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The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) and 190B against licensed trainer Mr Des Hilton.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Hilton related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Itmademyday’ following its 1st placing in Race 3, the ‘Discount Carpets 3YO Pace’, at Mildura on 19 June 2015.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. The charge under AHRR 190B related to stable inspections conducted by HRV Stewards when investigating the arsenic irregularity on 10 August 2015 and 8 September 2015 where Mr Hilton was found not to maintain a logbook as required by the Rules. During the investigation Mr Hilton explained that he did not use any arsenic based products and that Itmademyday had a tendency to chew the fence posts in the horse’s yard.  Subsequent analysis of samples of these fence posts revealed they contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing need to test for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the HRV RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic. Mr Hilton pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  After considering submissions from the HRV Stewards and Mr Hilton, the HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Hilton guilty though imposed no penalty against Mr Hilton in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as a tonic that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the  results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the results of  analysis of the fence posts from Mr Hilton’s property, Mr Hilton’s guilty plea and clear record in regard to this rule over a 30-year involvement in the industry and also the length of time involved as a result of the thoroughness of the investigation and administration trials conducted by the University of Melbourne. The HRV RAD Board ordered that ‘Itmademyday’ be disqualified from Race 3 at Mildura on 19 June 2015, under ARHR 195, and that the placings be amended accordingly.   Additionally, the HRV RAD Board ordered all prizemoney for this race be returned under AHRR 200. Mr Hilton pleaded guilty to the additional charge under ARHR 190B in that he failed to keep and maintain a log book and was subsequently fined $250. Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards conducted an inquiry yesterday into a report received from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from PENNY SNATCHER prior to it competing in Race 3, the BGC Industrial Cleaning Supplies 3YO Pace at Globe Derby on 8 August 2016. The ‘B’ sample was confirmed by Racing Chem Centre in Western Australia. Evidence was taken from trainer Scott Garraway regarding his feeding and treatment regime and regulatory veterinarian Dr. Roger Haensel. Mr Garraway was found guilty of charges under Rules 190(1), 190(2) and 190(4) in that he presented PENNY SNATCHER to race at Globe Derby on 8 August 2016 not free of a prohibited substance.  Mr Garraway was disqualified for 3 years and ordered to pay $1500 to HRSA to cover the cost of analytical testing. In determining penalty Stewards took into account: ·        the level of Cobalt recorded (350 ug/L) ·        the short period of time Mr Garraway has held a trainers licence ·        his not guilty plea ·        the penalties applied in other Cobalt cases in SA Mr Garraway has since lodged an appeal with the Racing Appeals Tribunal and has been granted a stay of proceedings. Barbara Scott CHAIR OF STEWARDS

Stewards today questioned harness racing driver Mr K Harper (BETTORS FIRE) in relation to comments made on TAB Radio on Sunday 27th November 2016 in relation to his intentions with respect to Heat 2 of the Inter Dominion Series being run at Bunbury tomorrow.   Mr Harper explained that although his choice of words may have been misinterpreted by some listeners, all he meant by his comments were that he believed it would be very hard to beat short price favourite, HECTORJAYJAY because of the barrier draw in Tuesday night’s second heat at Bunbury. As a result of the draw it would be tactically necessary to drive BETTORS FIRE in a more conservative manner to afford it the best opportunity in the race as the horse would have been better suited if drawn more favourably.    The Stewards issued Mr Harper with a reprimand in relation to his comments that left open to question his intentions.   Mr Harper was also reminded of his obligations under the Rules, in particular that the Stewards would be expecting him to demonstrate through his actions, that he was taking all reasonable and permissible measures during the course of a race to ensure that the horse was given full opportunity to win or obtain the best possible placing in the field.    Any failure to comply with this rule would be dealt with accordingly.

In September 2016, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) commenced an investigation into communications between registered owner Mr Harvey Kaplan and licensed trainer/driver Mr Nathan Jack in the period leading up to the Goulburn meeting on 26 January 2015. During this investigation HRNSW has undertaken various investigations including interviews with relevant parties, analysis of the betting relating to the race, certain forensic imaging of mobile telephones and computers. HRNSW has been assisted by Harness Racing Victoria in this matter. On 8 November 2016,Mr Nathan Jack was issued with the following charges: Charge 1: Pursuant to Rule 240 – Improper Conduct relating to a text message received from Mr Harvey Kaplan and his reply. Charge 2: Pursuant to Rule 246 – In that he has failed to report behaviour that could have cause or is likely to cause a breach of the Rules. This charge is in the alternative to Charge 1. Mr Jack pleaded not guilty to charge 1 and guilty to charge 2. Subsequently HRNSW withdrew the charge pursuant to Rule 240. Mr Jack was fined $10,000 payable by 24 December 2016. Should the fine not be rendered by that date, Stewards ordered that Mr Jack’s license to drive in races be suspended for a period of 4 months effective immediately. REID SANDERS | CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (02) 9722 6600 •  rsanders@hrnsw.com.au

Office Of Racing Integrity Stewards have conducted an Inquiry into the results of analysis on urine samples taken from GLAMOUR ART, following its second placing in Race 11- “ The Luxbet For Those That Know Racing Pace” at the Launceston Pacing Club race meeting on 28 August 2016. Analysis of the samples indicated the presence of the Prohibited Substance DEXAMETHASONE.  Evidence was heard from representatives of Racing Analytical Services Limited and The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory, Consultant Veterinarian Dr. Peter Horridge and from trainer Dylan Ford as well as veterinary evidence on behalf of Mr Ford. Mr Ford pleaded guilty to three charges as follows.  1. AHRR 190B(1) – A Trainer shall at all times keep and maintain a log book recording all details of treatment administered to any horse in his or her care. 2. AHRR 190(1) – A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. 3. AHRR 196A(1)- A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance (ii) which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of any race. After hearing submissions on penalty and taking into account all relevant factors the following penalties were imposed.  Charge 1. A fine of $200 Charge 2. A disqualification for five months. Charge 3. A disqualification for five months. Stewards ordered that the two periods of disqualification be served concurrently, commencing immediately and expiring at midnight on 22 April 2017. Mr Ford was given until 5 p.m. on 25 November to remove from his training property any horses in his care. In accordance with AHRR 195 GLAMOUR ART was disqualified from its second placing with the race results to be amended accordingly. Mr Ford was advised of his rights of Appeal.  Adrian Crowther Chairman of Stewards (Harness) (03) 6777 1900

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Rules of Harness Racing (ARHR) 190(1) against licensed trainer Ms Sally Hardy.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:               A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under ARHR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Ms Hardy related to a post-race urine sample collected from the horse ‘Major Charlie’ after it placed 1st in Race 3, the ‘Mildura Working Man’s Club Pace’, at Mildura on 23 December 2015. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely cobalt, at a level of 307 mcg/L in urine, above the allowable threshold (at the time) of 200 mcg/L in urine. The HRV RAD board considered the statements of Investigative Steward Mr Stephen Svanosio, RASL representative Mr Paul Zahra, veterinary consultant Dr Stuart Paine and scientific consultant Dr John Vine.   Ms Hardy pleaded guilty to the charge, before the HRV RAD Board heard submissions on penalty from the HRV Stewards and Ms Hardy. In deciding an appropriate penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered Ms Hardy’s 16-year involvement in the industry, her good record over this period of time, the circumstances surrounding Ms Hardy taking over the training duties of ‘Major Charlie’ two days prior to the above mentioned race, both specific and general deterrence, consistency of penalty and Ms Hardy’s guilty plea. In considering all of these matters, the HRV RAD Board imposed a 12-month disqualification upon Ms Hardy. The RAD Board ordered the disqualification commence with immediate effect.   The HRV RAD Board also ordered that ‘Major Charlie’ be disqualified from Race 3 at Mildura on 23 December 2015 and that any prizemoney be refunded.   Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

TRANSCRIPT OF PROCEEDINGS RACING AND DISCIPLINARY BOARD ANTHONY BURNS, Chairman ROD OSBORNE  ROBERT ABRAHAMS EXTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS PETER MUIR DECISION THURSDAY 24 NOVEMBER 2016 Mr R ANDERSON appeared on behalf of the HRV Stewards MR MUIR failed to appear Hearing commenced in the absence of Mr Muir and adjourned to a date to be fixed until such time as Mr Muir appears before this Board. The Interim Order of this Board, given the seriousness of the allegations and the implications for the integrity of the Harness Racing industry, is that Mr Muir is disqualified from participation in the industry until such time as he appears before this Board in relation to the charges issued by HRV Stewards.

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission (QRIC) Stewards today concluded an inquiry into the driving tactics adopted by Mathew Neilson on Big Abraxas in Race 8 at Albion Park on Tuesday, 25 October 2016. After taking initial evidence Stewards adjourned the inquiry in order to review previous performances of Big Abraxas and investigate wagering on the event. On resumption and after considering further evidence including phone records, Stewards did not accept the explanation for the manner in which Mr Neilson drove Big Abraxas over the final 200 metres in that event. Stewards were of the opinion that Mr Neilson’s actions were conscious and deliberate which did not allow Big Abraxas to race on its merits. In forming this opinion Stewards were critical of Mr Neilson’s decision not to direct Big Abraxas into the sprint lane when he had full opportunity to do so and which was in direct contrast to its recent starts. Mr Neilson’s distinct lack of vigour, the positioning of his hands at his chest and the obvious tight rein which he had on Big Abraxas was not indicative of a driver contesting a finish, nor was it consistent with his recent drives on Big Abraxas. Stewards issued charges against Mr Neilson pursuant to the Australian Harness Racing rules as follows: Charge 1 147.(1) “A driver shall race a horse on its merits.” 147. (2) “Action or non action by a driver during the course of a race which prevents or impedes the horse driven by that driver from racing on its merits shall be sufficient to establish non compliance with sub rule (10).” The particulars of the charge being, that Mr Neilson, as the driver of Big Abraxas in Race 8 at Albion Park on Tuesday, 25 October 2016, when trailing Leighmont approaching the final turn and afforded first use of the sprint lane, failed to take the run when full opportunity to do so was available and which would have allowed Big Abraxas a clear and uninterrupted run to the finish. Further, from the top of the home straight Big Abraxas was held on a tight rein which is in contrast to its recent racing pattern and his direct actions failed to allow Big Abraxas to race on its merits. Charge 2 149.(1) “A driver shall take all reasonable and permissible measures during the course of a race to ensure that the horse driven by that driver is given full opportunity to win or obtain the best possible placing in the field.” The particulars of the charge being, that Mr Neilson, as the driver of Big Abraxas in Race 8 at Albion Park on Tuesday, 25 October 2016, when trailing Leighmont approaching the final turn and afforded first use of the sprint lane, failed to take the run when it was reasonable and permissible to do so and when full opportunity was presented which would have allowed Big Abraxas a clear and uninterrupted run to the finish. Further, from the top of the home straight Big Abraxas was held on a tight rein which is in contrast to its recent racing pattern when it was reasonable and permissible to drive the horse out in the run to the finish. Mr Neilson pleaded not guilty to charge 1 and charge 2. After due consideration Stewards were of the view that both charges could be sustained and formally found Mr Neilson guilty. When assessing the matter of penalty Stewards were mindful of the following: The serious nature of the charges Mr Neilson’s licence history and his personal and financial situation The particular circumstances of the case The need for the penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate the paramount importance of the integrity of Harness Racing Penalty precedents After consideration Stewards imposed the following penalties: Charge 1 – Disqualification for a period of 12 months effective immediately Charge 2 – Suspension of licence for a period of 6 months In accordance with AHR Rule 150(3), Stewards directed that the penalty imposed under Rule 149(1) be suspended pending the decision on any subsequent appeal or right of review. Stewards’ Report – Mathew Neilson Date – 25 October 2016 Panel – P Zimmermann, N Torpey, M Ross

A local harness racing trainer who was caught on camera injecting a horse with performance-enhancing drugs in 2010 pleaded guilty to fraud and attempted fraud over $5,000 in Superior Court Monday. According to an agreed statement of facts read in court, Chris Haskell, 39, was filmed using a syringe to give horse He’soneinamillion a tracheal and “intramuscular” injection during an OPP horse doping investigation in October 2010. The drugs were administered in the “backstretch of stalls” which had high walls to hide the illegal injections and were given hours before a race. Racegoers bet a total of $26,669 on the event where Haskell’s horse ended up finishing out of the money in ninth. Crown attorney Brian Manarin noted that tracheal injections are only used by veterinarians in urgent situations. “This was not considered an emergency,” he said. On Nov. 7, 2010, Haskell was arrested at the now shut Windsor Raceway. A search of his person revealed six “loaded syringes” full of performance-enhancing drugs which police alleged he intended to use to give his horses Enzo Seelster and Ideal Gift a boost. Bettors laid down a total of $17,722 and $24,743, respectively, in each race, but after the syringes were discovered Haskell’s horses were kept from competing. The Windsor trainer was arrested during the OPP investigation that also netted Derek Riesberry, another area trainer whose precedent-setting case marked the first time in Canada horse doping was prosecuted criminally. That case went all the way to the Supreme Court. Haskell’s case was delayed while Riesberry’s charges worked their way through the legal system, but on Monday both the Crown and defence stated Haskell should face the same fines as Riesberry — a $2,500 fine for the fraud (injecting a horse) and $1,250 for attempted fraud (being caught with drug-filled syringes). Superior Court Justice Steven Rogin agreed with the lawyers’ joint submission and said the trainer has one year to pay. Haskell’s defence lawyer, Andrew Bradie, said his client has been unable to train racehorses while waiting for his case to be concluded. Instead, the single man who has one child has been working part time with young horses. Outside of the courtroom, Haskell, who appeared in court wearing a suit with a purple shirt and patterned tie, declined to comment on his plea. by Dan Taekema Reprinted with permission of The Windsor Star

New Zealand Racing Board (NZRB) has announced a Net Profit before Distributions result of $146.7 million for the year ending 31 July 2016, and the commencement of a new, independent inquiry for greyhound racing in New Zealand at its Annual General Meeting today. "NZRB has continued to increase its support of racing and sports in New Zealand, distributing $136.7 million to the three racing Codes, making commission payments of $8.0 million to National Sporting Organisations, and applying a further $11.7 million to the racing industry and $3.0 million to grassroots sports from gaming," says NZRB Chief Executive Officer, John Allen. "Our initial distributions to the racing Codes of $135.3 million was boosted by a further $1.4 million which was approved by the Board in September from Net Profit after Distributions, demonstrating our commitment to the wider industry. "Removing the impact of gains on sale of our Petone building in 2014/15, and our Christchurch property in 2015/16, our Net Profit before distributions has increased year-on-year by $5.6 million, or 4.1%. Betting Net Profit was $137.3 million, consistent with prior year, while Gaming Net Profit increased by 20.1% to $15.1 million." says Allen. "We have also increased both turnover and revenue, with total turnover of $2.7 billion 11.9% up on 2014/15, and total revenue up 4.6% to $351.9 million. "Our focus on our customers has seen nearly 181,000 account customers placing a bet over the past year, up 9.6%, with our digital channels continuing to grow in popularity and accounting for 55.9% of betting activity and our TAB Mobile App up 214.4% on last year." says Allen. "Economic analysis has shown that the New Zealand racing industry is not self-sufficient and is dependant on international racing income to sustain it. This is simply not a tenable position and we are working to help build a long-term sustainable future for racing in New Zealand. "Since taking up the reins in March 2015, I have focussed on assembling my leadership team with the right skills and experience to ensure NZRB has the foundations and capability to return the industry to a state where it can grow and prosper." says Allen. "We have identified a number of strategic initiatives to achieve this, and have made good progress this year towards their achievement. These initiatives will improve long-term profitability by an estimated $50-55 million in annualised net profit per year once fully delivered, by improving our competitiveness, growing our customer base and lowering our cost base. "We are putting the customer at the centre of our actions, focussing our investment in fit for purpose systems and infrastructure where it will provide the greatest long-term benefit," says Allen. Other key focuses for the racing industry over the next period will be animal welfare, infrastructure, youth development and stakes money. "We are working on a series of pilot enhancement funds to help support and grow the industry by tactically boosting stakes to attract higher quality racing, investing in key infrastructure and helping build the next generation of racing by encouraging and incentivising the development of career paths into and through the industry," says Allen.   The 2016 Annual Report, which can be found here.   Kate Gourdie Manager, Media and Corporate Communications New Zealand Racing Board m +64 21 994151 e Kate.Gourdie@nzrb.co.nz w www.nzracingboard.co.nz Level 1, 60 Stanley Street, Auckland, PO Box 37649, Parnell, Auckland 1151

Harness Racing Victoria Steward wraps for the 14 November 2016. Pending RAD Board Hearing – Ian Dornauf HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Ian Dornauf under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Royal Deviate was presented to race at Echuca on 1 January 2016 by Mr Dornauf when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Pending RAD Board Hearing – Kerry O'Riley HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Kerry O’Riley under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Royal Delight was presented to trial at Melton on 10 May 2016 by Mr O’Riley when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. Note: Australian Harness Racing Rules definition of ‘Race’- means a race or official trial or official time trial or event in which harness horses race or participate. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Pending RAD Board Hearing – Paul Rousch HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Paul Rousch under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Thelongroadnorth was presented to race at Terang on 5 January 2016 by Mr Rousch when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Others VIC - Craig Demmler VCAT Review - Adjournment The review application of licensed trainer Mr Craig Demmler against the Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board decision of 22 March 2016 was scheduled to be heard by the VCAT in the week commencing 28 November 2016. As a result of the legal representative for Mr Demmler not meeting the timetable for the exchange of material, the VCAT have set a new timetable and adjourned the hearing date.  The matter is now scheduled to be heard by the VCAT over the 5 days commencing 20 February 2017.   The VCAT have previously granted a stay of proceedings (regarding the application of the penalty imposed by the RAD Board) to Mr Demmler until such time as the matter is heard and determined by the VCAT. The RAD Board decision which is the subject of Mr Demmler’s review application can be viewed here. Daniel Neagoe VCAT Review – Hearing Date The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) have advised Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) that the review application of formerly licensed NSW trainer Mr Daniel Neagoe against the HRV RAD Board decision of 22 July 2016 will be heard by the VCAT from 7-10 February 2017.  The RAD Board decision which is the subject of Mr Neagoe’s review application can be viewed here.   The owner of the horse ‘Hot Shot Woman’ at the relevant time has also applied for a review by VCAT of the RAD Board decision to disqualify the horse from Race 5 at Melton on 30 August 2015.  Mr Neagoe has not applied for a stay of proceedings and therefore remains disqualified in the interim. Harness Racing Victoria

02 November 2016 - Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued charges against Mr Peter Muir under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 241, 243 and 187(2) in relation to the purchase of an unnamed (at the time) filly. It is alleged that Mr Muir entered into an agreement to act as a ‘buyer’s agent’ in the process of this transaction, however failed to act on that agreement when provided with the funds to complete the sale. It is further alleged that Mr Muir retained those funds for a period of time after the sale had fallen through and subsequently provided false evidence to the HRV Stewards when questioned about the location of the money. These charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria  

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) RAD Board yesterday heard a matter relating to charges issued under the Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) against licensed trainer/driver Mr Nathan Jack. Nathan Jack was charged with 37 breaches under the provisions of AHRR 230 and one breach each under the provisions of AHRR 245 and AHRR 246. All these charges emanated from communication with disqualified person Jackson Painting between January 2015 and October 2016.     Mr Jack pleaded guilty to all these charges and after taking into consideration his early plea of guilt, personal circumstances, offence record and specific and general deterrence, Mr Jack was fined $6000 of which $3000 is suspended for a period of 12 months. Mr Jack also received a further 3 months suspension, fully suspended for the next 12 months, a penalty to be activated if Mr Jack were to breach rules 230, 245 or 246 of the AHRR in the next 12 months. Mr Jack also pleaded guilty to one charge under AHRR 231 (2) and three charges under AHRR 247. All these charges emanated from a Bendigo Stewards inquiry on 11 August, 2016, after the late scratching of the horse Shared Interest which Mr Jack was engaged to drive. Mr Jack was charged for making inappropriate comments towards starter Graeme Morgan after the horse was a late scratching and in relation to behaving in an improper and intimidatory manner at the Stewards Inquiry that evening.              Mr Jack pleaded guilty to all 4 charges and he was fined $1000. Mr Jack also received a further 3 month suspension, fully suspended for the next 12 months, a penalty to be  activated if he were to breach any rules under 231 (2) and 247 of the AHRR in that time.       Harness Racing Victoria 

Harness Racing Victoria Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Ms Emma Stewart under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Berisari was presented to race at Melton on 26 June 2015 by Ms Stewart when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. A log book charge was also issued against Ms Stewart. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Stewards issue charge against Des Hilton HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Des Hilton under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Itmademyday was presented to race at Mildura on 19 June 2015 by Mr Hilton when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. A log book charge was also issued against Mr Hilton. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

A harness racing trainer with links to underworld figures is at the centre of an Environment Protection Authority investigation into the use of crushed glass on trotting tracks across Victoria. Industry sources say as many as 70 tracks have been covered using the recycled glass as fill material, and questioned the length of the EPA investigation, which has dragged on for more than a year without any findings about whether the glass is a pollutant. The EPA is still investigating whether the industrial waste is safe for use but has warned that landowners could be ordered to remove it, as they are ultimately responsible for knowing what is on their properties. In other states, recycled glass has been found to be a likely cause of soil and air pollution, and stormwater contamination. Racing officials say the product has been deemed safe for horses. Ahmed Taiba, a Sunbury-based trainer who had ties to Tony Mokbel's empire before the drug kingpin was jailed and is also an associate of controversial horse owner and gambler Paul Sequenzia, has supplied the product. Leading trainer David Miles, who swears by the crushed glass, said $300 bought a load that lightly covered a small track. Using the glass, which is a light grey and visibly different from any other material commonly used by trainers, gave his track extra bounce, and made it less susceptible to hardening. He said that because the product was significantly cheaper and more effective than normal trotting track fill it had become wildly popular, despite the EPA not having cleared it for use. It is understood Mr Taiba sources the product from Glass Recovery Services, which is based in Coolaroo. Last year, the EPA found that glass waste at the Glass Recovery Services plant in Penrith, Sydney, was probably contaminating the soil, stormwater, and air, as it was being kept outside without a cover and there was no containment to prevent run-off. The authority ordered that 90 per cent of the waste be removed and that buildings be improved to prevent contamination. While the glass being used on trotting tracks is kept in similar conditions to the material in Penrith, significantly less of the product is needed to coat a track, and it is believed the glass is generally of a higher quality than that found at the plant. But Mr Miles said the glass smelt like a rubbish bin, and the stench remained until the track was watered. The EPA noted a similar smell at the Penrith plant. Mr Taiba and his brothers, Hass and Freddy, are successful long-term harness racing trainers and drivers. Freddy trained Sushi Sushi, Mr Sequenzia's most successful trotter, until 2012. The horse netted $1.1 million in prize money and was once dubbed the Black Caviar of harness racing. Ahmed drove Em Maguane, a horse part-owned by Mr Sequenzia which later tested positive for the performance-enhancing stimulant EPO, in 2007. Ahmed and Hass have both been sanctioned for gambling on harness races. Mr Sequenzia, the brother-in-law of slain gangland figure Mark Moran, also has strong ties to the Mokbel clan, including Tony's brother Horty. Ahmed Taiba declined to comment. The EPA would not comment on what had prolonged the investigation, or whether Mr Taiba, and trainers who used the product, could face charges. Damien Wells, EPA executive director of regional services, confirmed that 15 properties had been inspected. "EPA is currently assessing whether the material being deposited at harness racing properties can be safely used for this purpose. "Landowners should not accept waste if they don't know where it's from or what's in it. It's also important for them to find out from their local council if a planning permit is required for activities on their land." Harness Racing Victoria's general manager of integrity, Andy Rogers, said the product had been deemed safe for horses by the RSPCA, but that trainers should remain vigilant about the waste being deposited on their properties. "It is noted that the EPA investigation relates to the distribution and use of the waste material, rather than any concerns from an equine welfare perspective and that the RSPCA is not currently continuing an active involvement in the investigation," he said. A spokesman for Glass Recovery Services declined to comment. Written by Nino Bucci To read the full article from The Sydney Morning Herald click here.

Columbus, OH--- According to an article in Newsday published on Friday (Oct. 28), former leading harness racing owner/breeder David Brooks, died in federal prison on Thursday (Oct. 27) in Danbury, Conn. of undisclosed causes. Brooks, 61, was the former executive of DHB Industries Inc. and was in the midst of serving a 17-year sentence after he was convicted in 2010 on a 17-count indictment that included conspiracy; securities, wire and mail fraud; insider trading; and obstruction of justice. Operating as Perfect World Enterprises and Bulletproof Enterprises, Brooks and his brother Jeffrey owned more than 800 horses when he was convicted, including 2004 Little Brown Jug winner Timesareachanging. The prison where Brooks was recently transferred is expected to issue a detailed report regarding the circumstances of his death in the near future. To access the full article please click here. For an article that appeared in The Atlantic shortly before his conviction, please click here. USTA Communications Department 

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