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Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards commenced an Inquiry today into a report received from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory that Xylometazoline was detected in the blood sample taken from WAKE UP QUINN following its win in race 8, the PARKES FURNITURE ONE PACE (2040 metres) conducted at Parkes on Sunday 6 August 2017. The “B” sample was confirmed by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria. Ms Amanda Coffee appeared at the Inquiry and was represented by solicitor Mr Glenn Walters. Ms Coffee provided evidence regarding her training establishment and husbandry practices. Evidence was also presented to the Inquiry by Ms Sharon Coffee and HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Martin Wainscott. Certificates of Analysis were also presented in evidence. Ms A. Coffee pleaded guilty to a charge issued pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 190 (1), (2) & (4) as stated: AHRR 190.  (1) A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence…. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. Following an application made on behalf of Ms A. Coffee, the Inquiry was adjourned with respect to the matter of penalty until a date to be fixed. Acting under the provisions of Rule 195, WAKE UP QUINN was disqualified from the abovementioned race. Michael Prentice - Integrity Manager   (02) 9722 6600 - mprentice@hrnsw.com.au Grant Adams - Chairman of Stewards (02) 9722 6628 - gadams@hrnsw.com.au

On Wednesday 11 October 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards concluded an Inquiry that commenced on Wednesday 27 September 2017 into a report received from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory that 3-methoxytyramine (including both free 3-methoxytyramine and 3-methoxytyramine liberated from its conjugates) above the threshold of 4.0 milligrams per litre in urine had been detected in the urine sample taken from; HOT SHOT WOMAN following its run in race 3, the ROCK N ROLL HEAVEN ALABAR NSW BREEDERS CHALLENGE FOUR-YEAR-OLD MARES FINAL (GROUP 1)(1609 metres) conducted at Tabcorp Park Menangle on Sunday 25 June 2017. The “B” sample was confirmed by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria. Michael Langdon appeared at the Inquiry and provided evidence regarding his training establishment and his husbandry practices. Evidence was presented to the Inquiry by HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Martin Wainscott and the Certificates of Analysis were also presented in evidence. Mr Langdon pleaded guilty to a charge issued pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 190 (1), (2) & (4) as stated: AHRR 190. (1) A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2) If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence…. (4) An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. Mr Langdon was disqualified for a period of 2 years to commence from 4 August 2017, the date upon which he was stood down pursuant to AHRR 183. In determining penalty Stewards acknowledged the following; Mr Langdon’s guilty plea;Mr Langdon’s involvement in the harness racing industry;Classification of the Prohibited Substance;A previous Prohibited Substance matter in 1995 andMr Langdon’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of Rule 195, HOT SHOT WOMAN was disqualified from the abovementioned race. Mr Langdon was advised of his right to appeal these decisions. Harness Racing NSW (HRNSW) is the controlling body for harness racing in New South Wales with responsibility for commercial and regulatory management of the industry including 33 racing clubs across the State. HRNSW is headed by an industry-appointed Board of Directors and is independent of Government. To arrange an interview or for further information please contact: Michael Prentice - Integrity Manager   (02) 9722 6600 - mprentice@hrnsw.com.au Graham Loch - Chairman of Stewards (02) 9722 6628 - gloch@hrnsw.com.au

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 259(1) (g) & (h), 187(6), 187(2) and 187(1) against former licensed person Daryl Douglas.  Charge 1, under AHRR 259(1) (g) & (h), which reads as follows: A disqualified person or a person whose name appears in the current list of disqualifications published or adopted by a recognised harness racing authority or a person warned off cannot do any of the following –  (g) enter any premises used for the purpose of the harness racing industry; (h) participate in any manner in the harness racing industry; The particulars of this charge were that Mr Douglas participated in the harness racing industry on 27 February 2017, while disqualified, by entering the registered training establishment of licensed trainer Marnie Bibby, exercising standardbreds and leading ‘Ubringthedrinks’ to the stable tie-up area. Charge 2, under AHRR 187(6), which reads as follows: A person shall not frustrate or endeavour to frustrate an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of this charge were that on 27 February 2017 when HRV Stewards approached Mr Douglas he ran and concealed himself in a dog kennel. Charge 3, under AHRR 187(2), which reads as follows:  A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of this charge were that on 27 February 2017, when HRV Stewards located Mr Douglas, he refused to answer questions and subsequently left the property. Charge 4, under AHRR 187(1), which reads as follows: A person who is directed to do so by the Stewards shall attend an inquiry or investigation convened or conducted by them.  The particulars of this charge were that Mr Douglas failed to attend an inquiry scheduled for 3 April 2017 to answer questions in relation to the previously mentioned matters.  This HRV RAD Board hearing had previously been adjourned on 24 May 2017 and 25 July 2017. Mr Douglas failed to appear on this re-scheduled date and the HRV RAD Board determined to conduct the hearing in his absence acting under Victorian Local Rule 50(1)(a). The charges were found proven and the HRV RAD Board heard submissions on penalty from the HRV Stewards. The HRV RAD Board also considered both specific and general deterrence along with penalties in previous matters with similar circumstances and issued the following penalties: Charge 1: 2 month disqualification Charge 2: $1000 fine Charge 3: $1000 fine Charge 4: Mr Douglas be warned off until he attends a HRV Stewards inquiry   HRV RAD Board Panel: Brian Collis QC (Deputy Chairman) Dr Hugh Millar / Rebecca Oliver (Members) Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board

Queensland harness racing fixer Barton Cockburn has been warned off for life from all race tracks in the state. In a Brisbane court on Wednesday, 28-year-old Cockburn was fined $5000 after pleading guilty to three charges of match fixing at the Albion Park Paceway in November 2016. The driver-trainer was one of three people charged with match fixing offences in April this year by detectives from the Queensland Racing Crime Squad after an investigation of match fixing allegations in the harness racing industry. On Friday, Queensland Racing Integrity Commissioner Ross Barnett announced he had cancelled Cockburn's license and advised him he had been warned off for life from all race tracks in Queensland. "Mr Cockburn's warning off applies to all three codes of racing – thoroughbreds, harness and greyhounds," Barnett said. "The prosecution of Mr Cockburn should sound a clear warning to anyone wanting to undermine the integrity of racing in Queensland that there will be serious consequences." QRIC warns about severe bans for fixing Participants in Queensland's three racing codes have been put on notice they face severe bans if they engage in match-fixing. Queensland Racing Integrity Commission boss Ross Barnett said harness driver Barton Cockburn, who pleaded guilty to match-fixing charges in the Magistrates Court last week, had been warned off for life. The ban means Cockburn can't attend any racetrack in the world. "Cockburn's warning off applies to all three codes of racing, thoroughbreds, harness and greyhounds," Barnett said. "The prosecution of Cockburn should sound a clear warning to anyone wanting to undermine the integrity of racing in Queensland that there will be serious consequences." Cockburn was one of three people charged with match-fixing offences in April this year after the Racing Crime Squad investigated match fixing allegations in the harness racing industry. He was fined $5000 with no conviction recorded. Barnett said the addition of two more full-time investigators to the RCS would bolster the commission's commitment to integrity.

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards concluded a number of inquiries into various matters on September 13, 2017, resulting from the presentation of the registered standardbreds horses GUTS and DEN HELDER at Cowra on May 14, 2017, including Mr N Carroll’s conduct in the investigation of these matters.  On the evidence before them, Stewards had notified Mr N Carroll on September 6, 2017, of a number of charges laid against him.  These matters were addressed by phone, at the request of Mr N Carroll, on May 13, 2017.  The Stewards decisions on penalty in these matters, other than Charge 2, were provided to Mr N Carroll on that day.  The decision in regards to Charge 2 was provided in writing on September 27, 2017. Charge 1 was issued pursuant to HRR 187(2) and (7): HRR 187.(2) states; “A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation.” HRR 187 (7) states; “A person who fails to comply with any provision of this rule is guilty of an offence.” Mr N Carroll pleaded guilty to a charge that he had “given evidence to the Stewards which was false and misleading in nature”.  Mr N Carroll had admitted his conduct in an earlier hearing on July 7, 2017.  Mr N Carroll was disqualified for a period of nine (9) months.  Stewards ordered that the penalty be served cumulatively with the penalty currently being served. Charge 2 was issued pursuant to HRR 190 (3): HRR 190 (3) states;  “If a person is left in charge of a horse and the horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1), the trainer of the horse and the person left in charge is each guilty of an offence. Mr N Carroll pleaded guilty to a charge that he had been in charge of the registered horse DEN HELDER NZ in the previous 24 hours (approximate) prior to the horse being presented to race at Cowra on May 14, 2017, from which a prohibited substance Clenbuterol was detected in samples taken from that horse.  The horse DEN HELDER NZ was trained by Mr M Carroll.  The prohibited substance was also detected in samples taken from the horse GUTS trained by Mr N Carroll on that day. Mr N Carroll was disqualified for a period of nine (9) months.  Stewards ordered this penalty to be served concurrently with a penalty being served which took effect from June 22, 2017. Charge 3 was issued pursuant to HRR 187 (3) and (7): HRR 187 (3) states; “A person shall comply with an order or direction given by the Stewards.” HRR 187 (7) states; “A person who fails to comply with any provision of this rule is guilty of an offence.” Mr N Carroll pleaded not guilty to the charge that he had “knowingly failed to comply with orders properly provided to you at Bathurst on May 17, 2017, to immediately produce a mobile phone as specified, or within any reasonable time frame.” Mr N Carroll was found guilty of the charge and was disqualified for a period of twelve (12) months.  Stewards ordered that the penalty be served cumulatively with the penalty currently being served. Charge 4 was issued pursuant to HRR 187 (6) and (7): HRR 187 (6) states; “A person shall not frustrate or endeavour to frustrate an inquiry or investigation.” HRR 187 (7) states; “A person who fails to comply with any provision of this rule is guilty of an offence.” Mr N Carroll pleaded not guilty to the charge that he had “knowingly frustrated HRNSW Stewards investigations into issues arising from the Cowra race meeting on May 14, 2017, and in particular their attempts to forensically examine mobile phones that were used and in your possession when it was open to comply with the Stewards orders.”  The Trainer had previously admitted deleting content from a phone which was not provided in accord with a direction. Mr N Carroll was found guilty of the charge and was disqualified for a period of twelve (12) months.  Stewards ordered that the penalty be served cumulatively with the penalty currently being served. Charge 5 was issued pursuant to HRR 173 (1) and (6): HRR 173(1) states; “A driver shall not bet in a race in which the driver participates.” HRR 173(6) states; “Any person who fails to comply with any provision of this rule is guilty of an offence.” Mr N Carroll pleaded guilty to a charge that as a trainer/driver on or about June 15, 2015, and September 19, 2015, he had made two bets on horses which he had driven in the respective races at Newcastle. The trainer/driver pleaded guilty and was fined $500. The total effect of the penalties announced in these matters is that Mr N Carroll is disqualified for a period of three years six months, taking effect from June 22, 2017. In determining the above penalties Stewards acknowledged the following; The serious nature of all the offences; Mr N Carroll’s Guilty pleas in regards to charges 1, 2 and 5; Mr N Carroll’s previous disciplinary record (no previous prohibited substance offences); and Mr N Carroll’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Mr N Carroll was advised of his right to appeal these decisions. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

The Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) hosted the first of several medication forums on Sept. 26, 2017 at the Riffe Center in Columbus, Ohio. A well-attended crowd listened to testimony from veterinarians and horsemen’s representatives during the near three-hour forum. “We were seeking practical insight into medication issues affecting horses racing in Ohio,” explained Dr. James Robertson, OSRC consulting veterinarian. “We also wanted input from experts who have been involved with medication issues affecting racehorses and horsemen on the national level.” A trio of Ohio-based, practicing veterinarians—all with extensive knowledge of equine athletic physiology, including Dr. F. John Reichert, Dr. Scott Shell and Dr. Dan Wilson—provided insight into their daily regimes of caring for the equine athlete, both Standardbred and Thoroughbred.  As well, Dr. Clara Fenger, a central-Kentucky-based equine practitioner and founder of North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians (NAARV); Dr. Tom Tobin, a toxicologist, pharmacologist and veterinarian at the University of Kentucky’s Dept. of Veterinary Science; and Dr. Alicia Bertone, an equine orthopedic surgeon from The Ohio State University’s Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Sciences—presented their views on racetrack medication and practical applications facing veterinarians today. A second medication forum will be held immediately following the OSRC monthly meeting on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017 at 10 am in Room 1948 at the Riffe Center, 77 South High Street, Columbus, OH.  All horsemen and the public are invited to attend.  Anyone wishing to speak is asked to contact Bill Crawford at the OSRC by Oct. 20, 2017. Kimberly Rinker OSDF Administrator Ohio State Racing Commission

Brett Sturman is right on target when he opines (Harness Racing Update 9/15/17) that suspending a horse is unfair to the owner, but surely it is also harmful to the industry; an industry that seems to be intent on chasing owners away from the auction rings and claim boxes under the well intended, but misguided popular mantra of much desired "integrity”.   Clearly, as Sturman properly pointed out, any owner found to be complicit with illegal activity, should be severely punished; but to punish an owner for entrusting his or her horse to a trainer who is licensed and fully able to participate by virtue of a license issued by the Commission is just wrong.   If the owner is to be charged with failing to be “more” mindful, diligent and selective about engaging a trainer, should not the regulator be held to the same standard in licensing and re-licensing trainers?   If owners are to be punished for engaging the services of “certain” licensed trainers, perhaps the regulator should consider publishing a list of those licensed trainers they "mindfully, diligently and selectively" issued a license to, and advise owners that in spite of their grant of a license, these licensees are the ones owners should avoid.   This would tremendously help owners in making an informed choice, rather than subjecting owners to such harsh punishment imposed, due to the lack of diligence on the Commission’s part in issuing a “stay away from” trainer a license in the first place.   Punishing owners after the fact for using a trainer who subsequently violates the trainer responsibility rule or for the failure to guard a horse from the administration of an illicit substance is simply not going to produce the desired result, especially when many regulators see fit to adopt the unfounded medication guidelines of RMTC. Enforcement of these guidelines has created false positives already and now could be a further predicate to cause owners to suffer.   Many of the sport’s top trainers have been the subject of permissive medication violations simply because they are the trainer.  Now is this new proposal going to allow regulators or/track track operators to pick and choose, not only which trainers should suffer but now which owners should, or should not, be penalized?    Consider something else, when does the 90 day suspension of the horse commence, when the positive is reported, or at the conclusion of a the trainer’s hearing or the exhaustion of the judicial process?   If from the report of the positive, how does the regulator compensate an owner whose trainer is eventually exonerated?   Can a horse’s ownership be transferred before the process is completed or can the Commission ignore one's right to the "free alienation of property"?   Will the Commission undertake alerting the entire industry that a horse is potentially subject to suspension at the end of the process or does a new and unsuspecting owner now suffer?     We have seen similar pitfalls erupt when Commissions decided to pre-race detain high TCO2 horses and paint them with an industry's "Scarlet Letter".    No doubt the industry needs to champion a level playing field. As usual, its knee-jerk efforts, lauded in so many quarters, make for positive sound bites and a purely negative and mostly counterproductive result.    If no real investment is made in properly policing this sport, no misguided punishment of owners who have done no wrong, will ever be a meaningful substitute for the integrity that we desire, as there may not be owners left.   The only real solution to the problem is, and always has been, the investment in “boots on the ground” investigations by the Commission, valid medication guidelines followed by appropriate testing protocols at experienced labs.   Attempting to clean up the problem via innuendo and the slander of trainers, accomplishes nothing more than a further erosion of the industry by driving out owners whose only foibles were hiring fully licensed conditioners.   Joe Faraldo  

September 15, 2017 – The Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) announced its intent to establish the ‘Moving Ahead: Horse Racing Regulation in Ontario’ AGCO-Stakeholder Working Groups on February 21, 2017. The announcement included an open call to the horse racing industry to review and make recommendations for policy reform by participating in three working groups: Equine Drug Program Working Group Officiating Working Group Health and Safety Working Group (Equine & Human). The Equine Drug Program Working Group has met three times and will meet again shortly. The Officiating Working Group met four times between May and August and has now concluded. The AGCO is now pleased to announce the names of the participants selected to sit on the Health and Safety Working Group.  Comprised of a broad range of industry positions, industry associations and licensees, as well as AGCO representatives, this group will participate in three to five meetings which will be held approximately once a month starting in September. We look forward to starting this series of interesting and productive discussions with the following people: Health and Safety Working Group Academic/Equine Guelph COSA/OHHA Rep Fort Erie Representative Fort Erie Representative HBPA Representative Ontario Racing QROOI Quarter Horse Owner/Trainer Quarter Horse Representative Racehorse Owner/Breeder Racehorse Veterinarian Racehorse Veterinarian Racehorse Veterinarian Racetrack Representative Rehoming/Adoption Rep (SB) Rehoming/Adoption Rep (TB) Standardbred Breeder Standardbred Canada Standardbred Driver/Trainer Standardbred Owner Thoroughbred Jockey (former) Thoroughbred Owner/Trainer Gayle Ecker Mark Horner Jackie Eder Tom Valiquette Sue Leslie Mike Chopowick Gayle Sommer Erik Lehtinen Bob Broadstock Chantelle Bourgeois Elizabeth Spencer Julie Ballinger Victoria Banks Karl Lagerborg Joanne Colville (OSAS) Vicki Pappas (LongRun) Ann Straatman Linda Bedard Tony O’Sullivan Mark Beaven Rob Landry Peter Berringer The AGCO would once again like to extend its sincere appreciation to the many stakeholders and industry participants that have committed their time, effort, insights and energy to this project to date. Updates and summary reports from the Working Groups, are posted when available, on the AGCO website at www.agco.ca on the ‘Moving Ahead’ project page. For more information, please contact connect@agco.ca.

Office of Racing Integrity Stewards today inquired into a report from the analyst that d amphetamine and d Methamphetamine had been detected in a urine sample provided by licenced harness racing driver James Austin at the Tasmanian Pacing Club race meeting on 21 July 2017. Evidence was tendered today from Mr James Austin who explained the circumstances leading up to the positive finding. Evidence was also taken from Mr Paul Zahra (Racing Analytical Services Ltd), who explained the method and results of analysis. After consideration, Stewards charged Mr Austin pursuant to AHRR 250(1)(a) which states; ‘A driver commits an offence if a sample taken from him is found upon analysis to contain a substance banned by AHRR 251’. Mr Austin pleaded not guilty to the charge, however, after consideration of all the available evidence, Stewards found Mr Austin guilty of the charge. In assessing the matter of penalty, Stewards took into account Mr Austin’s current circumstances, both personal and financial, the nature of the substances detected, the fact this was Mr Austin’s second offence for this substance within a short timeframe. Stewards were also mindful of the importance for participants to be free of prohibited substances to ensure the safety and welfare of drivers and horses and the need for any penalty to act as an appropriate deterrent both specific and general. Mr Austin was disqualified for a period of 12 months backdated to commence from 3 August 2017, the day on which he was stood down from driving. Mr Austin was advised of his rights to appeal. Adrian Crowther CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS

Office of Racing Integrity Stewards today inquired into a report from the analyst that, Altrenogest had been detected in a urine sample taken from BOBBY JOE prior to it competing in trial 3 at the Tasmanian Pacing Club on 26 June 2017. Stewards considered evidence tendered by trainer Mr Kevin Denny, Paul Zahra (Racing Analytical Services Ltd), Mr Adam Cawley (Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory) and Veterinarian Dr Peter Horridge. Mr Kevin Denny subsequently pleaded guilty to a charge pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHHR) 190(1) which states: ‘A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances’. The particulars of the charge were that Mr Kevin Denny did present BOBBY JOE for racing at the Tasmanian Pacing Club trials on 26 June 2017 when a post-race urine sample taken from that gelding was found to contain the prohibited substance Altrenogest. Mr Denny was further charged under the provisions of 190(B)(1)(b) for failing to adequately maintain a log book of treatments to which he pleaded guilty. Stewards imposed a fine of $2000 for the breach of AHHR 190(1) in these circumstances and a fine of $200 was imposed for the breach of rule 190(B)(1)(b). Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, BOBBY JOE was disqualified from its performance in trial 3 at the Tasmanian Pacing Club 2017 and Stewards directed that the placings be amended accordingly. Adrian Crowther CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS   

Standardbred Canada has organized an industry-wide initiative to review the rules of racing in hopes to create a rule book for every harness racing jurisdiction to adopt and enforce. The initiative co chaired by Dan Gall, CEO/President of Standardbred Canada and Hambletonian Society President John Campbell, will conduct a detailed and comprehensive review of the rules of racing with input from all stakeholders.   The initial goal of this effort is to identify rules that should be clarified, modified or expanded to enhance uniform adoption and interpretation and to more accurately reflect contemporary racing conditions. The group will ultimately work to incorporate changes to existing rules and seek their adoption with provincial racing commissions. "Our members have been asking for uniformed rules across the country for years and this was demonstrated overwhelmingly in a recent Standarbed Canada online survey that was conducted this past spring. I believe that we have put together an incredibly strong, credible group of industry leaders that can make what some might describe a 'pipedream' a reality, and it all begins with a goal, a vision and a great team to make things happen," stated Gall.   "We should have universal rules throughout harness racing, throughout North America," says Campbell. "That is something I've felt quite strongly about for a long time. I don't believe some of our rules are worded as well as they could be. That can make it difficult for the judges to rule consistently. If the wording were made more concise and definitive, it would be easier for judges. The beneficiaries are twofold -- this will benefit the gamblers betting on our game across Canada as well as for the participants and judges. It will be better for all involved to get this accomplished," said Campbell. It's anticipated that there will be some review and revision of rules completed this autumn with the goal to be completed in 2018.   While every aspect of the rules of racing will be considered, the initial areas of scrutiny will be driver safety and fitness, fair start, recall and starting gate rules, horses coming out of a hole, causes of interference, and in the era where so much handle is generated by simulcast wagering, conduct of post parades. Members of the committee include; Regulators from all provincial jurisdictions including; Mike Brown (B.C.), Doug Fenske (Alta.), Doug Schneider (Sask.), Larry Huber(Man.), Brent Stone (Ont.), Marc Bergeron (Que.), Dr. Paul Hogan (Atlantic region), retired Hall of Fame Driver and SC Director Bill O'Donnell, Bill McLinchey(WEG/SC Director), Judge Roger DesRoches (P.E.I.), Driver Gerry Hudon (Alta.) along with co-Chairs John Campbell and Dan Gall. Communications Manager Darryl Kaplan will serve as the Standardbred Canada representative to assist in coordination and execution of our committee agendas. In addition, there will be two non-voting members; Dean Towers, representing horseplayers (NS), and a horseman to be determined. The first meeting of the Rules of Racing Committee is scheduled for September 29, 2017.   Darryl Kaplan Manager, Industry Communications and Business Development Standardbred Canada Editor, Trot Magazine 905-858-3077, ext. 241 dkaplan@standardbredcanada.ca

Stewards today have concluded an Inquiry which resulted from criminal convictions being recorded against licenced Harness Racing Trainer/Driver Mr Keith Toulmin in Launceston Magistrates Court on Tuesday 29 August 2017. At the inquiry, Stewards considered invoking AHRR 267(1) and AHRR 267(2) which relate to licenced persons being disqualified as a result of criminal convictions. Mr Toulmin attended the Inquiry and after giving consideration to submissions made by him and after considering the very serious nature of the animal welfare offences Stewards determined to invoke AHRR 267(2) in relation to a conviction of aggravated cruelty.  Stewards also invoked AHRR 267(1) in respect of a conviction for animal cruelty and for failing to comply with instructions given to Mr Toulmin by the RSPCA. In determining penalty, Stewards were mindful of the seriousness of the charges which had a significant adverse impact upon the reputation of Harness Racing.  Stewards were also mindful that any penalty imposed act as a significant deterrent for breaches of animal welfare standards which are of paramount importance in Harness Racing. Mr Toulmin’s licence history and personal circumstances were also taken into account. Penalty 1 – AHRR 267(2), In relation to the 1st charge, aggravated cruelty, Mr Toulmins Harness Racing licences were disqualified for 5 years.  Which was back dated to commence on 29 August 2017 and expire 29 August 2022. Penalty 2 – AHRR 267(1) –Animal cruelty.  Mr Toulmins Harness Racing licences were disqualified for 2 years to be served cumulative to penalty 1, commencing on 29 August 2022 and expiring 29 August 2024. Penalty 3 – AHRR 267(1) – Fail to comply with instructions issued by the RSPCA.  Mr Toulmins Harness Racing licences were disqualified for 2 years to be served concurrent to penalty 2. In total Mr Toulmin was disqualified for 7 years. Orders were also made to Mr Toulmin and the registered owners of horses currently in his care that those horses be removed within seven days. Date of issue 11 September 2017 Panel: A Crowther, D Farquharson, R Brown. Keith Toulmin Inquiry – 11 September 2017. Adrian Crowther CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS – Harness

ON Friday September 8, 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards suspended the licence of trainer, Ms Amanda Coffee, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRNSW has taken these measures after receiving a report from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) that xylometazoline had been detected in the blood sample taken from WAKE UP QUINN following its win in race 8, the PARKES FURNITURE ONE PACE (2040m) at Parkes on Sunday August 6, 2017. The “B” sample has been sent to Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria for confirmatory testing. HRNSW Stewards considered all available evidence at that time and determined that Rule 183 should be invoked based on the following factors: The existence of a prima facie case against you based on the certificate from ARFL; The nature of the substance; The absolute nature of AHRR 190 offences; The likely penalty of a significant period of disqualification if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The high unlikelihood that AHRR 256 will have any application if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The fact that this is not a finding of guilt and that this will militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension; The fact that an offence against AHRR 190 does not involve any aspect of intent and that this must further militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension.  (h) HRNSW’s protective objectives in the course of its core function to control, supervise and regulate harness racing in this State Ms Coffee has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her right of appeal against the imposition of Rule 183. HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation into this sample result and an Inquiry will be scheduled in due course. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

The Victorian Labor Government has made a $1.6 million investment in a world-class drug testing laboratory to fight against performance enhancing drugs in racing. The Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) laboratory at Flemington, which carries out more than 50,000 tests per year from race horses and greyhounds, will receive the funding boost to invest in sophisticated new machinery and equipment to remain at the cutting edge of drug screening in Australia and internationally. RASL takes blood, hair and urine samples to test for different banned substances, including peptides, proteins and cobalt. The laboratory is one of only five in the world that meets strict drug testing expertise standards recommended by the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities. Victoria’s racing industry, across thoroughbred, harness and greyhounds racing, has increased its testing by more than 50 percent over the past three years. A total of 14,140 samples were taken during the 2016/17 thoroughbred racing season and analysed for prohibited substances, with 3.468 blood and urine samples analysed during the 2016 Spring Racing Carnival. This includes an average of 50 percent of starters across metropolitan race meetings being tested during the 2016 Spring Racing Carnival. The Victorian racing industry sustains 26,500 full-time jobs and generates more than $2.8 billion to the state economy each year. Martin Pakula, Victoria’s Minister for Racing, believes that the investment in RASL is crucial for the integrity of racing. “The integrity of racing is paramount – the industry employs tens of thousands of people and generates billions of dollars for the Victorian economy,” Pakula said. “RASL is a global leader when it comes to research and drug testing in racing. This funding will help to ensure the laboratory can keep up with emerging trends in international doping.” The latest investment builds on the Labor Government’s $1.5 million contribution throughout 2015 and 2016 to support research and upgrade equipment at the laboratory. Since 2014, the Labor Government has delivered more than $3.1 million through the Victorian Racing Industry Fund. The Racing Analytical Services laboratory is matching the Government’s contribution dollar for dollar. Dr John McCaffrey, RASL Chairman, believes that the latest investment from the Government will help the laboratory maintain its world-class reputation.  “We are delighted the Victorian Government is continuing its partnership with RASL, to help enable us to meet the ongoing challenge of staying at the forefront of drug testing in racing and maintain our world-class reputation,” Dr McCaffrey said. By Shane Anderson Reprinted with permission of racing .com

Life has turned out well for 11 of the harness racing horses that were in an emaciated and weakened state when seized by the RSPCA from a northern property last year. Former trainer Keith William Toulmin, 68, was sentenced to a two-month wholly suspended jail term and fined $5000 after being convicted of animal cruelty, aggravated cruelty and failing to comply with a notice. The animals involved were all former harness racing horses, some of which were from New Zealand and had been worth $30,000-$40,000, the court heard. They belonged to different owners but had been left in the care of Toulmin and his son Craig, who had left the state. RSPCA investigations officer Carrie Palmer visited the 40ha property at Birralee in April last year and found the 15 horses. Over several months the RSPCA sought to force Toulmin to feed and medically treat the horses — eight of which he had been the registered trainer for. However, he claimed he could not afford to do so and that his car had broken down. Toulmin euthanised three horses. For nearly two months the remaining horses deteriorated in condition as winter set in. In June teams from the RSPCA and Department of Primary Industries visited the property. They euthanised a horse called Kinda Taz, which was unable to rise. The 11 remaining were seized by the RSPCA, which looked after them at a cost of $13,042 for the year or so since. “Seven were rehomed and I often get updates from the new owners that they are doing well,” Ms Palmer said. “Some have become trail-riding horses.” The RSPCA retains ownership of four horses, Sybella Brioso, Never Enough, Clyde Maguire and Royal Affair. “Three of them are at our facilities at the Cressy Research Station and they are rolling fat,” Ms Palmer said. “The fourth, Sybella Brioso, is at facilities at Mornington and she is also doing well.” By Nick Clark Reprinted with permission of The Mercury

On August 24, 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards concluded an inquiry that commenced on March 14, 2017, in relation to the betting activities of licensed harness racing trainer-driver Mr Josh Osborn. On February 10, 2017, HRNSW Stewards suspended the licences of trainer-driver, Mr Joshua Osborn, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. Mr Osborn appeared at the inquiry represented by Mr Paul O’Sullivan and presented evidence on March 14, 2017, and again on August 17, 2017. Stewards issued seventy-seven (77) charges pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 173 as follows: AHRR 173. (1)  A driver shall not bet in a race in which the driver participates.  (2)  A driver engaged to drive at a meeting shall not enter the betting area of the racecourse during the period commencing 60 minutes before the time fixed for the first race and finishing at the completion of the driver’s engagements at the meeting. (3)  For the purposes of this rule, betting area means those areas of a racecourse where betting with an approved wagering operator is conducted. (4)  A driver or the trainer of a horse shall not authorise, enable, permit or allow another person to place a bet on a betting account of the driver or the trainer. (5)  A driver or trainer shall not place or have an interest in a bet on any betting account other than an account registered in their own name. (6)  Any person who fails to comply with any provision of this rule is guilty of an offence. In determining penalty, Stewards considered that sixty-eight (68) of the total bets were placed by Mr Osborn on the horse that he drove in the respective races. In addition, Stewards considered that a further nine (9) of the total bets were placed by Mr Osborn on horses other than those driven by him in the respective races. Mr Osborn was also issued with a further charge pursuant to AHRR 173(4) in that he permitted his partner to operate his betting account in placing six (6) bets between June 2015 and March 2016. In relation to the nine (9) charges relating to Mr Osborn betting on horses other than those driven by him in the respective races, Mr Osborn was disqualified for a period of 3 months in respect of each charge to be served cumulatively. Consequently, Mr Osborn was disqualified for a period of 2 years and 3 months to commence from 10 February 2017, the date upon which he was stood down. In relation to the sixty-eight (68) charges relating to Mr Osborn betting on horses that he drove in the respective races, Mr Osborn was fined a total of $3400. In relation to the charge issued pursuant to AHRR 173(4), Mr Osborn was fined $500. Mr Osborn was advised of his right to appeal and has since lodged an Appeal. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

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