Day At The Track
Search Results
17 to 32 of 61

Hungary’s National Trotting Breeders' Association continues its training series, which was launched in 2018, on January 28, 2020 (10:30 am at Kincsem Park), when a world-recognized harness racing breeder and executive, Dr. Paul F. ’’Pete” Spears, will direct our further training. Dr. Spears is President of the Standardbred Horse Sales Company, that conducts an annual early November auction in Harrisburg, PA ((USA), and formerly Vice President of Hanover Shoe Farms, practically growing up there, as his father worked as President and Treasurer of that world renown breeding facility. Dr. Spears has been very active in trot racing and breeding for several decades (his family’s Windsong Stable bred Hambletonian winner Windsong’s Legacy among many stakes winners), and his main expertise is genetics, pedigree analysis and auctions. Standardbred Horse Sales Company In his lecture, Dr. Spears will present examples of the possibility of pairing on related breeding and line breeding issues. He gives his opinion on the x-position and talks about the correct decisions that affect the effectiveness of breeding. There's great interest in this event. In view of this, please indicate your intention to participate by e-mail (ugeto@ugeto.com) as soon as possible. by Thomas H. Hicks, for Harnesslink

Recently announced Nappanee, Indiana, Citizen Of The Year, Ola Yoder stunned the harness racing world with a significant investment buying five sensational broodmares for $690,000 at the recent White Birch Farm dispersal sale held at Harrisburg in November. Ola Yoder turned to standardbreds recently when he took a shot buying Enterprise, a Chapter Seven stallion who won an elimination of the Hambletonian in 2017 and shipped to Sweden for racing the year after. Enterprise since has served well over 100 mares in 2019 at Dublin Valley Farms in Ohio. "I'm retiring from my business a Cabinet Company called Kountry Wood Products" Ola says in an interview on Harness Racing Update. Yoder has a simple game plan investing in standardbreds to sell high-priced, well-bred yearlings in the future feature sales, Lexington and Harrisburg. That is what Ola Yoder wants to achieve. The mares from the White Birch Farm dispersal that Ola bought were; Dragon's Tale - Dam of Workin Ona Mystery and in foal to Captaintreacherous Please Beehave  a Muscle Hill sister to Bee A Magician and in foal to Chapter Seven Belclare  dam of Captain Victorious and in foal to Captaintreacherous World Of Rock a sister to Worldly Beauty and in foal to Captaintreacherous Western Silk (Open) has a 1:49 record with over $1.6m in earnings. Since purchasing these mares in November, Ola Yoder again invested when the opportunity came, just announced last week, this time privately buying the Breeders Crown three-year-old Trotting Champion filly of 2019, Winndevie. Winndevie seen here winning The 2019 Breeders Crown (New Image Media Photo) Winndevie was one of North America’s leading three-year-old filly trotters in 2019 (by Credit Winner), whose late-charging success in the $655,000 Breeders Crown in a lifetime best 1:53 at Mohawk, was her crowning achievement in a glittering career.  To read the recent article on the impact of Ola Yoder and his purchase of Winndevie click on this link. Ola Yoder is our "Rookie Of The Year" in harness racing by making a significant investment in the future of the State of Ohio's standardbred breeding Industry. ...................................................................... Here is some background about Ola Yoder and his Company found on Buzz File; Kountry Wood Products is located in Nappanee, Indiana. This organization primarily operates in the Wood Kitchen Cabinets business / industry within the Lumber and Wood Products, Except Furniture sector. This organization has been operating for approximately 21 years and employs approximately 210 people at this headquarters location and 425 total employees across all locations producing some 1.4 million Cabinets annually. This organization is engaged in manufacturing activities at this facility. Harnesslink Media ...................................................... Below is truly an inspiring story about Ola Yoder, his life and his Faith The visitation room at the correctional facility looked like an elementary school cafeteria that hadn’t been updated since 1974. The walls were taupe but for two bold roller-rink stripes of maroon and blue. The tiled floor was patterned to make the room feel busier than it already was. Vinyl furniture was arranged around the room, creating faux privacy for families and loved ones. If not for the heavyset guards at the north end of the room and the steel-reinforced, bullet-proof Plexiglas, you might feel like you were at a support group meeting in a church basement as much as a prison visitation room Ola Yoder sat in the middle of the room and stood out. Crisp white short-sleeve button-down shirt tucked into black flat-front dress pants. Work-scuffed black dress shoes with black suspenders. This was Ola’s uniform. Work, leisure, meetings, Sunday church, family gatherings, prison visits. A uniform style of dress that discourages physical appearance as a source of pride, Ola and his religious community had learned that simplicity reflects universal values of humility and modesty. His Shenandoah beard and solemn gaze gave away his faith. But Ola never concerned himself much with what others think of him. He sat across from Eli Weaver with an open mind and a full heart. As he had done countless times before, Ola sought to comfort Eli and to understand what he had done. This was Ola’s fourth visit of the year. For Ola, you reach out to someone in trouble in your community and help them…and when you can’t help, you try to understand. You see, in 2009, a life had been taken — the life of a member of the community, a woman who was the mother of 5, and the wife of Eli Weaver. Hundreds of miles from Ola’s home, family, and business, the murder shook him. What would cause someone who grew up learning the ways of pacifism and peace to turn to violence and murder his wife? It just didn’t make sense. How could someone be so troubled as to murder an innocent woman, in their house, with their children present, seated in the middle of an Ohio Amish community? Hundreds of miles west, back in Nappanee, Indiana, an empire continues to grow. Dozens of semi-trailers litter the area behind locked gates. Hidden inside each, packed perfectly, are dozens of kitchen cabinets made by a company whose reputation is highly regarded by customers and vendors alike. Kountry Wood is a huge part of Ola’s legacy, though he’d never say it himself. His children, his faith, his works, his community — they would all be mentioned first, as well they should. But one cannot tell the story of Ola Yoder without understanding the beauty of his products. The company was started just 20 years ago in Ola’s barn. Today, it spans well over 250,000 square feet of factory floor, and it’s growing yearly. The company turns out over 1.4 million kitchen cabinets each year, with under 500 hard-working employees. The factory floor is clean A short tour around Kountry Wood would leave anyone blown away. The factory floor is clean — not clean like a standard factory floor, but immaculately clean like a hospital and biochemical lab. Skilled craftspeople delicately sand and stain at their respective stations. Between those stations runs a factory line that looks more like something that should be producing Tesla Model Xs than Nappanee’s favorite cabinetry. Laser precision guides nearly every step of the process, all the way through custom corrugated cardboard packaging built for each product. A red digital counter hangs from the middle of the ceiling reminding everyone of the day’s goals and current production numbers. Today, like most days, the factory has run so efficiently that by 3:00 p.m. the workers have surpassed production goals and only a few folks remain at work. The employees look happy to be involved. Ola doesn’t allow employees to use drugs of any sort in the workplace; in fact, he doesn’t even allow them to curse on the premises. Despite the dual monitors at every cubicle; despite the computer-guided factory floor; despite the beautiful efficiency…Kountry Wood, like everything lucky enough to be touched by Ola, is steeped to the core in his faith, and it shows. That faith, while understated by nature, is crucial. Ola Yoder is many things. A business mogul by any measure. A researcher tasked with understanding human behavior of the worst kind. A humanitarian. A human, endlessly proud of his wife and family. That faith is a common thread that can weave together all sides of the man. It’s the same faith that guided him to help those five orphans stay afloat after their mother was murdered and their father was imprisoned. It’s the same faith that comforts the man who put his children in that position — who stole their foundation and, if not for Ola’s kindness, almost stole their livelihood. One of several Awards that Ola Yoder has received for helping young people in his community There’s an Amish proverb that provides a thesis for Ola’s life: “The most important things in your home are people.” Ola, like many of his peers, believes that home goes well beyond four walls, a farm, or even a factory. That is the power of Ola’s faith. And now that faith is taking acts to a new level. Ola pulls a black, oversized handle. Hand-formed wrought iron has its own story to tell. A story of a craftsman like Ola, firing and hammering away — removing excess and shaping the remains until he finds perfection. It’s symbolic of Ola’s empire: the pull is simple, understated, without frills or excess, but it forms something beautiful. He and his longtime advisor, Brian Hoffer, walk through the oversized oaken doors. Inside is an amazing space that would drop the jaws of the most seasoned architects. Ola's new event center donated to the Nappanee Community Suited and put together, a lawyer focusing on finance and estate planning, Brian lets a smile break through. Who could help it? After working together since the beginning, Brian feels emotionally tied to Ola’s great work too, and he should. There is simply no reining in Ola’s philanthropic spirit. But, like the few cut from his same cloth in this world, Ola has a hard time approaching philanthropy in the same way he does business. So Brian’s recent guidance has been important in taking some big strides forward. Together with Brian’s guidance and the professionals at the Community Foundation of Elkhart County, Ola has recently opened a donor-advised fund to help him and his wife, Vera make the most of their charity. The fund allows the Yoder’s to help guide funds into the charitable projects that are most important to them, while still benefiting from the expert fund management being performed by the Foundation. Ola paces across the beautiful wood floors and takes in the status of another big project an example of his generous outreach: an event space befitting his community and reminiscent of his spirit. Enormous wooden beams span the ceiling several stories overhead. Like a barn-home made for giants, the new space is open, expansive, and natural and says everything about Ola’s heritage and craftsmanship. He called in a specialized Amish engineering team to ensure the building’s floor was free of supports in an enormous center section. The space is a work of art and will provide a center for activities of thousands in and around the community. While the event space will be used by the community for festivals, events, and fundraisers, it isn’t the only project Ola has his eyes on. He has an unwavering passion for the next generation. And when Ola heard from Foundation president Pete McCown about the good work being done at CAPS (Child and Parent Services), he knew he had to help. As quickly as Ola learns about a new project aimed to do good, he gets himself involved. His new fund is just another tool at his disposal. As Ola walks out of Grafton Correctional, he hears the invasive buzz of gates and barred doors. The low thud of a heavy steel door separates him again from Eli. Faint clangs and muffled yells create a harsh mixture of background noise that echoes through the walls of the sterile prison. Ola knows Eli will spend the next 15 years locked in that institution. He knows much or all of his life may well be spent inside those cold walls. He also knows that his own simple visits warm the days that surround them for Eli,and that Eli has grown in the time he has spent incarcerated. He knows that no soul is defined — and certainly not lost — in its worst moment. He believes firmly in the transformative power of love…a love he expresses to his family and to his community. The most important things in your home are people. For Ola, he calls home his humble farm; his ever-growing factory; his new event center — Sammlung Platz (translated — “The Gathering Place”). He calls home Nappanee, Indiana, and the Amish community. He calls home the whole of Elkhart County, where his fund will impact the lives of thousands. He calls home the many nonprofits offering love and forgiveness. He calls home Grafton, and Eli struggling to live with the heinous things he’s done. For Ola, home extends far beyond the property line. And the most important things in his home are the people. Reprinted with permission of The Community Foundation of Elkhart County  

Harrisburg, PA -- Donttellmeagain, a 5-year-old male harness racing pacer with $779,011 in lifetime earnings, was the top seller at Friday's final session of the Standardbred Horse Sale, purchased for $400,000 by Jon Paton. The gelding was one of six horses to sell for at least $250,000 during the second day of the auction's mixed sale. Donttellmeagain, by Dragon Again out of Donttellmewhattodo, has won 19 of 46 career races and finished among the top three a total of 37 times. He won last year's Graduate Series championship and Dayton Pacing Derby. This year, he was a dead-heat second by a nose to McWicked in the Jim Ewart Memorial and third in the Roll With Joe. The Jim King Jr.-trained pacer was owned by Paton Racing Stables. He was consigned by Northwood Bloodstock. Starita, a Grand Circuit-winning 3-year-old trotting filly, was the day's second-highest seller, going for $360,000 to Hanover Shoe Farms. She was one of three fillies to reach at least $300,000. Starita, by Trixton out of Morningstar, has won six of 29 career races and $307,696. Her second dam is two-time Dan Patch Award-winner Passionate Glide and her family also includes Hambletonian Oaks winner Marita's Victory. She was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing, owned by Val D'Or Farms and Ted Gewertz, and trained by Joe Holloway. O'Brien Award-winner Percy Bluechip, also purchased by Hanover Shoe Farms, sold for $340,000. The 4-year-old pacing mare, by Shadow Play out of Advantest, has won 12 of 40 career races and $874,267. She was a Breeders Crown winner at 3 and a two-time Ontario Sire Stakes champion. She is full sister to O'Brien Award winner Arthur Blue Chip and half-sister to millionaire Kenneth J. She was consigned by Preferred Equine, owned most recently by Burke Racing, Weaver Bruscemi, Purnel & Libby, and Donald Emond, and trained by Ron Burke. Quincy Blue Chip, a 3-year-old trotting filly by Chapter Seven out of Sirenuse, sold for $300,000 to Steve Stewart. She has won 12 of 23 career races, including this year's Empire Breeders Classic and New York Sire Stakes final, and $675,430. She was consigned by Northwood Bloodstock, owned most recently by Barbara Boese, James Boese, and Richard Banca, and trained by Banca. Two female pacers reached $250,000 - Medusa and Lu's Illusion. Medusa, an 8-year-old mare by Bettor's Delight out of Mythical, was purchased by Erika Sergent. Medusa has won 40 of 160 career races and $1 million. She was consigned by Fox Den Farm, owned most recently by Randy Bendis and Pollack Racing, and trained by Bendis. Lu's Illusion, a 3-year-old filly by Sweet Lou out of Artistic Vision, sold to Fair Winds Farm. She is a half-sister to 2010 Horse of the Year Rock N Roll Heaven as well as multimillionaire Clear Vision. Lu's Illusion, who has won five of 17 career races, was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing, owned by Determination, and trained by Luc Blais. The two-day mixed sale portion of the auction saw a total of 663 horses and stallion shares sell for $27 million, an average of $40,756. Last year, the mixed sale saw a total of 619 horses and stallion shares sell for $18.2 million, an average of $29,498. For complete results, visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA         Ken Weingartner   Media Relations Manager   U.S. Trotting Association   www.ustrotting.com      

For the second year in a row, it was a record year for the Standardbred Horse Sale. The three-day yearling portion of the sale concluded Wednesday at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex, where a total of 833 horses sold for a record average of $48,903. The previous best average was set last year, at $42,675 for 830 horses. This year's average represented a 14.5-percent increase. In addition, this year's gross of $40.73 million was nearly 15 percent better than last year's $35.42 million. The only other time the gross exceeded $40 million came in 2007, when 1,048 horses sold for $42.78 million. "It was a great sale," Standardbred Horse Sale President and CEO Pete Spears said. "I think the sale was strong throughout, all the way to the end. There was a great reception for the top sires and many, many top-selling horses. We're very happy." Last year, two yearlings reached six figures on Day 3 of the sale. This year, the total was five. Pacing colt Keystone Catalyst was Wednesday's top seller, purchased for $120,000 by Myron Bell as agent. The colt, by Betting Line out of Keystone Caitlyn, is a three-quarter brother to 2018 Ontario Sire Stakes champion Keystone Concrete. The family also includes Keystone Havoc, the dam of millionaire Keystone Horatio and grandam of millionaire Bedroomconfessions. Keystone Catalyst was consigned by Vieux Carre Farms for Max J. Hempt. Next on the list was Twin B Edge, a pacing colt by Betting Line out of Twin B Exquisite. He was purchased for $110,000 by Casie Coleman. The colt, from a family of strong Ontario Sire Stakes performers, was consigned and bred by Twinbrook Limited. Three horses sold for $100,000. Trotting colt Swingforthefences, by Swan For All out of stakes-winner Sunday Yankee, was purchased by Mel Hartman as agent. He is a half-brother to stakes-winner Miss Sue V, who in addition to her victories in North America later picked up wins in Europe. He was consigned and bred by Concord Stud Farm. Vali Hanover, a trotting colt by Chapter Seven out of Vanity Treasure, was purchased by Jim Glass as agent. His family includes stakes-winner Fad Finance. The colt was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. Trotting filly Flawless Country, by Southwind Frank out of Aleah Hanover, sold to Ake Svanstedt. She is from the family of 2018 Yonkers International Trot champion Cruzado Dela Noche, who also counts the Copenhagen Cup among his victories in Europe. She was consigned by Spring Haven Farm and bred by Christian Stoltzfus. A total of 374 trotters sold for $20.52 million, with the money divided nearly evenly between colts and fillies. The fillies averaged $55,297 for 182 and the colts averaged $54,469 for 192. Muscle Hill was the top trotting stallion with an average of $153,323 for 31 horses. Father Patrick was second with an average of $109,667 for 24 horses. A total of 459 pacers sold for $20.21 million. Colts averaged $49,943 for 229 and the fillies averaged $38,161 for 230. Somebeachsomewhere was the top pacing sire with an average of $97,860 for 43 horses. Captaintreacherous was second with an average of $54,295 for 44 horses. First-crop sire Betting Line averaged $52,561 for 66 horses. The Standardbred Horse Sale's two-day mixed sale begins Thursday at 10 a.m. (EST). For complete results, visit The Black Book.   Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association

Pacing colt Make My Deo was the top-selling yearling at Tuesday's (Nov. 5) second session of the Standardbred Horse Sale, purchased for $280,000 by Robert Cleary as agent for Bill Peshina's Royal Wire Products. Through two sessions at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex, a total of 468 horses sold for $32.65 million and average of $69,769. The gross is up 16.6 percent from 2018 when 473 horses sold for $27.99 million. The average is up 17.8 percent compared to last year's $59,182. Make My Deo, by American Ideal out of Electric Fool, is a half-brother to Rodeo Rock, who has earned more than $700,000 in his career for Royal Wire Products. The family also includes millionaire Western Shore. The colt was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing and bred by Deo Volente Farms. "He's a nice horse," Peshina said about Make My Deo. "We bought Rodeo Rock as a yearling too and he's done just fine for us. This is a very nice colt, so we were happy to get him. I liked just about everything about him; he's just a nice horse all around. And it's a good farm we bought him from, they're good people. "It's a big expense for us, we've never gone that high before. We're going to see what happens. Hopefully it works out. We'll find out next year." Second on the bestsellers list was trotting colt Delayed Hanover, by Southwind Frank out of Don't Wait Up, who was purchased for $230,000 by Ake Svanstedt for owner Melby Gard. He is from the family of international winner Order By Keeper as well as mare Amour Heiress, whose colt Spy Booth sold for $460,000 Monday. The family also includes 2014 Hambletonian winner Trixton. He was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. "I liked everything, it was good," Svanstedt said. "He is a good-looking horse. It will be interesting to see how he does on the racetrack. He has good conformation and the family on the mother is also very good. He is a good colt." Next was trotting colt Ghetto Boy, by Cantab Hall out of Galloway, who went for $200,000 to agent Robert Lindstrom. His family includes Dan Patch Award-winner Maven. The colt was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Order By Stable. Filly trotter Donna Soprano, by Donato Hanover out of O'Brien Award-winner Windsong Soprano, was purchased for $190,000 by Serge Godin's Determination stable. She is a half-sister to Ontario Sire Stakes champions Jula She's Magic (2019) and Tony Soprano (2015). She was consigned by Preferred Equine Marketing and bred by White Birch Farm. Sun B Kini, a pacing filly by Always B Miki out of One For The Beach, was purchased by Dana Parham for $170,000. Her family includes the dams of stakes-winners Divine Caroline and This Is The Plan. She was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by S R F Stable. Team Allard bought trotting filly Oh My Goodness, by Andover Hall out of Oh My Darlin, for $160,000. She is from the family of Dan Patch Award-winner Cedar Dove, who is the dam of Team Allard's Hambletonian Oaks winner When Dovecry. She was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Windsong Stable. Also selling for $160,000 was pacing colt Abuckabett Hanover, by Betting Line out of All Tucked Up. He was purchased by Tony Alagna as agent for Cousins Stable. His family includes stakes-winner Thong. The colt was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. The yearling portion of the Standardbred Horse Sale concludes Wednesday. The final session begins at 10 a.m. (EST) at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. The two-day mixed sale begins Thursday morning at 10. For complete results, visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA  

Harrisburg, PA -- A year after consigning the two highest-priced yearlings at the 2018 Standardbred Horse Sale, Concord Stud Farm enjoyed another big day during Monday's (Nov. 4) opening session of this year's auction. Concord consigned the two highest-priced yearlings yesterday and three of the top four. All three were bred by Stefan Balazsi's Order By Stable and raised at Concord, located in Cream Ridge, N.J. Leading the way was trotting filly Gangsta Rat, who sold for $550,000. The price surpassed the $500,000 for last year's sales topper, Fifty Cent Piece, and is the second-highest auction price ever for a yearling filly trotter, trailing only the $600,000 paid for Ineffable at last month's Lexington Selected Sale. The second-best seller Monday was trotting colt Take This Society for $475,000. Fourth was trotting colt Spy Booth for $460,000, who was displaced at No. 3 by trotting colt Glacier Hanover ($470,000) in the final minutes of the sale. Last year, Concord's second-highest seller went for $415,000. "It's extremely rewarding," said Julie Meirs, the daughter of Concord founders Robin and David Meirs III. "It's nice to see that we're able to get over that barrier again. We just keep raising the ceiling, which is great. It keeps us reaching for the stars." In addition to its big three on Monday, the Concord-Order By Stable partnership had two more yearlings in the top 20 -- trotting colt No Ball Games Rat at $300,000 and trotting filly Keep Your Coins at $250,000. Order By Stable received the 2018 Breeder of the Year Award from the U.S. Harness Writers Association. "We have a great relationship with Stefan," Meirs said. "We work really well together. He's got all the trust in the world in us and we treat his horses, as we do with all the horses on our farm, like they're our own. We're making decisions and communicating with him on a daily basis if necessary. And now we're here." When Monday's session ended, Concord had sold 32 horses for $4.34 million. The gross was second to only Hanover Shoe Farm's $8.68 million for 69 horses. Concord's average of $135,750 topped consignors with more than four horses sold. "We're very excited, very pleased with how the sale has been going so far," Meirs said. "Some didn't sell for what we thought they would, but those ones at the top just light it up, which is awesome." During last year's sale, the Meirs family hosted a brunch for horse owners and buyers on the morning of the opening session. The brunch was back Monday and looks to have become a fixture. "I think we're stuck with it, which is good; it's a good way to be stuck," Meirs said, laughing. "We've had numerous people thank us for the brunch and I think it's a good morale builder. It's something for people to enjoy before they get bidding. It's worked well for us, so I'd say it's here to stay for sure." by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA    

Harrisburg, PA — The Standardbred Horse Sale got off to a record start Monday (Nov. 4) at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex as the opening session set a record for average price and saw its gross increase by more than $3 million compared to 2018. Trotting filly Gangsta Rat (#45) was the day’s top seller, as the Muscle Hill daughter went for $550,000 to Ake Svanstedt on behalf of S R F Stable, and a total of 12 yearlings reached at least $300,000. The sale grossed $19.2 million for 169 horses, an increase of 20.7 percent from last year’s $15.9 million for 170 horses, and averaged $113,976, an increase of 21.8 percent compared to last year’s $93,541. Other top sellers Monday were trotting colt Take This Society for $475,000 to Diamond Creek Farm, trotting colt Glacier Hanover for $470,000 to Jeffrey Snyder, and trotting colt Spy Booth for $460,000 to agent Bryan Montgomery on behalf of a group of owners and trainer Per Engblom. Filly pacer Panda Hanover, purchased by Dana Parham, and filly trotter The Ice Countess, purchased by Tony Alagna, both sold for $400,000. The big numbers in Harrisburg follow a record-breaking Lexington Selected Sale in October, which included the sport’s first million-dollar yearlings. “It’s a fantastic sale so far,” Standardbred Horse Sale President and CEO Pete Spears said. “I’m sure this (average) is an all-time record for us. “Lexington was fantastic, the economy hasn’t changed, people are feeling good. There’s a lot of good news in harness racing. There’s money in New Jersey, the Ohio program is coming up, there are new developments in Illinois and even in Nevada. Everything is good right now. “I had hoped we would do equally well, and we have.” Trotting fillies, trotting colts, and pacing colts all posted six-figure averages Monday. Trotting fillies led the way with a $154,848 average for 33 followed by trotting colts at $124,851 for 47 and pacing colts at $100,939 for 49. “People were here doing their homework on Saturday,” Spears said. “All the big-money people were looking very closely at horses. It wasn’t just a lot of last-minute lookers today. I got a lot of feedback all day about how much underbidders regretted not getting the horse of their choice in many cases today. “The trotters (were strong). If it was a nice trotter, it sold wonderfully. It’s been such a good thing here in America that the Swedes have become so interested in breeding over here, selling over here, buying and racing over here. “I think (Tuesday) will be very strong. There are a lot more horses on Tuesday that would have been Monday horses last year, so there are going to be some really nice yearlings available.” Gangsta Rat, by Muscle Hill out of Order By Wish, is a full sister to this season’s Earl Beal Jr. Memorial winner Marseille, also trained by Svanstedt. Gangsta Rat was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Stefan Balazsi’s Order By Stable. “He is a very nice horse,” said Svanstedt, who noted it was the highest-priced yearling he ever purchased. “His pedigree is very good, a good family on the mother’s side, and Muscle Hill. He had good conformation; everything was good. He had everything I like with a horse.”  Take This Society, by Muscle Hill out of Thatsnotmyname, is a half-brother to stakes-winner Basquiat from the family of 2010 Hambletonian winner Muscle Massive. Like Gangsta Rat, he was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Order By Stable. “I love the fact the breeder was a big fan of the horse,” Diamond Creek’s Adam Bowden said. “I think when the breeder is behind a horse like this, it makes buying a horse that much easier. Stefan is a great guy; he’s had great success and his families are hot. It’s hard not to think that this is the next big thing. “We want to take more prominent pieces in some of these horses before they become multi-million-dollar horses.” Glacier Hanover, by Father Patrick out of Global Desire, was the day’s penultimate horse to pass through the auction ring. The colt is from the family of 2006 U.S. Horse of the Year Glidemaster. He was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. Jim Campbell will train the trotter for Snyder.  “I had him for 400, we got carried away, but let’s hope for the best,” Snyder said. “He’s a beautiful horse. The mare is a full sister to Glidemaster. Hopefully we’ll have luck. We got one other trotter (No Ball Games Rat for $300,000). This one and the other were our two favorite ones.” Spy Booth, the third of the top-four sellers consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Order By Stable, is by Muscle Hill out of Amour Heiress. He is a full brother to stakes-winner King Alphonso out of the family of 2014 Hambletonian winner Trixton. “He was big and strong, well built,” Engblom said. “We trained the mom with Jimmy (Takter) and the pedigree is great. His full brother is one of the best 2-year-olds out there. What’s not to like. “It was a little bit more than we wanted to pay but sometimes you’ve got to stretch a little bit to get the ones (you want). We did good in Lexington. This is the first one we’re getting today. We’ve been bidding on a couple other ones. You’ve got to get the ones you like; get quality horses, not just a lot of horses. We’ve been keeping our eye on him. He’s a nice colt.” Panda Hanover, by Somebeachsomewhere out of Panera Hanover, is a full sister to stakes-winner Papi Rob Hanover. She was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. Parham will turn over the training duties to Alagna. Alagna also will train The Ice Countess, by Muscle Hill out of The Ice Queen for a group of owners. The filly is a full sister to stakes-winners Ice Attraction and The Ice Dutchess and her family includes Southwind Serena, the dam of Dan Patch Award-winner Mission Brief and stakes-winner Tactical Landing. The Ice Countess was consigned by Preferred Equine and bred by Stephen Dey III and David Reid. “Dana is trying to buy top-end pacing fillies,” Alagna said. “He bought Panda Hanover and he bought the sister to Tall Drink Hanover (Takeway Hanover for $225,000), so that’s kind of what he’s doing. “(The Ice Countess) is a beautiful filly. She’s got so much residual (value) as a broodmare based on the fact she’s got Mission Brief on the second dam plus the two fillies that have already hit. There is so much upside for this filly either way. If she just does a little bit of something on the track her value is going to stay where it’s at. “I’ve been blessed every year. I’ve got great support; we buy great horses. But we work hard at it to try to find them too. We spend a lot of time looking, going to the farms. I’m very lucky to have people that support what we want to do.” The yearling portion of the sale resumes Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. The final day for yearlings is Wednesday, also beginning at 10. To view the full results of the Monday session or the upcoming catalogue, please click here. For a video recap of the opening session, click here. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

The Standardbred Horse Sales Company has posted a Harrisburg Mixed Sale supplement catalog on its website at www.theblackbook.com/catalog-downloads.php. The 55 entries include 7 stallion shares, 2 yearlings, 2 weanlings, 11 broodmares, 20 two year olds, 9 three year olds, and 4 four year olds and older. Stallion shares, yearlings, weanlings, and broodmares will be sold on Thursday, and race horses on Friday. Details of the schedule of sale are included with the catalog. The supplement catalog can be downloaded from the website and will be available in printed form at the sale. Our iPad formatted Black Book 2 catalog will be updated with the supplement entries and can be obtained by using the Equineline.com Sales Catalog App through the link on our DOWNLOADS page. From the Standardbred Horse Sales Co.  

In conjunction with its Annual Yearling Sale in Harrisburg, Standardbred Horse Sales Company is pleased to announce the 2019 edition of its popular “Stable Stars” Contest. Contestants will predict the knock-down sales prices of fifteen Harrisburg yearlings to be sold on Monday, November 4th.  An online entry form can be completed from a link on the Home Page of The Black Book website (www.theblackbook.com); by submitting a printed and scanned form by email to jcasey@hanoverpa.com; or by FAX to 717 – 637 – 6766 until Thursday October 31st and thereafter to 717 – 233 – 3625. The deadline for submission of entries is Sunday November 3th at noon. Prizes will be given to contestants whose predictions are closest to the actual knockdown prices for individual yearlings, and whose total price predictions are closest to the total knockdown prices for all fifteen yearlings in the contest. Prizes are as follows: 1st Place – contestant whose grand total of all fifteen yearling prices is closest to actual total knockdown prices. The winner will receive a Standardbred hat and jacket, a $100 gift certificate to the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame store, and a $100 Amazon gift certificate. 2nd Place – contestant whose grand total of all fifteen yearling prices is second closest to actual total knockdown prices. The second place prize will be a Standardbred hat and jacket, a $50 gift certificate to the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame store, and a $50 Amazon gift certificate. Individual hip number winners – each contestant whose prediction is closest to the actual knockdown price of each of the fifteen yearlings will receive a Standardbred hat and a $25 gift certificate to the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame store. Prizes will be mailed to the winners after the sale. The most astute contestants may win multiple prizes. Winners will be posted during the sale on our Facebook page and on our Twitter feed (#harrisburgsale). All fans of harness racing are encouraged to test their knowledge of yearling sales in the contest, and to follow the Harrisburg Sale by live video stream from a link on The Black Book website (www.theblackbook.com). Some restrictions apply.  Please see the web site for details.   From the Standardbred Horse Sales Company  

The 2019 edition of The Black Book 2 can now be found on Standardbred Horse Sales Company's website www.theblackbook.com/catalog-downloads.php. Printed catalogs are expected to be available for shipping on Friday, October 11. The Mixed Sale begins on Thursday, November 7 and ends on Friday, November 8 at the PA Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, PA, following the Select Yearling Sale which takes place from Monday, November 4 through Wednesday, November 6. Standardbred's popular "Black Book for the iPad" from www.equineline.com is available for download from a link on our website. Past Performances First Edition for race lines is also available for download on the website. Past Performances Second Edition with most current race lines will be available for download on October 28, and will be distributed in printed form at the Sale. The 2019 Mixed Sale features 30 magnificent broodmares in the White Birch Farm dispersal selling in the Preferred Equine Marketing consignment. The Mixed Sale has a total of 686 entries, including 216 broodmares and broodmare prospects, 20 weanlings, 26 yearlings, 65 stallion shares, and 359 race horses. Standardbred is accepting entries for a Mixed Sale Supplement catalog until Noon on October 23, 2019. Supplement catalogs will be available prior to the sale for download on our website, as an update to our iPad catalog and in print at the sale. From the Standardbred Horse Sales Company    

To enhance the end-of-season options for harness racing owners and breeders, Standardbred Horse Sales Company will continue to accept entries to its Annual Mixed Sale in Harrisburg until 12 Noon on October 23, 2019, for inclusion in a supplement catalog. The supplement will be printed and distributed at the sale, made available for download online from our Black Book website (http://theblackbook.com/catalog-search.php), and become an update for our iPad catalog from Equineline.com. Standardbred appreciates the support of our consignors and customers in this effort, and looks forward to a successful sale. From Standardbred Horse Sales Company  

The Standardbred Horse Sales Company is proud to announce that our 81st Annual Harrisburg Yearling Sale Preview is now posted on our website, www.theblackbook.com. Yearling video links will be posted closer to the Sale. Yearling Sale dates are Monday, November 4 through, Wednesday, November 6, featuring 855 fabulous yearlings (381 trotters, 474 pacers) 433 by Pennsylvania sires 156 by New York sires 185 by Ontario sires 53 by New Jersey sires 8 by Ohio sires 13 by Indiana sires 4 by Kentucky sires 3 by overseas sires. First crop yearling sires include: Bar Hopping (28) Betting Line (67) Control The Moment (11) Creatine (7) J K Endofanera (5) Southwind Frank (14) State Treasurer (1). Printed catalogs will be mailed September 13. Standardbred will again offer catalogs formatted for the iPad through the Equineline.com Sales Catalog app. As always, Standardbred provides multiple "Search" functions and downloadable PDF packets on our website to help in finding your next champion. Our convenient "My Black Book" feature allows customers to store lists of yearling prospects with pedigrees, video links, and personal notes in a confidential format that is accessible from any Internet-capable device. From the Standardbred Horse Sales Company

I have been involved with harness racing since the late 1980’s, and  I have to admit it’s a love/hate relationship. My love of horses came early as a child. I would do anything to ride a horse. My neighbor friend was lucky enough to have a horse, but she detested cleaning the stalls, which was a requirement her parents had for her.  I, of course, volunteered with the condition that I could ride Patches whenever I wanted. It was a while before her parents found out and stopped my job. They allowed me to continue riding but eventually Ruthie got tired of cleaning the stalls and her parents found a new home for Patches. Even though I was bitten by a horse, which required 150 stitches, fell off my fair share of them, and had a few visits to hospitals, my love of horses never weaned. Most of my adult life I showed/rode Arabian horses.  I also love the competition of racing, but find myself questioning some people’s motives in the business. A few years ago, my ex-husband Richard Young and I purchased a horse at the Harrisburg Yearling Sale. Her name was Elequent Diva. She was a beautiful animal and an extremely sweet horse to be around.  She was purchased with the full intent to race her one day.  I fell in love with her the day she arrived at our farm in Pennsylvania after we found out that racing was not to be in her future. Diva didn’t know how very sick she was, which looking back brings some comfort.  She was born with a rare congenital heart defect, one that would preclude her from racing or breeding. When we learned from the specialist’s at New Bolton that her life was considered guarded, we contacted the breeders/sellers, David and Brian Legge in Canada. We also contacted Standardbred Horse Sales Company. We told them that we would not be paying for the horse as she would never be able to race.   SHSC agreed that we should not pay for the horse. We never received an invoice. The breeders however, along with their consignment company, Preferred Equine, thought we should pay because we signed a contract that said the horse was being sold “as is”. I won’t get into the specifics of the contract as it is very complicated. Suffice to say they (SHSC) should one day reword their contract to include the “Diva Clause” which would protect all buyers of horses that have a congenital defect which effects their racing/breeding capabilities. We did offer to pay the Legges a very generous sum of money as to avoid possible litigation. That proved fruitless. The Legge’s did sue us first in Canada first but the judge said it was the wrong jurisdiction. They then got SHSC to assigns their rights, (SHSC didn’t want to be sued by them, but that is another story) which made it possible for the Legges’s to file a complaint against us in the US. This all could have been avoided if the Legges’s and David Reed would have just listened to reason and taken our generous offer. Realistically we didn’t have to offer them anything and could have shipped the horse either back to Harrisburg or to the Legges farm in Canada. In this conundrum we decided to keep Diva and try and make her life as comfortable as possible. Everything is not always about money. Sometimes we all need to just do the right thing. In this case what was important was a very sick beautiful horse deserving as good a life here on earth as we could provide. Looking back on the case it was so easy for everyone if they only had the best interest of Diva in mind. I have sold many show horses in my life and each time I would tell the buyer to take the horse home, ride him/her, get to know him/her and if you decide they will make a great horse for you then send me the check. If not, please bring them home to me.   The reason I do this is because it is the best thing to do for the horse and I also want the purchasers to be happy.  I am very thorough about the purchaser also. They need to pass the Joanne test.  I want to be sure my horse is going to the best possible home. If only more people cared about the animal and less about the dollars the horse industry would not have some of the problems they have today. I understand Diva was purchased at auction which is very different than a private purchase. That is why there should be protection for the buyers, sellers and most importantly for the horse. The trial lasted 4 days and after deliberating for less than 20 minutes the jury wanted to know how much they could award us. Needless to say, the Legges were less than thrilled with this question. The jury came back 10 minutes later and found we were not in breach of contract, meaning the “as is” clause in their contract did not mean that a horse with a congenital defect had to be paid for. We won, or did we. Certainly we felt vindicated, but no one really won. Much money, time, and stress won. Oh, and the attorney’s won too. But we did win one thing and that is we had Diva for a short time. As Diva exited Chris Ryder’s horse trailer that sunny June day in 2014, she quickly had a look around and decided this was going to be okay for a new home. We put her in the pasture with my elderly Arabian mare, Makkessa. That turned out to not be a great idea as Makkessa was almost completely blind and Diva was young and full of herself. Diva wanted to play, Makkessa wanted to barely move. We then decided to put her out with “the boys” which are a half Arabian gelding and a Dutch warmblood. Chase and Shane quickly fell in love with Diva and they all spent many great days running, eating and just being horses.  I actually had her at our farm for about a year and then my friend Katie took care of Diva. Katie didn’t own Diva but she treated her as if she did. Diva lived in Northern Florida with Katie because we thought it was better to not ship her up and down the east coast; as I lived in Pennsylvania during the summer and back in Florida in the winter. We thought it best to keep her in a mild climate. Diva lived with Katie for almost 2 years. Katie quickly got use to Diva’s voice when she wanted a treat or attention. She had to be fed first, after all she was the Diva! Katie rode Diva a bit, walking her down winding trails behind her home in the warm Florida sunshine until it proved too much for her ailing heart. Diva munched grass in lush pastures with her horse friends. People that came to the barn always heard Diva’s call for treats which they were kind enough to oblige her.  As time went on Diva’s heart was showing the signs we all feared. I remember one day Katie calling and we talked about what to do. The vet had her comfortable on medication. I told Katie to put her out with her friends in the pasture if she wanted to be with them. So on June 3, 2017  Katie put Diva out for the evening in the pasture she had frolicked in, where she ate the warm strands of Florida grasses, and enjoyed being with her buddies for the last time. In the morning Katie found Diva laying under the oak tree. She had passed away during the evening to the  sound of crickets. There was no sign of distress or movement, she just as the good girl she always was,  just laid down and went to sleep. I can’t help but cry as I write these words. Diva was a very special horse and I would not change a thing about the way she came into our lives. She taught us that all living creatures are valuable to the soul. She reminded us of what we should all strive to be, better people. Diva showed us that there is more to a life than the numbers in a bank account.   by Joanne Roy-Young   

Harrisburg, PA — Gallie Bythe Beach, a 7-year-old pacing mare in foal to Always B Miki, was the top seller Thursday (Nov. 8) during the first session of the Standardbred Horse Sale’s two-day mixed sale. She was purchased for $280,000 by Hanover Shoe Farms. A daughter of Somebeachsomewhere out of the mare Galleria, the stakes-winning Gallie Bythe Beach earned $749,898 during her career in harness racing. She retired in 2016. Her dam was a Dan Patch Award-winner in 1998 and 1999 and added an O’Brien Award in 2000. The family also includes mares Gallic Sea and Gallie Beach, who joined Gallie Bythe Beach on Thursday’s top-sellers list. Gallic Sea, a full sister to Gallie Bythe Beach, was purchased by Shmuel Farhi for $157,000, which was the day’s third-highest price. The 4-year-old mare is in foal to Always B Miki. Gallie Beach, a 4-year-old by Somebeachsomewhere out of stakes-winner Western Gallie, sold for $110,000 to Fair Winds Farm. She also is in foal to Always B Miki. Her dam is a half-sister to Gallie Bythe Beach. Gallie Beach’s price tied for the day’s fourth highest. Coming in at No. 2 on Thursday was 3-year-old trotting filly Danish Girl, who was purchased for $170,000 by Karen Carroll. Danish Girl is a daughter of Credit Winner out of Steamy Windows and a half-sister to undefeated Breeders Crown champion Gimpanzee. She is in foal to Muscle Mass. Rounding out the top five at $110,000 was 4-year-old pacing mare Kate Is Well Said. The mare is a daughter of Well Said out of stakes-winner Just Wait Kate. The family also includes Dan Patch Award-winner Kikikatie. Kate Is Well Said is in foal to Captaintreacherous. One other mare, 4-year-old trotter Pure Kemp, reached six figures. She was purchased for $100,000 by agent Bjorn “Bernie” Noren. Pure Kemp is a daughter of Muscle Hill out of Ally Hall. The family includes O’Brien Award-winner Amigo Hall. Pure Kemp is in foal to Walner. All of the six-figure sellers were consigned by Preferred Equine. Among stallion shares sold Thursday, two shares in Muscle Hill were purchased for $150,000 and $135,000 by Steve Stewart and Fair Winds Farm, respectively. Both shares were consigned by Preferred Equine. One Chapter Seven stallion share sold for $140,000 to Steve Jones and one Captaintreacherous share sold for $125,000 to Tim Klemencic. The Chapter Seven share was consigned by Steiner Stock Farm and the Captaintreacherous share was consigned by Preferred Equine. A stallion share for pacer Lazarus N sold for $50,000 to Urie Byler. The share was donated to the Standardbred Retirement Foundation by Duncan Taylor of Taylor Made Sales and Stallions and Mike Gulotta of Deo Volente Farms. Lazarus N will stand at Deo Volente for the 2019 breeding season. The Standardbred Horse Sale concludes Friday with the second session of the mixed sale at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. For complete results visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Harrisburg, PA — Chapter Seven-sired trotting colt Book Seven sold for $157,000 to lead Wednesday’s (Nov. 7) sellers at the Standardbred Horse Sale, which concluded its three-day yearling auction with a record average of $42,675 for 830 horses sold. The average topped the previous high set in 2007, when 1,048 yearlings sold for $40,824. This year’s average was 7.56 percent better than 2017, when 851 horses sold for an average of $39,675. This year’s gross was $35.42 million, which surpassed last year’s $33.76 million. “I’m very happy with such a successful sale,” Standardbred Horse Sales President and CEO Pete Spears said. “Despite the fact we sold 21 fewer horses than last year the gross is way up. I thought today the sale was a little spotty, it was up and down, but there were still some very strong sales. People were still active and enthusiastic and the figures reflected that. “It was a fabulous yearling sale and now we go on to the mixed sale tomorrow. Breeders should have a little bit of money in their pockets to reinvest in mares and race fillies. “Hanover Shoe Farms went over $12 million today for the sale, and I know Mr. Simpson (Jim Simpson, Hanover Shoe Farms president and CEO and Standardbred Horse Sales vice president) is extremely happy about that as well.” Book Seven was purchased for $157,000 by Stroy Inc. The colt, out of the mare Tantalizing Donna, is from the family of stakes-winners Triumphant Caviar, Prayer Session, and Centurion ATM. He was bred and consigned by Winbak Farm. Next on Wednesday’s top-sellers list was Sportswriter-sired pacing colt Sports Style, purchased for $100,000 by Adriano Sorella. Sports Style, out of the mare Nothing But Style, is from the family of 2008 Horse of the Year Somebeachsomewhere. He was bred and consigned by Spring Haven Farm. Tony Alagna bought filly pacer Pure Essence and colt pacer Radiant Blue Chip for $90,000 apiece. Pure Essence, by Western Ideal out of My Little Artist, is a full sister to stakes-winner Mangogh, who races Thursday in the Matron Stakes for 2-year-old male pacers. The family also includes Dan Patch Award-winner My Little Dragon. Pure Essence was bred by White Birch Farm and consigned by Preferred Equine. Radiant Blue Chip, by Roll With Joe out of Incredible Beauty, is from the family of Dan Patch Award-winners Sportswriter and Precocious Beauty as well as stakes-winner Prescient Beauty. Radiant Blue Chip was bred by Blue Chip Bloodstock and consigned by Blue Chip Farms. Nine yearlings sold for at least $80,000 on Wednesday. Pacing colts led the yearling sale with an average of $49,465 for 226 horses. Trotting fillies were next with an average of $47,215 for 177 followed by trotting colts at $41,265 for 185 and pacing fillies at $34,091 for 242. Muscle Hill led trotting stallions with an average of $178,938 for 16 yearlings followed by Father Patrick at $119,000 for 12. Captaintreacherous led pacing stallions with an average of $81,091 for 44 yearlings followed by Somebeachsomewhere at $72,235 for 51. The Standardbred Horse Sale’s mixed sale begins at 10 a.m. (EST) Thursday at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. For complete sale results, visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Harrisburg, PA —- Ken Jacobs arrived at Tuesday’s second session of the Standardbred Horse Sale with the intention of buying one horse. He departed several hours later with his objective fulfilled. Jacobs bought pacing colt Rodeo Blue Chip, out of the family of his Dan Patch Award-winning Heston Blue Chip, for $250,000. The price topped the 303 yearlings sold on Day 2. “I was going to get him,” Jacobs said. “He looked good. He looked a lot like (Heston Blue Chip). I didn’t think I would have to pay that much, but if you’ve got one guy who likes him beside yourself, you’re going to pay. “I’m done,” he added with a laugh. “I’m going home.” Linda Toscano will train Rodeo Blue Chip. The colt was among three yearlings to sell for at least $235,000 on Tuesday. Last year, the second session’s top-seller went for $180,000. Through two sessions this year, a total of 473 horses sold for $27.99 million. The average of $59,182 was 11.9 percent better than last year’s $52,847 for 483 horses ($25.5 million gross). On Tuesday, 19 horses sold for at least six figures, which was an increase of two from 2017. Rodeo Blue Chip is by Sweet Lou out of Lotsa Matzah and his family also includes millionaire Sunfire Blue Chip and Dan Patch Award-winner Kikikatie. He was bred by Blue Chip Bloodstock, Daniel Zucker, Christine Sallee, and Stephen Demeter. The colt was consigned by Blue Chip Farms. Following Rodeo Blue Chip on the top-sellers list were Chapter Seven-sired trotting colt Third Shift and Muscle Hill-sired trotting filly Hilly Holbrook. Both yearlings sold for $235,000. Third Shift was purchased by trainer Ake Svanstedt. The colt, bred and consigned by Winbak Farm, is out of the mare Overnight Command. “He is a very nice horse and good gaited,” Svanstedt said. “I like his conformation and that he is a Chapter Seven.” Hilly Holbrook was purchased by trainer Julie Miller for a group headed by Marvin Katz. Also in the partnership are Brixton Medical and Bud Hatfield. The filly is out of the mare Winky Dink, from the family of Dan Patch Award-winner Winky’s Goal. She was bred by Julie Meirs and consigned by Concord Stud Farm. “We’re super excited,” Miller said. “We loved her at Concord. She was great in the field, she just had a racy, athletic way of moving. She is a strong filly. You can’t help but love the (pedigree) page and her being a Muscle Hill filly. I don’t know if we can go wrong. Getting her was our goal and we were successful.” Rounding out the top five Tuesday were Chapter Seven-sired trotting filly Robin Blue Chip and Andover Hall-sired trotting colt Amstel Hanover. Robin Blue Chip, out of the Swedish-bred mare Richesse Oblige, sold for $175,000 to trainer Per Engblom for a yet-to-be-completed partnership. She was bred by Blue Chip Bloodstock, Herbert Burns III, and Jacob Kiefer and consigned by Blue Chip Farms. “She was solid and very correct, I thought,” Engblom said. “The Chapter Seven fillies are doing great, so we want to get on the train. She’s out of a Swedish family I know pretty well. It’s a good, solid Swedish family.” Amstel Hanover, out of the mare Angel Pie from the family of Hambletonian champion American Winner, sold for $170,000 to agent Lina Alm. The colt was bred and consigned by Hanover Shoe Farms. Through two days, trotting fillies led the sale with an average of $67,570 for 100 yearlings sold. Pacing colts were next with an average of $64,254 for 138 sold followed by trotting colts at $58,529 for 104 and pacing fillies at $47,954 for 131. Muscle Hill led trotting stallions with an average of $178,938 for 16 yearlings sold while Captaintreacherous led pacing stallions with an average of $84,146 for 41. The yearling portion of the Standardbred Horse Sale concludes Wednesday. The final session begins at 10 a.m. (EST) at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. For complete results, visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

17 to 32 of 61