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Happy New Year, and welcome to 2021. While the holiday season normally is a quiet one for harness racing, that was not the case most recently. On the evening of Monday, Dec. 21, 2020, the Horseracing Integrity & Safety Act (HISA) was passed by both the Senate and the House of Representatives as part of a 5,539 page omnibus spending bill. President Trump signed the bill into law several days later. Here's what every USTA member should know. *HISA is scheduled to go into effect no later than July 1, 2022. The Federal Trade Commission will oversee a rule-making process that eventually will establish and approve the medication control and racetrack safety programs to be enforced by the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Authority (Authority). Letters have already gone out to Thoroughbred stakeholders asking recipients to suggest nominees for the Authority's board of directors. *The entity will be costly to the industry, but that price has yet to be determined. The new law stipulates that the Authority initially will be funded by loans taken out to fund its expenses, which will then be repaid by fees assessed to the state racing commissions. It is widely believed that a per-start surcharge will be implemented. *The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) is identified within the new law as the medication control enforcement body that will be the foundation of the Authority. *The new law does not specifically mention harness racing, and, indeed, some proponents of the legislation frequently questioned why the USTA was opposing a measure that did not include Standardbreds. However, the law contains an opt-in provision for each state racing commission to elect to have additional breeds covered by the law, and the financial implications for state racing commissions, as expressed clearly in a September press release from the Association of Racing Commissioners International (https://www.arci.com/2020/09/federal-bill-may-incentivize-states-to-defund-anti-doping-and-medication-rule-enforcement/), are such that many commissions will have no choice except to bring Standardbred and Quarter Horse racing into the federal fold. *The new law effectively removes medication control from the state racing commissions. The commissions will continue to perform all other traditional functions, including licensing and general oversight. State racing licenses will still be required for participants, and it is likely that a national license also will be required for owners, trainers, etc. *The new law specifies that all race day medication, including Lasix, is to be phased out and ultimately prohibited. It does allow for a Lasix study to be performed, but for any changes to be implemented, the entire nine-person board of directors must unanimously agree that the following conditions are met: 1. That the modification is warranted. 2. That the modification is in the best interests of horse racing. 3. That furosemide has no performance enhancing effect on individual horses. 4. That public confidence in the integrity and safety of horse racing would not be adversely affected by the modification. Given that all four conditions are subjective, rather than objective, and that all nine handpicked board members, rather than a majority, must be in agreement in order for the policy to be changed, it's probably safe to say that Lasix will be off the table in any harness racing jurisdiction that opts into the Authority. *In addition to medication control, use of the whip/crop also would be regulated by the Authority as it is considered a racetrack safety issue. Other matters under the racetrack safety umbrella likely will include track surface composition and conditioning, in addition to pre-race examination and testing. There remains a long road ahead as the enactment of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act is contemplated. The USTA, under advisement from its attorneys, remains convinced that the new law is unconstitutional, and has grave concerns about its potential impact upon the harness racing industry. The Association continues to evaluate this issue and explore its options. Further developments will be reported as they occur. Dan Leary Director of Marketing and Communications

Former AFL player Lewis Jetta and his family were allegedly subjected to racial abuse at a New Year’s Eve harness racing event at Perth’s Gloucester Park racecourse. A Perth woman, who claimed to be sitting next to the Jetta family to ring in 2021, told 6PR radio on Monday that she was witness to the “disgraceful” and “horrible” verbal abuse at the function. “The way that they were treated was disgraceful. He was abused for his football, abused for being an Aboriginal,” Dee, who did not reveal her last name, said. “It was constant. Some horrible, horrible words. “The way they were harassed and verbally harassed for their race... it sickens me “We were there from 5.30pm until midnight and he just had it 24/7. “At the end of the night we even came up to him and his family and said how we were so proud of all of them and how sorry we were to watch it. “We have a 14-year-old and he said, ‘I’m going to become an ambassador’ to show that racism is not the right way to go. We are just the same no matter what colour our skins are. “This is why I’m speaking up today, for them.” Former AFL player Lewis Jetta and his family were allegedly racially abused at a New Year’s Eve event at Perth’s Gloucester Park racecourse. Credit: Matt Roberts/AFL Photos/via AFL Photos Gloucester Park chief executive Michael Radley told The West Australian no official complaints had been made from the event — which host about 4500 revellers. Mr Radley said he wished witnesses had reported the alleged incident to security and staff on the night so it could have been dealt with at the time. “We could have acted. We would have ejected the people and taken names,” he said. “It’s terrible. We don’t put up with that. It’s normally a family friendly venue. “If we had known we certainly would have acted. We would have liked to have known on the night, rather than Monday morning.” Mr Radley said it was otherwise a good family-friendly event, with pop-up bars and food venues, harness racing and a fireworks display, The West Coast Eagles confirmed last November that 31-year-old Jetta had not been offered a contract for 2021 season. He has since signed with WAFL club Swan Districts — a homecoming of sorts after wearing the black and white in their Colts side that claimed a 2007 Premiership win. Jetta had struggled for regular senior appearances in 2020, featuring just six times at AFL level. The Bunbury product finished up on 202 games, the last 75 as an Eagle after starting his career at Sydney. In his time at the Eagles, Jetta became a pivotal player across half back. He featured in the Swans’ 2012 flag triumph as well as West Coast’s premiership win in 2018. Jetta and his partner Jess Miller have a 10-year-old son Lewis Jnr and a seven-year-old daughter Daisy. Jetta has been contacted for comment. By Caitlyn Rintoul Reprinted with permission of Perth Now

Columbus, OH – Following is a response from USTA harness racing President Russell Williams on statement made Monday (Dec. 28) by the Meadowlands supporting the recently passed Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act: “Mr. Gural’s central message seems to be that he would like to see harness racing brought within the jurisdiction of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act (HISA) and that ‘we can modify the law next year to meet our needs, which are considerably different than the Thoroughbreds’ so that we can ‘live with’ HISA. “HISA supporters refused to countenance the slightest modification during more than three years of USTA effort to get something that we could live with. There is no reason to think that next year would be any different. “HISA is unconstitutional and is very unlikely to withstand the legal challenges that will be forthcoming if an attempt is made to apply it to harness racing.” from the USTA Communications Department   Following is the Meadowlands’ statement supporting the HISA: East Rutherford, NJ — The Meadowlands supports the inclusion of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act (HISA) in the 2020 Omnibus Appropriations Bill. The Omnibus passed through both houses of Congress last week and was signed into law by President Trump on Sunday. “The HISA is important to all of horse racing to demonstrate that we are addressing the problems that have plagued the sport for the last several decades. It is clear the past and current policies do not work,” said Meadowlands Chairman Jeff Gural. “Virtually all the horsemen that I have asked support trying to eliminate trainers that drug the horses. Having the Federal government involved will put some teeth into the effort to stop them as the indictments and subsequent arrests of last March showed. “It seems inconceivable that in 2022 every Thoroughbred racetrack will have uniform rules and be governed by this legislation while every Standardbred racetrack will continue to be governed by the states despite the fact that 27 of the 29 people indicted earlier this year were associated with Standardbred racing and only two were Thoroughbred trainers. “Hopefully we can work with the USTA to modify the law next year to meet our needs which are considerably different than the Thoroughbreds. If the USTA continues to oppose the legislation it would be our intention to ask the Racing Commissions in New York and New Jersey to allow us to opt in to the legislation since it does provide that option. “I remain confident that the majority of the issues that concern the Standardbred industry can be addressed and adjusted to where we can live with them.” Details on the HISA and its passage are available by visiting the Water Hay Oats Alliance (WHOA) website and consider joining that organization while you’re on the site. It is free to join. The Water Hay Oats Alliance is a grassroots movement of like-minded individuals who support the passage of federal legislation to prohibit the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the sport of horse racing.

Distinguished sports administrator Sean Carroll has been appointed as the next Victorian Racing Integrity Commissioner, replacing Sal Perna who is stepping down from the role after more than 10 years of service. Minister for Racing Martin Pakula today confirmed Mr Carroll’s appointment, which will take effect on 1 March 2021. The Office of the Racing Integrity Commissioner was established in 2010 to provide independent oversight of integrity-related matters across the Victorian thoroughbred, harness and greyhound racing codes, including controlling bodies Racing Victoria, Harness Racing Victoria and Greyhound Racing Victoria. Mr Carroll is the current Head of Integrity and Security at Cricket Australia and was responsible for developing and implementing an extensive integrity framework for that sport. He has represented Cricket Australia on national and government boards and working groups including the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports and the National Sports Integrity Unit Working Group. Mr Carroll was a senior police officer and AFL Tribunal advocate for nearly 20 years and is a current member of the Australian Sports Museum Advisory Panel. More information on the Office of the Racing Integrity Commissioner is available at racingintegrity.vic.gov.au. As stated by Minister for Racing Martin Pakula “Victoria is the home of Australian racing and the work of the Racing Integrity Commissioner is vital to ensuring we maintain that reputation.” “I’m thrilled that Sean Carroll has accepted the position and know that he will do a great job, just as Sal Perna has done for more than a decade.” As stated by incoming Victorian Racing Integrity Commissioner Sean Carroll “I’m proud to have been selected for this important position, and look forward to using my skills and experience to ensure the ongoing integrity of the Victorian racing industry”.

East Rutherford, NJ - The Meadowlands supports the inclusion of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act (HISA) in the 2020 Omnibus Appropriations Bill.   The Omnibus passed through both houses of Congress last week and was signed into law by President Trump on Sunday. "The HISA is important to all of horse racing to demonstrate that we are addressing the problems that have plagued the sport for the last several decades. It is clear the past and current policies do not work.   "Virtually all the horsemen that I have asked support trying to eliminate trainers that drug the horses. Having the Federal government involved will put some teeth into the effort to stop them as the indictments and subsequent arrests of last March showed.   "It seems inconceivable that in 2022 every thoroughbred racetrack will have uniform rules and be governed by this legislation while every standardbred racetrack will continue to be governed by the states despite the fact that 27 of the 29 people indicted earlier this year were associated with standardbred racing and only two were thoroughbred trainers.   "Hopefully we can work with the USTA to modify the law next year to meet our needs which are considerably different than the thoroughbreds. If the USTA continues to oppose the legislation it would be our intention to ask the Racing Commissions in New York and New Jersey to allow us to opt in to the legislation since it does provide that option.   "I remain confident that the majority of the issues that concern the Standardbred industry can be addressed and adjusted to where we can live with them," said Meadowlands Chairman Jeff Gural. Details on the HISA and its passage are available by visiting the "WHOA" website and consider joining that organization while you're on the site. It is free to join. The Water Hay Oats Alliance (WHOA) is a grassroots movement of like- minded individuals who support the passage of federal legislation to prohibit the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the sport of horse racing.    

Columbus, OH – Following is the statement from the harness racing USTA President Russell Williams regarding the inclusion of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act in the year-end omnibus bill and the passage of that legislation: “Inclusion of the HISA bill in the year-end omnibus legislation was not a surprise, and we have been working on the assumption that it would pass ever since Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell first made it public,” said Williams.  “A new Congress, the 117th, convenes next month. It will provide opportunities to remedy many official errors that were made in 2020, including HISA.” USTA Communications Department

View Fines and Suspensions for the week of December 18, 2020 as reported to the USTA by harness racing commissions in the United States. This bulletin reports actions that have been taken by the USTA and rulings as submitted by the various racing commissions in an abbreviated form; we are not responsible for the accuracy or timeliness of such information. For full ruling text, or if you have questions or concerns about the information found in this report, please contact the racing commission where the ruling was issued. All reported rulings, current and past, may be found by using Pathway, the USTA’s official database. Although there is no charge for this information, a USTA account is required. For a list of archived bulletins, click here. Looking for Canadian Rulings? View rulings posted at Standardbred Canada. This information is collected and posted by Standardbred Canada. The USTA assumes no liability for errors or omission. Michele Kopiec, USTA Racetrack Operations & Licensing Manager

Harness racing trainer Rene Allard has been included in a superseding indictment filed in federal court last week against Louis Grass, Donato Poliseno, Thomas Guido III, and Richard Banca. All defendants have entered not guilty pleas to one count each of drug adulteration and misbranding conspiracy for their role in what prosecutors say was a scheme to “manufacture, distribute, and receive adulterated ad misbranded PEDs and to secretly administer those PEDs to racehorses under scheme participants' control.” The allegations in the Dec. 3 indictment are nearly identical to those in the indictment filed against Grasso, Poliseno, Guido and Banca in February and March of this year. The timing of the indictments and arrests earlier in the year coincides with a larger case also from the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York into alleged doping schemes utilized by Thoroughbred trainers Jorge Navarro and Jason Servis. At that time, a complaint was filed against Allard but prosecutors requested several extensions of time in the case throughout the spring and summer. The complaint details Allard's involvement in the alleged scheme with his co-defendants, as recounted by FBI special agent Bruce Turpin. To read the full article by Natalie Voss in the Paulick Report click on this link.  

The career of a rising harness racing trainer has come to a sudden halt amid allegations of serious misconduct. Mitchell Kerr – who already has 87 wins to his credit and has won nearly $900,000 in stake money in his three-year training career – handed in his training licence to Harness Racing New Zealand last Saturday. At the same time, the Racing Integrity Unit (RIU) has received a raft of allegations about the 28-year-old's conduct as a trainer. Stuff understands the RIU is investigating and has also passed information to police. The police and the RIU declined to comment this week when asked about the case. A source described the allegations as serious. Kerr’s father Paul, a veteran licensed trainer based in Ohoka, North Canterbury, said the RIU had not put any of the allegations to his son, and he had not heard from police either. “I don’t have any respect for the Racing Integrity Unit whatsoever,” he said. “They have been hounding people for the last three years.” Paul Kerr said his son had “one or two personal issues going on” unconnected to the accusations. Mitchell was aware of the allegations, he said. “Until they are substantiated they are just rumour mongering. Things are only just coming out of the woodwork and there is nothing to say they are true.” Harness Racing New Zealand (HRNZ) confirmed Mitchell Kerr had relinquished his licence and said it was not aware of any investigation by the RIU. “If there is a breach of the rules of racing then HRNZ will act appropriately.” Horses stabled at the Mitchell Kerr Racing Stables in Rangiora have been removed to his father’s property in Ohoka. Paul Kerr said not a single owner had removed their horse from his son’s supervision and none had complained about his son. Mitchell Kerr’s last win was at the Kaikōura races earlier this month when William Wallace, which is part owned by All Black Anton Lienert-Brown, won the PGG Sales Series Classic. The allegations are the last thing the harness racing industry needs in its rebuilding phase after a police investigation into race fixing followed by charges against various industry figures in 2018. Canterbury trainer Nigel McGrath was disqualified for eight years in July for attempted doping and not co-operating with racecourse inspectors. An industry figure, who asked not to be named, said Kerr’s troubles were a major talking point in an industry known for its rumour mill. “[About] 99.9 per cent of us are working our guts out for little reward and a few people put the sport in a bad light.” Kerr has worked for his father, and for trainers Robert Dunn, at Woodend Beach, and Gareth Dixon in Auckland. He went out on his own in 2017 after securing 10 boxes and a barn at Rangiora Raceway and developed the outside yards and paddocks. By Martin Van Beynen Reprinted with permission of Stuff

BEFORE A JUDICIAL COMMITTEE OF THE JUDICIAL CONTROL AUTHORITY UNDER THE RACING ACT 2003 AND IN THE MATTER of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing BETWEEN RACING INTEGRITY UNIT (RIU) Informant AND MR DENIS O’CONNELL Horseman Respondent Information: A13219 Judicial Committee: Prof G Hall, Chairman Appearing: Mr S Renault, Stipendiary Steward, for the Informant The Respondent in person, with the assistance of Mr G Anderson, Licensed Trainer Date of hearing/oral decision: 25 October 2020 Date of written decision: 2 November 2020 WRITTEN DECISION OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE [1] An Information was filed by Stipendiary Steward, Mr Renault, against Driver, Mr D O’Connell, alleging a breach of r 868(2) in that Mr O’Connell as the driver of PETE’S DASH in Race 10, IRT. #1 AIRFREIGHT COMPANY FOR STANDARDBREDS MOBILE PACE at the NZ Metropolitan Trotting Club meeting held at Addington Raceway on 6 September 2020 failed to take all reasonable and permissible measures to ensure PETE’S DASH was given full opportunity to win or obtain the best possible placing by failing to attempt to obtain cover and allow his runner respite when the opportunities to do so were presented but instead elected to hold the parked position. [2] PETE’S DASH is trained by Mr O’Connell and finished 6th of 11, beaten 8.9 lengths from the winner MINNELLI SMILE. [3] Rule 868(2) reads: “Every horseman shall take all reasonable and permissible measures at all times during the race to ensure that his horse is given full opportunity to win the race or to obtain the best possible position and/or finishing place.” [4] The Charge was heard as a Non Raceday hearing at the Forbury Park Trotting Club’s meeting at Dunedin on 25 October 2020. [5] Mr O’Connell indicated on the signed Information that he admitted the breach. At the hearing he requested that he be able to change his plea to one of “Not admitted”. After hearing from the parties, Mr O’Connell was permitted to change his plea. Informant’s case [6] With reference to the video, Mr Renault provided the following written summary of the race: 1) This race was run over 2600 metres. PETE’S DASH drew 2 on the front line. PETE’S DASH showed gate speed at the start and immediately challenged for the lead with MUSTANG GT which had drawn 1 and also PAUL’S VERDICT which had drawn 4. Mr O’Connell urged his runner forward with the reins and whip after 100 metres in an attempt to clear MUSTANG GT however once being unable to do so he ceases in that challenge shortly after. By this time PAUL’S VERDICT had been able to muster enough speed to cross both PETE’S DASH and MUSTANG GT and assume the lead. 2) Rounding the first bend PETE’S DASH hangs inwards and Mr O’Connell tries to shift into a position behind the leader PAUL’S VERDICT however is unable to again fully clear MUSTANG GT and is left to race in the parked position. 3) From this point around the 2100 metres PETE’S DASH races outside the leader PAUL’S VERDICT. 4) Near the 1600 metres TIGER MOTH improves three wide from towards the rear of the field and progresses forward in an attempt to gain the parked position. 5) Mr O’Connell looks to his outside passing the 1400 metres and observes TIGER MOTH improving three wide and immediately urges his horse to hold its position. TIGER MOTH’S driver continues to urge his horse on until shortly after the 1200 metres before being taken hold of. 6) During this period where Mr O’Connell urged his runner forward the pace of the race increased noticeably and the front four horses break away from the remainder of the field. 7) Passing the 1100 metres there is ample opportunity for Mr O’Connell to ease his runner to gain some respite which would enable him to shift inwards and take up the vacant trail behind PAUL’S VERDICT as MUSTANG GT had lost ground and was under pressure from its driver to maintain its position. This opportunity was available to Mr O’Connell until near the 900 metres. 8) Mr O’Connell chose not to restrain his runner which allowed the horse following PETE’S DASH in the 1x1 position MINNELLI SMILE to shift inwards and take the trail. 9) As the field turned into the back straight near the 800 metres Mr O’Connell again places his runner under significant pressure to challenge x and the pace of the race increases. 10) PETE’S DASH is under pressure on the final bend and is forced wider on the track by the trailing MINNELLI SMILE. 11) The concern for Stewards is that Mr O’Connell had options presented to him to enable his horse an opportunity to gain some respite.  12) Passing the 1400 metres he could have taken hold of his horse to obtain the 1x1 position by handing up to the improving TIGER MOTH. Mr O’Connell should have been aware that there was no other horse following TIGER MOTH at that stage of the race however he was intent on remaining parked and had to increase the speed of the race to hold that position. 13) Further on as the field raced towards the 1100 metres, Mr O’Connell had a period of 200 metres available to him to shift inwards and obtain the trail. This is a significant amount of time during which he elected not to offer his runner any respite. 14) From the 800 metres when Mr O’Connell should have been looking to take hold of his horse to allow his runner respite, he again placed the horse under significant pressure until near the 600 metres. 15) When questioned by Stewards immediately following the race, Mr O’Connell’s explanation was that he had been told by the horse’s previous trainer that it races best parked, so he had been intent on staying in that position regardless of what happened in the race. 16) Stewards reviewed previous wins of PETE’S DASH. On the first occasion at Invercargill, the horse settled back with cover, before improving around the field near the 1400 metres to race parked for the final lap. For the horse’s second win, the gelding raced over 2600 metres at Oamaru and was parked from the 2200 metres until the 1200 metres. From there the horse was able to gain cover from a horse improving 3 wide and raced in the 1x1 thereafter. 17) Mr O’Connell’s tactics were unreasonable in the circumstances which amounted to bad judgement and as such he failed to take all reasonable and permissible measures to ensure PETE’S DASH was given full opportunity to win or finish in the best possible finishing position. [7] Mr Renault summarised the Informant’s case orally. He said there was no issue with Mr O’Connell’s early drive. He had tried to get in but could not do so. [8] Mr Renault accepted that not all drivers challenged in the fashion that Mr O’Connell had been would hand up and drop back into the one out one back position. But Mr O’Connell had been sat parked for some 700 to 800 metres and should have done so. Instead, Mr O’Connell kept urging PETE’S DASH forward in order to hold his position and to prevent TIGER MOTH from crossing him. Mr Renault believed Mr O’Connell should have been aware that no other horse was coming around following TIGER MOTH. [9] The Stewards’ biggest concern related to Mr O’Connell’s failure to take the trail when that opportunity was presented to him for a period of time, and by so doing, to give some respite to PETE’S DASH. MUSTANG GT had dropped off the leader and Mr O’Connell could have taken hold of PETE’S DASH and eased into the trailing position behind the leader. He was racing outside the wheel of the leading horse, PAUL’S VERDICT (Mr Morrison), at the time and he could have taken the position that Ms Ottley (MINNELLI SMILE), who went on to win the race, had taken. It had been there for Mr O’Connell for some time, approximately 200 metres. Mr Renault said Mr O’Connell had simply been intent on sitting parked and Mr O’Connell should have at least looked to trail. [10] Mr Renault also stated that from the 800 to the 600 metres the Respondent was urging PETE’S DASH. Before the final bend the horse was under significant pressure and was tiring. Respondent’s case [11] Mr O’Connell commenced his defence by questioning why he would take his horse away from the parked position when it was racing “nice and relaxed”. He said if he had dropped into the trail, he would have lost momentum. He could not understand why he should have done this. If he had got behind PAUL’S VERDICT, it “might not have carried on with the job”. He had been behind this horse before and it did not take him to the passing lane. He said it had not taken the trailing horse into the lane on this occasion either. (Mr Renault disputed this, commenting that this was because Ms Ottley had elected to come out.) [12] Mr Anderson assisted the Respondent. He said that TIGER MOTH had a reputation as a rough going horse and he could understand why Mr O’Connell did not want to sit behind it. TIGER MOTH had dropped out, beaten 27 lengths. TIGER MOTH had done nothing in its next start. It was not the best horse to follow. He said Mr O’Connell was driving his own race and had decided to deny TIGER MOTH the one out position as he was not sure it was the right horse to hand up to. [13] Mr Anderson said it had been easier for Ms Ottley to take the trail than it would have been for the Respondent. Mr O’Connell would have had to pull right back when Ms Ottley was racing close behind him, and check his horse. That would have been difficult, and he disputed that there had been an opportunity to do so for over 200 metres. [14] Mr O’Connell stated that he believed if he had handed up to TIGER MOTH, he would have been questioned by the Stewards as to why he had done so. [15] Mr O’Connell said there had been rain shortly before the start of the race. He had grit on his glasses. He had tried to remove them but had been unable do so as PETE’S DASH had ducked in at that time. He said he was concentrating on driving the horse. He thought it was wise to stay out of trouble, so he had sat parked. [16] In response to a question from the Committee, Mr O’Connell said he was aware the trailing horse had dropped off and there was space to his inside, but he had decided he was better to sit parked. He reiterated his horse was relaxed and travelling well at that time. He did not want to lose momentum by easing PETE’S DASH. He also did not want to follow PAUL’S VERDICT as he believed that horse would weaken under pressure as it had done so previously. [17] Mr Renault responded that PAUL’S VERDICT was a noted leader and was 2/3 in the betting on the day. [18] Mr O’Connell stated he had had difficulty in releasing the ear plugs when he was trying to put pressure on PAUL’S VERDICT. He had only recently purchased PETE’S DASH and it was the first time he had driven the horse on raceday. It had only battled since that start. He had thought that the horse was better than he actually was and had also thought that the horse raced better when parked. He thought it had sat parked and just got collared in the last 50 metres when so doing. Mr Renault disputed this, stating the horse had had cover in that particular race and had often raced on the fence. [19] Mr O’Connell agreed with Mr Renault that his intention was to race parked or to trail. [20] He concluded his case by reiterating he was not prepared to take hold of his horse. He did not want to lose momentum. Decision as to breach [21] The Stewards are concerned that Mr O’Connell continued to race parked when having the opportunity to take cover and with his not taking the trail when the opportunity presented itself. On both occasions his horse would have obtained some respite. [22] Mr O’Connell raced parked from the first bend to into the home straight with a lap to run at which time Mr Curtin driving TIGER MOTH challenged him for the parked one out position. Mr O’Connell had the opportunity to allow Mr Curtin to progress past and to take the one out one back position. Instead of so doing and obtaining some respite for PETE’S DASH, he used the reins and urged the horse forward to prevent Mr Curtin from crossing over. Mr O’Connell said PETE’S DASH was racing nice and relaxed. At this point, however, it is evident that the horse has to be urged to withstand the move from TIGER MOTH. [23] Mr O’Connell has acknowledged that he knew the trailing horse had dropped off and that he was intent on keeping PETE’S DASH parked. His explanation is simply that he wanted to keep momentum and again that the horse was racing in a relaxed fashion. [24] It is evident there was a distance, conservatively some 150 plus metres, when Mr O’Connell had the opportunity to ease his horse, take hold, and drop into the trail. It is accepted that it was ultimately easier for Ms Ottley to take the trail, as Mr Anderson has stated, but the Respondent had previously had the opportunity to so do himself but had spurned this. The horse had raced parked for some time and, by so doing, he would have again given PETE’S DASH some respite. [25] The Committee has noted Mr O’Connell’s concern that PAUL’S VERDICT might stop. This is always a concern for a trailing horse but there was no evidence on this occasion that PAUL’S VERDICT might do this. In this regard, just after the 800 metres Mr O’Connell has taken time to activate the gear (pull the ear plugs) as he has had some difficulty, before urging PETE’S DASH to keep up with PAUL’S VERDICT. Almost immediately after Ms Ottley had taken the trailing position that had been available to him, Mr O’Connell has had to start working on PETE’S DASH and, not surprisingly, the horse has tired and dropped back. [26] Mr O’Connell, as he has acknowledged, had over assessed the ability of PETE’S DASH. It was his first drive behind the horse, and it was not as good a horse as he thought. [27] Mr O’Connell’s concern that TIGER MOTH is roughly gaited and the fact he believed PAUL’S VERDICT might tire before the passing lane and thus cart him back appear to be post facto justifications, as does the difficulty with his glasses, for his failure to take the two opportunities that were available to him to give PETE’S DASH some respite. [28] Mr O’Connell has acknowledged he was aware he could have looked to drop down and trail, but he chose not to. The Committee is satisfied that Mr O’Connell’s intention once he failed to get the trail after the start was to sit parked, come what may; ie he had had a fixed mindset to sit parked as believed the horse raced better in this fashion. As a consequence, the Committee finds that Mr O’Connell did not take all reasonable and permissible measures that were available to him to ensure PETE’S DASH was given full opportunity to win or obtain the best possible placing. [29] The breach of r 868(2) is thus proved. Penalty submissions [30] Mr Renault produced the Respondent’s record. It showed no breaches of this Rule. [31] Mr Renault described the breach as towards mid-range. There were two occasions on which Mr O’Connell could have made decisions that would have kept his drive within the Rules. [32] Mr Renault referred to the starting point in the Penalty Guide of 20 drives or a $1,000 fine and submitted a six month suspension and a $400 to $500 fine was the appropriate penalty. [33] Mr O’Connell responded that he did not want a fine. He would prefer to take a suspension, even one of the length submitted by Mr Renault. [34] When the Committee informed Mr O’Connell that a suspension that equated to a little less than the 20 drive starting point was likely to be imposed, he was adamant that he did not wish a fine to be part of the penalty. He stated his horses would continue to compete primarily at Invercargill and Addington and that Ms Young-Grant would be likely to drive them. Decision as to penalty [35] The breach is towards the lower end of the range. The track conditions on the day were not ideal and Mr O’Connell was driving PETE’S DASH for the first time. He, as previously described, had over assessed the ability of the horse. He had a fixed mindset to sit parked, as he believed the horse raced better in this fashion and did not take the reasonable and permissible measures that were available to him. [36] When regard is had to the seriousness of the breach and the Respondent’s degree of culpability, and factoring in the very good record, the appropriate penalty is a 16 drive suspension. [37] Mr O’Connell drives very infrequently. After reviewing the number of drives he had last season and has had since February this year, it is evident he has about 16 drives in a six-month period. [38] Mr O’Connell requested that the penalty to be deferred until after the upcoming Methven meeting and the Informant had no objection to this. [39] Mr O’Connell is thus suspended from the end of racing on 30 October up to and including 30 April. The penalty is calculated in accordance with the Penalty Guide and there is no need for a fine to also be imposed in addition to the suspension. Costs [40] The matter was heard before the first race on raceday. There is no award of costs in favour of the RIU or the JCA. Dated at Dunedin this 2nd day of November 2020. Geoff Hall, Chairman

It is to be noted that the current open inquiries can be found by the following link. https://www.hrnsw.com.au/ racing/stewards /openinquiries New Inquiries – ·      15 October 2020 – Mr Malcolm Locke - HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation in relation to a report from LGC laboratory in the United Kingdom that recombinant human erythropoietin has been detected in an out of competition blood sample taken from TUNGSTEN TERROR at the registered training establishment of licensed Trainer Mr Malcolm Locke on Wednesday 2 September 2020. Acting under the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule 183, HRNSW Stewards have suspended the Trainer’s licence of Mr Malcolm Locke. (original notice at www.hrnsw.com.au) ·      29 October 2020 – Mr Robert Garrett - HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation in relation to a report from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) that Heptaminol had been detected in the post-race urine and blood sample taken from BONZA GUY following its win in race 2, the YANCO ALLSERVICEMENS CLUB PACE (1758 metres) conducted at Leeton on Tuesday 18 August 2020. Furthermore, a report from the Australian Government National Measurement Institute (NMI) has detected Cobalt above the threshold of 100 micrograms per litre in urine. Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) has confirmed both substances. Mr Garrett has been provided and has subsequently provided submission to HRNSW Stewards as to the reasons why AHRR 183 should not be invoked. Inquiries Concluded - ·      14 October 2020 - Mr Peter Trevor-Jones was disqualified for a period of 3 months to commence from 14 October 2020. This follows an investigation in relation to a report from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) and Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) that Trendione and Epitrenbolone had been detected in the post-race urine sample taken from IM ALL COURAGE following its win in race 7, the BARKERS BUTCHERY PACE (1730 metres) conducted at Bathurst on Monday 20 April 2020. The subject horse was disqualified under the provisions of AHRR 195 and in addition, in accordance with AHRR 190AA (4), HRNSW Stewards ordered that IM ALL COURAGE is not permitted to start in any race or be used for the purposes of breeding for a period of 12 months from 20 April 2020. Mr Trevor-Jones was issued a further penalty of $500 under AHRR 190B (1)(a) & (b) for failing to maintain a log book. Mr Trevor-Jones has appealed the penalty decision of HRNSW Stewards in respect of the period of disqualification. (original notice at www.hrnsw.com.au)   ·      14 October 2020 - Mr James Sutton was disqualified for a period of 3 months to commence from 14 October 2020. This follows an investigation in relation to a report from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) and Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) that Trendione and Epitrenbolone (ARFL Only) had been detected in the post-race urine sample taken from YARRAMAN BELLA following its win in race 6, the GRAPEVINE CAFÉ PACE (2120 metres) conducted at Dubbo on Sunday 26 July 2020. The subject horse was disqualified under the provisions of AHRR 195 and in addition, in accordance with AHRR 190AA (4), HRNSW Stewards ordered that YARRAMAN BELLA is not permitted to start in any race or be used for the purposes of breeding for a period of 12 months from 26 July 2020. (original notice at www.hrnsw.com.au)   ·      27 October 2020 - Mr Joshua Farrugia was disqualified for a period of 14 months to commence from 3 January 2020. This follows an investigation in relation to a report from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) and Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) that Total Carbon Dioxide above the prescribed threshold had been detected in the pre-race blood sample taken from ARE YOU WITH ME prior to race 7, the 57th INTER CITY PACE FINAL (GROUP 3) (2422 metres) conducted at Maitland on Saturday 28 December 2019. The subject horse was disqualified under the provisions of AHRR 195. Mr Farrugia was issued a further disqualification for a period of 6 months to be served concurrently with the above penalty (14 months) as a result of a breach of AHRR 196C (1)(b) & (2)(a) for administering an alkalinising agent within one (1) clear day of the commencement of the race. Mr Farrugia was issued a further penalty of $500 under AHRR 190B (1) & (6) for failing to maintain a log book.   Appeal Decision – ·      7 October 2020 – Mr Danny Gallagher appealed the decision of Stewards to disqualify his licence for a period of 3 months and 3 weeks for betting activities whilst he was a disqualified person and the recommencement of his disqualification imposed by the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal. The appeal was dismissed by the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal. (appeal decision at www.hrnsw.com.au) ·      19 October 2020 – Mr Malcolm Locke appealed the decision of Stewards on 15 October 2020 to suspend his Trainers licence under the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule 183 following an investigation in relation to a report from LGC laboratory in the United Kingdom that recombinant human erythropoietin has been detected in an out of competition blood sample taken from TUNGSTEN TERROR at the registered training establishment of licensed Trainer Mr Malcolm Locke on Wednesday 2 September 2020. At this time Mr Locke sought a Stay of proceedings. On Thursday 22 October 2020, the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal refused the Stay application.   Integrity Information – ·      During the month of October, HRNSW Integrity department has obtained 784 Race day samples. ·      During the month of October, HRNSW Integrity department has obtained 36 Out of Competition tests (OOCT) from various stables in NSW. ·      The HRNSW Retention Facility was utilised for all horses, including emergencies, entered in the NSW Breeders Challenge 2YO Colts & Geldings Final to be conducted at Tabcorp Park Menangle on Saturday 24 October 2020. All Horses were housed prior to 12 midday on Thursday 22 October 2020 until released to the raceday stables 2 hours prior to the race. ·      HRNSW Integrity staff and contracted security conducted security measures at the registered Stable address of Mr Craig Cross; Ø  Thursday 8th October 2020, Friday 9th October 2020 & Saturday 10th October 2020. Ø  Thursday 15th October 2020, Friday 16th October 2020 & Saturday 17th October 2020. Ø  Thursday 22nd October 2020, Friday 23rd October 2020 & Saturday 24th October 2020. Ø  Thursday 29th October 2020, Friday 30th October 2020 & Saturday 31st October 2020.   For further information on this matter contact: HRNSW Integrity Department (02) 9722 6655

The Australian Government National Measurement Institute (NMI) has advised HRNSW that Cobalt above the threshold of 100 micrograms per litre in urine has been detected in the urine sample taken from BONZA GUY following its win in race 2, the YANCO ALLSERVICEMENS CLUB PACE (1758 metres) conducted at Leeton on Tuesday 18 August 2020. The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has also advised HRNSW that heptaminol was detected in that urine sample. The reserve portion and control solution have been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria. In addition, the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has advised HRNSW that heptaminol was also detected in the post-race blood sample taken from BONZA GUY following that same race and the “B” sample has been confirmed by RASL. Acting under the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule 183, HRNSW Stewards have suspended the Trainer’s licence of Mr Robert Garrett. Mr Garrett provided submissions to HRNSW Stewards as to why the provisions of AHRR 183 should not be imposed. Acting under the provisions of Rule 183A, it was also determined that BONZA GUY, the horse subject of the certificate, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an inquiry or investigation. Mr Garrett has not been charged with any breach of the Australian Harness Racing Rules and has been advised of his rights of appeal against the imposition of Rule 183. HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation into these sample results and an Inquiry will be scheduled in due course.   HRNSW

The Hambletonian Society supports the proposed Horse Racing Integrity and Safety Act (HISA), the latest version of which is S.R. 4547, introduced on September 9, 2020. The Society believes that the current system of oversight and regulation of horse racing needs and demands changes in structure and execution and that the proposed legislation has the potential to bring new found confidence and trust to horseplayers, owners and all other participants. While some of the provisions of the original bill caused legitimate concerns for the Standardbred industry, since, among other concerns, it provided for "one size fits all" rules for all breeds, the amended bill now recognizes the uniqueness of other breeds, including Standardbreds. To be represented effectively, the Standardbred industry and its leaders must be united in their approach to the Horse Racing Integrity and Safety Authority to be established under HISA, so as to ensure that therapeutic medication protocols, funding mechanisms and representation, are appropriate and practical for the harness racing industry. Universal thresholds and withdrawal times, as well as standardized testing procedures for permitted therapeutic medications, will allow honest and ethical breeders, trainers and veterinarians to care for race horses in a more consistent manner. This proposed legislation also greatly increases the chances of detecting and apprehending unscrupulous and unethical people who currently operate within industry-regulated boundaries. The Society urges all participants and organizations in the Standardbred Industry to familiarize themselves with the contents of the amended bill, (Amended HISA Bill SR4547) and support this groundbreaking legislation. There is an opening to be part of a solution that will allow harness racing to be treated fairly and be the best that it can be as we move forward. Sincerely, John Campbell President & Chief Executive Officer Jim Simpson Chairman of the Executive Committee   The Hambletonian Society Executive Committee Frank Antonacci Thomas A. Charters E.T. Gerry Jr. Ted Gewertz Fred W. Hertrich III Charles E. Keller III Michael G. Kimelman Seth Rosenfeld George I. Segal   The full board of the Hambletonian Society, Inc. can be found here: Hambletonian Society Board Below is the link to the House floor if you would like to watch the debate on the HR 1754, the Horseracing Integrity & Safety Act.  It should begin around 1pm.  There is 40 minutes of debate, divided between Reps and Dems.   Votes will be stacked beginning at 6:30, and you can watch the live vote at the same link. live.house.gov/

NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal Decisions - Mr Shaun Simiana HRNSW Stewards commenced an Inquiry on 5 October 2016 into the results of the following Out of Competition blood samples taken from horses in the care of Trainer Mr Shaun (Anthony) Simiana:   FRANCO TIAGO NZ          Sample collected on 17 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK       Sample collected on 17 April 2016 FRANCO TIAGO NZ          Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK       Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK       Sample collected on 3 May 2016   Those samples were reported to contain the prohibited substance Peptide VNFYAWK. On 5 October 2016, HRNSW Stewards issued 8 charges against Mr Simiana and adjourned the Inquiry to allow Mr Simiana to consider those charges. The Inquiry resumed on 7 December 2016 at which time Mr Simiana’s legal representatives made a number of requests and further applications. Following correspondence between the parties, due to the fact that no submissions were received from Mr Simiana in response to the charges issued by 20 January 2017, HRNSW Stewards considered the matter on the evidence that was before them, in the absence of any submissions. Mr Simiana was found guilty of all charges and advised through his legal representative of that decision. Mr Simiana was provided with an opportunity to provide submissions in relation to the matter of penalty by COB 3 February 2017. Following an extension until COB 7 February 2017, no submissions were received and HRNSW Stewards considered the matter of penalty. On 15 February 2017, Mr Simiana was issued with the following penalties: In relation to Charges 1,2,3,4 & 7, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(a), Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of six (6) years to be served concurrently. In relation to Charges 5,6 & 8, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A(1)(i) & (2) Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of ten (10) years to be served concurrently. HRNSW Stewards ordered that the two (2) periods of disqualification imposed be served cumulatively. Therefore Mr Simiana was disqualified for a total period of 16 years to commence from 28 July 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. HRNSW Stewards also disqualified the subject horses from the following races pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(b): ·      FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 5 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016.  ·      FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 2 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 30 April 2016. ·      WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its fourth place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016. ·      WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its second place at Dubbo on 29 April 2016. ·      WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its third place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 May 2016 In addition, HRNSW Stewards ordered that Mr Simiana pay to HRNSW within 14 days of being advised of the Steward’s Decision, the sum of $15,000 as costs pertaining to the analytical tests that were costs borne by the Controlling Body in relation to the prohibited substances from his horses, pursuant to NSW Local Rule 256A. The decisions of the HRNSW Stewards were appealed to the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal by Mr Simiana. Following an appeal hearing, on 16 June 2020 the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal handed down the decision that the appeal against all eight (8) charges had been dismissed. On 5 August 2020, the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal handed down the following penalty decisions: Charges 1,2,3,4 & 7 -        Severity appeal dismissed. Disqualification in each of the five charges of 5 years to be served concurrently; Charges 5,6 & 8 -          Severity appeal upheld. Disqualification in each of the three charges of 10 years to be served concurrently. In addition, the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal ordered that the disqualification periods for charges 1,2,3,4 & 7 be served cumulative to the disqualification periods for charges 5,6 & 8. On 17 September 2020, the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal ordered that the periods of disqualification be served as follows: In respect of charges 1,2,3,4 & 7 (being a concurrent disqualification period of 5 years) Mr Simiana was disqualified: (a) from 29 July 2016 to 5 February 2019 (being 2 years, 6 months and 8 days); and (b) from 5 August 2020 to 26 January 2023 (being 2 years, 5 months and 22 days). In respect of charges 5,6 & 8, Mr Simiana was disqualified from 27 January 2023 to 27 January 2033 (being 10 years). Further, the NSW Racing Appeals Tribunal ordered the following: ·      Mr Simiana to pay HRNSW analytical costs of $15,000; ·      Limited order for Mr Simiana to pay HRNSW costs and further directions issued; ·      25% of the appeal deposit to be refunded to Mr Simiana.   For further information on this matter contact: HRNSW Integrity Department (02) 9722 6655

The plan to spend money it doesn’t have to prepare to challenge integrity legislation. Did you know that the USTA is operating this year with a budget deficit of $219,940? I didn’t. Did you know that at the same time the USTA is operating under this deficit it has cut salaries by $170,000 and rejected at least two attempts to provide more funding for the protection of unwanted horses? I didn’t know that, either. I also didn’t know that while the USTA is taking these unfortunate steps it authorized $425,000 in funding to prepare itself to challenge the constitutionality of whatever racing integrity legislation ultimately emerges from Congress. In other words, the USTA is running a budget deficit, and saddling its employees with pay cuts or worse, while it spends beyond its means to take on Congress, the executive branch, the Thoroughbred industry, animal rights activists, and all the many other powerful entities who have lined up to support a meaningful change to the way horse racing operates in the United States. Did you sign up for such a use of your USTA membership dues? I didn’t. Did your USTA director ask you what you think of the pending legislation? Mine sure didn’t. The complex federal litigation the USTA is preparing for-- no one spends $425,000 to study the constitutionality of a statute it does not intend to subsequently challenge-- will take millions of dollars and many years to conclude. And even if after all that the USTA somehow wins, which is unlikely, the victory would likely mean some sort of return to the current system we all surely can agree is a total failure. Even if the USTA wins, in other words, we all will lose. Another kicker? Throughout the course of that litigation harness racing will be vulnerable to political attacks by powerful people who want less racing-- including the very legislators we are begging to continue purse subsidies. We all deserve more answers about the USTA’s expenditure of this money. What justifies it at a grim time when the USTA is telling its own employees they have to do with less? Why didn't USTA leaders ask members for their input before authorizing the expense? How much already has been spent? How exactly is it being monitored? How were these lawyers and lobbyists selected? What are their connections to harness racing or to members of the USTA’s board? What outreach did the USTA undertake to educate members about its decision to spend precious resources in this fashion?  I asked the USTA’s Dan Leary some of these questions last week. His response via email: “As the public record reflects, the funding was unanimously approved by the full USTA Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting in April and has been closely monitored by the Executive Committee since then. The purpose is to examine and analyze the legality and constitutionality of the Horse Racing Integrity Act. That examination is continuing. We will be prepared to discuss these efforts when the work is completed.” No organization committed to transparency and accountability would offer to “discuss these efforts” only after all the money is all spent. Russell Williams, over the weekend, in a condescending open letter to Jeff Gural, defended the expenditure and then hinted that the law firm he hired to do the work reached a conclusion that the legislation is legally vulnerable. Of course it did. Give any law firm $425,000 and you can expect its lawyers to cobble together an argument you want it to make. And, sure enough, on Monday the USTA announced online that its hired guns had concluded that the legislation is likely unconstitutional. The smart people who support the federal legislation say that their very own smart lawyers have vetted the measure and revised it to make it less likely to be struck down by the courts. Ultimately, federal judges will decide-- after the USTA exposes itself for years to lawmakers and animal rights activists as an industry that wasn't willing to embrace a new approach to racing safety and integrity. Imagine paying all that money for the privilege of becoming a target for lawsuits and new legislative attempts to end purse subsidies-- without first giving USTA members the chance to vote on whether we want to travel down this perilous road. Not in my name. If the legislation passes, and it looks like it will, then those in harness racing who believe it should be challenged in court can all pool their own money and litigate the matter privately. Good luck with that. This is what I think the USTA is getting at, in those April minutes linked to above, when we see this: “Once the analysis is completed, we will be looking for other outside support to fund the balance.” So why then is the USTA footing the bill for the first $425,000 of this dubious endeavor? Why is that “outside support” not paying now?  Here’s an idea. How about a vote of USTA members with a single question involving the expenditure of the $425,000: What's the best use for that money: Paying lawyers to fight popular and bipartisan federal legislation to improve racing integrity or helping horsemen and horsewomen offset some of the additional drug testing costs that will come from the legislation once it’s passed? Or, better yet, what's more important, paying the salaries of USTA employees or funding lengthy and expensive litigation that if successful brings us to where we are today. Even if you are queasy about the pending federal legislation you should be alarmed that the USTA is operating in this manner. I have heard from many horsemen and horsewomen over the past few weeks who are simply shocked to discover that the USTA’s vitriolic opposition to federal legislation-- seemingly any federal legislation-- has found such profound expression in the association’s budget. Many are growing less skeptical of the pending federal legislation-- in its new and improved form-- and more skeptical of the USTA’s divisive and dangerous antics in opposing it. Andrew Cohen    

I have no axe to grind with Woodlands, Nevele R, Alabar, nor for that matter their main supplier US harness racing studs in Blue Chip Farms and Diamond Creek. I love the stallion choices Woodlands have made in recent years, the majestic set up of Nevele R and the rich history of Alabar and its true two country operation. I thank Blue Chip Farms for agisting World Class Hanover on their farm and providing us with a magnificent Credit Winner Colt from her and I thank Diamond Creek for allowing their champion trotting stallion Father Patrick to be available down under. We, Australia, belong to an international trotting community that has adopted limited stallion books the world over. Examples are the US 140 stallion book limit (no free returns), France 100 limit (and that’s for the best stallions its less for many others) and Sweden 150 limit etc. Limited stallion books have helped improve numerous areas of their industry. I hear no talk of dispensing with limited stallion books internationally. Why, because it works. I commend HRA for its courageous decision to limit stallion books in Australia. I am disappointed that our (Australasia’s) three biggest and in many areas, best studs have chosen to fight this decision. I am also disappointed that these two beautiful studs in the US are happy to adhere to limited stallion books in the US, but do not appear to be encouraging their Southern counterparts to do the same. Let’s get back on stride, let’s get back in step and join the international harness community in limiting stallion books down under. Pat Driscoll  Haras Des Trotteurs  

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