Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 16 of 607
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

Batavia, NY---James E. Boyd, age 83, of Batavia, New York died peacefully Thursday April 5, 2018 at the Northgate Health Care Facility in North Tonawanda. Widely known as "Gentleman Jim", Boyd took over the Batavia Downs track announcing duties from the legendary Max Robinson in 1984 and continued to call races there until it closed in 1996. He was also the announcer at Buffalo Raceway and called races at Finger Lakes racetrack. Mr. Boyd called the richest race ever held at Batavia Downs, the $268,756 Breeders Crown aged-mare trot in 1988 won by Armbro Flori and also Getting Personal's 1:53.3 track record in 1993. "Jim was known for a very steady voice and very accurate calls," Todd Haight, Director/GM of Racing at Batavia Downs said. "Even though it's been over 20 years since his retirement, our old-timers still ask about him." Besides calling the races, Jim was also a salesman in the Buffalo area for many years, Boyd was born in Batavia, the son of the late Harry S. and Marjorie (Price) Boyd and was also preceded in death by his wife Josephine (Nevin) Boyd and siblings, Raymond, Robert, Ronald "Don" and Harry "Jack" Boyd. He was a graduate of Batavia High School and Alfred State College and served honorably in the US Army during the Korean conflict. Upon returning home he became a member of the Glenn S. Loomis Post #332 of the American Legion in Batavia and rose to the position of Post Commander. Boyd is survived by his beloved daughter, Deborah (William) Evans of Nevada, dear friends, Paula (Frederick) Leigh of Batavia along with many nieces and nephews. The family will be present from 10 - 11am Thursday April 12, 2018 at the Michael S. Tomaszewski Funeral & Cremation Chapel LLC located at 4120 West Main Street Road, Batavia, New York 14020 where his Funeral Services will be celebrated by Jim's nephew, Rev. David Boyd at 11 a.m. He will be laid to rest alongside his beloved wife in Grand View Cemetery with military honors. In lieu of flowers, memorials in his memory are suggested to Volunteers for Animals of Genesee County.   By Tim Bojarski for Batavia Downs  

HAMBURG, N.Y. --- Longtime Western New York harness racing owner and trainer Robert Gruber III of Lakeview, N.Y., passed away on Saturday, March 31 after suffering a medical emergency during an on-track training session.   Mr. Gruber, 52, started his training career in 1991. During his 27-year career, his horses made 9,220 starts and won 1,235, making over $4.8 million in purse earnings. His best campaign was in 2009 where to found the winner's circle 130 times, collecting more than $565,000.   Racing throughout the Northeast, Mr. Gruber's operation was based in Western New York. His stable made many of their starts on the Buffalo Raceway/Batavia Downs circuit.   He was the husband of Carol Gruber, father of Robert Gruber IV, brother of David, Karen, Kim and Denise. Visiting hours for Mr. Gruber will be Sunday, April 8 from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. at the Lombardo Funeral Home (Southtowns Chapel), 3060 Abbott Road near Lake Avenue in Orchard Park, N.Y. Funeral services will follow immediately with interment in the Marilla Cemetery.   On-line condolences may be made at www.lombardofuneralhome.com   by Brian J. Mazurek, for Buffalo Raceway

The industry will farewell a friend and beloved brother this Friday when a service will be held to honour Doug Webster. The trots owner, stablehand and brother to prominent trainer Geoff Webster passed last week, inspiring an emotional salute from driver Emmett Brosnan when he won only hours later on Geoff’s horse Courageous Affair. “That was pretty special,” Geoff said. “It’s been pretty tough, but (Doug’s) had a good life.” Geoff said his brother had been born with a disability and had been cared for by his parents and then Geoff. “They didn’t think he’d get past 30 or 40, but we had a good 50th and then a good 60th birthday,” Geoff said. “It has been a tough road for him, but he is just one of those people who makes a lot of friends along the way.” Geoff said Doug had a great connection with horses, both helping in hands-on roles as well as a prolific owner. “He’s had a lot of nice horses and has always been really interested in horses, they’ve been his life,” he said. “He often helped Mark Webster and me train in Adelaide, and then when I came over here he helped me in Victoria. “Probably his best one was Scruffy Murphy, who he had in partnership with Greg Lutze. And he had a win the other week with Rift Valley, who was another one he had with Greg Lutze. There have been a lot of other horses along the way, especially with Dom Martello.” A service for Doug Webster will be held at St Mary’s Basilica, 136 Yarra St, Geelong, from 11am on Friday, April 6. HRV extends its sincere condolences to Mr Webster’s family and friends. Michael Howard (HRV Media/Communications Co-Ordinator)

The harness racing fraternity is mourning the passing of legendary administrator Max Laughton OAM. Mr Laughton, a Penrith harness racing icon, passed away last night. He was the longest-serving President at Penrith Paceway, serving on the Executive Committee since 1964 and had been President since 1988. Amongst this, Mr Laughton worked in the New South Wales Police Force, starting his career in 1948 at Penrith and eventually became the Chief Police Inspector in 1984. After 40 years of service in the Police Force, Mr Laughton was awarded a Merit of Services Award. Retiring from the Police Force in 1988, Mr Laughton devoted all of his spare time to Penrith Paceway. He originally obtained the 'harness racing bug' at the age of 24 when he began working horses with Alf Phillis. Mr Laughton was a foundation member of the Penrith Harness Racing Club and in 1999 it was his decision to build the registered club. As a mark of respect, drivers will wear black armbands at tonight's race meeting at Penrith. A funeral for Mr Laughton will be held next Wednesday, March 28, at Pinegrove in the North Chapel at 3pm which will be followed by a wake at Penrith Paceway. Harness Racing New South Wales extends sincere condolences to Max's beloved wife Lorna, his family and friends. "Max was an admired administrator, a rock for the Penrith Club and will be sorely missed in all harness racing circles," HRNSW chief executive John Dumesny. Amanda Rando

Harness racing and rugby league lost one of its favourite sons last Tuesday with the passing of former trainer-driver and rugby league stalwart John McMartin, aged 73, after a long battle with cancer. Well known amongst his peers as 'Macka', the former Cronulla Sharks and Parramatta Eels hooker played 92 games for Cronulla (1976-79) after having previously racked up 167 appearances for the Eels (1967-75). He also played one game for New South Wales in 1975 and was an integral member of the Cronulla team that made its way through to the Grand Final in 1978. Following the drawn Grand Final, he was ruled out by injury in the midweek replay loss to Manly. He was a Life Member of the NSWRL. John's other great passion was harness racing. A successful trainer and driver and breeder, John had a lot of enjoyment racing his beloved pacer 'Lenny', better known as Gotashotaway who won 22 races and earned just shy of $160,000 in prizemoney. Gotashotaway, a sire of one winner before being gelded, was John's last winner as a trainer-driver on October 6, 2011. John had success with many other horses having trained 70 winners including the trotter Krysta who won the Franco/Australian Trotters Final at Harold Park in 2005 with John in the sulky. A funeral for John will be held on Wednesday (February 21) at the Allan Drew Heritage Chapel, Castle Hill, commencing at 10.00am. Harness Racing New South Wales extends sincere condolences to John's wife Kathy, family and friends. AMANDA RANDO

Cyril Potts was an unsung hero of harness racing in the north of South Australia for well over forty years. From the 1950’s through to retiring in the 1990’s and moving across the border to Victoria. As a leading trainer, Cyril shared his love and passion for the sport with many people including Paul Fitzgerald and Ken (Bones) Smith.  However, the most notable was Peter Thompson, who himself became the Leading Trainer in the North for several years. Cyril keenly respected his owners, of which he had many, and would work hard to maintain his horses to high standard whilst keeping his training fees as low as he could at his cherished Simpson Road Stables. In the 1950’s dedicated himself to the Port Pirie Harness Racing Club Committee.  You would often find him at working bee’s for the Club with some of his owners in tow to help.  The Port Pirie Harness Racing Club held its very first Driver’s Invitational meeting In the mid 1960’s with Cyril being integral in securing leading Victorian drivers for the event. This Driver’s Invitation race remains a strong part of the Club’s calendar today. Aside from training horses, Cyril had a great ear for listening and provided a valuable service every Sunday at the track known fondly as “Sunday School”.  This was an opportunity for anyone in the industry to come the track, have a drink, share their issues and solve the problems of the world.  Fortunately, Cyril was a big man and a non-drinker, so if there were any physical difference of opinions, Cyril could easily step in as ‘crowd control’.  Stories from Sunday School sessions are legendary. Port Pirie Harness Racing Club awarded Cyril Life Membership in the mid-1970’s and the honoured with Legend status in 2013. Even once he moved to Victoria, Cyril always remained in close contact with the Club and the harness racing community, including remaining a regular trophy donor.  His philanthropic donations to the Club even extended to paying for the presentation area when the new track was built in 2000.  The Port Pirie Club are truly grateful for his support. Many people will have their own stories about the great man but all would agree, he was a great worker, hard but fair and a true legend of harness racing in Port Pirie. Office of the General Manager, Gary Crocker

John E. Bach, Sr., age 93, of Goshen, died Thursday, February 8, 2018 at Valley View Center, Goshen, NY. John was born July 3, 1924 in Goshen, NY, the son of the late Frederick W. Bach and the late Rebecca (Brede) Bach. He served in the U.S. Army in the 15th Air Force during World War II, as a bombardier with the 455th bomb group and later became a first lieutenant. He flew a total of 39 combat missions as a bombardier navigator aboard B-24 Liberator bomber planes. His combat took him to the Rhineland, Northern Apenines, Po Valley, the Balkans, North Africa, Italy, and Egypt. He was reported missing in action over Germany in 1944 and spent time as a POW in Germany and Poland, after his plane was shot down in Krakow, Poland. For his service, he was awarded an Air Medal and three oak leaf clusters. Upon his liberation and honorable discharge in 1945, he found work as a real estate broker and went on to establish a career in title insurance industry spanning five decades. He formed Goshen Abstract Corporation in 1959, PJ Enterprises Inc. in 1966 which was the first title insurance agency in Orange County and Hill N Dale Abstracters in 1972 with his fellow colleagues Paul G. Miller and Elmer Budd. His professional legacy lives on today through his son attorney, John E. Bach, Jr., and stepsons John and James Wood who succeeded to his ownership in Hill N Dale Abstracters, Inc. Although he retired in 1999, he was able to remain a strong presence at Hill N Dale Abstracters until his 90th birthday in 2014. John was an active member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church of Monroe, VFW, the American Legion, Cataracts Engine & Hose. Most importantly, John was a 35-year member of the Goshen Historic Track and U.S. Trotting Association. He spent his entire life in Goshen, his beloved home. He was proud to be one of the last “Goshen Boys”, and loved to reminisce about the good ol’ days as a farm boy growing up at the racetrack. Harness racing was in his blood. His father worked as a teamster at Good Times Track, and John and his brothers spent their childhood summers volunteering at the track during racing season. As teenagers, they worked as ushers and valets during the Hambletonian. John worked every aspect of the sport, as a clerk, a jogger, a timer, served on the Board of Directors, and even tried his hand at driving. He loved to boast that the only years he was ever absent from the July 4th Racing Weekend was during his service in World War II. Born on July 3, he lived for this weekend, and could be found in his box seat every year up through his 91st birthday. John also owned race horses for the majority of his adult life, buying his first horse in 1973 and selling his last in 2014. He accomplished his life-long dream of winning a New York Sire Stake in Buffalo on June 19, 2010 with racehorse “Flirtinwithcowboys”. John is survived by his wife: Carol (Mesnica) Bach at home; children: John Bach Jr. of Chester, Kevin Bach and wife, Celine of Middletown, Bernice Holmbraker and husband, Peter of Goshen, Rosemarie Tveit and husband, Stanley of New Hampton, Marguerite Bach of Raleigh, NC, Jamie Neumann and husband, Joseph of Hilton Head, SC and Rebecca Columbus of Wrightsville Beach, NC; stepchildren, Cheryl Samz and her husband, Gary from Waukesha WI, James Wood and wife, Wendy of Goshen, and John Wood and wife, Marlene of Montgomery; 21 grandchildren: Jessica (Kevin) O’Shea, Michael (Kristin) Guilfoyle, Kristen (Tim) Farber, Aaron Tveit, Fr. Jon Tveit, Kayla Neumann, Bradley (Alexandra) Neumann, Bryan Columbus, Paul Columbus, Thomas Columbus, Michele Wood, Sara Wood, Ryan Wood, Jared Wood, Erin Wood, Katie Rose Duff, Brian Duff, Taylor (Matt) Raimondo, Kyle Doce, Allen Faust and Alana Buono; five great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by four brothers: Frederick, William, Robert, and Peter; and two sisters, Joan Cox and Rose Bach. Visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. on Monday, February 12 at the Donovan Funeral Home, Inc., 82 South Church St., Goshen, NY. Funeral Service will be at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, February 13 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 21 Still Road, Monroe, NY. Burial will follow in the Orange County Veteran’s Cemetery, Goshen. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in John’s name to St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 21 Still Road, Monroe, NY 10950 or the Goshen Historic Track, 44 Park Place, Goshen, NY 10924. Arrangements under the care of the Donovan Funeral Home, Inc. To leave a condolence visit www.donovanfunerals.com Reprinted with permission of The Times Herald-Record

The harness racing industry is mourning the loss of owner-breeder and administrator Mr Bill Green. The former Bulli Harness Racing Club Foundation Member passed away on Thursday morning, aged 84. “Mr Green was not only a member (of the Bulli HRC) but also a sponsor of numerous events for the Club over a long period,” said Bulli HRC official John Crittenden. “He was exceedingly supportive of our efforts with the Keira High School students when we commenced this initiative.” Well liked amongst his peers, Mr Green also raced many talented horses over the years. This included 1997 Kilmore Cup winner Experte, Talk About Charles, Kiwi John and in more recent times had success with the likes Lettucerockthem and Iam Mr Brightside to name a few. “Bill was one of nature’s gentlemen,” said former trainer Peter Morris senior. “He was mates with everybody and would help anyone he could, he was just one of those blokes. “He loved the game and the people in it and had some nice horses along the way. “Bill was also a successful businessman through his trucking company (Tex Transport).” Former harness racing scribe Ray Corridan said: “Bill was one of the nicest blokes and was very, very well liked in the industry. “He was a very close friend of mine.” A funeral for Mr Green will be held on Thursday (February 15) at Hansen and Cole Funerals, Kembla Grange at 2pm. Harness Racing New South Wales extends sincere condolences to Mr Green’s family and friends. Amanda Rando

HAMILTON, OH --- Howard F. Beissinger, 94, a member of the Harness Racing Hall of Fame for 44 years, died February 6, 2018 in Hamilton, Ohio. Born on May 23, 1923 on the family farm near Hamilton, Beissinger died only a few miles from where he'd been born. He won the Hambletonian, America's greatest trotting classic, three times, earning the nickname "Hambo Howard." He enjoyed international fame, and raced across the United States and Canada as well as at tracks in Russia, Germany, Sweden, Italy, and elsewhere. He was also a member of the Ohio Harness Racing Hall of Fame and the Butler County (Ohio) Sports Hall of Fame. He was known for his tough, no-nonsense approach to his profession. His unfailing attention to detail in matters such as proper shoeing won him the admiration of many of his fellow horsemen. He is best known as the trainer and driver of the great trotter and stallion Speedy Crown. Speedy Crown was foaled in early 1968 and raised on the Beissinger family farm in Hamilton. In 1971 Speedy Crown won the Hambletonian in straight heats and went on to a breeding career that would make him legendary in the world of trotting. Two years earlier, Beissinger had won his first Hambletonian with Lindy's Pride, a colt that overcame faulty hooves with his speed and competitive spirit. Beissinger drove him to victory in the trotting Triple Crown---Yonkers Trot, Hambletonian, and Kentucky Futurity---in 1969. His third Hambletonian victory came in 1978 behind the meteoric Speedy Somolli, a son of Speedy Crown that Beissinger always said was the fastest trotter he'd ever driven. Beissinger learned the horse business from his father, who farmed and raced a few horses in the summer. After World War II, when Howard told his mother that he planned to make horse racing his profession, she greeted the news with tears. Her son achieved success quickly, however, becoming one of the leading drivers on the tough Chicago racing circuit. His abilities and his work ethic drew notice and he began to attract the support of prominent owners. In 1955, he married the former Ann Wingers. They were divorced in 1999. In the mid-1960s Beissinger earned the confidence and patronage of the Antonacci family of New York, a partnership that lasted for decades. For the Antonaccis and partners, Beissinger developed and raced countless stakes winners. Howard's peers in the training fraternity admired his mastery of all aspects of horsemanship. For decades he campaigned a stable that competed with success in the sport's largest stake races. In 1984, Beissinger entered four trotters in the Hambletonian, but decided to find other drivers for all four horses so that he didn't show favoritism to certain owners. In 1987, he drove Defiant One to victory in the Breeders Crown in Toronto, Ontario at age 64, and he is still the oldest driver ever to win a prestigious Breeders Crown event. For a half-century, he was also involved in rodeo and traveled across North America to visit rodeos and connect with his cowboy friends. His daughter Vana was extremely successful as a barrel racer in rodeo. Beissinger produced rodeos throughout the Midwest in partnership with Don Hight, a South Dakota cowboy Howard greatly admired. Beissinger was well known in the rodeo world to the cowboys and cowgirls, as well as stock contractors and officials. In many ways, Beissinger personified the Cowboy Way: he was strong, independent, and resilient. He was up every day before dawn to start work, and his associates marveled at his energy and work ethic. Beissinger was fearless in pursuing his passion for adventure. When he became interested in rodeo, he took up steer wrestling, an event in which the cowboy jumps from a running horse onto the back of a running steer and wrestles it to the ground. This event is often called "bulldogging" and it's most appealing to young men who feel invincible, but Beissinger began steer wrestling when he was in his 40s. He earned the nickname "Bulldog Beissinger." On his 80th birthday, he went para-sailing off the coast of Florida. A decade later on his 90th birthday, he went hang-gliding at 3,000 feet near Lookout Mountain, Georgia. He is survived by daughter Jane Freeman (Dave) of Naples, FL; daughter Gloria Beissinger (Joseph Rickard) of Naples, FL; son Orrin (Minna) of Randolph, NJ; daughter Vana Beissinger; and two grandchildren Julia Ganzi and Markus Beissinger. A memorial service will be held at the Webb-Noonan-Kidd Funeral Home in Hamilton, OH on March 10. Dean Hoffman      

Columbus, OH --- Former Hoof Beats editor and Communicators Hall of Fame member Dean Hoffman has reported that harness racing 'Hall of Famer' Howard Beissinger, 94, died Feb. 6, 2018, in his home state of Ohio. One of the sport's top trainer/drivers and trotting specialists, Mr. Beissinger won three Hambletonians, with Lindy's Pride (1969), Speedy Crown (1971) and Speedy Somolli (1978). Mr. Beissinger drove Lindy's Pride to win trotting's Big Five in 1969: the Yonkers Trot, Kentucky Futurity, Hambletonian, Dexter Cup and the Colonial. The third generation Beissinger to make harness racing a profession, he also had Lindy's Crown, who held a world race record of 1:54.4 before Cornstalk broke it in 1984 with a 1:53.4 mile. Cornstalk was also driven by Mr. Beissinger. He was inducted into the Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 1975. More information will be posted when available. USTA Communications Department

Pompano Beach, FL…January 29, 2018…Theodore S. (Ted) Colby, 78, passed away suddenly as a result of an accident in Bronxville, N.Y. Mr. Colby, an accountant by trade, was involved in the Standardbred industry as a breeder and owner for over 25 years and enjoyed considerable success with I’m Just Special (p, 1:50.3--$789.299) and Special Sweetheart (p,3,1:50.4--$860,933), among others. Trainer Tom Artandi described Mr. Colby as a “real gentleman and extremely generous” and said that all trainers should be lucky enough to have owners as great as he. Information on services are, at this time, pending. John Berry

The harness racing breeding industry has lost one of its giants with the shock passing of Bob McArdle. The 76-year-old who imported so many top stallions to New Zealand through his days at Nevele R Stud died in his sleep on Wednesday night. He is survived by his wife Denise and children Lisa and Baeden. Few people have every contributed as much to, or for that matter accrued as much information about the Australasian breeding industry, as McArdle. Not only was he a breeder, owner and agent but with the late Wayne Francis set up Nevele R, the stud whose footprint on the industry worldwide is enormous. Not only did they breed hundreds of winners of thousands of races but Francis and McArdle brought the likes of Falcon Seelster, Holmes Hanover and earlier Timely Knight and El Patron to New Zealand to mention just a few. Later, through his breeding and selling business Bromac Lodge, McAcArdle had a huge presence at the yearling sales, with 12 from that property to be sold at the Christchurch sales in a few week and three at Karaka. “Bob’s impact on the industry here is impossible to overstate,” says PGG Wrightson’s Peter Lagan. “What he and Wayne did at Nevele R will be felt across the industry for decades to come. “And his knowledge of breeding in this part of the world might be the most detailed of anybody I have ever met. “When you think of all the horses he bred, sold and was agent for he has put a lot of money in a lot of people’s hands over a very long period of time. “He was a very smart businessman and knew what he wanted but no matter how frank a discussion or even disagreement you had with Bob, he would get over it and get down to business “The New Zealand industry owes him a lot.” Bob’s best horse he actually owned was probably Howard Bromac, who won an Auckland Cup and was placed in a New Zealand and Hunter Cup when trained by Kirk Larsen. “He was maybe the best we had but Bob owned a hell of a lot of good horses,” says Larsen. “We probably trained for him for over 30 years. He would breed horses and then we would train them, sell plenty but keep some. “Bob had great knowledge and was a businessman first when it came to the horses but he loved the good families and was very loyal to them.” No details are available yet for McArdle’s funeral. Michael Guerin

The harness racing industry was saddened to hear of the passing of renowned strapper Julian 'Shamo' Attard. Julian passed away last Sunday after battling cancer for serval months, aged 69. He trained and drove his own horses but in the later years of his life, Julian assisted the Fitzpatrick stable in Cawdor as a strapper. "He worked with us for 10 to 15 years," Gavin Fitzpatrick said. "He was great friends with Jeffrey Usher, who owns Sally Fletcher, and he just started coming over and helping out one day. "He worked at the Ingham's factory for many years and loved it there but he loved his horses too. "He drove winners at Harold Park back in the day and did train and drive his own horses." The last winner Julian trained and drove was Bashful Dancer at Gosford on March 26, 1984. A kinder man was hard to find on any racetrack according to Harness Racing New South Wales chief executive John Dumesny. "Julian never had an unkind word to say about anyone or anything in the industry he just loved," Dumesny said. "This can be measured by the fact he respected everyone and everyone that knew Julian respected him. "His welcoming face will be sorely missed at racetracks across the state. "On behalf of the industry, I offer the deepest condolences to his family and friends." A funeral for Julian will be held on Monday January 15 at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Leppington, in the North Chapel at 10am. The Board and Management of HRNSW extends their deepest sympathies to Julian's family and many friends. AMANDA RANDO

Gary Alan Warner passed away unexpectedly at his home in San Jose, CA on December 14, 2017. He was just 52 years of age. The son of Donna (Provenzano) Warner and the late David Warner, Jr. and nephew of James Samberg and the late Barbara (Provenzano) Samberg as well as the grandson of Pat (Barbara) Provenzano. It was Mr. Provenzano who introduced pari-mutuel harness racing in western New York when he opened Batavia Downs in Batavia, NY in 1941 and it became a family business. Gary was born on April 17, 1965 in the 10th Ward in Rochester, NY , He attended Sacred Heart Cathedral Grammar School, Cardinal Mooney High School, and Gannon University. He excelled in many sports including golf, basketball, and soccer. Gary's easy-going demeanor and quick wit made him popular with everyone he met. He was especially proud of his high school soccer team at Cardinal Mooney and recalls with pleasure, the year they won the NYS Championship , Gary was the admissions director at Batavia Downs for many years where one of his favorite parts of the profession was greeting patrons, most of whom he knew by name. After his tenure at Batavia Downs Gary moved to Palm Desert, CA in 1992 to pursue a career in the golf industry. It was there that he met his wife, Melissa. They were married in La Quinta, CA in the very room in which they met. Gary became the Director of Corporate Tournaments at PGA West and he continued with that organization for many years before moving to San Jose, CA where Melissa was residing prior to their marriage After moving to San Jose Gary became Warehouse Manager at Williams-Sonoma in Los Gatos, CA and for over 11 years and he loved, and was loved, by his "work family". Gary's passions included family, friends, the Pittsburgh Steelers and he treasured summers in Thousand Island Park, New York. He so enriched the life of his wife Melissa Warner and was the devoted, proud father of Riley Warner, and embraced and cherished his step-son Grant Hendricks. Gary also left behind a tight family which includes his mom Donna, sisters: Amy (Carl) Munding , Julie (Michael) Miller and brothers David J III (Mary Beth) and Eric (Julia Poli). He is also survived by many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins and countless friends. There will be a memorial service held in San Jose, CA on January 20, 2018 and a Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Sacred Heart Cathedral in Rochester, NY on February 17, 2018 at 10.30am. John Manzi

Batavia, NY---Francis R. Bond, 86, a longtime harness racing owner, driver and trainer at Batavia Downs and Buffalo Raceway, died peacefully Tuesday morning, December 26, 2017 at United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia, NY. "Franny" Bond was born in Buffalo, NY on July 27, 1931. He became a Marine after leaving school and began boxing while in the service in the Armed Forces Title Fights. He fought in the lightweight class and eventually worked into the featherweight division. The then 126-pound "fighting Marine" was described as "a game and lively scrapper who could take a hit and come back with a better one." Corporal Bond became one of the Marine's top boxers, winning a featherweight title in 1953 while often times fighting men from the professional ranks between service bouts and sometimes competing in higher weight classes. Bond continued to fight professionally in the Golden Gloves after he left the service under the name Bobby Bond and was trained by Angelo Dundee who also conditioned the likes of Muhammad Ali, George Foremen, Sugar Ray Leonard and Carmen Basilio. He competed in 15 professional fights all over the eastern seaboard including New York City at Madison Square Garden. Bond first got involved in harness racing in 1966 and eventually got his trainer and driver's licenses. He ran a small stable for the next 39 years, seeing most of his driving success in the 1970's (where he scored 135 of his 189 careers victories) and most of his training accomplishments (total of 108) between 1990 and 2000. Bond also occasionally catch-drove horses when the opportunity arose. Bond's last winning effort came on May 16, 1996 behind H F Harriet at Buffalo Raceway. Bond was an entrepreneur and made a buck anyway he could. He owned a soft drink distributorship, ran the track kitchen at Batavia Downs and sold hay, straw and feed for many years while, and after, he was competing himself. He was known by everyone on the backstretch and was an affable individual his entire life. No memorial information has been relayed. By Tim Bojarski, for Batavia Downs  

Chesapeake City, Md. - Francis J. Tierney of Chesapeake City, Md. passed away Thursday, Dec. 12/2017 at the age of 97. Born June 27, 1920 in Newark, Del., the second of eleven children. He attended Newark Public School, then entered St. Charles College in Catonsville, Md. followed by St. Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore, graduating in 1942 with a BA in Philosophy. He continued studying Theology and was ordained to the Catholic priesthood for the Diocese of Wilmington, Del. in December 1945. For 31 years, Father Tierney served as pastoral assistant at St. Mary's, St. Ann's, and St. Helena's in Wilmington, Good Shepherd in Perryville, Md., and chaplain at the Veteran's Hospital at Perry Point. He also served as Captain and Chaplain in the Delaware National Guard, then as Pastor of St. Benedict Parish in Ridgely, Md. He was founding Pastor of St. Polycarp Parish in Smyrna, Del. then returned to the Wilmington area as Pastor of St. Mary Magdelain Parish and Dean of Suburban Wilmington. After a brief leave of absence, he returned to Ridgley, Md. as pastor until his retirement from active ministry and laicization. Married to Carol Gerstenberg in 1976, Frank and Carol devoted themselves to breeding, training, and harness racing and settled in Chesapeake City. Among the young people who were associated with his harness stable was Joe Holloway. Frank is survived by his wife, Carol of 41 years; his sisters Gertrude McKay of Tolland, Maine and Marguerite Downey of Atlantic City, N.J.; brother, Joseph Tierney of Long Grove, Ill.; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Wednesday, 12/20/2017 at 11:00 am at St. Rose of Lima Church, 301 Lock Street, Chesapeake City, Md. 21915. Visitation will begin at 10:00 am. Burial will follow the service at St. Rose of Lima Cemetery.  

1 to 16 of 607
1 2 3 4 5 Next »