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In the last 3 months Harness Racing Victoria has tested a number of harness racing participants (trainers and drivers) where unfortunately three participants have tested positive to amphetamine. One of those matters has been dealt with and the other two are pending future RAD Board Hearings. Harness Racing Victoria would like to work with all harness racing participants to seek appropriate support and treatment for them to engage with relevant agencies if they have issues in relation to the use of amphetamines or other drugs of abuse. Harness Racing Victoria will increase the number of human samples to be taken of harness racing participants in 2016 than the previous year to ensure greater compliance of drivers and trainers and to ensure that the sport of harness racing is as safe as possible on the race track. It is in the best interests for the sport of harness racing, that all harness racing drivers are not alcohol or drug affected whilst engaged in a race or trial. Harness Racing Victoria would encourage any harness racing participant whom may have an issue with alcohol or drugs to seek appropriate treatment and guidance and Harness Racing Victoria can be contacted on 03 8378 0287 in relation to this and all matters are treated confidentially.    Harness Racing Victoria   General Amphetamine Street Names Knowing the common street names for the different amphetamines drugs is important. Because there are so many different types of these drugs, many individuals take substances they do not know as a result. Being able to recognize the slang terms can help protect you from dangerous drug abuse and other issues. It could also allow you to help someone in need by knowing what they have taken. Be aware of the street names listed below as they are some of the most common. According to CESAR, “Medications containing amphetamines are prescribed for narcolepsy, obesity, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.” However, when someone takes one of these pills without a valid prescription or abuses them just to get high, it is a very dangerous practice that can lead to severe mood swings, insomnia, tremors, and when taken in very high doses even heart attack and stroke. When sold on the street, these drugs are often referred to as: Uppers Speed Pep pills Lid poppers Eye-openers Wake-ups If any of these street names are being used to describe a drug in question, it is most certainly an amphetamine of some type. Dextroamphetamine Medications that contain only dextroamphetamine have specific street names which you may hear but not initially recognize. Many of the general terms for amphetamines are clear about the stimulant effects, but dextroamphetamine which causes many of these same issues may be referred to as White crosses Dexedrine, a brand version of dextroamphetamine, is named for the white lines that appear on the pill in order to make it easier to split into quarters Dexies Another name for Dexedrine Methamphetamine Methamphetamine can be a prescription drug, but more often, it is abused in its pure form which is similar to a crystal-like rock. In many cases, if an individual uses one of the names above, they are likely referring to its the prescription pill form. However, if a person calls the drug: Glass Ice Crystal Chalk Meth it is probably this more potent version. According to the NLM, “Meth use can quickly lead to addiction.” Because illicit methamphetamine is smoked, it will reach the brain much more quickly and cause the individual to feel a stronger desire to abuse more of the drug. Understanding the difference is key to avoiding even more dangerous drug abuse. Combination Street Names There are some slang terms which refer to the combination of amphetamines and different drugs. These can be incredibly dangerous because of the joint effects of the two drugs. For example, goofballs are amphetamines and barbiturates that have been mixed together. According to a study from the NCBI, “The mixture produced a pattern of effects which was different from that produced by either drug separately.” Another similar-sounding combination called speedballs contains heroin and methamphetamine, both extremely potent, addictive, and harmful drugs. It is very important to understand the difference between the two combinations as one may be much more dangerous than the other. Knowing the different street names for amphetamines can help you stay aware of what drugs you are dealing with. You can also more readily help someone else in an overdose situation if you know what they have taken.  

As racing steward Terry Bailey stumbled on to his nature strip, clutching a tribal carving for ­defence seconds after gunfire peppered his suburban family home, he confronted two new realities. His world as sheriff of the track had changed forever: criminal elements had taken the fight straight to his doorstep only days before the Melbourne Cup. His second thought provided little comfort: the shooter could be anyone among a bulging Rolodex of enemies the 48-year-old chief steward had accumulated during a meteoric rise from Rockhampton racetrack to the hallowed turf of Flemington. Among the beaming celebrities and corporate suits in the luxurious marquees of the Birdcage from today, the party will barely miss a beat: DJs, champagne, fashion and some stunning feats of equine athleticism. But the racing industry — and its top cop — have been blasted into a new and terrifying era. Bailey speaks with a slow, nasal drawl that betrays his humble ­origins as the son of a cop who grew up in the backblocks of Queensland and NSW. But, up close, his eyes twinkle with a raw intelligence that smart folk quickly detect. John “The Sheriff” Schreck, perhaps the most famous steward in Australian turf history, saw that glimmer in Bailey’s eye and plucked him from obscurity at Rockhampton and put him on the path to the big league. “I first met him when he was still at school and he was working as a gofer on the track at Rockhampton — all he ever wanted to do was be involved in the administration of racing,’’ he tells The Weekend Australian in his first ­extended interview since the shooting. “His work ethic was quite outstanding and his common sense.” Today the stakes are astronomically higher, the villains smarter and far more ruthless, but Bailey hasn’t lost his laconic bush sense of humour. “I don’t have any other interests in life so, I presume, this is the common denominator,’’ he said the morning after an unknown enemy had pumped six rounds from a semi-automatic weapon into the front door of his suburban Melbourne house. “If they want to find you, they’ll find you.” Now, as the $16 billion racing industry begins its biggest week of the year, with the eyes of the racing world fixed on Melbourne, he and his family (a wife and two teen daughters he “idolises”) are living out of a safe house with a security detail attached to them 24/7. The attack was written up this week as the moment that racing lost its innocence, a description that didn’t pass the laugh test even for those who love the so-called sport of kings. “Don’t they remember (gangster) Tony Mokbel betting up a storm? Or (a certain jockey) taking bungs? Or the Smoking Aces (race-fixing) case? Or the cobalt scandal,’’ one world-weary racing fan mused. But Bailey’s mentor Schreck, who was the Australian Jockey Club’s chief steward for 15 years and did stints in senior roles in Hong Kong, Singapore and Macau, believes the attack on his friend and protege marks a significant new low and racing needs to recognise it. “It’s a bloody awful thing and it’s done untold damage to horse racing in this country,’’ he said. “He (Bailey) would be terribly disturbed about it and worried for his family. In the future, when Terry Bailey moves back home I would expect he will have CCTV throughout the house. I never thought I would see those days. It’s just gangster stuff, isn’t it?” Gunshots flying into the home of the industry’s top cop is undoubtedly a new low, but villains have always lurked in the shadows of horse racing. There was the Fine Cotton scandal in the 1980s, ­George Freeman roaming Sydney tracks before that — the links even go back to the days of John Wren, depicted in Frank Hardy’s Power Without Glory. In more recent times, there has also been the unsolved execution-style murder of horse trainer Les Samba, gunned down on a Melbourne street in 2011. The jailed drug lord Tony Mokbel was a horse owner and reputedly still punts from his maximum-security prison, having led the so-called Tracksuit Gang in the 1980s and 90s, trading words and tips at racecourses across Australia. His brother Horty Mokbel was banned from tracks in 2004. Mick Gatto, who shot dead gangland killer Andrew “Benji’’ Veniamin more than a decade ago but beat a murder charge, is also now banned from racetracks and Crown casino. Carl Williams, the murderer who was killed in jail, was at the epicentre of Melbourne’s gangland war. He loved a punt as well. As did ­Alphonse Gangitano, once the public but violent face of the Carlton Crew. His interest in horse racing and protection rackets ended with his death in 1998 at the hands of — police believe — Jason Moran. The Morans had close links with racing and Jason Moran was accused of triggering the underworld war that killed dozens. He, too, is no longer with us. Beyond the glittering success of the Flemington carnival, racing has for years been locked in a struggle to expel criminal elements, with Bailey at the vanguard. Pretty much ever since he was lured from the Gold Coast to clean up harness racing in Vic­toria, he has had a tiger by the tail. Bailey soon unearthed a race-fixing scandal involving the use of a drug known as Blue Magic. In a move that foreshadowed his ­aggressive style, he liaised closely with police and used covert surveillance to build a case that culminated in raids in Australia and New Zealand that would smash a crime syndicate. He parlayed that success into a shift into thoroughbreds — the main game — where he became one of the youngest chief stewards in Victorian history, replacing stalwart Des Gleeson. As Bailey drove a more aggressive enforcement culture, that Rolodex of enemies continued to grow. His detractors accuse him of the law enforcement equivalent of “managing up” — kicking the shit out of industry participants to garner publicity and to further his own career. He tangled with talented but troubled jockey Danny Nikolic, pursuing the hoop unsuccessfully over the so-called Betfair scandal and then the Smoking Aces race-fixing probe. Nikolic was cleared on both, but it was the start of a bloody war of attrition between the steward and jockey that would ultimately see Bailey get his man following a clash outside the steward’s tower in which Nikolic is alleged to have said: “We’ve all got families, c---, and we know where yours live ...” Nikolic, who was banned for two years, denied making the comment and was not commenting on this week’s incident. Bailey has been unrelenting in driving higher integrity standards, pushing for covert surveillance of stables and demanding trainers give his officials keys to their stable doors and even seeking to implant a spy in one stable. He found himself at the centre of the most high-profile drug case in the sport’s recent history when big-name trainers Peter Moody, Mark Kavanagh and Danny O’Brien were charged over positive swabs for cobalt returned by horses in their care. The cases continue to grind on, further damaging the sport’s image as ever darker secrets emerge, such as the reported links between a vet involved in supplying cobalt and organised criminals with ties to the harness racing world. It is true that racing has taken big strides towards a far more ruthless enforcement culture, introducing tough drug standards and investing in testing laboratories that keep officials close on the heels of biochemists. Victoria’s Racing Integrity Commissioner, Sal Perna, says on top of sophisticated race-day betting analysis teams, racing now has its own compliance and audit squads. “These are guys who are jumping the fences of trainers’ properties and checking the stables and drug testing,’’ he said. “Integrity has become much (more) important. Racing’s success is based on public confidence. If the public don’t have confidence in integrity, they won’t bet, then there’s less money coming in.” Racing Australia chief executive Peter McGauran says the brazen gun attack is a wake-up call for the federal government, which must let the industry’s integrity bodies have better access to phone call and intercept data to protect the sport from organised crime. “If there are criminal elements capable of that here you can only imagine what those associated with illegal Asian bookmaking are capable of,” he said. Racing commentator Richard Freedman, the brother of Melbourne Cup winning trainers Lee and Anthony Freedman, says the attack on Bailey comes at a bad time for the sport but he doesn’t believe it will have a lasting negative effect. “I don’t want to sound blase about what happened to Terry because it’s appalling, but you have to take the long view — in the long term, the sport will be better.” Freedman agrees that racing is suffering from “the Tour de France syndrome”. “If you attempt to tackle cheats in your sport, you will expose yourself to claims your sport is full of cheats, because you will find them,’’ he said.   By Rick Wallace   Reprinted with permission of The Australian.com.au site

After initiating and conducting an investigation into the conduct of races and associated betting in the Mildura region relevant to the operation of the Mildura based harness racing Shayne Cramp stable, HRV Stewards provided information to Victoria Police who commenced an investigation into the relevant matters. The investigation was conducted by the Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit. The complex investigation culminated in licensed participants Shayne and Greg Cramp being arrested on 2 February 2015 and questioned with respect to race-fixing allegations. On this date, HRV Stewards immediately suspended the training and driving licences of Shayne and Greg Cramp and excluded both parties from attending any harness racing tracks. At the Melbourne Magistrates Court on 3 September 2015, Mr Shayne and Greg Cramp pleaded guilty to a charge issued by Victoria Police under Section 195C of the Crimes Act 1958 which provides: A person must not engage in conduct that corrupts or would corrupt a betting outcome of an event or eventcontingency—    (a) knowing that, or being reckless as to whether, the conduct corrupts or would corrupt a betting outcome of the event or the event contingency; and    (b) intending to obtain a financial advantage, or to cause a financial disadvantage, in connection with any betting on the event or the event contingency. Both Shayne and Greg Cramp were convicted and sentenced to a Community Corrections Order (CCO) for a period of 12 months, with Shayne Cramp required to perform 300 hours of community work and Greg Cramp required to perform 200 hours of community work. The sentence imposed for both parties related to their conduct with respect to the lead up to and running of Race 5 at Mildura on 12 November 2014. The sentence for Shayne Cramp also related to his conduct with respect to the lead up to and running of Race 6 at Mildura on 29 November 2014.  On 23 October 2015, Shayne and Greg Cramp attended before a sub-committee formed by the HRV Board whose role it was to consider the application or otherwise of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 267(1) which provides: 267. (1) Subject to sub-rule (2) the Controlling Body may for such period and on such conditions as it thinks fit, disqualify a person who is found guilty of or convicted of a crime or an offence in any State or Territory of Australia or in any country.  On 30 October 2015, the HRV Board considered the above provisions and the recommendations of the sub-committee. The HRV Board endorsed the sub-committee’s recommendation that the provisions of AHRR267 (1) be invoked and that Shayne and Greg Cramp be disqualified for a period of 12 years. The HRV Board subsequently ordered that Shayne and Greg Cramp be disqualified for a period of 12 years and that such penalty be backdated to commence 2 February 2015 when their licences were originally suspended by HRV Stewards. Shayne and Greg Cramp are therefore disqualified from having any involvement in the harness racing industry and this disqualification will remain in place until 2 February 2027.  The HRV Board also noted and endorsed the sub-committee’s indication that but for the co-operation and admissions to the offending by Shayne and Greg Cramp, the sub-committee would have recommended a disqualification period of 16 years be imposed. Throughout the criminal and harness racing proceedings, both parties expressed remorse for their conduct with Shayne Cramp describing his actions as unforgiveable and a “brain fade” and Greg Cramp describing an “on the spot” decision which turned out to be diabolical. The board also endorsed the sub-committee’s belief that the corrupt act of race fixing is one of the most serious offences that can be committed by participants involved in the harness racing industry and that any person found guilty of committing such offences should be disqualified for an extended period. HRV would like to acknowledge the co-operation between Victoria Police’s Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit, the Office of the Racing Integrity Commissioner and Harness Racing Victoria in bringing these serious matters before a criminal Court proceeding. HRV particularly wish to acknowledge the significant efforts and dedication of the Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit in investigating this complex matter. HRV also wish to thank Mildura police for their extensive assistance and the Victoria Police Prosecutions Division, noting it to be the first successful prosecution in any form of racing under such legislation. If anyone has any information relating to race-fixing allegations they can contact Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000 or www.crimestoppersvic.com.au or the information can be reported to HRV Stewards on 03 8378 0222 or the Racing Integrity Hotline on 1300 227 225. Whilst the damage to the sport of harness racing for conduct such as that engaged in by Shayne and Greg Cramp is immeasurable, it is important to reflect upon the fact that such conduct has been detected and also that the conduct has been detected by the sport itself and that the parties involved have appeared before both criminal and harness racing proceedings. The harness racing industry is united in condemning such behaviour and will continue to support HRV Stewards in their endeavours to actively hunt any such wrongdoing and prosecute accordingly. HRV Stewards look forward to continuing their strong working relationship with the Victorian Police Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit who lead the law enforcement response to matters of race fixing in sport. Harness Racing Victoria

Not guilty pleas have been entered for four men facing allegations of $30 million gaming fraud. The four are due back in Wellington District Court on October 8 for a review of the Serious Fraud Office charges against them. Name suppression was continued for one man but the other three are Paul Max, 58, of Nelson; former Harness Racing New Zealand chairman Patrick O'Brien, 80, of Blenheim; and his son Mike O'Brien. A total of 32 charges of obtaining benefits by deception were laid. Max, 58, faces 13 charges that together with Mike O'Brien he obtained venue licences by deception. The man whose name was suppressed  asked to be dealt with separately from the others. He had previously pleaded not guilty and not guilty pleas were entered for the others on Friday. The Serious Fraud Office laid charges in February after an investigation involving police and the Internal Affairs Department into gaming grants made by trusts since 2006. About 20 venues, including five pubs in Blenheim, five properties in Wellington, two in Hawke's Bay and one in Masterton, were investigated. Details of the charges include concealing from the secretary of Internal Affairs that ownership of companies had been transferred from Mike O'Brien to Paul Max, and concealing the influence Mike O'Brien had in the management of Bluegrass Trust to retain control of it. The charges related to gaming machines outside casinos, such as those found in pubs and clubs. The money from them can only be used for certain purposes. Reprinted with permission of Stuff NZ - Check site here

A South Jersey harness racing trainer and cinematographer has been indicted on nine counts of animal cruelty, the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office announced Tuesday. The indictment comes after officers from the NJSPCA seized several horses and a goat from a South Harrison Township farm where Monica Thors, 55, of Mullica Hill, was planning to shoot a documentary about the care of harness racing horses. Thors, who has worked for decades in harness racing and horse photography, had to euthanize three horses in 2013 for chronic foot infections. Neighbors who complained to the NJSPCA said she had been excessively filing the animals' hooves — a claim Thors later denied when she contacted the South Jersey Times to discuss her case this spring. She had obtained permission from bankruptcy courts in May to have a veterinarian of her own choosing examine her horses, which are in state care, after successfully arguing that the animals were her way of making a living. However, she said was still having problems finding a vet to work with in the weeks that followed. In the meantime, Thors has argued in civil court that the condition of her horses has deteriorated while they were in state care. She said on Tuesday that she needed to consult with her attorney before discussing the matter any further. Thors acknowledged that her horses had chronic laminitis — an inflammatory condition that causes lameness — beginning in the fall of 2013, but said that she had been compassionately caring for them with some success when her seven horses and goat were seized in December 2014. Officials with the SPCA also said that her horses were overweight, and that Thors had failed to comply with recommendations to change their diet. She is charged with third-degree animal cruelty the deaths of four horses that had to be euthanized: According To Prince, a 7-year-old standardbred stallion; According To Hoyle, a 14-year-old standardbred stallion; Aspiration, a 7-year-old standardbred mare and Princess Grey, a 13-year-old standardbred mare. All of the horses were overweight and suffered from chronic laminitis. Thors also faces five counts of fourth-degree animal charges for allegedly "causing serious bodily injury, also by failure to provide care" to four more horses and a goat, all of which were also said to be overweight and suffering from hoof problems. Andy Polhamus Reprinted with the permission of NJ.Com - Check site here

New South Wale's racing codes are lining up to oppose any move to implement an independent regulatory authority in the state after an inquiry into the embattled Queensland greyhound racing industry recommended a similar model. Thoroughbred racing and harness racing officials are understood to be reluctant to consider such a template after the Queensland greyhound racing inquiry's commissioner Alan MacSporran, QC, was scathing in his criticism of Racing Queensland in the wake of the live baiting scandal. He has lobbied for an independent integrity model to be adopted north of the border. Fairfax Media understands the state government-triggered review into the NSW greyhound racing industry has discussed a similar framework to merge the integrity operations of all three jurisdictions under one umbrella. It potentially shapes as a back-to-the-future scenario in NSW after the harness racing and greyhound racing stewards worked under a failed government-controlled framework until its demerger in 2009. And thoroughbred racing and harness racing powerbrokers have just recently tabled strategic plans into their respective sports, with Harness Racing NSW only lodging their blueprint on Monday. Racing NSW published theirs late last year. They are believed to prefer the current system where NSW's thoroughbred, harness racing and greyhound racing control bodies are individually responsible for their own commercial and integrity units. Click on this link to read the full article written by Adam Pengilly on theage.com site 

Four men charged over gaming fraud to the tune of $30 million after a Serious Fraud Office investigation have been remanded for two months. Former chair of Harness Racing New Zealand Patrick O'Brien, his son Mike O'Brien and hospitality consultant Paul Max face 32 charge of obtaining benefits by deception. A fourth man, whose name was suppressed, pleaded not guilty and asked for a judge alone trial on two charges of obtaining by deception. Defence lawyer Bruce Squire QC for Michael O'Brien asked for the remand without plea and without electing trial.  He said there were several matters that still needed to be sorted out, including the defence being given all briefs of evidence. The Serious Fraud Office laid charges after an investigation involving police and the Internal Affairs Department into gaming grants made by the New Zealand Community Trust, Infinity and Bluegrass Trusts since 2006. About 20 venues including five pubs in Blenheim, five properties in Wellington, two in Hawke's Bay and one in Masterton were investigated. Wellington District Court judge Arthur Tompkins remanded them all on bail until July. Stuff.co.nz  

Columbus, OH --- The U.S. Trotting Association announced today it has retained the services of the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau to conduct a variety of integrity services. "The USTA is committed to integrity in harness racing and working with the TRPB will provide our industry with a wide variety of investigative, security and analytical services from the most experienced and professional integrity services organization in horse racing," said USTA Executive Vice President and CEO Mike Tanner. "We look forward to assisting and supporting the USTA's integrity initiatives in horse racing and wagering, and tapping our shared resources to better serve customers, participants, racetracks and regulators in the Standardbred industry," said TRPB Vice President J. Curtis Linnell. The TRPB will utilize its in-house resource database to provide investigative reports and intelligence on topics, organizations, vendors and people as requested by the USTA. The TRPB will also seek to expand and develop information relevant to the Standardbred industry. TRPB Senior Agent Douglas Murray, working out of the headquarters office in Fair Hill, Md., will be the primary contact for the USTA to coordinate research and information requested by the USTA. Murray will support the USTA's role in integrity issues, including allegations of illegal medications, the identification and investigation of suppliers of such, and involvement of organized crime in any aspect of Standardbred racing. Also, the TRPB Wagering Integrity Unit will consult with the USTA in the event of allegations of wagering integrity issues, including tote security lapses, alleged altered races, and possible betting malfeasance of any type. Among other services to be provided to the USTA, the TRPB will conduct due diligence and background examinations of selected associations and vendors in the pari-mutuel industry. The TRPB will include Standardbred matters of mutual concern in USTA's existing industry relationships in France, Sweden, Australia and New Zealand, as well as throughout the U.S. and Canada. Located in Fair Hill, Md., the TRPB operates as a multi-jurisdictional investigative agency in the horse racing industry. The mandate is to expose and investigate all activity prejudicial to horse racing and to maintain public confidence in the sport. The USTA Communications Department   

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Victorian Racing Integrity Commissioner (the Commissioner) are pleased to announce the signing of the Cooperation and Information Exchange Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in Sydney today. AFP Deputy Commissioner Graham Ashton and Racing Integrity Commissioner Sal Perna signed the Cooperation and Information Exchange MOU at the Australian Institute of Police Management (AIPM) in Manly earlier today. AFP Deputy Commissioner Graham Ashton said the MoU formalises the cooperation between the AFP and the RIC and solidifies the strong ties between the two agencies. “The partnership will further the cooperation between the Commissioner and the AFP to support law enforcement activities and AFP investigations in regards to organised crime,” Deputy Commissioner Ashton said. The partnership underlines efforts to ensure the integrity of Victoria’s $2.8 billion racing industry, which employs approximately 60,000 people. “This agreement will be major benefit to both the AFP and the racing industry and will assist in the facilitation of sharing information between the two bodies,” Mr Perna said. “The MOU not only helps both agencies gather and share relevant information, but leads to increasing the public confidence in racing.” This MOU follows a recommendation made in the Commissioner’s 2012 Own Motion Inquiry into Race Fixing to identify the barriers to information sharing between police and racing bodies. The agreement will strengthen the cooperation between the participants, particularly with respect to information exchange, to assist law enforcement to achieve its objectives and reduce the threat posed by criminal infiltration of Australian borders.  Paul Stevens Manager Integrity Operations Level 27, 121 Exhibition Street Melbourne Victoria 3000 T: 03 8684 7775 F: 03 8684 7778 M: 0419 921 586 www.racingintegrity.vic.gov.au  

Well respected harness racing trainer/driver Peter Greig must have wondered weather all his bad luck had come at once when he had a night at Albion Park on Saturday night that he will never forget.   The Queensland Police raided Albion Park Raceway on Saturday night executing a search warrant for drugs on horse trainers and drivers.   When they came to Peter Greig in the stabling area, he objected to the widespread searching of bags and people and by all accounts was very close to being arrested at one point.   In the end the Police slapped Peter Grieg with an infringement notice for allegedly obstructing a sniffer dog from inspecting a bag.   A spokesman for Queensland police confirmed that no drugs were found during the extensive search and no arrests were made as a result of last nights operation.   Mr Farquharson defended the searches when spoken to last night.   “We have had several incidents in the recent  past where cocaine has been found so we want to make sure that it doesn’t happen again,” Mr Farquharson said.   If the night had started badly for Peter Grieg, it got worse in race 4, the $50,000 Autumn Staryers Cup where Peter was driving Major Moment for Grant Dixon.   Away well from barrier one on the 20 metres mark, Major Moment was making good progress through the strung out field when Swarovski who had can canned away from barrier one and run up the track a touch, came back down the track and collected Major Moment who was in full flight, tipping Peter Grieg out of the bike in spectacular fashion.   Peter was able to walk to the ambulance but at this time we have no further information as to how Peter is.   We here at Harnesslink wish Peter a speedy recovery safe in the knowledge that he has just used up all his bad luck for this year in one night.   Harnesslink Media 

Four veterinarians entered guilty pleas for their illegal doping of thoroughbred race horses at Penn National Race Track in Grantville, Pennsylvania. The United States Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania announced that Dr. Kevin Brophy, age 60, Florida, Dr. Fernando Motta, age 44, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Dr. Christopher Korte, age 43, Pueblo, Colorado, pleaded guilty today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan E. Schwab in Harrisburg. Dr. Renee Nodine, age 52, Annville, pleaded guilty yesterday afternoon. Each defendant is charged with allegedly administering drugs to horses within 24 hours of when the horse was entered to race. This conduct was in violation of the state law prohibiting the rigging of publicly exhibited contests and regulations prohibiting the administration of drugs to horses within 24 hours of when they are entered to race. Additionally, because the administering of the drugs was in violation of the state criminal laws, rules and regulations governing thoroughbred racing, they were not dispensed in the course of the defendants’ professional practice. At the guilty plea proceedings before Magistrate Judge Schwab, Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe explained that the drugs were not administered to treat the horses but to enhance the horses’ performance in the race or to give it an edge over other horses. According to Behe this constituted misbranding of the prescription animal drugs in violation of federal law. The alleged activity took place at various times beginning as early as 1986 and continuing up to August 2014. The Informations also allege that the defendants conspired with horse trainers, whose identities are “known to the United States”, to administer the drugs in violation of the laws, rules and regulations governing the conduct of thoroughbred racing. The guilty pleas this week were pursuant to plea agreements in which the defendants agreed to plead guilty and cooperate with the United States in the continuing investigation. At the guilty plea proceedings Behe informed the court that cooperation by the defendants was an essential part of the plea agreement and that the defendants had already identified for the United States the many trainers with whom the defendants conspired with to illegally administer drugs to the horses. Behe identified for the court the drugs that were administered to include, among others, Kentucky Red, Carolina Gold, Bute, Dexamethasone, Banamine, Stop2, Estrogen, L-Arginine, and ACTH. According to the charges, trainers allegedly placed orders for drugs and the defendants, after administering the drugs, backdated the billing records to avoid detection. The defendants allegedly submitted false veterinarian treatment reports to the State Horse Racing Commission, omitting from those reports any reference to the drugs administered to horses at the track on race day. The filing of these reports and the backdating of billing records were, allegedly, to further the conspiracy by concealing the illegal activity. These acts had the potential to defraud other owners and trainers whose horses were entered in the same race and defrauded the betting public as well. The matter is being investigated by the Harrisburg Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Pennsylvania State Horse Racing Commission, U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Criminal Investigations, and the Pennsylvania State Police. Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe is prosecuting the cases for the United States. Indictments and criminal Informations are only allegations. All persons charged are presumed to be innocent unless and until found guilty in court. A sentence following a finding of guilty is imposed by the Judge after consideration of the applicable federal sentencing statutes and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. The maximum penalty in these cases under the federal statute is 2 years imprisonment, a term of supervised release following imprisonment, and a $200,000 fine. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the Judge is also required to consider and weigh a number of factors, including the nature, circumstances and seriousness of the offense; the history and characteristics of the defendant; and the need to punish the defendant, protect the public and provide for the defendant’s educational, vocational and medical needs. For these reasons, the statutory maximum penalty for the offense is not an accurate indicator of the potential sentence for a specific defendant. By Paul Smith Reprinted with permission of Fox43.com

An investigation, commenced by the Harness Racing Victoria Stewards’ Department, and continued by the Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit of Victoria Police, culminated yesterday in Victoria Police advising that criminal charges have been issued against licenced harness racing trainers Shayne Cramp and Greg Cramp. Upon receiving this advice, HRV Stewards have invoked the provisions of Australian Rule of Harness Racing 183 and suspended the licences of Shayne and Greg Cramp with immediate effect. No horse trained or owned by Shayne or Greg Cramp is able to race or trial. HRV Stewards have ordered the scratching of all of Shayne Cramp’s runners engaged at the Mildura meeting tonight. Any change of trainer requests from owners who have been impacted by these events must be approved by HRV. Shayne and Mr Greg Cramp have also been excluded under ARHR 15(1)(e) from attending any harness racing racecourse. HRV CEO John Anderson said: “It is important that the tireless work of Integrity Manager Andy Rogers is recognised. He initiated this exercise almost a year ago and has maintained a confidential vigilance throughout. I also commend the Chairman of Stewards Neal Conder and his panel for their ongoing contribution to the investigation. “I also wish to acknowledge the extensive commitment, dedication and tireless efforts of the whole team at the Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit led by Detective Sergeant Kieran Murnane.” HRV respect the matters are now before the court and will be limiting any further comment. Harness Racing Victoria

Ex-Harness Racing NZ boss says he set up trust at centre of allegations to help clubs starved of funding. A stalwart of the racing industry among those facing claims of a $30 million pokie fraud has spoken of the sport being starved of cash. Former Harness Racing NZ chairman Pat O'Brien, 82, told the Herald he set up the pokies trust at the centre of the allegations to get cash for race stakes and other purposes after funding dried up. "The taxes the government take out of it don't leave enough for the clubs to exist on," he said. Click here to read the full article written by David Fisher for the New Zealand Herald

Although rumours, and some facts, have already surfaced, names of the five Victorian harness racing participants arrested this morning cannot be released. Victoria Police confirmed raids were made on five properties during the early hours, with men arrested at each establishment. Two of the five – one from Merbein and another from Birdwoodton – have been charged, with the other three released pending further enquiries. The charged pair have been released on bail and are set to appear in the Mildura Magistrates’ Court on May 6. Even after being charged, the alleged offenders cannot be named until they appear in court. The five are alleged to have manipulated race odds and driving practices to achieve a desired outcome. After receiving information from Harness Racing Victoria, the Sporting Integrity Intelligence Unit and Mildura Crime Investigation Unit completed a year-long investigation before making the raids. A number of items, including documents, have been seized from the properties, with more charges expected to be laid by tomorrow morning. Speaking at a press conference, HRV chief executive John Anderson stated the raids were further indication corrupt behavior will not be accepted within the industry. “This is the first investigation of its kind that’s got to this outcome and has been a co-operative effort,” Anderson said. “It began with HRV commencing an investigation based on some information flowing through to a criminal investigation, so that’s a really strong statement for the harness racing industry that we’re prepared to go to those levels. “All credit to our officers and the police, who have kept it so tight from a confidentiality point of view, which is important in such an investigation.” Superintendent Peter Bringham is confident the alleged race fixing ring is confined to the Mildura region, which was echoed by Anderson. “It’s believed this is an isolated matter,” Bringham said. “It’s specifically focused on two races that were actually at Mildura. “Match and race fixing is a crime and the police will actively pursue to target and disrupt this crime right across the state.” “In the context in the size of the industry, this is only a very small part…but it does give us just a lever to have a look a bit further afield and see what else can be uncovered,” Anderson declared. “It’s confined for the Mildura region, so as it stands now, I don’t think it is wide spread.” If found guilty under various sections of the Crimes Act, the men face up to 10 years imprisonment. PAUL COURTS

Five men have been arrested in raids over race-fixing allegations in Victorian harness racing. Police hit properties in Merbein, Birdwoodton, Irymple, Mildura and Bolinda about 6.45am on Monday, seizing documents and other items. Superintendent Peter Brigham said the 10-month investigation involved owners, trainers and drivers. "Match or race fixing is a crime and police will actively work to target and disrupt it right across the state," Supt Brigham said on Monday. "It doesn't matter if it's happening at major events in Melbourne or events at our smallest country towns." A 29-year-old Merbein man, a Birdwoodton man, 57, a Bolinda man, 54, an Irymple man, 52, and a Mildura man, 34, were arrested and will be interviewed. Reprinted with permission of AAP

Victoria Police officers have raided the properties of top Australian harness racing figures over their alleged involvement in a race-fixing scandal. The Monday morning raids have targeted the racing operations of the Cramp family in Mildura. Shayne Cramp is one of the state's leading harness racing drivers, while both he and his father Greg also run a major training operation as well. Fairfax Media was to publish an investigation about the pair's links to suspect betting activities and alleged corruption a fortnight ago, but was requested by police to stall publication. The Fairfax Media investigation can reveal that Shayne and Greg Cramp are alleged to be involved in a suspected illegal betting syndicate that has been attempting to manipulate the outcome of races for several months. No other members of their family are alleged to be involved. Fairfax Media is seeking comment from the Cramp family. Click this link to read the full article written by Nick McKenzie Richard Baker Matt Taylor in The Sydney Morning Herald

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