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HARRINGTON, Del. - Owner/trainer Brian Malone and driver Anthony Morgan teamed up for three wins in a row with mares on the Tuesday Harrington Raceway harness racing program. Malone's Hostess Lisa ($12, Tony Morgan) notched her eighth win of the season with a 1:53.1 triumph in the featured $17,500 Mares Open. The 7-year-old Sagebrush mare surged three-wide on the final turn and cleared the leaders for a narrow win over Quotable Quotes and Matinee Dragon. Trained by Malone, it was her 24th career win. Malone and Morgan teamed up in the sub-feature as well as Malone and Carrie Stackowitz's Mcarma ($5.40, Tony Morgan) won the $10,000 conditioned pace in 1:54.2. The Malone-trainee notched her fifth win in seven starts at the meet. Lanco Express ($3) then completed the hat trick for Malone and Morgan with a 1:55.4 in a $7,500 conditioned pace. Allan Davis and Montrell Teague each had a driving double. Matthew Sparacino  

This Fridays Taylor Mile is one of the most even fields you will see in a while. Won by Mossdale Connor last year, other stars to win this sort after race include, Christen Me, Terror To Love, Changeover and Elsu. While this year nobody really stands out above the others. After the scratching of Say My Name this morning the Dunn barn have Robbie Burns and Little Rascal engaged. Robbie Burns made an early mistake back on the 31st March, he lost close to 50m and was seen storming home behind Bettor Spirits in a quickly run affair. “Robbie Burns was super last start, he’s a great chance from his draw, and there isn’t much between them both” said John Dunn Little Rascal was another to make an early mistake last week and cost himself plenty of ground in a tidy field. They ran home in 55.2/27.4 off the front and he finished just in behind them after being 5L off them at the 400m. “Little Rascal’s run last week was a lot better then the form line reads, he’s been going nice races and I wouldn’t rule him out of a top 4 placing with a handy trip” said Dunn. Other Canterbury visitors Maverick (Nigel McGrath) and Field Marshal (Tim Butt) look strong chances. Maverick has been a revelation since joining Nigel McGrath’s barn; Owned by A J McGrath and breeders Ken and Anne Marie Spicer, this season Maverick has won 6 from 16, including 5 seconds. "Maverick has travelled up well, his bloods weren't right a while ago and we missed a trial so I’d expect him to improve on this weeks run. The 2700m is more his go" said McGrath. The Tim Butt trained and likely favourite Field Marshal, will look to continue his picket fence line after beating Locharburn last start. Drawn awkwardly on the second line, driver Dexter Dunn will have to at his very best to get the Art Major entire over the line in first place. Hug The Wind (Barry Purdon) and Bettor Spirits (Mike Berger) look the best of the Northerners chances, both have been in super form recently but have tough barriers to work from. While Prince Of Pops (Garlick/Telfer) and Risk (Andrew & Lyn Neal) have drawn perfectly in barriers 1 and 2 respectively. Australian My Kiwi Mate arrives on a flight late this week looking to qualify for the Harness Jewels. With Tact Tate likely to receive the Harness Jewels invite, trainer Craig Demmler will be hoping to qualify his runner through the Taylor Mile and Messenger Andrew Fitzgerald

East Rutherford, NY - After careful consideration and consultation with various horsemen, The Meadowlands will be suspending its rule limiting a trainer to two horses (other than any horse the trainer has campaigned since the horse's first start) in the Final of a stakes race.   "There had been concerns voiced to us in the past regarding any trainer having multiple starters in one stakes final," said Jeff Gural. "But after listening to the view points of several horsemen, we will suspend the rule going forward. In addition, with the horse population continuing to decrease, limiting the number of horses entered into some of our biggest races may not be in the best interest of the Meadowlands as a business. We will monitor this going forward and we certainly reserve the right to bring this rule back with 30 days notice, if we feel it is necessary."   The suspension of this rule is effective immediately and all trainers should be aware of this when submitting their nominations for our stakes events on February 15th. by Darin Zoccali, for the Meadowlands  

Adam Bowden was in the Kentucky Futurity winner's circle last year with Creatine and he hopes to return there following Sunday's 122nd edition of the trotting classic, this time with Father Patrick. Bowden and his father, Chris, operate Diamond Creek Farm, which is part of Father Patrick's ownership group. Father Patrick, who has won 20 of 23 career races and $1.92 million, drew post No. 1 for Sunday's $435,000 Kentucky Futurity for 3-year-old trotters at The Red Mile in Lexington. Nine horses entered the Futurity, so eliminations are unnecessary. Yannick Gingras will drive Father Patrick for trainer Jimmy Takter in the one-dash-for-the-cash event. Rounding out the field in post order are Il Sogno Dream, Martiniwithmuscle, Datsyuk, Hillustrious, Nuncio, Mr Lindy, DD's Hitman, and Lightning Force. Sunday's card also includes the $224,000 Kentucky Filly Futurity, $173,000 Allerage Farm Open Trot, $160,500 Allerage Farm Open Pace, $90,000 Allerage Farm Mare Pace, and $89,000 Allerage Farm Mare Trot. Father Patrick brings a four-race win streak to the Futurity, including a 4-1/2 length victory over Lightning Force in 1:50.4 in a division of the Bluegrass Stakes at The Red Mile last Sunday. He also has won the $613,800 Canadian Trotting Classic, $260,000 Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship and $340,000 Zweig Memorial since losing by a half-length to Datsyuk in a division of the Tompkins-Geers Stakes. "Last week he was on cruise control and still trotted in sub-1:51," said Bowden, who owns Father Patrick with John Fielding, Christina Takter, Brittany Farms, Brixton Medical AB, and the group of Marvin Katz, Al Libfeld and Sam Goldband. "Hopefully, we're in the winner's circle on Sunday. Jimmy gives me two thumbs up. I'm hoping that's going to be the case." Last year, the Diamond Creek-bred-and-owned Creatine won the Futurity for hometown trainer Bob Stewart. Bowden had planned to sell Creatine when he was a yearling, but the horse was withdrawn from the auction because of an infected hock and remained with Diamond Creek. Creatine races Sunday in the Allerage Farm Open Trot. "We've been with Bob since the beginning and for him to be a Kentucky guy, no offense, I love Father Patrick, but I don't think anything is going to top last year," Bowden said. "That was the most exciting thing for me. It was the first time. It was a homebred with a good friend of mine. We always believed in the horse and we finally won one of the big ones. That was exciting." The Bowdens started Diamond Creek Farm in 2005 in Paris, Ky., and now have a second location in Pennsylvania. Diamond Creek will stand Father Patrick as a stallion at the conclusion of his racing career. Father Patrick, bred by Brittany Farms, is a son of stallion Cantab Hall out of the mare Gala Dream. He is a full brother to million-dollar-earner Pastor Stephen. "We're very happy and lucky; we want to stand the best horses," Bowden said. "After his 2-year-old year, we took a huge risk that (Father Patrick) was going to come back and be dominant at 3. Right now it looks like our gamble is going to pay off. Cantab Hall is arguably the hottest sire in the sport, along with Muscle Hill, and here's his greatest son so far. It's a great sire line and we're hoping it continues with Father Patrick." The Kentucky Futurity is the second jewel in this year's Trotting Triple Crown. Trixton won the first, the Hambletonian, but has since been retired because of injury. The third jewel, the Yonkers Trot, is Oct. 25. Takter trained and drove Trixton in the Hambletonian. Another of his charges, Nuncio, finished second in the race. Father Patrick went off stride from post 10 and finished off the board for the only time in his career. Nuncio will be driven by John Campbell, his regular pilot, in Sunday's Futurity. Nuncio has won 12 of 22 career races and finished second in the other 10. Eight of those runner-up finishes have come behind Father Patrick. "Nuncio is one tough horse," Bowden said. "He's a great horse and in any other year he's the best horse. "One of these days you think he's going to beat his stablemate. But I hope it's not Sunday." Takter sends out the likely favorite in the Kentucky Filly Futurity, Shake It Cerry. She was the 2013 Dan Patch Award winner for best 2-year-old female trotter and has won 10 of 12 races this season. She will start from post three with driver Ron Pierce. Scream And Shout and Heaven's Door will start inside of Shake It Cerry while to her outside are Highest Peak, Chivaree Hanover, Vanity Matters, and Yoga. Scream And Shout and Yoga also are from the Takter Stable. The Allerage Farm Open Trot features Sebastian K, the fastest horse in harness racing history thanks to his 1:49 win earlier this year, two-time Dan Patch Award-winner Market Share, 2010 Kentucky Futurity winner Wishing Stone and recent Centaur Trotting Classic winner Master Of Law. Bee A Magician, the 2013 Horse of the Year, and multiple-stakes-winner Classic Martine lead the way in the Allerage Farm Mare Trot, where they will encounter Dan Patch Award-winner and defending race winner Maven. Sweet Lou, who has won 10 of 15 races and nearly $1 million this year, and Foiled Again, North American harness racing's all-time money-winner, are among the 10 horses in the Allerage Farm Open Pace. Eleven horses were entered in the Allerage Farm Mare Pace, including three-time Dan Patch Award-winner Anndrovette, stakes-winners Rocklamation and Somwherovrarainbow, world champion Shebestingin, last year's race winner Shelliscape, and 2012 winner Drop The Ball. by Ken Weingartner, for Harness Racing Communications  

WASHINGTON, PA, Sept. 23, 2014 -- Pecking for late racing room outside and inside, Cover Model finally found a seam and poured through to score in Tuesday's $88,600 Keystone Classic at The Meadows. Alexa Said took the other harness racing division of the stake for 2-year-old filly pacers. Cover Model was sixth near the three-quarters when Dan Rawlings slipped her off the cones into the outside flow. When cover took him nowhere, Rawlings guided Cover Model back inside and hunted room, finding it between horses. The daughter of Dragon Again-Fashion Sureal rolled home to triumph in 1:53.4, 2-1/4 lengths better than Special Package. Momas Got A Gun, a full sister to Little Brown Jug winner Limelight Beach, was third. "I came out because I thought the outside flow was good, but it wasn't going anywhere," Rawlings said. "I basically took a shot (inside), and a seam opened up. I wasn't planning on being buried like I was, but everything worked out." Douglas Lewis trains Cover Model for Frederick W. Hertrich III and CTC stable. Alexa Said roared three wide through the lane to prevail for Eric Ledford in a career-best 1:55.3. Pennsylvania Stallion Series champion Half Past Seven was second by a length while early leader Mistup Magic earned show. It was the first stakes victory for Alexa Said although Tye Loy, who conditions the daughter of Well Said-Niki Blue Chip and owns with Michael Lowe, said she easily could have several more. "She's had bad luck and bad trips," said Loy of his $18,000 yearling acquisition. "When you warm her up, you wouldn't think she could go in 2:30 the way she's lollygagging around. When she hits the gate, it's all business; she puts her game face on." In the $18,000 Filly & Mare Winners Over $10,000 Life/Preferred Handicap Trot, Cowgirl Hall thwarted the challenge of Better Caviar and downed him by a length in 1:53.2. Major Athens saved show. Dave Palone drove for trainer Ron Burke and owners Burke Racing Stable, Weaver Bruscemi LLC, Jack Piatt III and Michael Rosenthal. The 5-year-old daughter of Cash Hall-Centerfold hall extended her career bankroll to $598,903. On Wednesday the Meadows Racetrack & Casino will offer a $5,000-guaranteed pool for its Pick 5 wager as part of the United States Trotting Association's Strategic Wagering Initiative. The Meadows added the “instant” guarantee after Tuesday’s Pick 5 was uncovered, resulting in a carryover of $1,239.74. Minimum wager for the Pick 5 (Races 12-16) is 50 cents. Since Pennsylvania law requires a minimum per-race wager of $2, a player wagering at the 50-cent level must bet at least four tickets. First post for Wednesday’s program, which features a $117,200 Keystone Classic for 2-year-old colt and gelding trotters, is 12:55 PM. by Evan Pattak, for the Meadows

The New Zealand Racing Board has become a despot, says leading Thoroughbred trainer John Wheeler, spending money willy nilly that the industry cannot afford. Wheeler is incensed about revelations the board has had to revise the over ambitious forecasts of its recently departed chief executive Chris Bayliss, leaving the codes facing more lean years. "They spend money hand over foot and we get the left-overs," Wheeler said of NZRB. "I've been saying for 10 years that the funding model is wrong. How much longer do we have to tolerate it? "We shouldn't be getting the crumbs. The codes should be getting what they need to make racing flourish and the board should be cutting its cloth to suit." While Bayliss was talking a 50% rise in returns to owners within five years, Wheeler said he gave up believing anything the board said years ago after a succession of ineffectual highly-paid CEOs had come and gone. "The board has been dysfunctional for a decade and it's time the Racing Minister did something. "Costs have doubled in the last decade, they've hired more and more staff, it's out of control." Wheeler said the industry was now paying for the grand spending spree that its just departed CEO Chris Bayliss went on, millions spent on moving to flash new offices in Parnell, a $10 million state-of-the-art Trackside studio and a failed Triple Trio campaign. Wheeler said he understood the cost of the failed Typhoon betting system was also a lot higher than the $11.1 million the board wrote off in 2012. "Thoroughbred Racing needs only another $3 million or $4 million to make a go of it." Courtesy of Barry Lichter and the Sunday Star Times

The 3 YO Maryland Standardbred Fund stakes started the evening with the non wagering filly trotters going for a purse of $28,900.    Explosive Attitude(Explosive Matter) and Kelsey's Commando(Cr Commando) renewed their rivalry from July only this time Kelsey's Commando was able to catch Explosive Attitude coming down the stretch, stopping the clock in 2:00.2 last quarter in :29.2. Victor Kirby drove and trained the filly for new owners George and Rose Bonomo.   The wagering card started with the 3 YO filly pacers. Driver Tony Morgan sent Ain't No Maybe So(Nuclear Breeze) charging right to the front with a first quarter of:27.1. The Lundell entry of Valentina De Vie and Rosie De Vie sat second and third just waiting for the right moment. Jonathan Roberts pulled Valentina De Vie(Bettor's Delight) in the last turn quickly overtaking the leader winning in 1:55.3. Ain't No Maybe So held on for second and Rosie De Vie finished third. Valentina De Vie is owned by the Joie de Vie Farm.   After race 3 the Maryland Horse Industry Board presented Ocean Downs Racetrack with a Secretary's Citation from the State of Maryland in honor of the track's 65th Anniversary. MHIB also presented track owner William Rickman with a Secretary's Citation in honor of his many contributions to the harness racing industry over the year.   In the colt/gelding trot Kandy Korn(Cantab Hall) got away 6th but driver Frank Milby pulled before the half, working his way up to the leader Whichwayrightorleft near the ¾ pole. These two battled down the stretch with Kandy Korn crossing the wire in 1:59.4 for owners Bruce and Tanya Schadel.   The most exciting race of the night was the 3 YO colt/gelding pace. In usual fashion driver Corey Callahan sent Tom's Titan(Cam's Rocket) to the lead with new comer Kingofthejungle(Well Said) getting the pocket trip. At the head of the stretch Tony Morgan pulled Kingofthejungle and the two charged down the stretch head and head with Kingofthejungle winning by a head in 1:53.4 last quarter in :27.4. Desyllas Racing LLC , William Beck and Carol Rieken own and Brandon Simpson trains.   By Cheri Stambaugh  

A night field with the Alpine $3,000 claiming series harness racing action was nothing but eye popping and heart grabbing at Red Shores Charlottetown on Tuesday night. The common phrase of "Boom, just like that!" used by track announcer Vance Cameron when a large first quarter flashes up on the board was used many times Tuesday night. A total of five races on the 12 dash card feature first quarters better than :28. In the evenings feature Race 8, favourite Lyndale Royal seen his win streak stopped by Mcmacverick in line to Kenny Murphy. Lyndale Royal left off the gate from post 3 with Marc Campbell at the helm, after being clearing just before a quarter in :27.3, Campbell continued to roll his charge flipping off a half in :56.2 and three quarters in 1:26.4. Tempo Seelster made a bolt three wide move up the back stretch to clear Lyndale Royal at the head of the stretch before Mcmaverick got up in the final stride to win by a nose for owner - trainer Keith Campbell. The fastest trip of the night came in the evening finale with the 'Blue Knight' Jason Hughes guiding Outside The Wire to a five length victory winning in 1:55.1 for owners Andrew Avery and John Brodrick. Onehotvett finished second and Iron Phil was place third after I D K was placed for interference approaching three-quarters. Claiming action was in full flight in the final leg of the Alpine $ 3,000 claiming series. A total of six horses were claimed heading into the two finals Saturday night. Maiden Heaven was the first claim, she prevailed to win for her owners Charles Gaudreaut and Maxim Gaudreault in 1:58. Hello America finished third and was claimed. Whatabadgirl picked up the win in the Race 5 fillies and mares for owner, trainer, driver Gary MacDonald in 1:58.1. The third division went to driver Stephen Quinn and Mcdaisy Cutter in 1:58. On the horses and geldings side of things Cam Cool took Race 9 in 1:56.4 for driver Campbell, he and third place finisher Bakardi Arti were claimed. Godivabeachdiamond played a little hard ball hanging out two other rivals to an opening quarter of :27.4 and hanging on to win in 1:56. He and second place finisher J N J both found new addresses. Bo Ford

He's been to the top of the tree and down again and, with little hope that harness racing can recover, respected trainer Richard Brosnan tells Fairfax Media why he's getting out.  He's trained some of harness racing's pin-up stars, but as the industry honours its heroes this weekend, Richard Brosnan is instead winding down his operation, resigned to putting his Ardmore property on the market. "The game's buggered," Brosnan says bluntly. "I tried to warn them 10 years ago that their systems were wrong and now it's getting too late. The pool of horses is shrinking that fast, they don't realise it." Brosnan is no sit-back-and-moan stirrer. He's been on numerous horsemen's committees and advocated a major overhaul of the handicapping system so many times at annual meetings he now feels like people think he's "crazy". Brosnan was there in Christchurch again last Friday, asking the hard questions on what Harness Racing New Zealand proposes doing about the new import levies which are crippling sales of our battlers to Australia. "Most people don't want a bar of owning horses now - and in the long run, I'll be proved right." Brosnan reckons that in his nearly 40 years in harness racing, when he' s trained 559 winners and driven 719, he's learned a thing or two. He's seen the game from both sides - from the top end when he enjoyed the ride with stars like Bonnie's Chance, who beat Armalight by seven lengths in winning the 1982 NZ Cup, and champion trotter No Response whose weaving home straight burst to win the 1979 Interdominion Final at Addington will never be forgotten. And he's seen it from from the bottom end, where he sits now, no longer able to afford any staff and struggling to keep his owners with his team down to under 10, and no end in sight to the drain. "Thankfully I've still got my main owners but they're getting older and cutting back too and in another 12 months a couple of them won't be here. "The 0utlook is not good and I'll just be winding down quietly. I'll put my place on the market and see what happens, maybe relocate somewhere else if things pick up. I wish it would, but it's hard to see that happening." Brosnan said training had never been as big a struggle as it is at the moment - only last month Pukekohe trainer Tony Grayling walked away from the game - and he says he can see a lot more going the same way. "Things have quickly gone from bad to worse for me since the start of the year," says Brosnan. "I've lost six payers since Christmas and haven't been able to replace them." "There'll be no bugger here in five years. We're worse off today than we were five years ago. I've hung in there doing the best I could, hoping things would turn, but now I don't have an option, I have to face facts. I'll do what I can myself, that's the only way to survive, but for how long I can do that is debatable. I'm 66."Brosnan praised the Auckland Trotting Club for lifting stakes but said he got little encouragement from the projected goal of the suddenly exited Racing Board CEO Chris Bayliss that purses be raised by 50 per cent in five years' time. Brosnan said if harness racing wanted to keep its owners, it had to offer them hope of at least some return. "In all the time I've been in training the majority of horses have been good enough to win only one race. Some win two, but that's their lot, and that's never changed. "What we should be doing is utilising those horses more. Everyone calls them poor horses but they can still make up competitive fields which are good betting mediums. "People who think good horses draw the most betting are wrong. If one good horse stands out it kills betting. The key is putting like with like." Brosnan says owners quickly get the pip if their horse wins a race only to be told: ‘You better sell it because that's as far as it will go'. "The horse goes to Australia, wins three, four, five races straight away and the owner thinks ‘what the hell are they doing here?' They say I'm not having a horse again and they tell their mates . . ." But Brosnan says the pool of horses has dropped so much here it was getting harder to split up the lesser ones from the others as happens in Australia were his son Emmett is driving successfully. Now, even more alarmingly, it was becoming almost impossible for owners to sell their battlers to Australia. Since Australian authorities introduced a $2000 import levy on colts and geldings, the person who would previously have bought a cheapie because it was a ready-made commodity was opting out. Horses were instead being given away and owners, without any return, were not moving on to the next horse as they had in the past. But with the correct handicapping system, Brosnan says there would be no need for owners to quit their horses. Brosnan has long advocated a floating points system, where horses are continually reassessed depending on their performances - similar to the weight rating system successfully used in Hong Kong. If they raced well, they went up in the points, if they raced poorly they dropped back, allowing them into fields of similar performers. It made no sense for a horse who had won a race to become a C1 and be pigeon-holed in that grade no matter how it performed. "At the moment the worst thing that can happen to some horses is to win a race - they're buggered when they do. "It doesn't take long for owners to say ‘to hell with this' if you keep taking horses to the races and you know before you start that your chances are slim." And if HRNZ thought its new drop back system would solve the problem, it was sadly mistaken, says Brosnan. Horses had to run out of the money 10 times before they were reassessed. That took three months or longer, a period owners simply could not afford given the costs of training. "A friend of mine in Australia who investigated it reckoned it should be six starts, not 10." Brosnan says he's never been a fan of free wins - the concession system HRNZ offered two-year-olds and three-year-olds so owners could maximise their winnings without rising in the grades too quickly. "It's always to the detriment of somebody else - and at some stage it bottlenecks and impacts on others. "I always found the good horses look after themselves and I've had a couple of very good ones. "I always thought the other horses should still have the opportunity to win money. If I was handicapped out of it, too bad. You can't be winning everything at the expense of everyone else." It has been nearly 10 years since Brosnan trained his last good horse - Pompallier, who numbered the 2005 Dominion Handicap among his 20 wins - during which time he says he's had to make do with the satisfaction of squeezing the most out of his lesser horses. Others he'd had to sell, initially needing the money after his shift north from Kerrytown. Horses like 2003 Interdominion winner Baltic Eagle whom he sold after only two starts, and DB Bopper who excelled in Australia and later the United States. More recently 32-race winner Gaius Caesar went the same way. "Anything that's looked like being a bit decent has been sold and that's meant you don't get noticed the same as a trainer, "You do get down about it - and after a while when things aren't going your way you even start doubting yourself, and whether to change the way you're training. "But you get a certain amount of satisfaction in developing horses even if they're limited in ability and, in the end, you've just got to play the cards you're dealt." Courtesy of Barry Licther and Sunday Star Times

The Hambletonian Monte Series Final at the new Meadowlands and two Ontario pari-mutuel races at Grand River Raceway showcased North American monte activities this weekend. On Friday evening the $27,500 Hambletonian Monte Final took place (non-wagering) at the new Meadowlands. Sponsors were Jeff Gural, Valley High Stable, Back On Track, Ron Burke Stable, Arden Homestead Stable, Crawford Farm, Aldrich Properties, George Ducharme and Winners Circle Blueberries. The final followed two $10,000 legs the previous two weekends. This week, A Penny Earned (5g Conway Hall-Penny Dream-Dream Vacation) scored for Michelle Crawford and trainer George Ducharme in 1:57.2 (last quarter :28.2), just short of the north American speed race record set by Master Pine two years ago in 1:57.1. The winner was second in a July 18 leg behind Take My Picture that was second in the final for Therese Lindgren and trainer Nikolas Drennan. O U Gus (the July 25 winner) ended third for Stephanie Werder and trainer Whitney Richards. Master Pine finished fourth for Helene Gregory and trainer Julie Miller in the competitive (seven starters timed in 2:00.1 or better) ten horse field. In Ontario, Grand River Raceway hosted two pari-mutuel events on August 1st and 4th. The August 4th International Monte was part of the raceway's Industry Day and attracted riders from Canada, Belgium and Finland. The US rider-entrant Jennifer Connor was a scratch due to travel problems. Previous monte winner Radical Dreamer (Marit Valstad) made the fast pace, tracked and battled by eventual winner Tragically Shipp (Saara Jalasti aboard), that pulled away late for an comfortable win over Angies Lucky Star (Philippe Massachaele) in 2:02.4h over a rain soaked surface. Tragically Shipp (8g Shipps Speed-CH On Tour-Armbro Laser) is trained by Lee Watson for owners Lynne and David Magee. Jalasti and Massachaele regularly ride in monte races in Europe, where monte is very popular and part of most pari-mutuel racing cards at French and Scandinavian tracks. Race replay follows: The August 1 race at Grand River was billed as the Canada vs. Norway Challenge and it went to Callie Magoo (5g Magoo-Callie Alyssa-Wesgate Crown) with Norway's G. Berg up for trainer John Braid. This pair scored in 2:04.3h over King Tut (Sarah Town up for Canada) and Charlie Tuna. Both Grand River races were well received in the pari-mutuel wagering, as had been the case in previous Ontario pari-mutuel monte races. Standardbred Canada and Meadowlands files Thomas H. Hicks  

After enjoying a cozy pocket trip, Stitch in Time ($19.20) made a late push to the fore, collaring 6-5 favorite Wisenheimer to take the $14,000 Open Handicap Trot at Tioga Downs on Saturday (August 2) evening.   Brandon Simpson floated forward with the four-year-old Keystone Nordic gelding, settling behind House Money (Aaron Byron) on the first turn. As Wisenheimer brushed to the fore through a :28 first quarter, House Money broke stride, enabling Stitch in Time to inherit the pocket with just over a circuit to go. The two would continue as an uncontested leading pair throughout, but Stitch in Time was able to benefit from his tracking trip in the final eighth. Off the far turn, Simpson angled him wide, and the response was instant. Stitch in Time wore down Wisenheimer, prevailing by three-quarters of a length in 1:54.1. I Love New York (Bruce Clarke) was carried to the grandstand side off a stalking trip, staying on for third.   Amber Buter trains Stitch in Time for owners Lynette Buter, Carol Fuhs, and William Fuhs.   Racing returns to Tioga with a stakes-filled Sunday (August 3) afternoon card. The 13-race pari-mutuel program is slated for a 1:30 p.m. EDT start, with a pair of non-wagering events to commence a half-hour earlier.   by James Witherite

MANALAPAN, NJ - July 30, 2014 - Saturday's Hambletonian Day 15-race card at the Meadowlands is loaded with rich stakes worth nearly $3.6 million in purse money, including the $225,000 Anthony Abbatiello New Jersey Classic and its filly companion race, the $100,000 Thomas D'Altrui Miss New Jersey. The two stakes for New Jersey-sired three-year-old pacers are early in the card - the third race for the Miss New Jersey and the fourth race for the New Jersey Classic - and have the possibility of being two of the most contentious and bettor-friendly events, with no prohibitive favorites. Racing conditions for the two stakes were amended to eliminate eliminations. The finals are limited to the 10 highest lifetime money-winning horses in the entry box. To further sweeten the pot, even those who do not share in the top five purse distribution will not go home empty-handed. The connections of the New Jersey Classic colts finishing sixth through 10 will receive $1,500 each while the connections of the Miss New Jersey fillies will receive $1,000 each. "We are very pleased that we have full and competitive fields for both stakes, in fact, 11 entered in each with 10 going postward," said Tom Luchento, president of the Standardbred Breeders & Owners Association of New Jersey [SBOANJ], which sponsors the two races. "We feel stallions will return to New Jersey once we have casino-infused purses, a likelihood in the next few years, but for now we are trying our best to make it worthwhile for breeders to support our program and owners to buy New Jersey-sired offspring with the opportunity to compete in such events as the New Jersey Classic and Miss New Jersey," Luchento added. Post time on Saturday, August 2, 2014 is 12 noon with gates opening at 10 a.m. Admission is $5. The $1 million Hambletonian [Race 13] and $500,000 Hambletonian Oaks [Race 12] and the $300,650 John Cashman Jr. Memorial Trot will be featured on the live television broadcast from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on CBS Sports Network [for Channel Finder - www.cbssportsnework.com]. The program will be hosted by Gary Seibel, Dave Brower and Justin Horowitz. The fields for the New Jersey Classic and Miss New Jersey with post, horse, sire, driver, trainer and morning line odds: Race 4 - $225,000 ANTHONY ABBATIELLO NEW JERSEY CLASSIC 1-Doo Wop Hanover - Rocknroll Hanover - Yannick Gingras - Steve Elliott - 9-5 2-Western Vintage - Western Ideal - Brian Sears - Nancy Johansson - 5-2 3-Rockeyed Optimist - Rocknroll Hanover - Matt Kakaley - Steve Elliott - 20-1 4-Buckwacker - Rocknroll Hanover - David Miller - Chris Ryder - 9-2 5-Sweet Rock - Rocknroll Hanover - Brett Miller - Wayne Given - 20-1 6-Dancin Hill - Rocknroll Hanover - Scott Zeron - Tony Alagna - 10-1 7-Rock Out - Rocknroll Hanover - Tim Tetrick - Steve Elliott - 15-1 8-Card Shock- Cam's Card Shark - George Brennan - Mark Silva - 20-1 9-Beat The Drum - Tell All - Ron Pierce - Staffan Lind - 6-1 10-Rocknroll Reality - Rocknroll Hanover - Corey Callahan - John Butenschoen - 12-1   Race 3 - $100,000 THOMAS D'ALTRUI MISS NEW JERSEY 1-Ideal Helen - Western Ideal - Marcus Miller - Erv Miller - 10-1 2-Act Now - Western Ideal - Brian Sears - Nikolas Drennan - 3-1 3-Gettingreadytoroll - Rocknroll Hanover - Yannick Gingras - Jimmy Takter - 2-1 4-My Lady Day - Western Ideal - David Miller - Joe Holloway - 15-1 5-Surfside Sexy - Rocknroll Hanover - Ron Pierce - Ron Burke - 20-1 6-Cut A Deal - Rocknroll Hanover - George Brennan - Nick Surick - 20-1 7-Blixtra - Rocknroll Hanover - Ake Svanstedt - Ake Svandstedt - 9-2 8-Highland Rockstar - Rocknroll Hanover - Mike Lachance - Buzzy Sholty - 20-1 9-Rockingcam Park - Rocknroll Hanover - Tim Tetrick - Ron Coyne Jr. - 8-1 10- Kate Can't Wait - Rocknroll Hanover - Corey Callahan - Ross Croghan - 6-1 By Carol Hodes for the SBOANJ

Montreal, July 30, 2014 – The Association of Progressive Jurists (AJP) and the Montreal SPCAare announcing the publication of AJP’s document which provides a critical analysis of traditional animal control by-laws and the publication of Montreal SPCA’s model animal by-law. The AJP and Montreal SPCA consider that the current legislation contains a number of problematic elements. The AJP points out that animal welfare provisions are often left out of animal related municipal by-law laws, but that they shouldn’t be. “General provisions that ensure the welfare of animals should be an integral part of all animal related municipal by-laws, in particular taking into consideration the scientifically recognized principle of animal sentience” says Me Marie-Claude St-Amant, who is responsible for the animal law committee at the AJP. “We drafted this text in order to explain, from a legal perspective, the issues inherent in most municipal by-laws that deal with animal control” she adds. In addition, the Montreal SPCA considers animal related municipal by-laws to be an integral part of a comprehensive solution to ensure the safety and welfare of animals and citizens. “Municipal by-laws should facilitate the reduction of companion animal overpopulation, ensure for responsible animal ownership and regulate the general way in which citizens and animals interact in the community” says Alanna Devine, jurist and Director of Animal Advocacy at the Montreal SPCA. “We drafted this model by-law in order to provide Municipalities with an example of what they should be adopting in their communities. We are really pleased to have the support of the AJP for this important initiative” adds Devine. To consult the AJP’s text in its entirety, please visit the AJP’s website by clicking here(available in French only). To consult the Montreal SPCA’s model animal by-law please click here (available in French only). About the Association des juristes progressistes AJP is an association of lawyers, law students and workers dedicated to defending rights and determined to bring legal services to the struggle for social justice and to bring an end to inequality. About the Montreal SPCA Founded in Montreal in 1869, we were the first humane society in Canada and our mission is to: protect animals against negligence, abuse, and exploitation; represent their interests and ensure their well-being; raise public awareness and help develop compassion for all living beings. For many years, the Montreal SPCA has been working hard with the three levels of government (municipal, provincial and federal) to improve laws on animal protection. For more information about the Montreal SPCA, please visit our website at www.spca.com. Media contacts: Anita Kapuscinska, Media Relations Coordinator, Montreal SPCA, 514-226-3932, oranitak@spca.com. Me Marie-Claude St-Amant, AJP, 514-793-9448, or info@ajpquebec.org

When I talk to overseas harness racing administrators, trainers and owners on my travels and we discuss the management and governance structures of our respective countries and whether they are delivering the best results for participants in our industry, I am frequently having to defend the structure and management of the industry in New Zealand. Northern Hemisphere people struggle to see how you can run harness racing in 2014 with a structure and governance that is a relic of a different time. Northern Hemisphere tracks are owned by either wealthy individuals or companies and they make all the decisions with regards to their tracks. This gives them the ability to adapt their programs and race structure to suit their immediate needs or those of the stakeholders who operate at their tracks. These tracks live or die on the strength of their product and  they try at all times to deliver a superior product to their customers.  As with any structure, there are issues and conflicts but in the main they do a far better job of selling and marketing harness racing to the general public than we do here in New Zealand. Over a period of time I have come to the conclusion that they have a far better management and governance structure than the Southern Hemisphere does. I have given up defending the structure of harness racing in New Zealand and have become a strong advocate for major change in how our industry is governed. How can it be in 2014 that we have a system of governance for our industry that is manifestly inappropriate for a business in the 21st century.  Currently we have a system that is controlled by the trotting clubs of New Zealand. Any major changes to the administration or structure of  ANYTHING  within the trotting industry requires the approval of a majority of those clubs. They meet once a year which means change within the industry happens at a glacial pace. The Executive of Harness Racing New Zealand can tinker at the edges but for anything major they need to take the proposal to the annual meeting of trotting clubs for their approval. Can you imagine any business in 2014 being able to survive and prosper if they were unable to adapt to changing trends and challenges in their business on a regular basis due to the necessity to wait for a once a year meeting for approval. If you speak as I do regularly do to a  lot of the successful businessmen who are involved in the harness racing industry in New Zealand, you quickly appreciate how frustrated they are at the inability to change what many see as a dysfunctional governance and management structure. Both the Auckland and New Zealand Metro trotting clubs have made massive gains in recent years in how they structure and manage their business due to the influence of several successful businessmen on their respective boards. But there is so much more they would like to do both now and in the future but are hamstrung to a certain extent by the current management and governance structure.  So what should any new management and governance structure look like.  First and foremost the clubs should concentrate on what they do best, running their clubs and their race meetings in a professional and profitable manner. That is what they were originally set up to do and most do an exemplary job. But any governance or leadership role in the management structure of harness racing in New Zealand should be withdrawn. The management of the day to day running of harness racing  should remain as it is now. Harness Racing New Zealand employees do a sterling job implementing the current policies and strategies of the industry as set by the executive and we are lucky to have them. The current executive and clubs structure should be replaced by a board that has industry representatives but also has a much stronger business focus and expertise. An eight member board with five business orientated members who have a knowledge of the harness racing industry along with one representative from each of  the three industry groups that have a large monetary investment in the industry; 1)                  Owners 2)                  Breeders 3)                  Trainers/Drivers  Should this board be elected by industry participants or be a mixture of elected /appointed members is something for wiser heads than mine. However the details of how a structure such as this would evolve need to be carefully developed so we don't harm the industry we are trying to help.   Now I can hear the screams emanating from some quarters but I also know from having already had this discussion with many of the major players in the New Zealand Industry that there is a broad consensus on the need for structural change. People involved in the harness racing industry are some of the most passionate people you would  ever come across. Why would you work in this industry with its long hours in any weather if it wasn't for a genuine love of what you were doing. We have some fantastic people in the harness racing industry in New Zealand who do a wonderful job of promoting our sport to the wider public and we have a great racing product that is in my view as good as anywhere in the world. What we don't have is a governance structure that lets this industry flourish. Just have a look at the last twenty years and see how much this industry has changed and progressed. Frozen Semen and Shuttle Stallions have opened our industry up to the very best stallions available worldwide with a result that our equine product has closed the gap enormously with the Northern Hemisphere product. Trackside has taken our racing product to a much wider audience throughout Australasia. Betting options have expanded and harness racing clubs have diversified their income streams. The only thing that has NOT changed for several generations are our governance structures. I have spoken to several government ministers about this issue and the message is always the same. Any change to the present structures must come from WITHIN the industry itself. If this industry is to truly reach its potential and maximize its returns to its stakeholders, then we need a governance structure that is more applicable to the 21st century and not the 19th century. I therefore invite any like minded people who hold a similar view to my own to contact me to see if there is a way we can progress this matter further.  John Curtin JC International jdci@harnesslink.com

$75,000 Gov. David L. Lawrence, 2-Year-Old Colt & Gelding Pacers Yankee Bounty stayed undefeated in his four-race career with a victory in 1:51.3, a stake record. Although parked from post 8 for about one-half mile, Yankee Bounty thoroughly dominated his split, drawing off to win by 7-1/4 lengths. Cooperstown and Lone Survivor completed the ticket. Kevin Lare trains the Yankee Cruiser-Bootleg Yankee gelding for Frank Chick. Too Darn Hot, who had been toughened in New Jersey Sires Stakes competition, trailed the loose leader, UF Larry Alltheway, by 4-1/2 lengths at the three-quarters before his greater experience kicked in. He tracked the leader down and edged him by a neck at the wire in 1:53.3 for Yannick Gingras, with Hall of Terror third. "I figured the leader would come back to me at some point," Gingras said. "At that point, my hands were tied. If I chased him into a big quarter, that wouldn't do my colt any good. I trained him once -- he's a big colt, and I thought he would be a top colt. It's taken him a little longer." Ron Burke trains Too Darn Hot, a son of Rocknroll Hanover-Kiss Me Kate, for Burke Racing Stable, Our Horse Cents Stables, Weaver Bruscemi LLC and Larry Karr. Rich Wisdom moved from sixth for cover and drew off to break his maiden in 1:53.1 for Matt Kakaley and give Burke a Gov. Lawrence double. My Hero Ron was second, 3 lengths back, while Denslow Hanover earned show. "He's gotten better every start," Burke said of his $25,000 yearling purchase. "I think he's a good colt, not a great colt, so probably this is where he fits. He has a lot of stakes this year. He might be the kind who does good at Lexington; he seems to be long winded." Burke Racing Stable, Weaver Bruscemi LLC, JJK Stables and Phillip Collura campaign Rich Wisdom. $55,352 Ned McCarr, 3-Year-Old Filly Trotters   Donatella Hanover didn't move crisply first over when initially asked, but she found her best stride late and scored in 1:56.1 for Brett Miller, trainer Jimmy Takter and owner Christinatakterandthekids. The rallying Dancing Dynamite fell a neck short, with Jessie's Song third.   "She was really locked on the left line today, and I was having a hard time keeping her along the pylons," Miller said of the daughter of Cantab Hall-On The Glide. "The last half of the mile when we really started going fast, she straightened out. This filly is game. She kept fighting and didn't give up." Broadway Socks had little trouble wiring her field for her ninth victory in 17 lifetime starts, although winning driver Dan Rawlings indicated she might not have been at her best. "I didn't like the way she scored down, and I was actually planning on being a little bit conservative with her," Rawlings said. "But nobody came, and she's just a gutsy filly. I didn't have to work her that hard anywhere in the mile." She scored in 1:56.2, 1-1/2 lengths ahead of the pocket-sitting Global Magic. Travelin Dream earned show. David Wade trains the daughter of Broadway Hall-I Gotta Feelin and owns with Gerald Brittingham and William F. Peel III. $65,310 James Manderino, 3-Year-Old Colt & Gelding Trotters Skates N Plates, clearing to the lead by the quarter despite the outside 8-hole, was allowed to skate to the half in 58.3 during his division of the $65,310 Arden Downs 3-year-old colt & gelding trot, then scooted home in 57.1 to hold off Lightning Lane shooter Frost Free Hanover at the end of his 1:55.4 mile. Dave Palone handled the Revenue S colt for trainer Trond Smedshammer and owner/breeder Bob Key. Wheelsandthelegman, driven by Dick Stillings, set the pace, then rebuffed the last-quarter challenge of 1-5 favorite Il Sogno Dream to equal the 1:54.1 stake record of SJ's Caviar in the other division. The Donato Hanover gelding was unraced at 2, but he's making up for lost time in 2014, as he is now 6 for 7 for trainer Walter Carroll and owner Beth Carroll. $75,000 Mary Lib Miller, 2-Year-Old Filly Pacers Angel Or Terror is now two-for-three lifetime, and three-for-three in good performances, after winning the first of two divisions of the $75,000 Arden Downs 2-year-old filly pace. Driver Jason Brewer never looked back with the Jim Dailey-trained daughter of Western Terror, getting a cheap half and then sprinting home in 56.4-28 to complete the 1:55.2 win. Angel Or Terror adds this triumph to the 1:55.4 maiden victory and the hard-luck third after going first-over on her brief resume for the ownership combine of Dailey, Carlo and Down The Lane Stables. "She hadn't been on the front before," Dailey said of his $5,200 yearling acquisition. "If she didn't get lost, I felt pretty confident. I only plan to race her six or seven times. She's growing pretty good, and she'll make a nice 3-year-old if I don't beat her up." Hot Chica Boomba rewarded Daddy Dewdrop fans with a closing victory in 1:54.4 in the other freshman filly pace cut. The daughter of The Panderosa broke her maiden by following favored Melanies Sharkette, going past her in mid-stretch, then holding off Half Past Seven for driver Aaron Merriman, trainer Jim Arledge Jr. and owner Winchester Baye Acres Inc. by Evan Pattak, for the Meadows

Two of the most well known identities in harness racing in Auckland in Graham Mackie and wife Trish Dunell have always dabbled in both codes. Trish , who is the HRNZ photographer at northern harness racing meetings and Graham have struck the jackpot with one of their homebred thoroughbreds. Read and enjoy. Every owner dreams of getting a racehorse good enough to win a million dollars. Spalato has done it in just four starts for his South Auckland breeder Trish Dunell.  "I'm no student of breeding. I just got lucky." Trish Dunell's economical choice of words hardly does justice to the incredible sequence of events which led to Spalato winning the Group One Singapore Derby. And while it is two weeks since the horse she bred and races with husband Graham Mackie annihilated his rivals in the S$1.15million feature, there's not a morning goes by when she doesn't wake up and think: Did that really happen? Isn't that kind of result reserved for the rich and famous? When she watched a video replay of the race last week, for the umpteenth time, she burst into tears. The excitement of the big win is now being replaced by raw emotion as everywhere she goes she is hugged and congratulated by wellwishers, both friends and strangers. In her email box a message from NZ Bloodstock principal and leviathan owner Sir Peter Vela tells of the inspiration he gained from the feat. Winning a major international Group One feature is nothing new to Sir Peter but it's certainly a novel feeling for Dunell, who has raced horses for nearly 40 years, 10-win trotter Silver Wheels her previous best. The closest Dunell had come to a Group I win before was seeing other owners' joy through the lens of her Canon, as the country's leading equine photographer. So in Singapore, when it came time to honour the horse they call "The Pony" Dunell was lost for words. "There are no words," Dunell managed to get out when interviewed immediately afterwards. For when Dunell looks at Spalato she sees more than the flying machine who under Brazilian jockey Manoel Nunes put a big space on his derby rivals. And she doesn't just think of the ridiculously big dollars - $NZ975,590 to be exact - that the horse has earned in only four starts. She sees the little foal who popped out one October night in 2009 at Highview Stud near Hamilton. And she can't help but recall the trials and tribulations that led to his even being there. Always on the lookout for a bargain - a trait of her whole family, including son Cameron after whom Spalato was originally nicknamed - it seemed like such a good plan to buy Miss Forty Niner at Ashford Park Stud's dispersal sale at Otaki in 1996. The broodmare had seen a few summers but, being by Mr Prospector, was a full sister to the former successful sire Straight Strike. Bloodstock agent Peter Jenkins, instrumental in importing the mare from the States when Sir Arthur Williams' stud was at its prime, recommended Dunell buy her and her weanling filly Delph. Dunell can't recall how much she paid - "but it wasn't a lot" - and as it turned out that seemed just as well as the mare, who already had a chequered breeding history, kept losing her foals when close to giving birth. "I didn't get one foal out of her," Dunell said. "I tried three or four times - Glenmorgan Farm tried too with the same result. I even leased her out and they didn't get a foal either." Any hopes Dunell had of recouping her outlay by racing Delph were dashed when the weak little weanling, by the unheralded Blue Razor, failed to furnish - and she was put to stud, dropping her first foal in October, 2000. But it was Delph's second foal, Aftershock, that gave Dunell and Mackie hope that the family might yet deliver for them. He debuted in winning style in February, 2006, and only seven starts later in November was running in open company, dead-heating for a close second in the Avondale Cup. Sadly, he started roaring and after being operated on, went in the wind again. Knowing how good he could have been, Dunell went in search of his closest relation - Delph's third filly foal. To cut expenses, she had done a foal-for-foal deal with Frank Drummond, sending the mare to his Cheval Stud to be served by Express Duke - "Graeme really liked Express Duke as a racehorse" - Drummond to take the first born and Dunell the second. "When I called him and asked what had happened to the filly he said he was about to sell her as a polo pony. He'd done nothing with her and she was still running round the hills." In the nick of time, Dunell bought the filly, named Ellington who, big and strong, proved a real handful when broken in by Toni Croon. Ellington, however, didn't have much ability and even though she "tried like a tiger" the $150 she earned for fifth in her debut was the extent of her earnings. In four subsequent starts, three for beach trainer Sue Martin, she finished among the tailenders each time. Ellington stopped so quickly in her last go at Avondale, Dunell suspected she may have been bleeding, and decided to quit her. "If they show nothing at all on the track I find homes for them, as riding horses or polo ponies," Dunell said. "I hate to get them put down or give them horrible homes." But Ellington wasn't your typical kids' pony. "She didn't have the right temperament to be someone's favourite pony," said Dunell who got to know her funny little traits during the time she looked after her at their former Takanini property. "She was quite unsociable - very hard to catch. I'm sure she would have been a hermit in the wild. She wasn't even sociable with other mares. She was happier standing with the cows. "It would have been very hard to find a place for her. You couldn't say she was even pretty - she's very plain - she wouldn't have made it in the show ring. "If I had been realistic, she wouldn't have made the cut as a broodmare." Dunell says she puts her decision to breed from Ellington down to her tendency to be "a little potty over the Delph family. "I kept on thinking there has to be another good horse out of this family. But I shouldn't have bred from her - nobody else would have." Perhaps what kept Dunell going was that, while a little cranky, all the family were honest and tried hard. That about summed up the ability of two of Delph's other foals, full sister and brother Divine Miss Em and Roverto, who gave Dunell a thrill when they quinellaed a $5000 maiden race at Waipa in August, 2011. But whatever the reason, Dunell will forever be thankful that she did keep Ellington because Delph is now dead and Ellington's second foal turned out to be Spalato. The hand of fate was on Dunell's side again when Spalato failed to sell as a yearling because he was on the small side. And yet again when Spalato won his second trial and looked like being sold, the deal fell through. So Spalato ended up in Singapore, where the prizemoney puts New Zealand racing to shame and owners get a NZ$840 rebate every time their horses start - unless they run first or last. A small bone chip in his fetlock delayed his debut but since he finally stepped out in May - in a maiden race worth NZ$60,000 - he's never stopped winning and now, with an unbeaten streak of four, he's being talked about as one of the most exciting horses to have raced in Singapore. Dunell's name might not appear as an owner in the racebook - she never bothered to sign the papers to avoid the NZ$530 annual fee - but Spalato is as much her baby as Mackie's who with 15 wins is Singapore's leading owner this season, S$280,000 ahead of Laurie Laxon's Oscar Racing Stable. Since Spalato's boom run, Dunell says she's been told by breeding buffs how her choice to go to the stallion Elusive City was truly inspired. "But it was just luck. All I do is try to make sure they're not too closely bred and I have to like the stallions on type. And that's it. I'm no student of breeding." Dunell said she invariably chose a new stallion, because they were cheaper, and just hoped that the sire would become commercial and not flop. That's why you won't find any big name sires in the list of consorts for Ellington who has been to Royal Gem, Strategic Image and Per Incanto. Ellington is now at Lime Country in the Hawkes Bay, due to foal to Niagara, an Encosta De Lago stallion Dunell and Mackie have a major share in. Lime Country's Greg Griffin is busy breaking in Ellington's latest yearling, who only last week he described as a real "toad" - just like the rest of the family. Ellington's third foal, by Strategic Image, has just joined Spalato in Singapore after three trial placings but Dunell knows the chances of him ending up as good are a million to one. But then Dunell already has her million dollar horse. And the memories she has of that Group One day at Kranji will linger. While trainer John O'Hara, who wept openly as Spalato ran to the line, couldn't feast with them that night because of Ramadan, nearly everyone else did. Staff at the Regent Hotel were kept busy extending tables, then spilling them into another room, as people turned up to help celebrate the big win. And outside, like a beacon to all, sat the motorbike which Spalato's groom Sylvester Gho has had specially repainted with his idol's name and registered racing number 250. You get the feeling Spalato mania has only just begun. Courtesy of Barry Lichter and the Sunday Star Times

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