in this year's Harness Horse Youth Foundation driving demonstration at The Meadowlands on Hambletonian Day, Saturday, August 8. They are Katilee Dunn of Honesdale, PA; Alexandra Urbanski of Jackson, NJ; Hayley Halloran of Lewes, DE; and Emily Clemons of Holland Patent, NY. The non-wagering event is a one-half mile dash, the standard Trottingbred distance, from behind the mobile starting gate, and is set for post just prior to the 12:00 Hambletonian card. Dunn, age 12, has drawn the rail and will drive Ima's Hit, assisted by Yannick Gingras. The daughter of Brian and Tracy Dunn, she attends Wayne Highlands Middle School. She represents the camp that was held at The Downs at Mohegan Sun. Urbanski, the "senior citizen" of the group at 14 has post two. Aaron Merriman will be her co-pilot behind I Want Another, who is completing his first season as an HHYF Trottingbred. Alexandria attends Jackson Memorial High School and is the daughter of John and Alisa Urbanski. She represents the camp that was held at Gaitway Farm. Hayley Halloran, who turned 13 in mid-July leaves from post three with Royal Attire and assistant driver Andy Miller. Representing Harrington Raceway's camp, Hayley is a student at Beacon Middle School. She is the daughter of Lee Halloran. Drawing the outside post four and assisted by HHYF Trustee Corey Callahan, twelve-year-old Emily Clemons will pilot L R Trixie. Emily lives in Holland Patent, NY and represents the HHYF Vernon Downs camp. The daughter of Bob and Lisa Clemons, she attends Holland Patent Central School. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org or find them on Facebook. Keith Gisser

Westfield, IN- The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is pleased to announce that Keelan MacDonald of Inverness, Nova Scotia Canada has won the $2,500 Curt Greene Memorial Scholarship and that the $1,000 Sweet Karen Scholarship goes to Rebecca Galloway of Otsego, Michigan. The Curt Greene Scholarship honors an individual who, like its namesake, has demonstrated a passion for harness racing. Keelan MacDonald, the son of Jolene Macdonald, demonstrates that passion with his goal of becoming a full-time trainer and driver. While he will be attending Nova Scotia Community College to learn heavy equipment operation, he plans to follow in his grandfather's footsteps. Even then, he has an eye to harness racing, believing his skills in equipment operation will allow him to condition the local track, Inverness Raceway. "When I was a child, the track was the place to be in the summer," he says, demonstrating he same passion Greene brought to his myriad racing responsibilities. Sweet Karen may be the HHYF diva, but Michigander Rebecca Galloway, the daughter of Scott and Tracy Galloway, is anything but. She has the talent and the ability of a diva, but leaves the attitude at home. Galloway attended the week-long HHYF Balmoral Park/Odds On Racing camp in 2010 (attendance at an HHYF event is a pre-requisite for the scholarship) and learned a great deal about the differences and similarities between the HHYF Trottingbreds and the larger Standardbreds that she had seen race. She plans to attend Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan, here she will study Psychology. Rebecca plans to use her degree to develop a therapeutic equine program that involves a driving element. She attends Otsego High School and despite a demanding course load carries a 3.6 GPA. "Reading their essays, it's really clear that these two scholarship recipients meet the criteria and ideals that the Curt Greene and Sweet Karen Scholarships entail," said HHYF President Marlys Pinske. "We are proud to be able to assist in their continuing education." Keith Gisser

Westfield, IN - As a racehorse, Gallo Blue Chip was one of the gamest and most determined campaigners in harness racing history. In his honor two determined students will receive scholarships that will help them make their own mark on history in the future. Laura Doherty of Monticello, New York, has been granted a $15,000 Gallo Blue Chip scholarship by the Harness Horse Youth Foundation. The stipend is sponsored by Martin Scharf, who campaigned Gallo Blue Chip. Doherty will be in the ivy as she plans to attend Harvard where she will study Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Ranked 2nd in her class at Monticello High School, Doherty has a long list of extra-curricular achievements. In addition to being a four-year track athlete, she has shown her determination through her participation in forensics, and in numerous engineering courses and clinics at prestigious universities including MIT, winning awards at several. She has been a peer mentor and a biology and algebra tutor. She is a member of the National Honor Society and in her spare time she volunteers at the E.B. Crawford Public Library. Sarah Papa of Oneida, New York, near Syracuse, is also ranked 2nd in her class. She attends Stockbridge Valley Central School where she has studied, among other things, equine science. Sarah has been accepted into the 3+3 Physical Therapy program at SUNY-Geneseo, one of just 17 students accepted to the program from 152 applicants. She plans to continue that course of study in graduate school, eventually becoming a physical therapist. A member of the National Honor Society, Sarah has been a member of the wind ensemble for four years, where she plays the alto saxophone. "Both Sarah and Laura have worked exceptionally hard to get to this point," said HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor. "They epitomize everything that Gallo Blue Chip represented and are remarkable recipients of this award, which will be presented at the Meadowland by Mr. Scharf this winter." For more information on this press release, contact Keith Gisser at 216-374-1392 or keihQ@hhyf.org    

Westfield, IN - Mark Hanamirian of Villanova, PA will be attending the Adios and meeting harness racing driver Dave Palone after his name was drawn as the winning entry in the Harness Horse Youth Foundation - Meadows Standarbred Owners Association HARNESS HEROES promotion. Hanamirian's set of HARNESS HEROES cards included one of several silver tickets to make him eligible for the promotion. He will get a backstretch tour and a trip around the track with Palone in a two-seat jogcart as well as spending the race card in the owner's dining area where he and his guests will receive a complimentary buffet. Other winners, who received HHYF and MSOA gear and collectible uncut sheets of HARNESS HEROES cards were Jean Goehlen of Aurora IL, Vicki Vilchek of Adah PA, Heidi Pergola of Monongahela PA and Suzanne Valdisera of Pittsburgh PA. Each year, the Harness Horse Youth Foundation issues a set of 35 HARNESS HEROES trading cards featuring the various equine and human award winners in harness racing. For ordering information go to http://hhyf.org/harness-heroes. The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing young people and their families educational opportunities with harness horses, in order to foster the next generation of participants and fans. The Foundation has been making a difference in young people's lives since 1976, and its programs include interactive learning experiences with these versatile animals, scholarship programs, and creation and distribution of educational materials. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org.   Keith Gisser

1 to 16 of 252
1 2 3 4 5 Next »