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You are hereby directed:   1. Horse racing is cancelled at your facility through April 30, 2020;   2. If your backside (including dormitories) is open, it SHALL remain open and operational until further notice;   3. If your track is available for training, it SHALL remain open for reasonable equine exercise until further notice.   The intent of this directive:   1. Prevent horse abuse/abandonment;   2. Allow for consolidated feed operations;   3. Prevent homelessness for those who temporarily/seasonally reside on the backside;   4. Provide adequate exercise for horses on property needed to prevent injury potentially caused by confinement   It is incumbent on the horsemen organizations in the State of Ohio and the racing permit holders operating as Racinos in the State of Ohio to submit a 30-day and a 60-day plan to comply with this directive (including financials) to the Ohio State Racing Commission (Commission) not later than midnight April 2, 2020.   The Commission considers themselves a partner with the horsemen and permit holders in reaching a solution to the issues and stand ready to assist the parties in compromise.   You should take all reasonable measures possible to continue social distancing practices.   The Commission will continue to update you as pertinent information becomes available.   Thank you for your patience as we all deal with this unprecedented and very fluid situation.   If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 614-466-2758.   If you need further information on COVID-19, please visit, coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-427-5634.   Ohio State Racing Commission

For Immediate Release: March 25, 2020   The Ohio State Racing Commission (Commission) announces that horse racing at all Ohio racetracks is officially cancelled through April 6, 2020. The Commission will be in contact with the permit holders and the horsemen to discuss further cancellations, if needed.   Racetrack backsides are to remain open.   The racetrack is to be maintained and made available for training. Horsemen and racetrack employees are strongly encouraged to practice safe social distancing procedures. The Commission will continue to keep everyone informed and will post updates when pertinent information becomes available.   The Commission thanks everyone for their patience during this unprecedented and very fluid situation. For questions or concerns, contact Executive Director Bill Crawford at 614-466-2758 or at bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov. If you need further information on COVID-19, please visit, coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-427-5634. -30-  

The Ohio State Racing Commission (Commission) announces that harness racing at all Ohio racetracks is officially cancelled effective immediately from March 20, 2020 through March 27, 2020. The Commission will be in contact with the permit holders and the horsemen to discuss further cancellations, if needed.   Racetrack backsides are to remain open.   The racetrack is to be maintained and made available for training.   Horsemen and racetrack employees are strongly encouraged to practice safe social distancing procedures.   The Commission will continue to keep everyone informed and will post updates when pertinent information becomes available.   The Commission thanks everyone for their patience during this unprecedented and very fluid situation.   For questions or concerns, contact Executive Director Bill Crawford at 614-466-2758 or at bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov.   If you need further information on COVID-19, please visit, coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-427-5634.     

Grove City, Ohio -There has been clarification from the Ohio State Racing Commission in regard to the continuation of live racing in Ohio. At this time all racing can proceed. This clarification authorizes the continuation of racing with simulcast-only wagering in place, racing personnel to de minimis levels of only those required, the closure of racing locations to live spectators, and a reduction of horsemen in their paddock workplace to only those that are necessary and essential to race. Please recognize that in the paddock, as with any workplace, you should maintain social distancing (approximately six feet away from other people) whenever possible, continue to wash hands, maintain proper respiratory etiquette, and above all self-quarantine if you experience any illness symptoms at this time. Thank you for your patience as we continue to proactively monitor and review this situation. We will immediately text any updates to all racing social media outlets and OHHA Emergency Text Blast. To subscribe to the OHHA Emergency Text Blast, text OHHA to 614-924-8072. As a reminder on the 2020 OHHA Staking Nomination Due Date of March 15th. As in past years when March 15th falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or other legal Holiday, we will recognize nominations as timely submitted if they are received and/or postmarked by March 16th. Please make sure that any U.S. Postal Service method enables us to verify the Postmark Date and your nomination contains an Official U.S. Postal Service Postmark. For the sake of fairness, we adhere strictly to this rule for all nominations. by Frank Fraas, for the OHHA  

The Ohio Standardbred Development Fund (OSDF) will hold a meeting in the north end of the Scioto Downs Clubhouse on January 16, 2020 at 10:00 am to discuss the OSDF administrator’s 2020 budget. If you have any questions, please direct them to William Crawford, Ohio State Racing Commission Executive Director at 614-466-2758 or a bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov. ***************************************** The Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, January 21, 2020 at 10:30 am in Room 1948 of the Riffe Center, 77 South High Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215. The OSRC monthly meeting was originally scheduled for January 22, 2020 at 10 am. The meeting is open to the public and all horsemen are encouraged to attend. For any questions or concerns, please contact OSRC Executive Director William Crawford at 614-466-2758 or at bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov. by Kimberly Rinker, Ohio Sires Stakes OSDF Administrator  

Progeny of Ohio-based stallions who participated in the 2019 Ohio Sires Stakes earned a total of $7,100,000 in purses. Stallions must be registered with the Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) during the year of conception for their foals to be eligible to Ohio Standardbred Development Fund (OSDF) events such as the Ohio Sires Stakes (OSS), Ohio Breeders Championship (OBC) and Ohio Fair Stakes (OFS), among others. Twenty-eight pacing stallions were represented by youngsters and older horses in this past season's OSS contests who earned a total of $3,450,000, with ten of those laterally gaited studs siring the winners of $103,000 or more. Pet Rock was the leading sire among those 28, with his OSS performers earning $612,800. Yankee Cruiser was the next most prolific stallion, with $542,850 in foal earnings, while Mcardle sired the winners of $457,650 in 2019 OSS races. The ill-fated Dragon Again saw his foals earn $391,400, while Nob Hill High had foal earnings of $252,800; Big Bad John $244,150; and Mr. Apples, $200,000. Eight pacing stallions standing in Ohio sired foals who earned between $15,500 and $79,500 in 2019 OSS events, while four had starters who earned between $3,750 and $6,000. Pet Rock, who stands at Midland Acres in Bloomingburg, OH, had 19 foals represented among the 2- and 3-year-olds in OSS contests, with 12 freshmen and seven sophomores. Dragon Again had 17 (eight freshmen & nine sophomores); Big Bad John had 16 (13 freshmen & three sophomores); and McArdle had 11 foals (five freshmen & six sophomores). Yankee Glide had nine (five freshmen & four sophomores) and Western Vintage had nine (three freshmen & six sophomores). A total of 29 trotting sires were represented by foals who participated in the 2019 Ohio Sires Stakes, with 22 of those stallions producing foals who garnered $3,650,000 in OSS earnings. Uncle Peter's foals grabbed the top spot among all trotting stallions, earning $1,014,550. Just half a million dollars behind in second was Triumphant Caviar, whose foals earned $554,800 in OSS races, while Manofmanymissions' foals earned $451,000. Cash Hall-who sadly passed away in 2019-produced the winners of $388,400 in OSS events, with the exported Wishing Stone's foals earning $298,700, while Dejamrbro sired the winners of $241,200 in OSS races in 2019. Break The Bank K's foals earned $179,950; Broadway Hall's foals earned $153,900; and Dontyouforgetit's foals earned $140,950 in 2019 OSS contests. Six stallions had progeny that earned between $10,000 and $69,200, while seven stallions had foals who earned between $2,000 and $9,600. A total of seven stallions had OSS starters who did not earn a purse check. The stallion Uncle Peter, who stands at Hickory Lane Farm in Findlay, OH, had 40 foals participating in this season's Ohio Sires Stakes: 13 freshman colts and 13 freshman fillies, with seven 3-year-old colts and seven 3-year-old fillies. Triumphant Caviar, who stands at Abby Stables in Sugarcreek, OH, had 16 OSS contestants including six freshmen colts and six freshmen fillies, and four 3-year-old fillies. The exported Manofmanymissions was represented by 15 foals in OSS competition: four 2-year-old colts; three 2-year-old fillies; six 3-year-old trotting colts and two 3-year-old trotting fillies. Wishing Stone and Dejarmbro-both of whom have been exported either to Europe (Wishing Stone) or to Illinois (Dejarmbro) were represented by 11 foals each in 2019 Ohio Sires Stakes competition. As well, Break The Bank K, who stands at Hagemeyer Farms in Clarksville, OH, produced 10 foals who participated in the 2019 OSS season. Overall, 16 horses earned $100,000 or more in OSS competition in 2019: eight pacers and eight trotters. Yankee Cruiser, who stands at Midland Acres in Bloomingburg, OH, produced two top pacing geldings that earned $361,000 in OSS this year. Elver Hanover, who captured the $300,000 OSS 2-Year-Old Championship at Northfield Park earned $230,000, while the 3-year-old Yankee Boots banked $131,000 in OSS earnings. Uncle Peter produced a pair of 2-year-old trotters who earned a combined $297,800: the colt Action Uncle ($174,800) and the gelding Big Box Hanover ($123,000). Triumphant Caviar had a pair of 2-year-old trotting foals whose earnings totaled $296,000: the filly Kikimora ($190,000) and the gelding Exhibit Class ($106,000). As well, the aforementioned trotting sire Manofmanymissions produced two youngsters who combined earned $236,700 in OSS competition: the 2-year-old filly Globetrotting ($128,200) and the 3-year-old filly Weslynn Quest ($108,500). by Kimberly Rinker, for the Ohio Sires Stakes  

The Ohio State Racing Commission approved both the Standardbred and Thoroughbred 2020 stakes schedules at its Dec. 18, 2019 meeting at the Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus, OH. The 2020 approved Standardbred (Ohio Sires Stakes) schedule is below: Date Day Track Age/Gender/Gait/Leg May 1 Friday Miami Valley 3-Year-Old Filly Trot & 3-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 1 May 3 Sunday Miami Valley 3-Year-Old Colt Trot & 3-Year-Old Colt Pace, Leg 1 June 6 Saturday Northfield Park 3-Year-Old Colt Pace & 3-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 2 June 13 Saturday Scioto Downs 3-Year-Old Colt Trot, Leg 2 June 19 Friday Scioto Downs 3-Year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 2 July 3 Friday Northfield Park 2-Year-Old Colt Trot & 2-year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 1 July 4 Saturday Scioto Downs 3-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 3 July 10 Friday Northfield Park 3-Year-Old Colt Trot & 3-Year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 3 July 11 Saturday Scioto Downs 2-Year-Old Colt Pace & 2-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 1 July 17 Friday Scioto Downs 2-Year-Old Colt Trot & 2-Year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 2 July 18 Saturday Scioto Downs 3-Year-Old Colt Pace, Leg 3 July 24 Friday Scioto Downs 2-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 2 July 25 Saturday Northfield Park 2-Year-Old Colt Pace, Leg 2 Aug 7 Friday Northfield Park 2-Year-Old Filly Trot & 2-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 3 Aug 8 Saturday Scioto Downs 2-year-Old Colt Pace, Leg 3 Aug 10 Monday Northfield Park 2-Year-Old Colt Trot, Leg 3 Aug 14 Friday Scioto Downs 3-Year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 4 Aug 15 Saturday Northfield Park 3-Year-Old Colt Trot & 3-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 4 Aug 17 Monday Northfield Park 2-Year-Old Colt Pace & 2-Year-Old Filly Pace, Leg 4 Aug 21 Friday Scioto Downs 2-Year-Old Colt Trot & 2-Year-Old Filly Trot, Leg 4 Aug 22 Saturday Northfield Park 3-Year-Old Colt Pace, Leg 4 Sept 5 Saturday Scioto Downs 2- & 3-Year-Olds Super Night $300,000 Championships Oct 16 Friday Dayton Raceway 4-Year-Olds & Up $85,000 Championships Oct 17 Saturday Northfield Park 2- & 3-Year-Olds $75,000 Consolations These 2020 schedules can be found at the OSRC website at www.racingohio.net. For information on the Standardbred (Ohio Sires Stakes) schedule, contact Kimberly Rinker at 614-779-0269 or at kim.rinker@racing.ohio.gov. For information on the Thoroughbred (Best of Ohio Series) schedule, contact Greg Veit at 614-779-0268 or at greg.veit@racing.ohio.gov. By Kimberly Rinker, OSDF Administrator  

The Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) reminds Ohio harness racing horsemen that the new therapeutic medication resolution for regulatory thresholds takes effect on Jan. 1, 2020. The resolution and OSRC regulatory thresholds list can be found at the OSRC website (www.racingohio.net) under Licenses, Laws & Rules. OSRC Commissioner Beth Hansen, chair of the OSRC Medication Committee (OSRC-MC), presented the resolution at the Sept. 23, 2019 OSCR Meeting where it was unanimously approved. For questions, please contact William Crawford, OSRC Executive Director at 614-466-2758 or at bill.crawford@racing.ohio.gov. OHIO STATE RACING COMMISSION RESOLUTION 2019-07 WHEREAS, The Ohio State Racing Commission ("Commission") has the authority under Ohio Revised Code 3769.03 to prescribe rules and conditions under which horse racing may be conducted; WHEREAS, Ohio Administrative Code sections 3769-8-01 (A)(2) and 3769-18- 01 (A)(2) state the Commission may, by order, establish a system of classification of prohibited foreign substances, to include methods of detection and/or regulatory thresholds recommended penalties and disciplinary measures for the presence of said substances in test samples; WHEREAS, Ohio Administrative Code sections 3769-8-01 (A)(2) and 3769-18- 01 (A)(2) further state in determining the substances to be classified the Commission shall give due consideration to the uniform classification guidelines of foreign substances and recommended penalties and model rules revised by the association of racing commissioners international; WHEREAS, The Commission has established a medication committee which has reviewed industry therapeutic medication thresholds and the Commission's current list of Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances; WHEREAS, The medication committee received industry input regarding the misuse and/or abuse of these therapeutic medications and the detrimental effect on the equine athlete and to all of horse racing; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the following substances are approved as the Commission's Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances: Substance Threshold Matrix Acepromazine HEPS 10 ng/ml urine Albuterol 1 ng/ml urine Betamethasone 10 pg/ml blood Butorphanol 10 ng/ml urine   .   Cetirizine 6 ng/ml blood Cimetidine 400 ng/ml Blood     Clenbuterol   Dantrolene 25 pg/ml   5-OH dantrolene blood   blood   0.1 ng/ml   Detomidine 1 ng/ml blood Dexamethasone 5 pg/ml blood Diclofenac 5 ng/ml blood DMSO 10 ug/ml blood Firocoxib 20 ng/ml blood Flunixin 20 ng/ml blood Furosemide 100 ng/ml blood Glycopyrrolate 3 pg/ml blood Guaifenesin 12 ng/ml blood Isoflupredone 100 pg/ml blood Isoxuprine 1 ug/ml urine Ketoprofen 2 ng/ml blood Lidocaine 20 pg/ml of total 3-OH Lidocaine blood Mepivacaine 10 ng/ml of 3-OH Mepivacaine    urine Limit of Detection urine   blood Methocarbamol 1 ug/ml urine Methylprednisolone 100 pg/ml blood Omeprazole 10 ng/ml blood Omeprazole Sulfide   Phenylbutazone 2 ug/ml blood Prednisolone 1 ng/ml blood Procaine Penicillin 25 ng/ml blood Ranitidine 40 ng/ml blood Triamcinolone Acetonide 100 pg/ml blood Xylazine 200 pg/ml blood     NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the following substances are removed from the Commission's Regulatory Thresholds for Prohibited Substances and are now prohibited substances: Substance Threshold Matrix Pentazocine 50 ng/ml urine Promazine 50 ng/ml urine 3-OH promazine Pyrilamine 100 pg/ml blood O-desmethylpyrilamine Stanozolol 1 ng/ml urine 16 B-hydroxystanozolol   NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AND ORDERED, by the Commission that the effective implementation date of the above Orders is January 1, 2020. Adopted: September 23, 2019 by Kimberly Rinker, for the Ohio Sires Stakes  

It hasn’t been that long ago that harness racing at the fairs and pari-mutuel tracks in Ohio were losing owners, trainers and drivers to other states because of low purse money. “The advent of the Video Lottery Terminals has really helped give an influx not only to our industry, but the trickledown effect has helped the fairs as well,” said Steve Bateson, a Rudolph resident who is the current president of the Ohio Harness Horsemen’s Association. “The fairs that have harness racing receive support money for doing such and there is also purse support money that comes from the Video Lottery Terminals, otherwise known as VLTs,” Bateson continued. “That significantly increased the purses probably by 2x to 3x in the last six years. “That has made it more of just being a hobby. People can now invest and make money and have fun even racing at the county fairs.” There are seven VLTs in Ohio, four at harness racing tracks and three at thoroughbred tracks. All seven of the tracks have racinos and a percent of those receipts go back into the state racing program. Bateson’s interest in harness racing started at a young age at the Wood County fair aided by his neighbors at the time, Forrest and Winifred Warner, who both were heavily involved in harness racing. “Their love of horses and the industry really drove my interest to the next level,” Bateson said. “I went to races as a kid either with my dad or my grandfather. I owned by first horse with a gentleman from Wood County who was a farmer, D.L. Whitacre, who trained horses. “I had a good experience from just going to different fairs and watching harness racing.” Bateson is the fourth Wood County resident to be the president of the OHHA. “I think the fairs are really the backbone of our sport in this state,” Bateson said, adding that the 66 fairs that have racing are the roots of the sport and that has helped get the industry through the tough times. “It’s been generational and a lot of it dates back to racing at the county fairs,” he added. “The county fair system in this state is stronger than any place in the country. Very few states have as many strong agricultural fairs as what Ohio does and Wood County is one of the stronger ones.” By Jack Carle Reprinted with permission of The Sentinel-Tribune

Columbus, OH — The following is a statement from the United States Trotting Association regarding the scratch of Bettor Joy N at Miami Valley Raceway on Monday (May 6). The U.S. Trotting Association is aware of and disappointed by the Ohio State Racing Commission’s eleventh-hour scratch of Bettor Joy N from the Sam “Chip” Noble III Memorial this afternoon at Miami Valley Raceway. It has been conveyed to us that this was done because Bettor Joy N, while microchipped, did not possess a freeze brand. The USTA approved the use of microchips for identification purposes at its March 2018 Board of Directors meeting, and alerted all state racing commissions as to this change in policy shortly thereafter. Specifically, foals of 2019 and beyond are required to be microchipped. Starting in 2021, all Standardbred horses competing at United States racetracks will be required to have a microchip, including those that were previously freeze branded. Bettor Joy N does not have a freeze brand. She is a New Zealand import and was microchipped after her arrival in the United States in December 2018. We have had numerous conversations, starting early last summer and as recently as late last month, with the Ohio State Racing Commission about this rule, and were left with the impression that there were no objections to it nor confusion about its application. All Ohio racetracks, including Miami Valley, were provided with microchip readers free of charge as part of their USTA membership benefits. We are particularly dismayed by third-party reports indicating that Bettor Joy N was allowed to be treated with Lasix at the appointed time, and that only afterward was it conveyed that she would not be allowed to participate in the Noble. Standardbred horse identification is central to the USTA’s mandate, and an area in which we have significant expertise, responsibility, and experience. Rule changes are deliberated and voted upon by a board of 60 directors — including eight from Ohio — who represent all facets of the industry. Moreover, our outreach to alert and educate the industry about the microchip rule change has been steady and ongoing for 15 months. We have experienced no similar issues with any other jurisdiction regarding the introduction of microchips, and we remain available to work with the OSRC to ensure that this scenario does not repeat itself. from the USTA Communications Department

The Ohio Sires Stakes nominations for 2- and 3-year-old trotting and pacing colts and fillies remain strong in 2019, with a healthy 1,016 nominations received in the Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) office by the March 15 deadline.  Harness racing horses sired by a stallion registered with the OSRC and standing in the Buckeye State in 2019 are eligible to the rich Ohio Sires Stakes, which are funded by the Ohio Standardbred Development Fund (OSDF). A total of 139 stallions are currently standing at Ohio-based facilities for this year’s breeding season. In 2019, the Ohio Sires Stakes will offer eight $300,000 Championships to be raced Sept. 1 at Northfield Park and eight $75,000 Consolations set for Sept. 7 at Scioto Downs. As well, eight $75,000 Championships will be contested at both Scioto Downs (Sept. 7) and at Northfield Park (Oct. 12) for trotters and pacers, 4-year-olds and up. A total of 620 trotting and pacing youngsters of both genders (293 fillies & 327 colts) were nominated in the 2-year-old divisions, while the sophomore ranks had 369 (156 fillies & 213 colts) foals nominated.  Among freshman trotters, 175 colts were nominated this season, while in the 2-year-old trotting filly division, 129 nominations were received.  In the freshman pacing divisions, 152 colts and 164 fillies were nominated to the 2019 program. Among Ohio-sired 3-year-olds, 117 trotting colts and 84 trotting fillies are Ohio Sires Stakes eligible, while 96 pacing colts and 72 pacing fillies were nominated. While the overwhelming majority of nominations came from individuals and stables residing and training in the Buckeye State, nominations were also received from Florida, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, Iowa, Tennesse and Mississippi, as well as from Canada and Bermuda. Of the 24 Ohio stallions represented in the 2-year-old colt pacing division, 21 of the 152 youngsters nominated are sired by Big Bad John, 20 by Pet Rock, 19 by McArdle, 16 by Mr Wiggles, 14 by Dragon Again, 12 by Yankee Cruiser and ten by Rockin Amadeus. In the 2-year-old pacing filly ranks, the leading Ohio sires of those 164 nominees include Big Bad John with 25 nominees, followed by Dragon Again and McArdle with 19 each,  Pet Rock with 17, and Mr Wiggles with 15. Uncle Peter dominated the 2-year-old diagonally-gaited colt division, with 35 of his progeny nominated.  Manofmanymissions is represented by 20 nominees, while Dejarmbro has 17, Cash Hall and Triumphant Caviar 13 each, and Dontyouforgetit 12.   Both Full Count and Wishing stone are reprsented by 10 foals each in this same division. Among the 129 freshman trotting fillies, Uncle Peter produced 27 nominees, with Dejarmbo siring 15 and Triumphant Caviar 13. Likewise, in the 3-year-old filly trotting division of 84 nominees, Uncle Peter again reigns surpreme with 16 nominees.  Manofmanymissions and Dejarmbro each have eight nominees, with Break the Bank K and Wishing Stone having six foals each nominated to the program. From the 117 sophomore colt trotters nominated, 28 are by Uncle Peter, while Wishing Stone and Manofmanymissions have 13 progeny each nominated. OSRC-registered trotting sires Dontyouforgettit and Dejarmbro are represented by ten foals each in this division. Among the 96 side-wheeling 3-year-old male nominees, 18 are sired by Pet Rock, 14 by Western Vintage, and 13 each by Dragon Again and McArdle. Pet Rock also leads the sophmore pacing filly division, with 16 foals nominated to this year’s Ohio Sires Stakes, while Dragon Again has 11 nominees, with Big Bad John and McArdle having seven of their daughters in the 2019 program.  The first leg of the Ohio Sires Stakes for 3-year-olds is less than a month away, with 3-year-olds vying at Miami Valley Gaming & Racing on May 3 (trotting & pacing fillies) and May 5 (trotting & pacing colts).   By Kimberly Rinker OSDF Administrator

A quintet of Ohio-based, practicing racetrack veterinarians provided the Ohio State Racing Commission members with their thoughts on out of competition testing at the OSRC's monthly meeting, Nov. 29, in Columbus. The veterinarians-who between them have over 150 years of experience-included: Dr. John Piehowicz, Cincinnati (Thoroughbreds/Standardbreds); Dr. John Reichert, Grove City (Standardbreds); Dr. Barry Carter, Lancaster, (Standardbreds); Dr. Dan Wilson, Cleveland, (Standardbreds); and Dr. Scott Shell, Cleveland (Thoroughbreds). All five veterinarians agreed that clients in their respective practices were in favor of out of competition in the Buckeye State. "We need to establish a simple process, whereas a public training center or private farm would be able to be easily licensed by the OSRC," Dr. Barry Carter stated. "By being licensed, it would allow the OSRC to walk onto a property at any time and test and/or examine any racehorse. "The race secretaries would only accept horses from licensed facilities," Dr. Carter added. "And the licensing fees should be nominal, so everyone would be encouraged to get licensed." "My major concern is, what will we test for?" said Dr. Dan Wilson. "The RCI protocol is currently burdensome and we need to narrow the focus of testing and test for street designer drugs such as neuro-toxins, blood doping agents and venoms. "Also, we'll have to deal with horses coming in from neighboring states such as Michigan and New York. At Northfield we have a ton of horses coming from these areas every night and have anywhere from 640 to 740 horses stabled on the grounds." "Out of competition testing will eliminate the 'shooting star' trainers, as well as the gossip and innuendoes that are a backstretch constant," Dr. John Piehowicz acknowledged. "Out of competition testing also serves as a strong deterrent to those few bad apples we have in the racing industry. "Racing is a privilege, just like driving, and protocol will need to be set well in advance," Dr. Piehowicz continued. "We're going to need to establish who does the testing? What criteria is that person going to have to be authorized to test horses? What about out of state competitors? How do we handle them? We're going to have to work closely in cooperation with surrounding states. "The penalties need to be stiff too-ten or 15-year suspensions or a life ban for medications that are injurious to the welfare of the horse," Dr. Piehowicz stressed. "This year at Belterra Park we had 900 horses on the grounds and 30 to 40% of those on race day are ship-ins, so a slap on the wrist for a drug that has no business being in a horse's system isn't appropriate." "I'm firmly in favor of out of competition testing but the RCI model as it currently stands is just way too large," said Dr. Scott Shell. "There are drugs out there right now that have no business being in a horse: venoms, toxics and blood-doping agents like synthetic EPO. However, there are a lot of drugs on the RCI list that we use as healing agents and we need to narrow the scope to those harmful agents. "Out of competition testing will also help to eliminate excess testing expenses," Dr. Shell continued. "In order for me to keep my veterinarian license, I'm required to be accountable for every drop of medication that goes into every horse and when and where I performed that service. Therefore, a trainer needs to be able to produce a vet record of his or her horses so that regulators have a clear idea of what is therapeutic and what isn't. "For instance, anabolic steroids are a controlled substance that we, as veterinarians, use therapeutically, and we need to establish the difference between when medications are used therapeutically and when they are not." "Out of competition testing has become a necessity," Dr. John Reichert admitted. "The majority of trainers are operating within the rules, but because of the few bad apples we need out of competition testing and we need to establish accurate testing. I'm talking about agents that have long term effects on a horse's system: blood doping, venoms, etc. We need an effective narrow scope of testing, and the accuracy of testing is paramount to establishing severe penalties for the cheaters. "We also need to think about legal concerns," Dr. Reichert continued. "For instance, do we do random testing, or do we pick the obvious cheaters? There's not many trainers who operate on a 400 to 600-win average. But we're also going to have to think about horses that throw in bad races for reasons such as flipped-palates and tying up, and then dramatically improve when in the hands of a new trainer who can help alleviate those issues. "I also think that logistically we'll have to figure out how we're going to cooperate amongst the other states who already have out of competition testing in place," Dr. Reichert noted. "For instance, different states have different testing procedures. Are we going to test the horses in the state they're currently in or do we bring them to a central location? The manpower to do the testing has to be credentialed and capable as well." "In my opinion, out of competition testing is the biggest deterrent to illicit drug use in this industry," Dr. Barry Carter concluded. "Obviously, out of competition is a multi-faceted issue which needs to be discussed further," stated Robert Schmitz, OSRC Chairman. "At our January 2019 meeting I'm asking the Ohio Department of Agriculture's testing lab to be on hand to lend their insight into this issue." by Kimberly Rinker, OSDF Administrator 

A panel of practicing racetrack veterinarians will present their thoughts on Out of Competition Testing at the Ohio State Racing Commission's (OSRC) monthly meeting, November 29, 2018 at 10 am in Room 1948 at the Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus, Ohio. The meeting is open to all pari-mutuel stakeholders, horsemen's associations and the public. "The commission hopes input from practicing racetrack veterinarians will generate ideas concerning out of competition testing that will elevate Ohio's strong racing program to even greater heights," OSRC Chairman Robert K. Schmitz stated. "We are looking at establishing testing management and results processes for both breeds, as well as the differences between therapeutic and performance-enhancing medication ideology as it relates to sample testing procedures." All horsemen-both Standardbred and Thoroughbred-are invited and encouraged to attend and participate in the discussion, Chairman Schmitz stressed. The panel of veterinarians includes: Dr. John Piehowicz, a Cincinnati-based Thoroughbred veterinarian; Dr. John Reichert, a Grove City-based Standardbred veterinarian; Dr. Barry Carter, a Lancaster, Ohio-based Standardbred veterinarian; Dr. Dan Wilson, a Cleveland, Ohio-based Standardbred veterinarian; Dr. Scott Shell, a Cleveland, Ohio-based Thoroughbred veterinarian; and Dr. Bob Schwartz, a Bloomington, Ohio-based Standardbred veterinarian. by Kimberly Rinker, OSDF Administrator

Ohio State Racing Commission Chairman Robert Schmitz is seeking input from both Standardbred and Thoroughbred horsemen regarding Out of Competition Testing at the OSRC meeting, Aug. 29, 2018 at 10 am in Room 1952 at the Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus. The meeting is open to all pari-mutuel stakeholders, horsemen's associations and the public. "Out of Competition Testing needs to be studied and strategically developed in Ohio, and we're hoping for input from everyone involved in the Ohio horse racing industry," Chairman Schmitz stressed. "The Ohio State Racing Commission is looking to generate ideas that will continue to elevate Ohio's racing program to even greater heights." All horsemen are invited and encouraged to attend and participate in the discussion, Chairman Schmitz stressed. by Kimberly Rinker, OSDF Administrator

The Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC) hosted the first of several medication forums on Sept. 26, 2017 at the Riffe Center in Columbus, Ohio. A well-attended crowd listened to testimony from veterinarians and horsemen’s representatives during the near three-hour forum. “We were seeking practical insight into medication issues affecting horses racing in Ohio,” explained Dr. James Robertson, OSRC consulting veterinarian. “We also wanted input from experts who have been involved with medication issues affecting racehorses and horsemen on the national level.” A trio of Ohio-based, practicing veterinarians—all with extensive knowledge of equine athletic physiology, including Dr. F. John Reichert, Dr. Scott Shell and Dr. Dan Wilson—provided insight into their daily regimes of caring for the equine athlete, both Standardbred and Thoroughbred.  As well, Dr. Clara Fenger, a central-Kentucky-based equine practitioner and founder of North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians (NAARV); Dr. Tom Tobin, a toxicologist, pharmacologist and veterinarian at the University of Kentucky’s Dept. of Veterinary Science; and Dr. Alicia Bertone, an equine orthopedic surgeon from The Ohio State University’s Dept. of Veterinary Clinical Sciences—presented their views on racetrack medication and practical applications facing veterinarians today. A second medication forum will be held immediately following the OSRC monthly meeting on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017 at 10 am in Room 1948 at the Riffe Center, 77 South High Street, Columbus, OH.  All horsemen and the public are invited to attend.  Anyone wishing to speak is asked to contact Bill Crawford at the OSRC by Oct. 20, 2017. Kimberly Rinker OSDF Administrator Ohio State Racing Commission

The richest night in Ohio harness racing history was recorded Sept. 2 at Scioto Downs when that evening's Super Night program sported more than $2 million in purses, highlighted by eight $250,000 Ohio Sires Stakes contests for Ohio-sired 2- and 3-year-old trotters and pacers of both genders. The Ohio Sires Stakes provides youngsters sired by a stallion standing in the Buckeye State, and registered with the Ohio State Racing Commission (OSRC), an opportunity to race in the four-leg, $40,000-per-division series, culminating with $250,000 Championships. Drivers, trainers, owners and breeders of winning horses are all rewarded for their efforts via the prestigious OSS Championships, both directly and indirectly. Stallion Stats The pacing stallion McArdle-who stands at Hickory Lane Farm in Findlay, OH-had the most contestants in the pacing championships, with eight of his foals going postward. That number includes a pair of 2-year-olds and six 3-year-olds. The Panderosa-who stands at Marvin Raber's farm in Baltic, OH-was represented by five foals, including two freshman and three sophomore side-wheelers. As well, Big Bad John and Pet Rock (both standing at Midland Acres, Bloomingburg, OH) each had four of their progeny competing, while the ill-fated Dragon Again (who stood at Sugar Valley Farm, Delaware, OH until his death earlier this year) was represented by three 2-year-olds. Art Official (Midland Acres) and Manhardt (standing at Dublin Valley Farms, Fredericksberg, OH) each had one 2-year-old and one 3-year-old in OSS competition that night, while the exported Foreclosure N had a pair of freshmen pacers vying. Believeinbruiser, Charley Barley, Santana Blue Chip, Woodstock, World Of Rocknroll and Yankee Cruiser all had one foal each in an OSS event. World Champion trotting stallion Triumphant Caviar (standing at Abby Stables, Sugarcreek,OH) held his own in the trotting ranks, with seven of his foals battling in the OSS Championships-with one 2-year-old and six 3-year-olds. Dejarmbro (Hickory Lane Farm) had one freshman and four sophmore trotters sparing, with Manofmanymissions having six 2-year-olds racing. Three 2-year-olds and one 3-year-old foal by Break The Bank K (Midland Acres) went postward as well. The stallions Cash Hall, Full Count and Victory Sam were all represented by two foals each in the OSS Championships, while And Away We Go, Big Rigs, Deep Chip, Iron Duke, My MVP and Stormin Norman all had one foal each in competition. OSS Championship winners Impinktoo and Mission Accepted were both sired by Manofmanymissions, while Triumphant Caviar sired Champions Fraser Ridge and Rose Run Sydney. Dragon Again sired the winning Seeing Eye Single; Champion Bad Girls Rule was sired by World Of Rocknroll; the winning Pistol Packin Mama is by The Panderosa, and Champion Drunk On Your Love by Foreclosure N. Favorites Prevail Six winners of the OSS Championships were favorites: 2-Year-Old Colt Trotting Champion Mission Accepted and 3-Year-Old Colt Pacing Champion Drunk On Your Love were each 8-5; Seeing Eye Single, the 2-Year-Old Colt Pacing Champion, was 2-1; Rose Run Sydney, 3-Year-Old Filly Trotting Champion, was 4-5; Fraser Ridge, the 3-Year-Old Colt Trotting Champion, was 1-5; and Pistol Packin Mama, the 3-Year-Old Filly Pacing Champion, was 6-5. Impinktoo, the 2-Year-Old Filly Trotting Champion, had the longest odds of any of the Super Night Champions, leaving the gate at 14-1, while 2-Year-Old Filly Pacing Champion Bad Girls Rule was sent off at odds of 7-2. Trainers Conditioner Jim Dailey harnessed two OSS Champions-Impinktoo and Bad Girls Rule, as well as second-place finisher Rockathon and third-place finisher Scotch McEwan-from four starters. Trainer Chris Beaver tighened the girth on eight Super Night starters, including the winning Fraser Ridge, with Gabbyloosechange second; Red Storm and Buckeye Boss each fourth; and Sesame and Bamaslastchance each fifth. Trainer Ronnie Burke sent out four pacers, winning the 2-Year-Old Colt Championship with Seeing Eye Single, while Baron Remy was third in the 2-Year-Old Filly Pacing Championship, as was Rosa's Touch in the 3-Year-Old Filly Pacing Championship. Ten pacers went postward from the Brian Brown stable in OSS Championship, with 44-1 Dragonology finishing third; Rock On Creek fourth; and Slick Mick fifth in the 2-Year-Old Colt Pacing Championship. Barnabas was fourth and Lightning Onmyfeet fifth in the 3-Year-Old Colt Pacing Championship. Drivers Danny Noble won two Championship events; first with Bad Girls Rule in the 2-Year-Old Filly Pacing Championship in 1:54.3 and then in the 3-Year-Old Colt Pacing Championship with Drunk On Your Love, who was timed in 1:53. Second Isn't Bad Either Perhaps the most interesting horse of the night was Bourbon And Barley-who finished second at 48-1 odds in the 3-Year-Old Filly Pace Championship to the winning Pistol Packin Mama in 1:53. This daughter by Charley Barley had career earnings of $143,105 prior to Super Night, and has only one win lifetime from 18 starts-a victory in the first leg of the OSS at Miami Valley Raceway earlier this season on May 1 in 1:56. In seven starts at two she never visited the winner's circle and still earned $107,870 for owner Kenneth Kohut of Independence, OH. Her career earnings now stand at $205,605-a testament to the money-making opportunities for owners that invest in an Ohio-bred harness horse. As well, to those fans who invested in her abilties in the Championship, she returned a wopping $50.60 to place. Ohio Sires Stakes action wraps up on Saturday, Oct. 14 at Northfield Park, when eight $50,000 Consolations will be contested at the "Home of the Flying Turns." Kimberly Rinker OSDF Administrator Ohio State Racing Commission 77 South High Sreet, 18th Floor Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-779-0269 Kim.rinker@racing.ohio.gov

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