Search Results
1 to 16 of 152
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

The second $20,000 leg of the Horse & Groom trotting series drew a dozen entries and went as the first and third races on the Friday night card. Bambino Glide took the opener in wire to wire fashion for Andy Miller to kick off the card on a pleasant spring evening, reducing his career record to 1:52.2 in the process. Miller sent the favored Bambino Glide to the top and set even fractions with second choice Hldontghttoyurdrms pocketed throughout in the abbreviated field. In the stretch Bambino Glide sprinted away from that rival under his own power to a two and a quarter length decision. Crosby's Clam Bake may have secured a final berth with his third place finish after being a judges scratch from the first leg. Julie Miller is the trainer and Kapiledo Singh and Shakoor's Racing Stable share ownership of the winner is will look for the series sweep as the likely favorite in next Saturday's $60,600 final. The second division saw Banker Volo prevail over Amigo Ranger in a photo. Amigo Ranger was a leg one winner in first over fashion and new driver Jimmy Morrill seized the opportunity afforded by the short field to steal easy fractions on the lead, aided by Ashes Cash and Explosive Action both going off stride before the half. Banker Volo sat the pocket throughout and tipped out head stretch for Marcus Miller to engage the leader. It took the length of the stretch, but Banker Volo did get his nose on the wire first in 1:55.2. Amigo Ranger was gallant in defeat and March Awareness rewarded the hunch players with the show dough. Erv Miller trains the talented Yankee Glide five year old for Mystical Marker Farms, Peggy Hood and Paymaq Racing. A series of upsets on the second-half of the card, included a 24-1 Team Orange Crush shocker in the 7th with Bambino Hall, ignited a massive Late Pick 4 payout of $14,209.80 from the pool of $66,901, yielding just four winning tickets. This marked the fourth time on the meet where the Late Pick 4 returned over $10,000 for the pool that has returned an average payout of over $8,000 so far in 2014. The Late Pick 4 returns Saturday with its customary $50,000 guaranteed pool. Featured on the Saturday program is the Final of The Winter Survivor Series and the second round of the Clyde Hirt. Post time is 7:15 P.M. by Darin Zoccali, for the Meadowlands

The parents of a harness-racing driver, Anthony Coletta, who was severely injured in a crash at Harrah's Philadelphia Race Track in Chester last year, has sued the track and its owners, Harrah's and its parent company Caesars Entertainment Corp. Anthony Coletta, of Hammonton, N.J., suffered what lawyers claim is traumatic and irrevocable brain damage in the terrifying high-speed crash on the rac track Nov. 17, 2013. Video of the wreck showed Coletta thrown high into the air after his sulky collided into another sulky and horse. Coletta suffered "horrific and catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached for comment, but told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where the horse Coletta was driving, had raced into Marcus Miller's horse, , Rocknmyjeans' who had fallen ahead of Colletta's horse," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages by Steve Wolf with files from the Association Press   d catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached by Philly.com for comment, but he told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where [the horse Coletta was riding] 'rocknmyjeans' fell," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Harness-race_driver_sues_Harrahs_Philadelphia_for_horrific_race_track_crash.html#y31WixTZ77oVcsIR.99 he parents of a harness-racing driver severely injured in a crash at Harrah's Philadelphia Race Track in Chester last year has sued the track and its owners, Harrah's and its parent company Caesars Entertainment Corp. Anthony Coletta, of Hammonton, N.J., suffered what lawyers claim is traumatic and irrevocable brain damage in the terrifying high-speed crash on the track Nov. 17, 2013. Video of the wreck showed Coletta thrown high into the air after his sulky — the vehicle attached by harness to the race horse — collided with another sulky and horse. Coletta suffered "horrific and catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached by Philly.com for comment, but he told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where [the horse Coletta was riding] 'rocknmyjeans' fell," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Harness-race_driver_sues_Harrahs_Philadelphia_for_horrific_race_track_crash.html#y31WixTZ77oVcsIR.99 he parents of a harness-racing driver severely injured in a crash at Harrah's Philadelphia Race Track in Chester last year has sued the track and its owners, Harrah's and its parent company Caesars Entertainment Corp. Anthony Coletta, of Hammonton, N.J., suffered what lawyers claim is traumatic and irrevocable brain damage in the terrifying high-speed crash on the track Nov. 17, 2013. Video of the wreck showed Coletta thrown high into the air after his sulky — the vehicle attached by harness to the race horse — collided with another sulky and horse. Coletta suffered "horrific and catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached by Philly.com for comment, but he told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where [the horse Coletta was riding] 'rocknmyjeans' fell," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Harness-race_driver_sues_Harrahs_Philadelphia_for_horrific_race_track_crash.html#y31WixTZ77oVcsIR.99 he parents of a harness-racing driver severely injured in a crash at Harrah's Philadelphia Race Track in Chester last year has sued the track and its owners, Harrah's and its parent company Caesars Entertainment Corp. Anthony Coletta, of Hammonton, N.J., suffered what lawyers claim is traumatic and irrevocable brain damage in the terrifying high-speed crash on the track Nov. 17, 2013. Video of the wreck showed Coletta thrown high into the air after his sulky — the vehicle attached by harness to the race horse — collided with another sulky and horse. Coletta suffered "horrific and catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached by Philly.com for comment, but he told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where [the horse Coletta was riding] 'rocknmyjeans' fell," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Harness-race_driver_sues_Harrahs_Philadelphia_for_horrific_race_track_crash.html#y31WixTZ77oVcsIR.99 he parents of a harness-racing driver severely injured in a crash at Harrah's Philadelphia Race Track in Chester last year has sued the track and its owners, Harrah's and its parent company Caesars Entertainment Corp. Anthony Coletta, of Hammonton, N.J., suffered what lawyers claim is traumatic and irrevocable brain damage in the terrifying high-speed crash on the track Nov. 17, 2013. Video of the wreck showed Coletta thrown high into the air after his sulky — the vehicle attached by harness to the race horse — collided with another sulky and horse. Coletta suffered "horrific and catastrophic" injuries, including what the lawsuit described as "profound abnormalities indictative of severe and permanent brain damage," in a crash his family's lawyer contends was preventable. "The defendants, including track owners Caesars/Harrah’s turned a blind eye when it came to track maintenance and they permitted an unreasonably dangerous condition to exist at the exact location where the chain-reaction accident began," Philadelphia attorney Michael Barrett said in a statement Monday. "Anthony Coletta would now be preparing for the spring racing card — not fighting to regain some semblance of a normal life — had it not been for the track’s utter disregard for safety and human life." Coletta is currently at Kessler Rehabilitation Center in New Jersey. A lawyer for Harrah's could not be reached by Philly.com for comment, but he told the Associated Press he had not seen the lawsuit and would not immediately comment. The lawsuit claims that the track's condition, particularly at locations of the first and third turns, had deteriorated over time and went unfixed. "Numerous disturbing accounts have surfaced regarding years of Harrah's Philadelphia and Caesars turning a blind eye to track maintenance, despite reports to management of an unreasonably dangerous condition at the exact location where [the horse Coletta was riding] 'rocknmyjeans' fell," the suit claims. Coletta's parents seek in excess of $50,000 in damages Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Harness-race_driver_sues_Harrahs_Philadelphia_for_horrific_race_track_crash.html#y31WixTZ77oVcsIR.99

Harness racing driver Joe Bongiorno was taken off two drives at the Meadowlands Racetrack Saturday evening because in a pre-race interview he said “I will not be pushing my horses because the owners said not to try too hard, they are in a series next week.” The two horses in question that Bongiorno spoke about and was replaced on were Shoobee's Place in the sixth race and Code Word in the eighth race. “The decision to replace Joe Bongiorno on those two horses was done by the judges,” said John Tomasello, presiding judge at the Meadowlands. “It was done because of the interview he gave before the races and in the best interests of the betting public. “He was only taken off the two horses he talked about,” Tomasello explained, “Those two horses he indicated would get “easy trips” and we understand about racing and how racing lays out. However we expect horses to be raced to win and we don’t want to hear that they are in a series next week. We are concerned about the races here tonight. That was the reason we made the driver changes tonight. We want to see every horse here tonight given the best chance to win.” When asked if there will be a further investigation into this situation, Tomasello said “possibly.” In the sixth race, Shoobee’s Place was driven by Marcus Miller and finished fourth in a photo at odds of 4-1. Code Word was driven by Steve Smith in the eighth race and was never a factor, finishing eighth at odds of 6-1. Bongiorno, 21, of Colts Neck, NJ, has been driving professionally for less than five years. He currently has 407 career victories and $2.9 million in purses earned by the horses he has driven. In 2011 he was voted the national Amateur Driver of the Year by the United States Harness Writers Association. Bongiorno could not be reached for comment. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink.com

East Rutherford, NJ: Beginning on Saturday, March 22 The Meadowlands will host a six week tournament for drivers that pits the sport's established stars against the emerging new talent.   Each Saturday night through April 19 (five legs) a point tally determined by each driver's order of finish will be kept over the course of the entire race card and the top point earner for each of those two groups will be awarded $2,000 for their efforts.   The tournament will conclude on April 26 with a final in which the top point earners over the course of the five preliminary legs will compete in a series of races on the card. The winner of the final will be awarded $15,000, second place is worth $5,000, third $3,000 and all other finalists will receive $1,000. This event is jointly sponsored by Jeff Gural and The Meadowlands with no effect on the purse account.   "During the Levy Series at Yonkers I thought this would be an opportunity to reward those drivers who remain loyal to the Meadowlands and at the same time create an opportunity for the younger drivers to earn some extra money," said Meadowlands Chairman Jeff Gural. "With increased competition for the handle looming we feel the need to generate promotions that will hold the interest of our customers.   "I think this is also a great chance for out of town drivers to show off their skills at the sport's most competitive racetrack during a time when there will be increased opportunity for them to get drives. We welcome those young drivers that would like to try their luck at The Meadowlands."   There will be no specifically dedicated races for this contest. All drivers will be competing for their own interests, there is no team element other than to determine the top point earners for the purpose of awarding the prizes.   The contest will consist of all races on each of the Saturday programs and the process will remain as it normally is so far as entering horses and driver selections. The trainers will enter their horses listing the driver of their choice. The drivers will make their choices with the judges by scratch time and trainers will be required to call the judges and react to those choices, then name whomever they wish if their first choice has gone elsewhere. The "Legends" will be comprised of Yannick Gingras, David Miller, Corey Callahan, Tim Tetrick, Andy Miller and John Campbell (who expects to return to the sulky on March 28).   The "Phenoms" will include Scott Zeron, Andy Mc Carthy, Joe Bongiorno, Marcus Miller, Jimmy Marohn, Jr, and Tyler Smith among others.   Any drivers not listed above who race at The Meadowlands on the tournament Saturdays will compete as members of the "Phenoms" and are eligible for any prize awarded to that group.   The drivers named above and any others will compete of their own volition, as their personal schedule allows. They may compete in as many or as few of the preliminary legs as they choose.   Contact Nick Salvi at (607) 972-5500 with inquiries.      

YONKERS, NY, Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - Yonkers Raceway's stakes season continued Tuesday night, with the opening round of the Sagamore Hill Pacing Series. The annual tribute to Teddy Roosevelt, for 3- and 4-year-old gentlemen who are/were non-winners of four races and/or $40,000 through last Dec. 1, offered up eight, $12,500 divisions. Turns out that the last division (Touchdown Mindale) was also the swiftest (1:53.3), with the entire list of winners as such... --Artist Night,g,4 (by American Ideal); co-owners (as Burke Racing) trainer Ron Burke,Weaver Bruscemi,Howard Taylor/driver George Brennan; 1:54/$3.20; --Sir Michigan Z Tam,g,4 (by Somebeachsomewhere); co-owners (trainer/driver) Pat Lachance,M&M Harness Racing,Ira Rosenblum; 1:55.4/$4.10; --Rocks N Bonds,g,4 (by Rocknroll Hanover); owner Kostas Tsanakos/trainer Ivan Llopez/driver Eric Abbatiello; 1:55.1/$4.60; --A Stitch in Time,g,4 (by Kent's on Nuke); owner A Piece of the Action/trainer Lou Pena/driver Brian Sears; 1:54.1/$2.10; --I Dream a Dream,g,4 (by Western Ideal); co-owners Lomangino Standardbreds,Leo Lomangino/trainer-driver Lachance; (life-best) 1:54/$18.60; --Ashley's Husband,g,4 (by Henry Clay); owner W J Donovan/trainer Kyle Spagnola/driver Jordan Derue; 1:56.1/$2.50; --K-Lee's Shakenbake,g,4 (by Raycer Thad); co-owners Martin Scharf,David Linker/trainer Darren Cassar/driver Ron Pierce; 1:54.4/$3; --Touchdown Mindale,g,4 (by Always A Virgin); co-owners Erv Miller Stb,Harvey Eisman,Leland & Owen Mathias/trainer Nick Surick/driver Marcus Miller; 1:53.3/$22.40. The Raceway's five-night-per-week live schedule continues, with first post every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:10 PM. Evening simulcasting accompanies all live programs, with afternoon simulcasting available daily. by Frank Drucker, for Yonkers Raceway  

Perfect Alliance completed her sweep of the Charles Singer Memorial with dominant 1:52.2 stakes record performance in the $53,200 final for Andy Miller. Sent away as the overwhelming 1/5 betting choice, Perfect Alliance followed Time To Quit around the first turn before brushing to the top before the 55- half. Ray Hall ranged up first over for Tetrick and pressed the leader toward the 1:24- three quarters before Perfect Alliance kicked it into another gear and drew out to an open length win under minimal urging in the record mile. Longshot Little Bitty Lies rallied late for Marcus Miller to take the place and Time To Quit stuck around for third. The winner is trained by Julie Miller for owners Meadowlands Racing Entertainment Chairman Jeff Gural (racing under Little E, LLC), General Manager & CEO Jason Settlemoir, Dave Stolz and Art Geiger. Julie Miller was beaming with pride in the winners circle. "She was unbelievable tonight," said Miller. "I couldn't be more excited. She had a great week, was training great all week and she raced great tonight." Miller confirmed the Bobby Weiss will be next on her mare's agenda. National Debt continued the parade of unbeaten prospects when he captured the $60,500 Buddy Gilmour pacing series final in Saturday's eleventh race. Driver Tim Tetrick protected the eventual winner's position from the rail, allowing second choice Capital Account a short lead before retaking before the 55.2 half. The winner faced token pressure through the 27.4 third panel with Gingras waiting in the pocket with Capital Account for the homestretch to unleash his colt from the pocket. National Debt had the answer when asked by Tetrick, sprinting home in 27.2 for the 1:50.3 win. Capital Account was a well meant second and Dinner At The Met third. Tetrick was pleased with his colt once again. "A 1:50 mile in March is pretty big," said Tetrick. "He got a little lazy on the lead and he has some things to learn, but the talent is there. Now we just have to see if he can pace in 1:47." National Debt is now six for six in his career and doubled his lifetime earnings with the Gilmour win for owners Kelly Hoerdt, Ema & Blair Corbell and their new partner J & T Silva Stables. Ron Coyne, Jr has been deputized by Hoerdt to tend to his prize pupil while stateside and his work thus far has been impeccable. Total handle for the Saturday program was $3,426,720, which included slight on-track gains. Racing returns Thursday, with a 10-race program and post time at 7:15 P.M. Darin Zoccali    

On what was another difficult evening weather-wise with the wind blowing a gale throughout, The Meadowlands Saturday night card provided excitement, opportunity and value. The excitement was provided by Easy Again who won the $30,000 Free For All feature by leading all the way in 1:51.1. Sent out hard from the outside post six after a pair of scratches by Yannick Gingras, Easy Again got to the opening quarter in 27.4 and decided to duplicate those fractions for each quarter thereafter, including ripping home in 27.4 into the teeth of a fierce wind. Trained by Ron Burke for Burke Racing, Weaver Bruscemi and Panhellenic Stable who bought the Dragon Again horse for $100,000 at Harrisburg. Easy Again has always been a high speed horse but plagued by issues throughout his career. He certainly looks poised to be a force on the east coast this summer. So far as opportunity and value, the nightly Pick 5 got the ball rolling with a payoff of $5,076, the early Pick 4 returned $1,341 and the late Pick 4 a whopping $23,854 (all $1 increments). Panesthetic and Dave Miller made it back to back impressive wins, making a double jump in class, but going wire to wire again, winning the $16,000 B-1 Pace in 1:52.2 for trainer Andrew Harris. Panesthetic is owned by Arlene Shaw, Alice Bonenfant and P. Shaw. In addition, Dinner At The Met will head into Saturday's Buddy Gilmour Pacing Series a perfect three for three following his 1:54.3 romp in the nightcap, a non-winners of two pacing event. The three year old son of Metropolitan is trained by Erv Miller, who co-owns the gelding with Bert Hochsurung and has been guided to victory in all three of his starts by Marcus Miller. Despite the snow and extreme winds, it was another $3 Million night in East Rutherford, New Jersey as total handle checked in at $3,064,833. Racing returns Thursday, for the first round of the Charles Singer Memorial Trotting Series with post time at 7:15 P.M. That program is the identical program from February 13th that was forced to cancel due to a winter storm. That entire 10-race program has been carried over to this coming Thursday. Darin Zoccali  

The handle at The Meadowlands for the meet starting around Thanksgiving has been very good – if you don’t believe me, ask The Meadowlands, and they’ll tell you. (I mean that statement as a compliment, for it is one of the most basic tenets in The Publicist’s Handbook, which my editor and I devoured as pups under Marv Bachrad and Bruce Stearns – when things are going well, publicize them everywhere. In fact, if Tom Aldrich is reading this, he’s probably recalling with a smile when his track, Northfield Park, used these tactics during a Golden Period in 1987-89.) There have been several reasons given and hypothesized about this mutuel gain – catering to “whales,” the New Meadowlands/physical renaissance, extra effort in distribution of signal, and so forth. But there is one basic area which is of primary concern to the majority of handicappers/fans – What kind of value am I getting on my bets? Is the diet of favorites too steady for my taste? What is the average win price so far in the meet? These are the questions we are going to address in this article. The percentage of winning favorites at North American hippodromes comes in slightly over 40%. The percentage at tracks such as The Meadowlands which regularly start big fields is just below that. Racetrack managements like the percentage of favorites down as far as possible, with the concomitant rise in average win price, as their logic is that fans want to make some money, and they view “making money’s” major outlet as higher-priced payoffs, as commonly measured by the consistent index of win price. On the first five cards at The Meadowlands, favorites came in at 41.5%, with 27 chalkies out of 65; the next seven programs saw an increase of only three winning chalks in 26 additional contests, 30 for 91, for a period percentage of 33.0% and a meet figure of 36.5%. Then this past week, the first three-card week at the Jersey oval, favorites went 19-39 (48.7%), the meet figure rising to 39.0%. The results of all three periods can be explained. The first five cards featured a single card on opening Saturday; the next week saw the TVG FFA Finals and the freshman Final Four on Saturday, November 30, classy horses producing a logical result – the first night of 7 successful chalks. The last of the five cards saw favorites going 7-13, too (though something else happened that night of huge significance, as we shall see shortly.) The meet “settled down” after this start, with more horses available as tracks went on winter hiatus, whether short or long, and there were many high-class, competitive fields, where one horse was not as likely to stand out. With the Jersey track going to three nights this past week (January 9-11) comes more of a reliance on some of the lower-level horses, claimers, and the start of the late-closers, with certainly the latter two generating a lot of predictable winners. The first Thursday card saw nine of 13 races with morning line favorites at 2-1 or less; the classier two cards of the weekend had only five such morning liners between them. Thus it was no surprise that two more 7-win nights for favorites resulted last week (Thursday and Saturday) – the first ones since that Card 5 on December 7. Favorite percentage being up usually results in the win price being in the $10 or less average range. But a very important piece of The Meadowlands betting jigsaw that despite the 39% favorite rate, the average win price is $14.82 – well above the norm, and the envy of many racing emporiums. How can this be accounted for? Well, remember when we pointed out above that one unusual thing happened on December 7, Card 5, among all the winning chalk that night? That key unusual occurrence came after race 7, as Marcus Miller paraded Bolder, who had rallied from last at the half to win, back to the winners circle – over his shoulder, the tote board lit up with the official prices, and “$187.00” came up in the win position. And après Bolder, la deluge. (After Bolder, the downpour or flood, to translate from the French.) No fewer than thirteen horses have paid $50 or more to win at The Meadowlands in the first 15 cards of the season! Bolder’s mutuel, the first big one, has held up as the highest, but here are the other numbers behind them: $183.40 (just this past Friday night), $87.60, $84.40, $82.00, $80.20, $67.40, $56.20, $51.40, $51.20 three times (including twice on December 20), and $50.00. That’ll jar your average price! Statisticians have a way of dealing with what they call “statistical anomalies,” or what they think are accidental occurrences that were fluky and wouldn’t hold up in the long run. But even using their technique here – subtracting the longest-priced winner from each night and then figuring the average payoff -- that number would still come to $10.72 – a figure exceeding the total average price at many ovals! The strange thing about this Long Shot City is that you could take away two blocks of four consecutive races and one block of six races, and you’d get the average price down almost three full dollars, to $11.98! But lightning has struck three times at The Meadowlands to date: Last four races on December 13: $51.20, $82.00, $19.60, $32.20. First four races on December 28: $67.40, $19.40, $19.20, $84.40. Races 3-8 on January 10 (this past Friday): $183.40, $5.00, $5.20, $21.40, $80.20, $50.00. Last week, the first with three cards, the average win price was “down” to $12.55 (even with that six-race streak mentioned above), and we have already noted that the chalk rate was almost 49%. Will this phenomenon extend into the next few weeks of three cards per? I think it will, with the early-closers, and the sheer unlikeliness of this concentration of so many long shots. BUT NOT BY MUCH – many of the horses that are winning did show some form in paper (as did that $76.20 Meadowlands winner this corner picked a year ago, at about the same time of year), and the go-go-go-GO style of racing being practiced by the talented driving colony is going to upset the apple cart on a few more occasions, I think. The Meadowlands has helped itself in many ways – it is still a work in progress, but there are many things to like. If you’re a bettor looking for good value, that $14.82 average win price has to rank highly for you on such a list. By Jerry Connors for Harnesslink.com 

DOVER, Del--- Dynamic Youth, an impressive 1:49.2 winner last week, returns to the $30,000 Preferred/Open Handicap pace in the final race day before the annual week-long Christmas Holiday Break, on Thursday, Dec. 19 at Dover Downs. Post time is 4:30 p.m. K.R.Tucci, C&G Racing and J&T Silva's Dynamic Youth moved away at the start to the lead for Vic Kirby and was never headed in a neck victory over Harry von Knoblauch's longshot Texican N and Ross Wolfenden. KDM Stable's Bullet Speed with Marcus Miller took third-place honors. Local favorite, Eddie and Kathy Davis' Nova Artist, driven by Allan Davis, took an unsuccessful shot at the winner on the backstretch before stopping on the far turn. Nova Artist drew post 1 with Ken Wood, Bill Dittmar and Steve Iaquinta's sharp Adventure Bound with Trace Tetrick, alongside. Its That Time with Eddie Dennis moves up after winning the Delaware Special in a lifetime best 1:49.3, last Thursday. Mustang Art cut out that pace with Corey Callahan to finish second. Bettor's Edge arrives from Yonkers for Burke Racing, Weaver-Bruscemi and M1 Stable. The high powered 15-race card also features an $18,000 3&4-Year-Old Open pace and three $15,000 events. All but two races boast $10,000 or higher purses. Beginning tomorrow, Dec. 20 through Dec. 28, there will be a respite from racing with the annual Christmas Holiday Break. Live racing will resume on Sunday, Dec. 29 at 5:30 p.m. post time. From everyone at Dover Downs, Have A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. by Marv Bachrad for Dover Downs    

Dover, Del--- Despite cold weather, fast miles were in vogue at Dover Downs as Dynamic Youth tripped the timer in 1:49.2 to win the $30,000 Preferred/Open and 10-1 Its That Time scored a lifetime best 1:49.3 mile in the $27,500 Delaware Special on Thursday, Dec. 21. They say 'Youth Must Be Served," and in the feature race, Youth did the serving. Hard-hitting Dynamic Youth, trained by Aaron Lambert, showed his class turning back five sharp adversaries in 1:49.2 to win the week's top event. Vic Kirby took the four-year-old altered son of Bettor's Delight-Always True, who has raced against most of the top horses this season, to the front early and shook off competitors on the backstretch and rolled home a winner for the seventh time this year for K.R. Tucci, C&G Racing and J&T Silva Stables. He has now won $175,400 this season and $841,957 lifetime. Texican N, a recent New Zealand- import raced tough for Ross Wolfenden to finish second. Bullet Speed teamed with Marcus Miller for third. Eddie Davis Jr. got Its That Time going in the lane and the veteran Real Artist-Mib Hanover horse streaked past front pacing Mustang Art and Ron Pierce for a 1:49.3 victory, his fourth of the campaign. Owned by David King and E&K Stable, Its That Time increased his career bankroll to $470,371. Mustang Art held on for second with Believe This Bob and Montrell Teague the show finisher. Papa Ray was an early scratch. Jeremes General was Allan Davis' fourth winner of the day notching a lifetime best 1:50.1 triumph in the $17,500 3&4-Year-Old Open Handicap. Steve Iaquinta and Bill Dittmar own the Jereme's Jet-Major Delight sophomore, a winner for the seventh time this year. It was the gelding's second straight win and fourth in his last six outings. Race favorite Rage N Ryan (Corey Callahan) and Allstar Preview (George Dennis) were second and third respectively. Trainer Jeff and Robin Breasure's People Are Crazy racked up his eighth win of the season scoring victory in a $15,000 3,4&5-Year-Old Winners-Over pace. Ron Pierce collected his second trip to the winner's circle. Democracy (Jonathan Roberts) closed well to finish second in front of SB Mikes Hot Beach (Mike Rossi). Feel Like A Fool, a recent acquisition by Kovach Stable won for the second time in three starts chalking up a 1:51.2 decision in a $15,000 Male Winners Over pace. George Dennis reined the Art Major-Fool That I Am gelding for victory #5 this season. He has won $68,659 in purses. Beavercreek Artist (Ron Pierce) led until the final strides and settled for second. Ourea Nourrir (Ross Wolfenden) took third. The Wiz Kids Stable's Golden Gun closed out the program with a 1:52.3 victory in another $15,000 3,4&5-Year-Old pace. Montrell Teague steered the Headmaster-Golden Delicious soph gelding to his fifth win of the season upping his bankroll to $56,855 this year and $99,855 lifetime. Shark On Board (Frank Milby was next in front of fast-finishing Regal Mac (George Dennis). While Allan Davis drove four wins and Ron Pierce two, meet leading trainer Wayne Givens also had two winners. by Marv Bachrad for Dover Downs  

DOVER, Del--- Nova Artist, a three-time top feature winner already this meet, returns to the $30,000 Preferred/Open Handicap pace while in the $27,500 Delaware Special, Papa Ray, a two-time winner and Rage N Ryan, a 1:50.3 winner in the Open, top a strong Thursday, Dec. 12 card at Dover Downs. Post time is 4:30 p.m. In the $30,000 purse-topper, Eddie and Kathy Davis' Nova Artist, second last week after three consecutive victories, takes on Ken Wood, Bill Dittmar and Steve Iaquinta's super sharp Adventure Bound with Ron Pierce and Harry von Knoblauch's Texican N, driven by Ross Wolfenden, both winners last time and Howard Taylor, Weaver Bruscemi and Burke Racing's Escape The News, back from a close second in a Yonkers Open. KDFM Stable's Bullet Speed, teamed with Marcus Miller, leaves from the rail while Dynamic Youth, with Vic Kirby driving for K.R.Tucci, C&G Racing and J&T Silva complete the field. Papa Ray (Ross Wolfenden) drops down from the Preferred to the $27,500 Del. Special to take on Max Walton and Greg Papaleo's Mustang Art (Ron Pierce), a 1:50.3 winner last Thursday, Toby Lynch's Sunshine Superman (Jason Lynch), third in the Preferred and Its All Good Stable's Simon's Artist (Vic Kirby). Mary Ann Larrimore's fast finishing Believe This Bob (Montrell Teague) has post 1 with newcomer Its That Time (Eddie Davis Jr.) owned by David King and E&K Stables, complete the fast field. Rage N Ryan (Corey Callahan), winner of this event last week, is the one to beat in the $17,500 3&4-Year-Old Open Handicap. Iaquinta and Dittmar's Jeremes General, Josh Parker and Nanticoke Racing's Wahine (Jim Morand) and Mike Casalino and Dylan Davis' Lindwood Player (Trace Tetrick) are worth opponents. by Marv Bachrad for Dover Downs  

Harness racing driver Anthony Coletta is in critical condition after surgery, following an accident on the track at Harrah's Philadelphia in Chester on Sunday afternoon. Racetrack officials said that Coletta was thrown into the air after a collision involving four horses and their drivers and was then trampled by a trailing horse. Coletta was rushed to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for surgery. He remained in critical condition Monday morning. Anthony DeFrancesco, a friend of the victim, watched as the crash unfolded on the track. "A horse had taken a bad step around the last turn and fell, and Anthony was behind him," said DeFrancesco. Coletta was driving a horse named Straight Up Tequila. The horse that went down first was Rocknmy Jeans, driven by Marcus Miller.  Fortunately Miller and the other two drivers involved in the accident that were unseated, Tyler Butenshoen and George Napolitano Jr., walked away without any serious injuries "Coletta is a young driver with a lot of talent," DeFrancesco said. " He's somebody for the future of this sport. It's odd, because normally he races a horse out front and this time he had one in the back and it kind of worked against him." Caesar's Entertainment, which owns Harrah's, released the following statement Sunday night: Earlier this evening there was an accident involving four horses and their drivers at Harrah's Philadelphia. One of the drivers is being treated for his injuries, and while complete information of the extent is not available at this time, our first concern is for the well being of the driver involved, and we send our thoughts and prayers to his family and friends. Harnesslink will have follow-up information on Coletta Monday afternoon. By Steve Wolf for Harnesslink.com with reports from ABC TV WPVI Philadelphia

 Lindy’s Tru Grit ($25.00) scored a minor upset in the $235,000 American National 3-Year-Old Colt Trot at odds of 11-1, stopping the timer in a new lifetime mark of 1:53.3 for driver Tim Tetrick.  The 3-year-old son of Cantab Hall is trained by Frank Antonacci for the Lindy Racing Stable & Robert Rudolph. The brown colt notched his fifth career victory in 14 starts and pushed his career earnings to $288,881.  Lindy’s Tru Grit returned $25.00 on a two dollar ticket.   Creatine (Mike Lachance) took the lead to the :27.3 first quarter before Spider Blue Chip took (Ron Pierce) over at the :55.2 half, with Rossini (Peter Wrenn) first over and Pine Credit (Marcus Miller) second over.  Spider Blue Chip kept the lead to the 1:25 three-quarters with Pine Credit drawing even, before   Lindy’s Tru Grit shook loose and flew home to win easily for Tetrick by a length.   “There was a lot of speed early and the speed isn’t holding up,” said winning driver Tim Tetrick. “My horse is fresh at a time in the season when a lot of horses have been racing hard and aren’t fresh.  I wanted to make sure my horse didn’t run and tonight he was super solid.”   Creatine held on for second, while Lauderdale (David Miller) close well to be third and EL Rocket (Yannick Gingras) got up late to be fourth.   Video attached by Kimbery Rinker for Balmoral Park  

Tough Rose was able to light up the tote board in the $115,000 American National Stake for two-year-old pacing fillies Saturday at Balmoral Park, winning by a head over Jaded Dream and paying $254.60 to win. Leaving from post seven, driver Andy Shetler sent Tough Rose out to the early lead and by the opening quarter mile in :27.3 had to give way to Sweetnsinful (Jimmy Whittemore), who had also left from post 8. They raced that way through the half mile in :56.1 and that was when Southwind Silence (Yannick Gingras) came first-over with Boxed Chocolate (Marcus Miller) second over. Past the three-quarters in 1:25.4, Southwind Silence was able to almost collar Sweetnsinful as they started down the stretch as Tough Rose seemed trapped and looking for racing room. Then in mid stretch Sweetnsinful made a break, Tough Rose was able to find clearance, Southwind Silence began to fade with Jaded Dream (Brett Miller) coming on late. Then it was a two-hole race to the wire with Tough Rose holding off Jaded Dream for the upset win in 1:54.2. It was the fourth victory this year for Tough Rose, who is trained by Stanley Miller of Etna green, IN, who also owns and bred the daughter of United Ace. Video attached by Steve Wolf for Harnesslink.com  

DOVER, Del.--- The Matrons, the sport's oldest major stakes, kick off the Dover Downs' "Novemberfest" of stakes. Many of the top stables, trainers and drivers will be headquartered at the track for two-weeks of Sunday Grand Circuit competition starting on Nov. 10. All eight Matron freshman and sophomore division share the spotlight on the same program. Two of the divisions are split with one elim in the others with the first eight in each of the divisions making the lucrative finals the following Sunday, Nov. 17. One of the headline events is a $53,462 Three-Year-Old Colt & Gelding elim featuring Dedi's Dragon (Yannick Gingras), upset winner beating highly touted Captaintreacherous last week at Hoosier Park, Ronny Bugatti (Jason Bartlett) who won the $450,000 Messinger Stake last Saturday got Prevost, McNeese and Haughton, the highly touted Vegas Vacation (Brian Sears) a nine-time winner of $887,162 and Leber, Bertrand and Hudson Standardbred's Sunshine Beach fresh from a second-place finish in the recent Breeders Crown. Some of the major names in this year's Matrons include freshmen pacers: Colts; Stevensville (Ray Schnittker), McWicked (Andy Miller) and So Surreal (Tim Tetrick) and fillies: Ideal Helen (Marcus Miller), Beach Body (Brian Sears) and Ali Blue (Tim Tetrick), and filly trotters Shake It Cerry (Ron Pierce), Struck By Lindy (David Miller), Scream And Shout (Tim Tetrick) and colts led by Nuncio (John Campbell). Among a strong group of three-Year-olds are trotters are Ma Chere Hall (Corey Callahan) and Southwind Cocoa (Tim Tetrick) in one section and Time To Kill (John Campbell) and Thistle Dhu (Brett Miller) in another division and Don Dorado ( Tim Tetrick) heading the colt section. The soph filly pace has strong fields, Somwhereovrarainbow (Montrell Teague), Summertime Lea (George Brennan), Jerseylicious (Corey Callahan) and Cheyenne Miriam (Andy Miller) in one division and in the other Shebestinggin (David Miller), Ms Caila J Fra (Andy Miller). Smilin Eli (Tim Tetrick), Dontyouforgetit (Yannick Gingras), Crazy About Pat (David Miller), All Laid Out (David Miller) Possessed Fashion) and Tirade Hanover (Ron Pierce) are part of a field of 10 in the three-year-old trot. For those planning to enjoy racing dinning in the Winner 's Circle Restaurant or for those seeking to stay at the 4-star Dover Downs Hotel, it is suggested to make reservations early. Call 302-674-4600. Sunday racing begins at 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; post time is 4:30 p.m. There is no live racing on Fridays and Saturdays. Parking and admission at Dover Downs are free. by Marv Bachrad for Dover Downs  

ANDERSON, Ind.—October 31, 2013—After an impressive victory earlier this season in Hoosier Park’s signature event, the $200,000 Dan Patch Invitational, Bolt the Duer will return to Hoosier Park once again with an eagerness to defend his Hoosier Park winning streak. The four-year-old, son of Ponder will get the opportunity to visit Hoosier Park’s winner’s circle once more on Friday, November 1 as he faces nine other rivals in the $223,500 Hoosier Park Pacing Derby. Mark Macdonald has been enlisted to drive the Peter Foley trainee and has been tabbed 5-1 on the morning line. Last year, Bolt The Duer became the fastest horse in history on a five-eighths-mile track with a 1:47.4 world record in the $500,000 Adios final at The Meadows. He also won the $250,000 Kentucky Sires Stakes final at The Red Mile in 1:48.2, the $415,820 Messenger Stakes at Yonkers in 1:51.2, and capped his sophomore season with a 1:51 triumph in the $130,000 Cleveland Classic at Northfield Park. “He has really stepped up this year,” MacDonald noted of his mount. “He is a very handy horse to drive that can race from anywhere. He can go a quarter in 25 seconds and then back it down to 31 seconds, so I like my chances.” While looking to score the fifth win of his 2013 campaign, Bolt The Duer ships to Hoosier Park after a fifth place finish in the $500,000 Breeders Crown Open Pace on October 19. Bolt The Duer will start from post two in the 10-horse field and will be joined by some of the top rated horses in North America. The 2013 Hoosier Park Pacing Derby field boasts career purse earnings over $16 million combined and includes six millionaires, six World Champions and multiple world record holders. Joining the stellar cast of entrants is Foiled Again, harness racing’s richest horse, who will look to score his third win in this event for trainer Ron Burke. Foiled Again and Yannick Gingras were victorious in the 2011 and 2012 edition of the race, formerly called the Indiana Pacing Derby, and setting the track record at Indiana Downs with a 1:49.1 performance last year. Enlisted as the morning line favorite at 2-1, Foiled Again will start from post six with Yannick Gingras in the bike. Following is the Hoosier Park Pacing Derby field in post position order with listed drivers and trainers: 1. Foreclosure N, Brett Miller, Ron Burke; 2. Bolt The Duer, Mark MacDonald, Pete Foley; 3. Pet Rock, David Miller, Virgil Morgan, Jr.; 4. Time To Roll, Marcus Miller, Tom Simmons; 5. Our Lucky Chip, Trace Tetrick, Jason Miller; 6. Foiled Again, Yannick Gingras, Burke; 7. Dynamic Youth, Andrew McCarthy, Aaron Lambert; 8. Warrawee Needy, Tim Tetrick, Mark Ford; 9. Golden Receiver, Corey Callahan, Mark Harder; 10. Sweet Lou, Ricky Macomber, Jr., Burke. “I think this is the best field of horses ever assembled in Indiana harness racing history,” Hoosier Park’s Racing Secretary, Scott Peine noted. “Given the success of our 2013 meet, Friday’s entire card is great way to celebrate the progress that Hoosier Park has made over the years and its’ commitment to the sport of harness racing.” For the first time in its’ 20 year history, Hoosier Park will host a standout card that includes the $286,500 Carl Erskine, the $250,000 Monument Circle, and the $223,500 Hoosier Park Pacing Derby.  The 14-race card will offer purses over the million dollar mark for the fourth time this season and begin at its’ regularly schedule post time of 5:30 p.m. Emily Gaskin Racing Commentator, Publicist and Marketing Specialist  

1 to 16 of 152
1 2 3 4 5 Next »