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New Brunswick, NJ — In a joint project by the Equine Science Center at Rutgers University; Equine Integrated Medicine, Georgetown, Ky.; Duer Forensic Toxicology, Clearwater, Fla.; and the New York Drug Testing and Research Program, Morrisville State College; a recently published journal article shows that a sterile solution of cobalt salts (50 mg of elemental cobalt as CoCl2 in 10 ml of saline, given IV for three consecutive days) did not affect aerobic or anaerobic performance or plasma erythropoeitin concentration in race fit harness racing horses. The study was funded in part by the United States Trotting Association. “The Evaluation of Cobalt as a Performance Enhancing Drug (PED) in Racehorses” study sought to determine if cobalt acts as a performance enhancing drug by altering biochemical parameters related to red blood cell production, as well as markers of aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance. The study also identified the normal distribution of plasma cobalt in a population of horses on a maintenance dietary ration without excessive cobalt supplementation. Research was conducted using 245 Standardbred horses with no supplementation of cobalt from farms in New York and New Jersey, including those at the Rutgers University Equine Science Center. The authors concluded that a threshold of 25 micrograms per liter in plasma, currently in place in many racing jurisdictions, may result in horses exceeding the threshold without excessive cobalt administration. They suggest that a threshold of 71 micrograms per liter be considered. The study also found that plasma cobalt concentrations over 300 ppb had no adverse effects on horses’ well-being or on performance. However, we caution that investigators have found that higher doses are purportedly being illicitly administered to horses with reported dangerous adverse and life-threatening effects on the horses. The present study does not address the effects of administering the much larger doses that racing officials and investigators have suggested are being misused to enhance performance. Cobalt in salt form (closeup) According to Dr. Kenneth H. McKeever, Associate Director for Research at the Equine Science Center, “The results of this study are the first to document that administration of cobalt salts at the level studied does not stimulate the production of red blood cells and does not affect markers of performance in race fit horses. Horses appear to respond in a species-specific fashion that is different from human studies that showed toxicity at plasma concentrations above 300 ppb. This study presents data rather than speculation for the decision-making process for setting thresholds.” The study has been published as an open access paper, accessible for free at this link. The Rutgers Equine Science Center

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. - "Racehorse/Sport Horse Care and Rehabilitation" is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. The seminar, scheduled from 8:00 am - 3:30 pm on Sunday, February 9, 2020, will feature presentations by several equine experts. "This year we selected a topic that we have not covered during any of the previous Horse Management Seminars. Whether you have racehorses, sport horses or just like riding horses there will be something for everyone! We have so many veterinary experts in the New Jersey area, I am very excited to be able to have them share their expertise with you" says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center. "Our goal for this workshop is to bring in the leading veterinary and academic experts in each of these topic areas. This includes caring for the racehorse, managing the sport horse, rehabilitating horses, transitioning careers between race and sport, and feeding for different types of exercise. We will also highlight some of the current, and future, research from Rutgers graduate students conducting equine research." Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as the leading experts in their field to offer perspectives and personal insight. The morning will start with "Caring for the Racehorse vs. Sport Horse" by Dr. Nancy Lee, owner of Sound Equine. "Dr. Lee is a perfect speaker for this topic because she deals with both types of horses closely in her practice along with competing some sport horses of her own!" says Williams. The morning will also include Dr. Jesse Tyma, from Mid-Atlantic Equine Medical Center, a local veterinarian specializing in injuries common to both sport and racehorses. Dr. Tyma will present "Transitioning careers - Racing to Sport/Pleasure which injuries can you live with?" The afternoon will start off with "Rehabilitating a Race/Sport Horse from Injury" by Dr. Sarah Bye of Foundation Equine, Chesterfield, NJ which will be followed by "Feeding for Different Competitive Sports" by Dr. Shannon Pratt-Phillips, from North Carolina State University. "Dr. Pratt-Phillips has a long history of performing nutritional research in all kinds of equine athletes and is one of the top nutritionists in her field," mentions Dr. Williams. Closing out the day will be two short presentations on some of the current research taking place on campus, as well as what future research being planned. "Sugar Metabolism of Horses Grazing Warm-Season Forages" by Doctoral Candidate, Jennifer Weinert, and "The Human-Horse Interaction: What Does the Horse Tell Us?" by Doctoral Student, Ellen Rankins. In addition to these presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities with industry companies and area organizations, ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day's presenters and lots of door prizes! Early bird registration ends soon (Jan. 26th) so register now for the great event! The complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu, as well as the registration site at: http://bit.ly/2020HorseManagement. For questions, please contact Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, carey.williams@rutgers.edu. The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu. From the Rutgers Equine Science Center  

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – “Feeding and Care of Mare/Foal, Stallion, and Growing Horse” is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. The seminar, scheduled from 8:30 am – 3:45 pm on Sunday, February 10, 2019, will feature presentations by several equine experts. “This year we selected a topic that we have not covered during any of the previous Horse Management Seminars. Even if you don’t currently breed horses, the presentations will have lots of information for everyone!” says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center. “Our goal for this workshop is to bring in the leading experts in each of these topic areas. This includes broodmare and growing horse nutrition, care of the stallion, and new reproductive advances. We will also highlight some of the current, and future, research from Rutgers Equine graduate students.” Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as the leading experts in their field to offer perspectives and personal insight. The morning will start with “Stallion Care” and “Recent Advanced in Equine Reproduction” by Dr. Ed Squires from University of Kentucky’s  Gluck Equine Research Center. “Dr. Squires leads the country in his contribution to the field of equine reproduction” says Williams, “we are honored to have him here at Rutgers courtesy of Vetoquinol USA.” The morning will also include Dr. Dan Keenan from Foundation Equine, a local veterinarian specializing in equine reproduction. Dr. Keenan will present “Care of the Mare and Foal Pre and Post Birth.”  The afternoon will start off with Dr. Amy Burk, who leads the equine breeding program at the University of Maryland, presenting “Feeding the Pregnant/Lactating Mare”, followed by “GI Development and Nutrition of the Growing Horse” by Dr. Paul Siciliano from North Carolina State University. Closing out the day will be a panel discussion from the three main speakers, moderated by Williams. Following the panel Dr. Williams’ doctoral student, Jennifer Weinert, will give a short presentation on some of the current research taking place on campus, as well as what future research has been planned. In addition to these presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities with industry companies and area organizations, and ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day’s presenters. The complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu, as well as the registration site at: http://bit.ly/2019HMS . Space is limited, and the early bird discount for registration ends on January 28th, so be sure to register early! For questions, please contact Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, carey.williams@rutgers.edu. About Rutgers Equine Science Center The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu.   ================================================== Carey A. Williams, Ph.D. Equine Extension Specialist Rutgers University 84 Lipman Dr., Bartlett Hall New Brunswick, NJ 08901   PH: 848-932-5529 Email Replies to: Carey.Williams@Rutgers.edu =================================================

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – “Why Do They Do That? Behavior and Training of Horses; is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. The seminar, scheduled from 8:00 am 4:00 pm on Sunday, February 14, 2016, will feature presentations by several equine industry experts. For a discounted registration checks must be post marked by January 29th. “Horse training is an often-requested but tricky theme for this seminar because there are so many methods out there, so we will instead explain how horses learn and how that knowledge can be applied to training,” says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center.  “Our goal in presenting this workshop is to give our audience an understanding of the concepts behind equine learning which are present regardless of discipline or training method and provide some of the research techniques that can be applied.” Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as experts in their field to offer background and advice.  The morning will start with topics including “Normal/Natural Behavior of Horses” by Dr. Carissa Wickens from University of Florida, “Using Learning Theory to Train Horses” by Angelo Telatin from Delaware Valley University, and “Psychological Stress and Welfare of Horses” by Dr. Betsy Greene from University of Arizona.  In addition to the educational presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities and door prizes from industry companies and area organizations, along with ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day’s presenters.  Complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu under the ‘outreach & events’ tab.   For more information, Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, Carey.Williams@rutgers.edu.  Remember, early bird discount registration ends on January 29! About Rutgers Equine Science Center The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu.

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – “Why Do They Do That? Behavior and Training of Horses” is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  The seminar, scheduled from 8:00 am – 4:00 pm on Sunday, February 14, 2016, will feature presentations by several equine industry experts. “Horse training is an often-requested but tricky theme for this seminar because there are so many methods out there, so we will instead explain how horses learn and how that knowledge can be applied to training,” says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center.  “Our goal in presenting this workshop is to give our audience an understanding of the concepts behind equine learning which are present regardless of discipline or training method and provide some of the research techniques that can be applied.” Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as experts in their field to offer background and advice.  The morning will start with topics including “Normal/Natural Behavior of Horses” by Dr. Carissa Wickens from University of Florida, “Using Learning Theory to Train Horses” by Angelo Telatin from Delaware Valley University, and “Psychological Stress and Welfare of Horses” by Dr. Betsy Greene from University of Vermont.  The afternoon will continue the behavior theme, including “Problem Solving Using Learning Theory” by Angelo Telatin, “Stereotypic Behaviors: Understanding Cribbing, Weaving, and Other Behaviors” by Dr. Carissa Wickens, and “How Nutrition Can Affect Behavior” by Dr. Carey Williams.  The day will conclude with a panel of each of the speakers for additional question and answer opportunities. In addition to the educational presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities and door prizes from industry companies and area organizations, along with ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day’s presenters.  Complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu.  For more information, contact Laura Kenny at 848-932-3229, kenny@aesop.rutgers.edu, or Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, cwilliams@aesop.rutgers.edu.  Early bird discount registration ends on January 29! About Rutgers Equine Science Center The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu. Carey A. Williams, Ph.D. Equine Extension Specialist esc.rutgers.edu

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – “Grazing Rewards and Concerns: How and Why to Care for Your Pastures” is the over-arching theme of the upcoming Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  The seminar, scheduled from 8:00 am – 3:30 pm on Sunday, February 8, 2015, will feature presentations by several equine industry experts. “We all know that pasture can provide a substantial amount of a horse’s nutrition, but there is also increased concern about the metabolic problems that some horses experience when turned out on lush grass,” says Dr. Carey Williams, Extension Equine Specialist and Associate Director of Extension for the Equine Science Center.  “Our goal in presenting this workshop is to explain when the risks and benefits are the greatest, and teach guests how to properly manage pastures and grazing.” Williams has assembled presenters who are recognized as experts in their field to offer perspectives and personal insight.  The morning will start with topics including “Nutritional Benefits of Pasture and When Pasture Is Not Enough” by Dr. Steve Duren from Performance Horse Nutrition, “Pasture Problems: Safe Grazing Tips for Managing Equine Metabolic Syndrome” by Dr. Bridgett McIntosh from Virginia Tech, “Equine Grazing Behavior” by Dr. Amy Burk from University of Maryland, and “Rotational and Continuous Grazing: New Research You Can Use” by a team of researchers from across the East Coast.  The afternoon will consist of presentations about pasture management, including “The Fences Are Up – Now What Do I Do? Basic Pasture Management” by Bill Bamka from Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Burlington County, “Got Weeds? Understanding and Managing Weeds in Your Pastures” by Donna Foulk from Penn State University, and “Danger in the Grass – Plants that Are Toxic to Horses” also by Donna Foulk.   In addition to the educational presentations, the seminar will feature informational displays, networking opportunities with industry companies and area organizations, and ample time for one-on-one discussions with the day’s presenters.  Complete program, registration information, and seminar brochure are posted on the Equine Science Center website at esc.rutgers.edu.  For more information, contact Laura Kenny at 848-932-3229, kenny@aesop.rutgers.edu, or Dr. Carey Williams at 848-932-5529, cwilliams@aesop.rutgers.edu.  Early bird discount registration ends on January 23! About Rutgers Equine Science Center The Equine Science Center is a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Its mission is Better Horse Care through Research and Education in order to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry. Its vision is to be recognized throughout New Jersey as well as nationally and internationally for its achievements in identifying issues in the horse industry, finding solutions through science-based inquiry, providing answers to the horse industry and to horse owners, and influencing public policy to ensure the viability of the horse industry. For more information about the Equine Science Center, call 848-932-9419 or visit esc.rutgers.edu. Program Associate, Dept of Animal Sciences Rutgers University Bartlett Hall, 84 Lipman Drive New Brunswick, NJ 08901

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