Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 4 of 4
1

A young man will join his uncle in prison after they both instigated a major drug operation in Ballarat, making and selling pills at night clubs. Nathan Weightman, 23, was sentenced to 16 months' imprisonment at the County Court of Victoria on Thursday for trafficking drugs and possessing a pill press. For the first time, The Courier can reveal his uncle, Ian Weightman, was sentenced to two-and-a-half years' imprisonment in April last year for the same Offenses. Three years ago the Weightmans started making and selling thousands of inexpensive pills, along with then 19-year-old DJ Peter Moore. The operation was based at Ian's Redman house where a pill press was set up to make the drugs, which Moore sold at Ballarat nightclubs. Some of the pills contained low levels of the drug MDMA. The Weightman men made a batch of pills emblazoned with Transformer logos, while on another day Moore helped Nathan work the press to make 2000 pills. On another occasion, Nathan turned up at the Golden Point home he shared with Moore carrying a bag of 2000 yellow pills marked with Homer Simpson emblem. Three months after starting the drug business, police searched the trio's houses in October, uncovering a large quantity of pills and powder, cash and drug paraphernalia associated with trafficking. Nathan persisted with a plea of not guilty for two-and-a-half years before he admitted to dealing the drugs and possessing the tablet press. County Court Judge John Smallwood told Nathan his offending must be regarded as serious. "Clearly over that period of time a very significant number of pills were manufactured by you and your uncle for the purpose of selling for profit and Mr Moore was involved in all that in terms of trafficking and the distribution," Judge Smallwood said. "Yours is a situation where it's clear that you were very much involved in it "You were certainly aware of the potential consequences of this "You are to be sentenced for a serious example of trafficking over an extended period of time where you knew what you were doing and you were an instigator and directly involved in it" The Judge told Nathan he had pleaded guilty late in the Court process after he was committed to stand trial. The Judge said he took into account Nathan's good work ethic, family support and his rehabilitation "which means the risk of you re-offending should be low, depending on the future". He said Nathan had been on bail for the past two-and-a-half years, which included a curfew from 9pm to 6am. Nathan, who was born in Ballarat and moved to Mildura, became a successful harness racing driver after he obtained his license when he was 16. "I am very aware you are still a very young man, I am very aware you haven't offended since (2017) and I am very aware that you have no prior convictions," Judge Smallwood said. Nathan was sentenced to 16 months' imprisonment with a no-parole period of eight months. He has served 14 days of the sentence. If he did not plead guilty, he would have been jailed for two years with a minimum of 15 months, according to the Judge. Nathan pleaded guilty to two counts of trafficking and one count each of possessing a tablet press and dealing with proceeds of crime. A suppression order on Ian's case was lifted after his nephew's sentence on Thursday. The 62 year-old was sentenced to two and a half years' imprisonment in April last year. He pleaded guilty to trafficking and processing a tablet press. Moore was sentenced to 10 months' youth detention in May, 2018, after pleading guilty to drug trafficking and possessing a pill press. By Erin Williams Reprinted with permission of The Ballarat Courier

Former Mildura harness racing driver Nathan Weightman has taken a dispute with Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT). The Ballarat reinsman has applied to the VCAT for a review of the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) board’s decision on January 16 to dismiss his appeal against a three-week driving suspension imposed by HRV stewards. Weightman was found guilty by the RAD board relating to a charge issued under Australian Harness Racing Rule 162(1)(r) for failing to activate gear that required activation in race 7 at Bendigo on December 30, 2016. During his January 16 hearing before the RAD board, Weightman also appealed against a three-week suspension imposed by the stewards under Rule 163(1)(a)(iii), which relates to causing or contributing interference, at Mildura on December 13, 2016.  That appeal was also dismissed, with the penalty varied to 10 days. The VCAT review will be listed for a directions hearing at a date to be set. For more of this story, purchase your copy of Tuesday's Sunraysia Daily 31/01/2017.To subscribe to our Digital Edition Click here Reprinted with permission of the Sunraysia Daily  

The Harness Racing Training Centre Bendigo Central Victorian 2016 Concession Drivers Championship is set for an exciting finish, with one race remaining in the four-race series. There appear to be three concession drivers with a realistic chance of taking out the title. Nathan Weightman currently heads the leaderboard on 30 points, having picked up points in all three races thus far. He will be hard to beat, given that he would only require a top five finish to secure the title. He also has the choice to pilot either emergency Sir Dasher Dee (8) or Mister Bellisimo (11) in the final race of the Series on Sunday. Jackie Barker on outsider Guilty Rama (3) and Brad Chisholm on likely favourite Chirpy Chuckles (7) would require at least a top-two finish to have a show of taking out the title, and for other results to go their way. Win or lose, all concession drivers who participated in the series will also have the chance to secure the much sought-after drive aboard Smoken Up as he leads out the Bendigo Cup Field on Saturday, February 13. Trainer Lance Justice has said that Smoken Up is in fine fettle at present for his appearance at Bendigo. This privilege would undoubtedly be a thrill for the lucky person selected, with the driver selected being announced at the Central Victorian Championship Finals at the Wedderburn  at Maryborough Meeting on Sunday, January 31. The third race in the series at Charlton on January 25 was taken out in fine style by the Andy Gath trained four-year-old mare, Shadow Flag, courtesy of an exemplary front-running drive by young Cheyenne King-Davies. The second favorite, Shadow Flag jumped straight to the lead from the pole mark in a slick 29.1secs second quarter before King-Davies gave the mare a breather with a second quarter of 31secs. She then upped the ante in the latter part of the race, running home the last half in 57secs to win untouched by 6.2 metres from the favorite in the race, Blurred Lines, with Brad Chisholm aboard. The overall mile rate for the event was 1:57.1 for the mile trip. In her post-race interview, King-Davies explained how she had recently moved across from Western Australia to join the Andy Gath stable to gain some valuable experience. At such a young age she is already a well-travelled young driver, having spent six months in her teenage years at Mark Purdon’s stables in New Zealand before home sickness drew her back to the West. King-Davies has had around 80-100 previous drives, with this win being around her 10th. During the presentation her current mentor, Andy Gath, complimented her on her fine work ethic and suggested they may need to find her a few more drives in the near future, given her excellent performance here.   STANDINGS AFTER RACE THREE Nathan Weightman 30 Jackie Barker 23 Brad Chisholm 23 Patrick Franklin 22 Ashley Ainsworth 17 Robert Caton 17 Denbeigh Wade 16 Cheyenne King-Davies 15 Kevin Weidenbach Jnr 12 Lisa Bartley 11 Xavier O’Connor 11 Ashleigh Stewart 9 Daniel Rose 9 J. Murphy 8 Matthew Horsnell 7   CODY WINNELL

On 7 September 2015, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) heard the application for review of Mr Nathan Weightman in regard to the decision of the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on 17 June 2015 to suspend Mr Weightman for a period of 4 months and impose fines totalling $2,000 (with $500 suspended) regarding 3 offences committed against Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 173(1) and 2 offences committed against AHRR 187(2).  These rules read as follows: 173(1) A driver shall not bet in a race in which the driver participates. 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. At the commencement of the hearing, the legal representative for Mr Weightman advised that the application for review would only be continued with respect to the penalty of a 4 month suspension imposed for a breach of AHRR 173(1).  The review application was not continued with respect to the fines imposed for the other breaches.  This specific rule breach and 4 month suspension related to Mr Weightman having been found to have placed, or been a party to, a $70 win bet on the 3rd placed horse Beachstar ($5.60) in Race 5 at the Charlton harness racing meeting  when Mr Weightman had driven the horse Itsmentamota which finished last. This matter was detected by HRV Stewards as a result of routine checks conducted upon a number of harness racing participants. After hearing submissions on behalf of Mr Weightman and the HRV Stewards, the presiding member, Senior Member Davis, varied the 4 month suspension penalty in the following manner. In recognising that Mr Weightman had served 12 days of the initial suspension imposed, prior to receiving a stay of proceedings, Senior Member Davis ordered that a further 2 months suspension be served instead of the remaining 3 months and 18 days.  The Tribunal ordered the 2 month suspension to be effective from midnight 9 September 2015 meaning Mr Weightman will be able to resume engaging in licensed activities as from 10 November 2015.   In delivering this decision, the Tribunal noted the special circumstances present in the case including that; Mr Weightman was 18 years of age at the time of the offence, Mr Weightman had driven his own horse to the best of its ability during the race, Mr Weightman had admitted the offence at an early opportunity and Mr Weightman had been a great support to his family in difficult times.  The Tribunal also noted the positive opportunities and future in front of Mr Weightman with respect to his involvement in the industry.  It was also noted that the betting account on which the relevant wager had been placed had only been opened as a result of Mr Weightman taking advantage of an offer by a Wagering Service Provider (WSP) to match his initial $100 investment in opening the account and that the account had only been active for a total of 16 days and that otherwise Mr Weightman did not bet at all. In rejecting the submission that a wholly suspended suspension or fine be imposed, the Tribunal noted that anything less than a suspension would not suitably protect the integrity of the industry and not be an appropriate deterrent.   The Tribunal also noted that it was not unusual for jockeys or drivers who breached such rule to be disqualified though in the special circumstances of the current matter, particularly the age of Mr Weightman, a further two month suspension was an appropriate penalty in all the circumstances. Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal

1 to 4 of 4
1