Day At The Track
Search Results
1 to 16 of 33
1 2 3 Next »

Freehold, NJ --- A year ago, Sandbetweenurtoes won her first eight races of the season before seeing her campaign derailed by illness. She has returned this year to win two of five starts and is the favorite in Saturday’s $213,450 Golden Girls for older female pacers at Meadowlands Racetrack. The Golden Girls is part of a stakes-filled night at the Big M. The card also includes the $706,000 Meadowlands Pace for 3-year-old pacers, $443,300 Hambletonian Maturity for 4-year-old trotters, $430,600 William R. Haughton Memorial for older male pacers, $207,350 Mistletoe Shalee for 3-year-old female pacers, $187,000 Delvin Miller Memorial for 3-year-old female trotters, and two $155,000-plus divisions of the Stanley Dancer Memorial for 3-year-old male trotters. Sandbetweenurtoes enters the Golden Girls off a win in the Preferred for fillies and mares at Mohawk Racetrack on July 4. Last year, she won her first eight races, including the Mistletoe Shalee, but failed to hit the board in her final three starts of the season. She finished with $252,572 in purses for owner Brad Grant and the stable of trainers Larry and Ray Remmen. “She ended up getting sick and she never overcame it,” Larry Remmen said. “We tried to play catch-up and it just doesn’t work that late in the year. This year she’s come back a little stronger and, knock on wood, she’s been healthy. She’s trained good so maybe if we get the right trip there we can do some damage.” A daughter of Somebeachsomewhere out of the mare Al’s Girl, Sandbetweenurtoes started this year with a fifth-place finish in the Open Handicap for fillies and mares at the Meadowlands, beaten only 1-3/4 lengths. She won a conditioned race at Harrah’s Philadelphia, then was third-placed-second in her elimination for the Roses Are Red Stakes and third in the Roses Are Red final at Mohawk. Sandbetweenurtoes won the July 4 Preferred at Mohawk in gate-to-wire fashion by 1-1/2 lengths over Marlee B in 1:50.4. “She raced good in Canada,” Remmen said. “She won her last start, but I thought she would have won a little easier. But that’s kind of the way she races. She only does what she has to do when she’s left alone on the front. The bottom line is she won the race. She had a good go in the three starts up there. “So far she’s been going the right way at the wire. I’m happy with how she’s progressed so far. It’s a long year for the horses racing in that company.” This year’s Golden Girls features a 12-horse field and will be contested at 1-1/8 miles. Sandbetweenurtoes will start from post two with driver John Campbell and is the modest 4-1 favorite on the morning line. Katie Said, leaving from post three with Brett Miller at the lines for trainer Jimmy Takter, is the 9-2 second choice. Color’s A Virgin, Table Talk, Venus Delight, Rocklamation, Anndrovette, and Beach Story are listed at 5-1 to 8-1 on the morning line. Rocklamation is a two-time Golden Girls champion and is joined by Anndrovette and Color’s A Virgin as Dan Patch Award winners in the field. “It’s pretty wide open,” Remmen said. “I think it’s a pretty even field. It’s going to come down to the trip; we’ll have to see what the fractions go. It should be interesting with 12 horses at a mile and an eighth. It seems like in those races there are horses that look like certain winners and it all changes the last sixteenth of a mile. “I’m curious to how it’s going to play out, but we’re hoping for good things.” by Ken Weingartner, Harness Racing Communications 

Wake Up Peter entered tonight's $30,000 A-2/A-1/Free For All Handicap with two wins in his last four starts. He left the racetrack tonight three for his last five. Leaving for forward position off the wings of the gate, the 5/2 second choice Wake Up Peter found a comfortable spot, fourth along the pylons, where Brett Miller showed patience through an opening quarter of 27-seconds flat. When Sante Fe Beachboy, who was pacing just ahead of Wake Up Peter pulled first over, Wake Up Peter quickly grabbed his cover and drafted off Yannick Gingras' helmet through a 54.2 half mile and a three quarter clocking of 1:21.2. Brett Miller pulled on the right line and Wake Up Peter responded and drew clear to a two length win, stopping the timer in 1:48.4. Dapper Dude was second and Handsome Henry K rallied to be third. In a post-race interview Brett Miller referred to Wake Up Peter's determination as the difference maker. "He is a very good horse, but more than that he always gives 100-percent, everytime, he gives 100-percent." The victory marked the 14th time the son of Rocknroll Hanover has made it to the winner's circle this season with earnings of $248,710 for the year. Wake Up Peter is trained by Larry Remmen for owner Bradley Grant. In the $20,000 B-1 Pace, Doctor Butch returned dividends as the even-money favorite to score in 1:50.1. Having found trouble in each of his last four starts in the top-class at The Meadowlands, Doctor Butch moved first over for Tim Tetrick and with nothing but racetrack in front of him, the son of Art Major responded to the clear sailing, pacing strong through the stretch while holding off both Rockin Wizard and Sweet Rock to win on the class drop. Despite the first over move into strong fractions of 26.2, 54.2 and 1:23, Doctor Butch was able to sustain his rally for Linda Toscano who earned her first training win of the meet and owner Kenneth Jacobs. Gold Rocks made it two in a row, scoring a powerful win in the $20,000 B-2/B-1 Handicap for three year olds. Electing to stay along the pylons while Winds Of Change established a quick tempo of 27.3, 55.1 and 1:22.4, Gold Rocks waited until the stretch to make his move. When Tim Tetrick found room, he guided Gold Rocks outside of his rivals where he stormed past them all to win in 1:50.4 for trainer Virgil Morgan Jr.and owners Stephen Herrick and Bruce Soulsby. K-Lees Shakenbake rallied from far back again to win the $16,000 B-2 Pace in race four. Despite getting away last from the widest post, the son of Raycer Thad tracked a stalled outer flow while the fractions were hot and heavy up front. Warrawee Needy was wheeling off a 26.1, 53.3 and 1:20.3 clip and he fought all the way to the wire. But, he could not hold off the oncoming K-Lees Shakenbake who was a last to first winner for the second consecutive week, tripping the timer in 1:49.3, establishing a new lifetime mark with driver Scott Zeron. The winner is trained by David M. Smith and owned by Randall Bendis and Thomas Pollack. There will be a pair of carryovers into the Friday card at The Meadowlands. The 13th race Jackpot Super Hi-5 features a carryover of $14,924, while the 5th race Jackpot Super Hi-5 Carryover stands at $2,258. Racing resumes on Friday, December 26th with first post time at 7:15 P.M. The Meadowlands would like to wish everyone a very happy and safe holiday season. by Darin Zoccali, for the Meadowlands  

The summer of 1990 will be remembered as the year the Sportsman’s Park record brook was rewritten. Beach Towel (Ray Remmen) became the fastest harness horse in Chicago circuit history when he captured the $347,000 American National 3-Year-Old Colt Pace in 1:52.4. That clocking was one of six track records set on the five-eighths mile track in Cicero, Illinois. When you consider that the 2-year-old filly pacer record was broken three times by the eventual Illinois Horse of the Year Plum Peachy (Walter Paisley) and the aged trotting mare mark was fell twice, there were nine track records broken that summer. Ron Marsh set a single season record for driving wins at Sportsman’s with 170. He also became the first driver to bring home six winners on a single Sportsman’s Park program and he did it twice. Ronnie did it the first time on July 19 and he came back to do it again on September 245. Dave Magee finished second in the driver standings with Walter Paisley third. The training title went to Bob Farrington. In addition in Beach Towel and Plum Peachy’s track records, new marks were set by Keystone Raider (1:53.2) in the aged pacing division; Mantese (1:55.1) in the 2-year-old colt pace division, Kit Lobell (1:58.4) for aged trotting mares, and Jean Bi (2:00.4) for freshman filly trotters. The largest crowd of the meeting, 15,499 attended Super Night 1990 on Saturday, September 15 and wagered (on-track) $2,333,038 on a nine-race card that saw a total purse distribution of $1,268,850. Among the Super Night champions that night were Plum Peachy in the $305,843 Filly Orange & Blue Final and the GoSox (Lavern Hostetler), in the $219,230 Pete Langley Memorial Pace Championship, both future Illinois Harness Hall of Fame inductees. Later that Super Night Buck And Wing (Walter Paisley), the older brother of Plum Peach, won the $40,000 Dan Patch Final. It was the first and only time sister and brother pacers both captured Super Night crowns on the same program. The Free For All pace division that summer was dominated by the New Zealand bred gelding Prince Sharvid N, while the kingpin of the Open trot division was Red Rhone who won one Free For All Trot, a six-horse field, handicapped by the Race Office with the eight-hole. Keystone Raider topped off his splendid meet, with a neck victory over Dorunrun Bluegrass in the $148,000 American National Aged Pace. Dorunrun Bluegrass (Herve Filion) came back to score an easy 1:54 win in the $146,000 U.S. Pacing Championship Final. by Mike Paradise, for IHHA

Rocklamation shocks at 12-1 in Golden Girls Final

R I P Tony Chiaravalle. He owned the 1993 Pace winner Presidential Ball and was the original owner of the third place finisher that year Riyadh. R I P Matts Scooter-1988 Meadowlands Pace winner-sire of Mach Three 2002 Pace winner. Grandsire of Somebeachsomewhere-THE most prohibitive Pace favorite of the 21st century/ R I P Joe Muscara. He owned the 2002 Pace winner Mach Three and his Muscara Trust co-owns elim divisional winner He's Watching, one of the favorites in this Saturday's race.   $776,000 Pace Purse. Not counting the two years with a supplemental entry, (2000 and 2008), this is the first time since 1990 that the purse is at least $100G higher than the previous year: 1989 $852,000 Dexter Nukes 1990 $1,153,500 Beach Towel   Sire Well Said looks to do-with two chances-what has been done SEVEN TIMES in Meadowlands Pace history. Win the Pace with his first crop. (Sometimes Said, Tellitlikeitis) 1984 Happy Motoring sired On The Road Again 1985 Niatross sired Nihilator 1997 Artsplace sired Dream Away 1998 Life Sign sired Day In A Life 2005 Western Ideal sired Rocknroll Hanover 2008 Art Major sired Art Official 2013 Somebeachsomewhere sired Captaintreacherous   If you're betting either He's Watching or Luck Be Withyou, you have recent history on your side. Tim Tetrick and Ron Pierce have won 6 of the last 7 editions of the Meadowlands Pace, THE most dominant TWO-driver run in the races 37 year history. (Of those 6 wins between them, 3 each, 4 of those 6 were NOT favored)   Ron Burke will try and do what has been done THREE TIMES before. Be the Leading trainer at the Meadowlands for the meet AND win the Meadowlands Pace. J K Endofanera 1993 and 1994 Bill Robinson did it with Presidential Ball and Cams Card Shark 1997 Brett Pelling did it with Dream Away 2004 Mark Harder did it with Holborn Hanover, who was 2-22 lifetime coming into the race and lit up the board at 58-1   "MILLER TIME?" Maybe. There are three driving "MIllers" in the race-Dave and Brett and Marcus. That doesn't even count trainer Erv. The first ever TRAINER named Miller to be in the Pace-as well as the first ever drive-BOTH finished 3rd. Del Miller trainer 3rd 1980 Tyler B Jim Miller driver 1979 3rd with Tijuana Taxi   THROWBACK TIME? Some Pace participants in 2014 were prominent at the Meadowlands in the 1980s. Val D'Or Farms (Always B Miki) 3 times made a 1980s Pace final. 4th with Masquerade in 1986, 7th and 11th with Ringaleevio and Paladium Lobell in the 1988 edition Steve Elliott was 10th with Souffle in the 1986 final of the Pace, and was 3rd and then 2nd in the 1988 and 1989 Trainer Standings here Joe Holloway won FOUR races at the Meadowlands in the 1970s-including twice with a pacer named Pentagon as a DRIVER. In the 1980s, Joe became the first ever Meadowlands trainer to win as many as 106 races in a singe meet-1988 Jim Campbell was the 1989 Meadowlands Training Leader. He also started in the Pace with a pair in 1987-3rd with Run The Table and 12th with Dictionary   Peter Blood is one of the owners of Doo Wop Hanover. As a trainer here-he was second in the 1988 Wilson-the LAST one to go for $1 Million-with Nukes Image to Kassa Branca. The following year, he went 1-2 in the Wilson conso.   Pierce Pace Potpourri Ron Pierce drove the shortest priced Pace winner of the new millennium-$2.80 Well Said 2009. Ron Pierce UPENDED the shortest priced Pace STARTER of the new millennium-Somebeachsomewhere-10 cents on the dollar-in 2008 with Art Official. (Art Official-incidentally-sold as a $4,000 WEANLING at a Meadowlands January sale)   NUMBERS 17 of the 37 Pace winners were sired by a horse who himself raced in the Pace final. ONLY ONE-Real Desire is the ONLY horse to win $3 Million-be Horse Of The Year and win the Meadowlands Pace and NOT be in the Hall Of Fame ONLY ONE Pace winner won from the second tier-On The Road Again 1984 Post 12 THREE Homebreds in the Pace final field. The 2013 Hambletonian had three homebreds win all three eliminations and then the final. Creatine, Smilin Eli and Royalty For Life 20-1 or better-Tellitlikeitis will surely be one of the longshots in the 2014 Pace final field. Rarer than rare for the North America Cup FAVORITE-ALSO the Meadowlands Pace elimination FAVORITE, to be an also-ran in the wagering in the Pace final. FIVE catch-drivers have gone into the Hall Of Fame the past TWO decades. Only five.   ANNIVERSARY 23 years to the day of Precious Bunny winning the 1991 Meadowlands Pace. July 12, 1991. That marked the first time in history a horse won TWO million $ races in the same year (Nihilator did it in 1984 and 1985) John Campbell drove him in the North America Cup to victory, but opted off for Artsplace in the Pace final and Jack Moiseyev won with the Cam Fella colt. HOY. It was also the first of four STRAIGHT Pace winners for Cam Fella as a stallion-ironic when you consider that Cam Fella finished his career 57 straight times on the board-the last time he MISSED the board? 1982 Meadowlands Pace elimination!! 7th   Ron Pierce is on top in North America in $$$. 58 Years of age. This stat is especially interesting when you consider that-in 2006-he was and is the ONLY 50 Years Old to EVER lead the way, and now at 58 is threatening to do the same   Golden Receiver's barn change-AFTER winning $2 Million-brings back memories of possibly the two greatest horses to ever undergo a barn change. Seatttle Slew and Artsplace.   WIDE OPEN PACE?-2013 TOLD US EXACTLY THAT Many live candidates to win the 2014 Meadowlands Pace. And why not. In 2013-the LEADING 2 YO colt pacing earner made $390G-Arthur Blue Chip. This marked the first time since 1977 that the leading $$-winning freshman pacing colt did NOT have at least $400G on his card. No No Yankee had $211G in 1977 (Ironically-the FIRST year of the Pace)   Dave Miller-John Campbell Dave Miller-6 days after entering the Hall Of Fame, hopes to do what only John Campbell has done prior. Go into the Hall Of Fame and win either the Hambletonian or the Meadowlands Pace the SAME year. 1990-John Hambo Harmonious. Dave handles Always B Miki   IF Marcus Miller wins the Meadowlands Pace-he WILL become the YOUNGEST driver ever to do so. Tetrick also did it at 25 in 2007 with Southwind Lynx, Marcus a few months younger.   Canadian Influence 5 of the 6 inside posts in the 2014 Meadowlands Pace have Canadian ownership. 6 of the first 12 Meadowlands Pace winners (1977-1986) had Canadian ownership.   "Hall" Pass-OOPS Pace Five of the first 10 winners of the Meadowlands Pace had trainers who were Hall Of Famers. BUT-only ONE of the last 27 training winners of the Meadowlands Pace did it. Ray Remmen 1990 Beach Towel. Jimmy Takter has two shots at ending that 24 year 0-fer.   Coyne-Operated Ron Coyne (National Debt) has been in the Pace before. 1999 with Washington VC. 8th. That colt then sired a $3 Million career earner by the name of Themightyquinn   If either John Campbell or Ron Pierce win the Meadowlands Pace, they will be the oldest to do so. 59 and 58. Cat Manzi at 56 in 2006 with Artistic Fella currently holds than distinction.   Steve Elliott is the ONLY trainer in the 2014 Meadowlands Pace field who has won this race before. And he did it twice. 2006 and 2009. There are only two trainers in Meadowlands Pace history who have won the Pace multiple times and were FAVORED in all of their wins: Elliott, Billy Haughton  Billy Did it with Falcon Almhurst in 1978-9/5 choice over eventual HOY Abercrombie-and with Nihilator at 1-9 in 1985 heading a prohibitive 5 horse entry.   "Starter" Kit NO 2014 Pace finalist has more than 8 starts in 2014. Yet 16 of the first 24 Meadowlands Pace winners had at LEAST NINE starts on the season entering the Pace final.   Jimmy Takter (Tellitlikeitis and Lyonssomewhere) will try and do what Brett Pelling did last. Go 1-2 in the Pace. Pelling did it with Rocknroll Hanover in 2005 and Village Jolt second.   He's Watching's June 13 foaling date would be THE latest ever for any Meadowlands Pace winner. (TWO of the more famous JUNE foals of all time used to be stablemates-Art Major and McArdle)   SLOW STARTS? NO PROBLEM IN THE PACE Your year isn't going the greatest going INTO the Meadowlands Pace? This doesn't mean a whole lot-or at least it didn't to these brand names: 2001 Real Desire 1 for 5 going into the Pace 2000 Gallo Blue Chip 5 for 10 entering the Pace 2010 One More Laugh 2 for 6 going into the Pace 1988 Matts Scooter Just 2 for 9 entering the Pace (NOTE-the 2 YO Champion (He's Watching 2-5)-and the 2YO Breeders Crown winner (Luck Be With You 1-5)-are a combined 3/10 entering the 2014 Pace)   The "OUTSIDERS?" The three outside horses in the Pace were all sired by a Pace favorite: Post 8 Sometimes Said (Well Said 2009) Post 9 Always B Miki (Always A Virgin 2007) Post 10 Doo Wop Hanover (Rocknroll Hanover 2005)   Takter's Pace Breakthrough? NO Trainer in the 21st century who's campaigned a Horse Of The Year has made it to the Hall Of Fame. Jimmy Takter is the last trainer to do both-having won the HOY titles in 1997-1998-1999. Bob McIntosh went into the Hall Of Fame in 2002-and a full decade later-won his first MILLION $ race going 1-3 in the 2012 NA Cup. Jimmy Takter is looking for his very first Pace score. Ron Burke just scored his first Million $ win taking the NA Cup with J K Endofanera.   The Two oldest drivers to hit the board in the Meadowlands Pace? 1978 Joe O'Brien 59-thid with Flight Director 1982 Billy Haughton 58 3rd with McKinzie Almahurst John Campbell is 59 and Ron Pierce 58   Campbell-Meadowlands Pace-Post 10 The man is amazing. Post 10 in the Meadowlands Pace in 2014 with Doo Wop Hanover. His history from post 10 in the Pace is almost beyond belief. ALL of the following are from Post 10-IN The Meadowlands Pace: 1982 Hilarion winner-first ever catch-driver to win a Million $$ race. 1997 At Point Blank second at 14-1 the colt was WINLESS (0-15) on the year!! 1999 The Panderosa got post 10 initially-AND on the redraw-and still dominated with a 26 flat final quarter in 1:49.3-then a record mile in the Pace and thus becoming the first horse ever to win TWO million $$ races BOTH in sub 1:50) 2004 3rd with Metropolitan from post 10 2007 third with Artriverderci from post 10. 5 different trainers from post 10-five times on the board. Consider that in the other 30 times any driver raced in the Pace from post 10-combined-those drivers were 3-30 ON THE BOARD!   OTHER Post 10 notes...... Dave Miller's Pace debut-1995-Cinder Lane Sam came from post 10-5th-flying home in 26.1.....Pat Crowe drove exactly once in the Pace-from post 10-in 1984 12th with a colt by the name of Greener Pastures.....Brett Pelling made his Pace debut in 1993 from post 10 (No check)....Pinocchio raced in the Pace-from post 10 for Neal Shapiro...   15 times in history the Meadowlands Pace winner has been THAT YEAR'S Leading $$ winner among ALL Pacers.(MOST common of any race of the leaders)   Just HOW tough is it to WIN The Meadowlands Pace? This stat might tell it best. The last THREE Triple Crown winners in the sport-NONE of those three finished first OR second in the Meadowlands Pace!! 2003 No Pan Intended 4th 1999 Blissful Hall 7th 1997 Western Dreamer 3rd   Who are the three richest ever horses to have participated in the Meadowlands Pace final and NOT gotten a check? Boulder Creek $3,425,853 8th 2003 Red Bow Tie $2,673,920 9th 1997 Western Hanover $2,541,647 7th 1992   Super Tough Quiz: Can you name the three colts who led all pacers in year end earnings but did NOT compete in the Meadowlands Pace final? 1977 Governor Skipper $522,148 1998 Shady Character $1,070,569 2002 Art Major $1,562,779   Compiled by Bob "Hollywood" Heyden

Suzanne D'Ambrose, of Neptune, N.J, is the winner of the 2014 Stanley Dancer Award from the N.J. Chapter of the U.S. Harness Writers Association. The award honors an individual whose efforts on behalf of racing and cooperation with the media are in keeping with the example set by the late Hall of Fame driver and trainer Stanley Dancer, a native of New Egypt, N.J. D'Ambrose, a retired high school teacher and mounted police officer, has given countless hours of both her time and that of her family-friendly 13 -year-old trotter, Independent Act, aka Indy, in doing outreach events for the Standardbred industry. D'Ambrose and Indy have appeared at libraries throughout the state to help celebrate New Jersey's Month of the Horse each June. This month so far, the duo will be at the Howell Library at 6 pm on June 11, the Manalapan Library on June 30, as well as June 29 at Fair Winds Farm in Cream Ridge, N.J. Indy has patiently been petted and fed carrots by hundreds of adults and children, many of them making their first ever equine encounter. He has often been the only "boy" at Girl Scout camps where D'Ambrose teaches horsemanship. D'Ambrose, who is a freelance equine massage therapist, also volunteers extensively with the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) on fund raising events as well as helping with adoption outreach events. She even provides complimentary massages for horses rehabilitating from racing injuries and awaiting adoption. Independent Act retired from racing at age 6 and now accompanies D'Ambrose as the two represent the breed in parades, hunter paces, Western trail classes and showmanship competition. Previous winners of the Dancer Award, since1991, were drivers John Campbell, Herve Filion, Ray Remmen and Luc Ouellette; trainers Robbie Siegelman, Kevin and John McDermott, Kelly Stackowicz and George Teague Jr.; the father-son team of Carl and Rod Allen; the duo of trainer Jimmy Takter and owner/amateur driver Mal Burroughs, the Meirs Family of Walnridge Farms for the Niatross Tour, Robert J. Sharkey, the go-to guy at Meadowlands, SBOA of New Jersey President Tom Luchento, Meadowlands General Manager Chris McErlean, the late veterinarian Dr. Pat Knapman. By Ellen Harvey, for the New Jersey chapter of USHWA

Hall of Fame horseman, Douglas J. Ackerman, 86, died today in North Carolina after an illness of almost two years. He was one of the most respected trainers in harness racing and widely admired for his innate horsemanship, ironclad integrity, and memorable sense of humor. His fellow horsemen held him in the highest esteem, and that is the ultimate compliment in his profession. Ackerman was a fixture on the Grand Circuit for decades and trained and drove many top horses, such as Albaquel, Crowning Point, Self Confident, Noble Hustle, Denali, Happy Chatter, Noble Traveler, Amer I Can, Cape Canaveral, Leopard, and the old warrior Bramble Hall. The list could go on and on. In recent years, he turned the driving duties over to his son D.R., and together they raced Chocolatier, a winner of $1.3 million and the champion freshman trotter of 2005. Albaquel was a daughter of Albatross, a stallion Ackerman admired greatly. She earned almost a half-million on the track and was the dam of six pacers to earn more than $250,000, including the Ackerman Stable stars Ever So Rich and Just The Ticket. Albaquel is also the dam of the remarkable broodmare Hattie. Doug Ackerman had a master's touch in selecting yearlings and his advice on conformation was sought by many other trainers. He was one of those rare horsemen who could "look right through a yearling" and size up its potential. Ackerman had a well-honed sense of humor and always had a clever quip to fit just about any occasion. Surely long after his death people who knew him will be saying, "As Doug Ackerman once said......" He grew up in the small rural community of Three Oaks in southwest Michigan, and both his father and grandfather trained and raced horses in the Midwest. Young Doug grew up immersed in the world of harness racing in Michigan and Indiana and recalls seeing Greyhound and Rosalind in their memorable team-to-pole effort at the Indiana State Fair in 1939. His late brother Jack was a noted horseman in his own right while brother Charles stayed on the family farm. Their father Rollin died of a heart attack in a race at the fair in Hillsdale, Michigan when Doug was just 14 years old. His father was only 48. Doug went west to seek his fortune in harness racing in the Golden State of California as a young man and set down roots there for more than a half-century. He trained for decades over the Thoroughbred track at Del Mar, just north of San Diego, which once had a large and thriving Standardbred winter colony. He met Ada Jean Funderbunk, daughter of the prominent horseman Foy Funderbunk, in 1950 and they were married four years later. They recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. While in California, Ackerman developed close friendships with Hall of Famers Joe O'Brien and Jim Dennis. The Ackerman family lived near the Del Mar Fairgrounds and Doug loved every day he trained horses at the magnificent Del Mar facility. Ackerman's ability and work ethic soon allowed him to attract owners and achieve success on the competitive California circuit. Each summer he would ship his stock east to compete on the Grand Circuit and Midwest tracks from a base in Michigan. Ackerman was particularly close to Pres Jenuine, the major domo of the Western Harness meet at Hollywood Park for many years. When Hollywood Park conducted a seminar for new owners in 1970, Ackerman met Richard Staley, a fellow transplant from the Midwest to California. They formed an owner-trainer partnership and friendship that lasted until Staley's death in the mid-1990s. Staley entrusted Ackerman implicitly to manage the horses he owned and never questioned any of Ackerman's decisions or purchases. He admired Ackerman's honesty and horsemanship and they enjoyed phenomenal success over many years. Staley recognized that Ackerman was a natural horseman, raised in an environment filled with horse talk. "Doug was to the manner born," said the erudite Staley, borrowing a phrase from Shakespeare. When Ackerman was inducted into the Living Hall of Fame in 1994, he gave credit to Staley for his friendship and patronage. "He was the greatest owner ever," said Ackerman. "Ever." Ackerman had a wide circle of friends in the sport but was particularly close to such legends as Bill Brown of Blue Chip Farm, Delvin Miller, and George Sholty. The friendship between Ackerman and trainer-driver Howard Beissinger went back many decades and they talked on the phone regularly after their retirements. The two old-school Hall of Famers shared a love of rodeo, and Ackerman took great pleasure in owning a champion bucking bull in recent years. Among the active horsemen in the sport, Ackerman had close relationships with Ray Remmen, John Campbell, Chris Boring, and many others. In truth, however, anyone who ever met Ackerman quickly came to like him. In 1989, Ackerman, Beissinger, and Delvin Miller represented the United States in a driving challenge in Moscow against Russian and German reinsmen. Ackerman won the first race in the series, thus becoming the first American to win a race at the historic Central Moscow Hippodrome since before the Russian Revolution in 1917. When Del Mar closed its track for training purposes almost a decade ago, Ackerman had to relocate his horses to Pinehurst, North Carolina. When asked the difference between training in southern California and Pinehurst, Ackerman quipped, "About 50 degrees." Ackerman was seldom seen without his beloved wife Ada Jean at his side and she was as popular and widely known in harness racing as her husband. Their daughter Connie Hochstetler is a noted racing official whose husband Homer is a veteran trainer. Their son Jay, a student at the University of Kentucky, is now working at The Horseman & Fair. Son D.R. Ackerman has been training and racing the Ackerman Stable horses during his father's illness. He and wife Angelika have sons D.R. Ackerman, Jr. and Kevin. Doug Ackerman was truly a master horseman and enjoyed the respect of everyone who knew him. by Dean Hoffman    

Wake up Peter was purchased for $210,000 by Ray Remmen at the recently completed 2014 Meadowlands January Select Mixed Sale. The purchase was made for renowned owner Brad Grant of Ontario.  Although winless in 19 races, Wake Up Peter earned $307,091 in 2013.  Wake Up Peter earned more money than any winless three-year-old pacer in the history of harness racing   By having only 3 lifetime wins, Wake Up Peter has set himself up to be of the favorites in the early stake series at the Meadowlands, including the Clyde Hirt Series and the Whata Baron. "We have trained him down a couple of times slow in 2:10.  He acted real good.  He is everything that Tony Alagna said he would be.  We are not racing him until February 15th at the Meadowlands.  This is the keep him eligible for the Whata Baron Series,"  Remmen said. "We were looking at Emeritus Maximus first in the sale, but we didn't get him,” Ray Remmen explained. “Brad Grant is the guy who bought the ticket.  We have about eight horses in our barn with Brad, among them is Word Power. This was the second best horse in the sale.  We were looking for a hard hitting race horse.  All of his races last year were good although he was just a notch below the real good ones.” The Clyde Hirt Series begins at the Meadowlands on March 15th and March 22nd.   The first two legs go for $20,000.  The final on March 22nd is for $75,000.  A new series at the Meadowlands is the Whata Baron for non-winners of 4 pm or $100,000 lifetime. The Whata Baron begins on April 5th and April12th.  The first two legs go for $22,500. The final on April 19th is for $75,000. Wake Up Peter will be one of the favorites in both series. "He was eligible for the Clyde Hirt when we bought him,” Remmen said.  “He will have a race before the Clyde Hirt at the Meadowlands, probably in non-winners of 4.  We will race in the Clyde Hirt and then go right into the Whata Baron.  In these two series we should be the pre-race favorite.  Hopefully we can get some of our money back before he has to go against some of the best older horses.  “After that we will race him at Harrah's, Pocono, and the Meadowlands,” Remmen said.  “We are not going to put him in against the Sweet Lou's at first.  We will put him in some of the bigger races later in the season.  Brad Grant owns both Word Power and Apprentice Hanover.  Both of those horses are probably better than Wake Up Peter.  Who knows, we might be surprised. "We have Word Power and a yearling who is the full brother to Word Power in our barn now,” Remmen added, “Hopefully Word Power will be able to make a step upward this year.  Lush Art is a full brother to Word Power.  We are very high on him.  We think he will turn out to be a stakes horse. Other than that we have a bunch of nice race horses.” Brad Grant has several horses in the Remmen barn.  Among them is Wake up Peter, Word Power, and Lush Art.  Lush Art was purchased at the Lexington Selected Yearling Sale for $100,000.  The Art Major-Lush Limbaugh colt is a half brother to Yankee Lauriat (1:50.4 - $421,560) and full brother to Word Power (149.4 - $378,584). Word Power finished his three-year-old season with seven wins in 18 starts. "We thought Wake Up Peter was one of the two best horses in the sale,” Brad Grant said. “I raced him against him the last two years with Apprentice Hanover and Word Power.  He might not be good enough to go with Sweet Lou, Foiled Again, and Captaintreacherous.  If he does real well in those first series we could recapture some of our money.  I am sure Ray will have him ready to go.  I might be able to say at the end of next year that I got the best horse out of the sale.  As a four-year-old going against some of those aged horses you got to be pretty darn good.  We don't think he is there yet.  We look to race him a lot this year.  After this year we will look to take some of the bearcats on.  We will talk with Ray later this week to see if we want to put him into some of the late season stakes. “The plan with Word Power is to start him against the best aged horses, Grant added.  “He desires a shot at them. It is going to be tough.  He can pace along and come home.  He races very well from behind.  A four-year-old racing against the top aged horses, unless you’re Captaintreacherous, you got to have a little luck.  He will race in the Invitational's at Harrah's, Pocono, Meadowlands, and Yonkers.  The sixty four dollar question is will we race him in the Levy.  We will talk about that later this week.  I am putting Apprentice Hanover in the Levy.  We are leaning toward putting him in the Levy. "Lush Art is a full brother to Word Power,” Grant said. “He is a little bit bigger colt.  Larry and Ray really like him.  He is keen to train and get out there. I would like him to fill out a little bit more.  I think he has a lot of upside. It is a crap shoot, but he has the breeding to be a good one." Grant explained. If everything goes according to plans Ray and Larry Remmen and owner Brad Grant could have a very exciting season in 2014, especially when it comes to their older pacers. By Brian McEvoy for Harnesslink.com

East Rutherford, NJ --- Emeritus Maximus, who was purchased for $248,000, was the sales topper Monday at the Meadowlands January Select Mixed Sale presented by Tattersalls. Kevin McDermott bought the 4-year-old male pacer for brothers John and Tom Cancelliere. “He’s Roman, so I had to get him,” John Cancelliere said, laughing. “We’re from the same peninsula.” Emeritus Maximus was among three horses to sell for more than $200,000. Five-year-old male trotter Appomattox sold for $240,000 to Finland’s Reima Kuisla, with trainer Liisa Vatanen signing the ticket, and 4-year-old male pacer Wake Up Peter went for $210,000 to trainer Ray Remmen. A total of 17 horses sold for at least $80,000. Emeritus Maximus is a son of stallionRocknroll Hanover out of the mare Eternity’s Delight. He has won six of 35 career races and earned $292,305. His most recent victory was Jan. 18 at the Meadowlands, where he won by six lengths in 1:50.2. Last year, he won five times and banked $245,397 out of the stable of trainer Tony Alagna. He won a division of the New Jersey Sire Stakes and an elimination for the Hempt Memorial. He finished second to Lucan Hanover in the New Jersey Classic and was third in the Matron Stakes. “We talked to a bunch of people and we kind of liked him, so we went for him,” Cancelliere said. “He’s got to race against some of the best horses out there; it’s as tough as it’s going to get. You’ve got some killers floating around out there (in the older pacer division) and he’s still a babe in the woods. But you always have high hopes.” Alagna’s stable also raced Wake Up Peter last season. A son of Rocknroll Hanoverout of the mare Lovely Lady, Wake Up Peter earned $307,091 despite going winless in 19 starts. No 3-year-old pacer in history has ever earned as much money while failing to win a race. For his career, Wake Up Peter has won three of 29 starts and earned $604,821. Last year, he was third in the North America Cup, Cane Pace and American-National Stakes. “We liked the other horse better, Emeritus Maximus, but we couldn’t get him,” Remmen said. “We took a shot at this one. He fits some late closers here at the Meadowlands; maybe we can get a little money back. I think he’ll make a solid racehorse. “He doesn’t really match up with the good ones, we know that. But he’s solid. He raced against those good ones all year and he never really got his heart broken. A lot of horses would have called it off and said they were tired of chasing those horses, but he didn’t. He kept chasing them.” Appomattox, who won seven of 45 lifetime races and $407,858 out of the stable of Frank Antonacci, was the top selling trotter. He finished second to My MVP in the 2012 Kentucky Futurity final and was second to Market Share in that same year’s American-National. He is a son of Yankee Glide out of the mare Courtney Hall. Appomattox’s mother is a full sister to millionaire Cameron Hall. “He’s just a gorgeous, good-looking, all-around nice horse,” Vatanen said. “He’s going to stay here for now and eventually he’ll probably be going overseas. He’s very well bred, he’s beautiful, and he stands good. There’s nothing bad to say about him.” Vatanen, who previously worked for trainerTrond Smedshammer and has been on her own for two years, didn’t expect Appomattox to go for such a high price. “We thought maybe $200,000, but (Kuisla) really wanted him. He’s got some nice horses at home, but he wants to own a very nice one over here. He’ll have a little bit of a break and we’ll go from there.” Breeder Steve Jones bought 5-year-old female pacer Big McDeal for $125,000. A daughter of McArdle out of the mare Ideal Gal, Big McDeal won 11 of 56 career starts and earned $818,544. As a 2-year-old, she won the Champlain Stakes and a division of the International Stallion Stakes by a head over American Jewel in a world record 1:50.2 at The Red Mile. At 3, she won a division of the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes in a world record 1:49.1 at The Meadows. She finished second to Economy Terror in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship. Big McDeal is a half-sister to 2010 Empire Breeders Classic winner Galimony and her second dam, Before Sunrise, won the 1996 Breeders Crown for 2-year-old filly pacers. “She’s done racing,” Jones said about Big McDeal. “I’m going to send her to the farm and probably breed her to Somebeachsomewhere, but I haven’t really decided on that yet. “I’m just happy to get her. You never know what she’s going to do as a broodmare, but her mother has had three fillies that were all very nice fillies. She’s got everything going for her, in my opinion. She’s got great pedigree, great conformation, great racetrack performance. I don’t really know anything she doesn’t have.” Other horses to sell for at least $100,000 were female pacer Yagonnakissmeornot, male trotter Toss Cartwright and male pacer Sparky Mark. A total of 234 horses were sold for $5.97 million, bringing an average of $25,519. Those numbers were better than in 2013 when 206 horses brought $4.54 million and an average of $22,085. Pacing males topped the sale for the second straight year as 97 head sold for an average of $29,754. In 2013, 71 pacing males sold for an average of $29,341. To see all the results from Monday's sale, click here. by Ken Weingartner for Harness Racing Communications

East Rutherford, NJ – Harness fans, eager to check out the new Meadowlands Racing & Entertainment complex, stormed into the facility Saturday night (Nov. 23) by the thousands.  Shortly after the opening ceremonies, a series of snow squalls also stormed into the East Rutherford Sports Complex.    Despite the high winds, the spirit of the estimated 15,000 fans would never be diminished as the new facility was as exciting as the racing product.  Five of the thirteen races were determined by winning margins of less than a length and ten were won by 2 lengths or less.  Possibly the most exciting was the neck victory by Foiled Again over Warrawee Needy in the final leg of the TVG FFA in 1:49.3.   Interestingly, just three hours before his race, Foiled Again joined Gallo Blue Chip for a ceremonial ribbon cutting ceremony by the two richest pacers of all time.  With combined earnings over $10 million dollars, the two harness heroes posed for throngs of photographers in the new “Blue Chip Farms Winners Circle.”   Previous to the ribbon cutting, Miss Rodeo New Jersey delivered a poignant national anthem, followed by opening remarks by Sam McKee, Chairman Jeff Gural, SBOA/NJ President Tom Luchento, and CEO Jason Settlemoir.  Fans were reminded that three years ago the SBOA/NJ and Gural met with the NJ Governor’s administration and helped rescue the Meadowlands Racetrack from governmental extinction.   “Three years later, we are here in a magnificent new building, at the premier track in North America, looking forward to showcasing the best harness racing presented anywhere in the world,” Luchento said.   Patrons on the apron for the race two-TVG trot found themselves in a mini white-out due to a rapid burst of wind and snow.  Some of the best trotters in the world went behind the gate, where five out of the six starters were Hambletonian finalists.  Wishing Stone was victorious, and paid his supporters handsomely at odds of 9-1.   One big fan of racing, USTA Executive Director Mike Tanner found himself caught in the whirlwind.  He proclaimed, “This place is great,” as he tweeted ‘Not Pompano’ in response to the sudden blast of arctic air.   Fans and horsepeople alike were ecstatic about the new building.  Janet Terhune, director of the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame, exclaimed, “The New Meadowlands is absolutely fantastic.  Trotters (Owners club) is a great experience—it is very ‘clubby.’  The whole facility is filled with people and everybody loves racing.”   Enjoying the atmosphere in Trotters was the breeder of Deweycheatumnhowe, Steve Jones.  Clearly enjoying his well appointed surroundings, “Jonesy” stated, “The facility is fantastic.  Gural and his partners have done a great job.  There is a lot of enthusiasm here.  I like the night club, and all the gambling areas, the bars and everything!  I really think this is going to be a great place to be.”   Hall of Famer Jimmy Doherty, who is one of the few drivers to win a race every year that the Meadowlands has been open, noted that, “I think it is tremendous.  Everyone is very excited about the future.  This place was built for a new generation.”    Ray Remmen, who won the first race on the 1976 opening night with Quick Baron, presented the trophy to the first race winner Alexie Matosie and David Miller.  Another guy who was active on the original opening night on Sept. 1, 1976 was Ted Wing.  He was back as the trainer of a horse in the new opening’s twelfth race.   When reminiscing about historical races, one need not venture any further than the statistician to the stars, Bob “Hollywood” Heyden.  From his TV studio he reminded fans that on the ’76 opener, eight Hall of Famers drove on the card—and only ONE found the winners circle:  Robert Farrington with Rambling Willie.   When quizzed about his observations of this opening night Holly opined that, “Three things stand out.  An unmistakable buzz in the building.  A steady stream of patrons entering from 4 pm through 9 pm, reminiscent of Niatross winning the Meadowlands Pace or a heavy-weight title fight.  And, the sense of anticipation for the overall future of the facility.”   As fans poured into the main entrance, they were eager to enter the Million Dollar Pick 13 challenge.  Many a punter stopped to ogle over the suitcase full of cash, prominently on display in the center of the ground floor betting area.  Alas, the promotion turned elusive as the new racing configuration created a new and distinct track bias.   Perhaps it was a night for underdogs, as only four betting favorites found the winners circle.  Ironically, horses named after 1976 movie icon, Rocky, had a big night: Salevster Stallion (Race 1, fin. 2nd), Stallone Blue Chip (R3,1st) & Yo Cheyenne Rocky (R9, 1st).  Nonetheless, Team Gural showed the world that they were up for the task! by Chris Tully for Harnesslink.com  

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. _ A new era in harness racing dawned Saturday night with the debut of The Meadowlands Racing & Entertainment. The gleaming $88 million track, the vision of chairman Jeff Gural, launched with a 13-race program on a blustery, chilly night with occasional snow squalls before an estimated 15,000 fans. The on-track handle exploded in the new facility, reaching a total of $530,917, an impressive 18-percent of the total $2,968,600. The evening began with a dedication ceremony in the paddock with Gural thanking the numerous members of The Meadowlands team who made the dream a reality. "To all the people who helped--and there are many of you--and for all the people who are here tonight, I hope you enjoy what you see," Gural said. "It's not only racing, it's also entertainment." Tom Luchento, president of the Standardbred Breeders & Owners Association of New Jersey, joined Gural in welcoming the fans on opening night. Luchento recalled how Gural came to the rescue when The Meadowlands faced closure. "Three years later, we are here in a magnificent new building, at the premier track in North America looking forward to showcasing the best harness racing presented anywhere in the world," Luchento said. There was a ceremonial ribbon breaking by a hero of yesteryear, Gallo Blue Chip. The winner of the 2000 Meadowlands Pace was also joined in the winner's circle by Foiled Again, the sport's all-time leading money earner at $5.7 million, who returned later that evening to win a TVG division. The honor of winning the first race at the new Meadowlands went to Alexie Mattosie and driver David Miller in 1:50 4/5. They were greeted in the winner's circle by Ray Remmen, who captured the first race at the original Meadowlands with Quick Baron in 1976. The opening night features were the final $50,000 legs of the inauguaral TVG Free-For-All Series. The $500,000 TVG finals are on tap next Saturday night along with a quartet of 2-year-old stakes: the $534,500 Governor's Cup, the $494,750 Valley Victory, the $394,950 Three Diamonds and the $456,150 Goldsmith Maid. The TVGs were a clean sweep for the team of driver Yannick Gingras and Ron Burke, one night after he set the single-season training record with his 1,000th win. The TVG Trot went to Wishing Stone, a race contested in a brief but blinding blizzard. He set the pace, beating Arch Madness by 1 ¼ lengths in 1:54 with Market Share, the 2012 Hambletonian winner, third. Foiled Again, a top contender for Horse of the Year, turned in yet another game effort in the TVG Pace. He ranged up first-over victory into a stiff wind to beat Warrawee Needy by a neck in 1:49 3/5. Modern Legend was third. Following the racing, the party at The Meadowlands continued long into the night as Victory Sports Bar & Nightclub was packed and in full swing into the morning. Rachel Ryan  

Lexington, KY --- The Lexington Selected Yearling Sale’s third session youngsters turned in a sterling performance on Thursday (Oct. 3), as their sale results crushed the numbers from the same session in 2012. The average sale price of $34,051 for the 157 sold was a gain of 31 percent, gross sales rose more than 33 percent and the number of $100,000 yearlings jumped from one to six. This remarkably strong showing has helped push the average price of $54,148 for 420 yearlings through three sessions to a 10 percent advantage over the first three days a year ago. The sale topper Thursday at $105,000 was pacing colt Helios Lindy, by American Ideal out of Sunshine Sister. Jeff Gillis signed as agent for Mac Nichol for this colt in the Preferred Equine Marketing consignment. Five yearlings sold for an even $100,000. The first of these was the colt Lush Art, by Art Major out of Lush Limbaugh, a $200,000-winning three-quarter sister to Camtastic and the producer of a pair of $200,000-plus winners. This includes the current 3-year-old Word Power, who boasts a 1:49.4 record. Ray Remmen, trainer of Word Power, signed for this Dunroven Stud-bred colt. The next yearling to reach $100,000 was Southwind Wildfire, a colt by Muscle Hill out of Wafs. Bjorn Noren cast the winning bid on behalf of Courant AB for this colt that was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing as agent for Southwind Farms. The very next horse in the ring sold for that same price. This was the Western Ideal colt Artspeak, out of the Artsplace mare The Art Museum, a member of the same family as Southwind Lynx ($1,763,389) and Ultra Jet ($756,571). John Fodera signed as agent for this youngster from the Brittany Farms consignment. Courant AB of Sweden returned to $100,000 territory, this time in pursuit of a pacer. Nancy Takter Johansson signed the slip for Courant AB in acquiring the Art Major colt Think Again, out of $900,000 winner Remember When, closely related to millionaires Mr Feelgood, Western ideal, and Leah Almahurst. Brittany Farms bred Think Again. The final $100,000 yearling for the night went to Ken Jacobs’ K J Stables LLC, as he selected the Bettor's Delight colt Eagle Feather. Dam Town Feather has produced a pair of full siblings, the filly Ramalama and colt Duke Did It, each with earnings over $200,000, as well as millionaire half brother Razzle Dazzle. Preferred Equine Marketing consigned the colt for Freedom Hill Farms. Here are the summary statistics by gait and sex, from both the third session and overall, plus the leading horses by price from the third session: Session 3       Group-No. Sold-Total Price-Average Price-Top Price-Median-$100,000+ Pacing Colts-40-$1,604,000-$40,100-$105,000-$30,000-5 Pacing Fillies-29-$831,000-$28,655-$92,000-$19,000-0 Trotting Colts-40-$1,629,000-$40,725-$100,000-$38,500-1 Trotting Fillies-48-$1,282,000-$26,708-$65,000-$20,000-0 Total-157-$5,346,000-$34,051-$105,000-$30,000-6 Sale through three sessions       Group-No. Sold-Total Price-Average Price-Top Price-Median-$100,000+ Pacing Colts-101-$5,981,000-$59,218-$150,000-$50,000-22 Pacing Fillies-94-$4,571,000-$48,628-$180,000-$40,000-10 Trotting Colts-108-$7,156,000-$66,259-$475,000-$48,500-18 Trotting Fillies-117-$5,034,000-$43,026-$260,000-$35,000-8 Total-420-$22,742,000-$54,148-$475,000-$42,000-58 Yearling-Sire-Dam-Sex-Gait-Price-Buyer Helios Lindy-American Ideal-Sunshine Sister-C-P-$105,000-Jeff Gillis, Agent For Mac Nichol Lush Art-Art Major-Lush Limbaugh-C-P-$100,000-Ray Remmen Southwind Wildfire-Muscle Hill-Wafs-C-T-$100,000-Bjorn Norden, Agent For Courant Ab & M Langli Artspeak-Western Ideal-The Art Museum-C-P-$100,000-John A. Fodera, Agent Think Again-Art Major-Remember When-C-P-$100,000-Nancy Johansson, Agent For Courant Ab Eagle Feather-Bettor's Delight-Town Feather-C-P-$100,000-K J Stables Llc The Lexington Selected Yearling Sale continues each evening at 7 p.m. through Saturday at the Fasig-Tipton Sale Arena. by David Carr for USTA www.ustrotting.com

Lexington, KY --- The Lexington Selected Yearling Sale’s third session youngsters turned in a sterling performance on Thursday (Oct. 3), as their sale results crushed the numbers from the same session in 2012. The average sale price of $34,051 for the 157 sold was a gain of 31 percent, gross sales rose more than 33 percent and the number of $100,000 yearlings jumped from one to six. This remarkably strong showing has helped push the average price of $54,148 for 420 yearlings through three sessions to a 10 percent advantage over the first three days a year ago. The sale topper Thursday at $105,000 was pacing colt Helios Lindy, by American Ideal out of Sunshine Sister. Jeff Gillis signed as agent for Mac Nichol for this colt in the Preferred Equine Marketing consignment. Five yearlings sold for an even $100,000. The first of these was the colt Lush Art, by Art Major out of Lush Limbaugh, a $200,000-winning three-quarter sister to Camtastic and the producer of a pair of $200,000-plus winners. This includes the current 3-year-old Word Power, who boasts a 1:49.4 record. Ray Remmen, trainer of Word Power, signed for this Dunroven Stud-bred colt. The next yearling to reach $100,000 was Southwind Wildfire, a colt by Muscle Hill out of Wafs. Bjorn Noren cast the winning bid on behalf of Courant AB for this colt that was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing as agent for Southwind Farms. The very next horse in the ring sold for that same price. This was the Western Ideal colt Artspeak, out of the Artsplace mare The Art Museum, a member of the same family as Southwind Lynx ($1,763,389) and Ultra Jet ($756,571). John Fodera signed as agent for this youngster from the Brittany Farms consignment. Courant AB of Sweden returned to $100,000 territory, this time in pursuit of a pacer. Nancy Takter Johansson signed the slip for Courant AB in acquiring the Art Major colt Think Again, out of $900,000 winner Remember When, closely related to millionaires Mr Feelgood, Western ideal, and Leah Almahurst. Brittany Farms bred Think Again. The final $100,000 yearling for the night went to Ken Jacobs’ K J Stables LLC, as he selected the Bettor's Delight colt Eagle Feather. Dam Town Feather has produced a pair of full siblings, the filly Ramalama and colt Duke Did It, each with earnings over $200,000, as well as millionaire half brother Razzle Dazzle. Preferred Equine Marketing consigned the colt for Freedom Hill Farms. Here are the summary statistics by gait and sex, from both the third session and overall, plus the leading horses by price from the third session: Session 3       Group-No. Sold-Total Price-Average Price-Top Price-Median-$100,000+ Pacing Colts-40-$1,604,000-$40,100-$105,000-$30,000-5 Pacing Fillies-29-$831,000-$28,655-$92,000-$19,000-0 Trotting Colts-40-$1,629,000-$40,725-$100,000-$38,500-1 Trotting Fillies-48-$1,282,000-$26,708-$65,000-$20,000-0 Total-157-$5,346,000-$34,051-$105,000-$30,000-6 Sale through three sessions       Group-No. Sold-Total Price-Average Price-Top Price-Median-$100,000+ Pacing Colts-101-$5,981,000-$59,218-$150,000-$50,000-22 Pacing Fillies-94-$4,571,000-$48,628-$180,000-$40,000-10 Trotting Colts-108-$7,156,000-$66,259-$475,000-$48,500-18 Trotting Fillies-117-$5,034,000-$43,026-$260,000-$35,000-8 Total-420-$22,742,000-$54,148-$475,000-$42,000-58 Yearling-Sire-Dam-Sex-Gait-Price-Buyer Helios Lindy-American Ideal-Sunshine Sister-C-P-$105,000-Jeff Gillis, Agent For Mac Nichol Lush Art-Art Major-Lush Limbaugh-C-P-$100,000-Ray Remmen Southwind Wildfire-Muscle Hill-Wafs-C-T-$100,000-Bjorn Norden, Agent For Courant Ab & M Langli Artspeak-Western Ideal-The Art Museum-C-P-$100,000-John A. Fodera, Agent Think Again-Art Major-Remember When-C-P-$100,000-Nancy Johansson, Agent For Courant Ab Eagle Feather-Bettor's Delight-Town Feather-C-P-$100,000-K J Stables Llc The Lexington Selected Yearling Sale continues each evening at 7 p.m. through Saturday at the Fasig-Tipton Sale Arena. by David Carr, the U.S. Trotting Association Courtesy of the United States Trotting Association Web Newsroom

It was a day nothing short of Legendary. 12 Hall of fame drivers descended on small town Clinton, Ontario to bring together thousands of race fans for a Sunday afternoon in support of the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation. With a record handle of $48,900 and a crowd twenty deep at the wire, this is what harness racing is all about. Ray Remmen and The Northern Dude captured the $15,000 Legends Day invitational trot in true legendary fashion with a gate to wire finish and a new track record of 1:59. This was Remmens’ first Legends Day win, and by the smile on his face, it was well worth the wait. Ron Waples and Amigo Loco were not far behind for second and Cimeronken driven by Bill O’Donnell rounded out the triactor. While there isn't a total available at this time, the event was an amazing success and great fundraiser for the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation. by Jessica Carnochan  

He has been an integral part of Clinton Raceway’s Legends Day since its inception back in 2001 and will be back again this year on Sunday, August 18. But Ron Waples still can’t get used to the thought of being considered a harness racing ‘living legend’. Those who have followed the incredible career of the double Hall Of Famer would say otherwise. Waples has driven just shy of 7,000 winners and has posted career purse winnings of more than $75 million in the process. Along the way, he has been blessed to sit behind some of the greatest horses ever to look through a bridle – horses like Ralph Hanover, Sugarcane Hanover, Peace Corps, No Sex Please, Dream Maker and Presidential Ball, just to name a few. He has won almost every major race in the sport along the way, including the Hambletonian, Little Brown Jug, North America Cup, Meadowlands Pace and nine Breeders Crown titles. “At the time, it’s all just another day at the office,” recalls Waples. “But now, when I reflect back on things, I realize just how fortunate I was to be associated with so many great horses and great people and to enjoy the success that I did.” Waples will be looking to capture his second Legends Day Trot this year after winning the 2003 edition with Carrland Buddy in a then track record of 1:58.2. This will be his seventh consecutive Legends Day appearance and he says it is an experience that never gets old. "I don’t really think of myself as a legend but it’s definitely very special to be asked to take part in something like this. I’m still a fan too and I’ve got to spend this day with some of the guys I’ve idolized myself like the late Buddy Gilmour for example. “It’s always a great day and I love the atmosphere,” he explains. “I am amazed at how many fans come out and they’ll stand in line for a couple of hours just to get autographs. The folks at Clinton go above and beyond on this day and they’ve raised a lot of money for local charities too over the years which makes it even more special.” In fact, the previous six Legends Day events have provided $132,000 that go directly to benefit local charities in the Clinton area. The Legends Day roster this year will include Waples along with Herve Filion, John Campbell, Bill O’Donnell, Ray Remmen, Keith Waples, Dave Wall, Clint Galbraith, Bud Fritz, Jim Doherty, Doug Brown and Steve Condren – a group with combined purse winnings of well over half a billion dollars. The $15,000 Legends Day Trot and Ontario Sires Stakes action for two-year-olds will be the highlight races for the afternoon. Fans will have an opportunity to meet this year’s legends and receive autographs starting at 2:30 p.m. There will also be live entertainment and pony rides in the park. The Pineridge Barbecue Chicken dinner is scheduled from 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. (tickets $15 each) and Legends T-shirts will be on sale for just $2. All proceeds, along with those from the silent auction that day, will go to the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation. For complete details visit www.clintonraceway.com . by Jessica Carnochan  

He has been a part of many battles on the racetrack over his outstanding 30-plus year driving career but the biggest battle of all for Steve Condren has come away from the track. The Milton resident was diagnosed with Colon cancer in 2011 and that very well could have meant the end to his storied career. But, with the steely determination and steady focus he has become known for, Condren has battled his way back into the race bike and back to prominence on the national stage. The man in green and gold is also getting set to take part in his first ever Legends Day at Clinton Raceway on Sunday, August 18, and says he is all systems go and looking forward to the experience. “The doctor gave me a clean bill of health the last time I saw him and I’m feeling good,” he explains following a recent golf outing where he shot a round of 75. “I’ve worked hard to get back driving and I certainly realize how fortunate I am to be able to be back doing what I love. I’m going to fully enjoy the day and the whole experience.” Condren’s other passion is golf which gives him much of the exercise he requires to stay healthy along with a regular workout routine. After three months of excruciating chemotherapy treatments in the Fall of 2011, the veteran reinsman was forced to slowly and methodically get himself healthy and back into good enough condition to return to the race bike. That patience, and attention to detail, are attributes that have helped him in the race bike too and made him one of the most respected drivers this country has produced. “I’d like to think that one of my strengths is looking at the big picture with young horses and trying to show them how to race the right way,” he admits. “Being versatile has also helped me and having a pretty good sense of how to react to situations that arise in a race. When I look back now, I have to be satisfied with my career to this point and what I’ve accomplished.” As a young driver starting out his career, Condren looked up to several prominent Ontario Jockey Club stars including the late Bill Wellwood and Ron Feagan. He also greatly admired another future Hall Of Famer named Ron Waples – a former Legends Day Trot winner who will be taking part as well this year for the seventh consecutive time. Some of the best horses Condren has driven in his career were ones that he partially owned including Canadian champions Pure Ivory and Elegantimage – the namesake of one of WEG’s premier trotting stakes. His biggest career victory came in 1989 when he guided Goalie Jeff to a dramatic upset win in the North America Cup at Greenwood. Condren has amassed impressive career totals of more than 6,600 victories and purse winnings in excess of $110 million but enjoys the opportunity to get back to the smaller tracks and personally interact with the fans. “I drove in Clinton last Spring for the first time in a long time and it’s a great atmosphere,” he says. “I think that the folks there have a true appreciation of the sport and it’s going to be fun to be a part of. To be asked to join a group of guys like this is a real honour.” The Legends Day roster this year will include Waples along with Herve Filion,  John Campbell, Bill O’Donnell, Ray Remmen, Keith Waples, Dave Wall, Clint Galbraith, Bud Fritz, Jim Doherty, Doug Brown and Steve Condren – a group with combined purse winnings of well over half a billion dollars. The $15,000 Legends Day Trot and Ontario Sires Stakes action for two-year-olds will be the highlight races of the afternoon. Fans will have an opportunity to meet this year’s legends and receive autographs starting at 2:30 p.m. There will also be live entertainment, pony rides and face painting for the kids. The Pineridge Barbecue Chicken dinner is scheduled from 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. (tickets $15 each) and Legends T-shirts will be on sale for just $2. All proceeds, along with those from the silent auction that day, will go to the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation. For complete details visit www.clintonraceway.com. Jessica Carnochan  

1 to 16 of 33
1 2 3 Next »