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American Dealer (NZ) (American Ideal) reigned supreme as NZB Standardbred graduates dominated the first Group One of the new harness racing season at Alexandra Park on Friday night.  The Ray Green trained pacer showed himself to be a complete racehorse when taking out the $128,000 Garrard’s Sires Stakes Final (1700m) for driver David Butcher in an exciting finish. American Dealer showed brilliant gait speed early in the race and just as much dash at the finish to hold out the favourite and fellow NZB Standardbred National Yearling Sale graduate, Krug (NZ) (Bettor’s Delight), in an exciting finish to the $140,000 feature. Green was full of praise for his colt following American Dealer’s maiden Group One win. “I am very proud of him,” Green told HRNZ. “He is a real little racehorse and he has a big season ahead of him.” After finding the front early, American Dealer set a solid pace to set up his slick winning time of 2-00.9 and mile rate of 1-54.4. American Dealer became the fourth individual Group One winner from NZB Standardbred’s National Yearling Sale, following a highly interrupted first season on the track for its graduates. The American Ideal (USA) colt from Bettor’s Delight (USA) mare, Maddison’s Delight was a bargain $23,000 purchase by Lincoln Farms Bloodstock at Christchurch in 2019. The classy customer was offered as a member of the White Stables of Winton draft and was sold on account of Auckland breeder-owner and trainer Lew Driver. With his win on Friday night, American Dealer became the latest in a lengthy list of Group One performers bred by leviathan breeder, the late Charles Roberts. The victory also saw driver David Butcher win his first Group One race in New Zealand since 2011. Krug launched a brave finish after enduring a tough run outside the leader early in the race and got within a head of the winner at the finish. With NZB Standardbred graduates making up the entire field for the Garrard’s Sires Stakes Final, 2019 National Yearling Sale purchases were always going to fill the trifecta. At the finish, It’s All About Faith (NZ) (Captaintreacherous) took third after making a searching run around the field from his wide second row draw. B D Joe (NZ) (Roll With Joe) ran into fourth placing after trailing American Dealer throughout. American Dealer has the chance to bank another big race purse just seven days after achieving Group One glory. The classy colt will take on an almost identical field in the $200,000 Listed Harness Million Two Year Old Colts And Geldings at Alexandra Park on Friday night. Aladdin (NZ) (Sweet Lou) will be out to make up for his unlucky run for fifth in the Garrard’s Sires Stakes Final. The All Stars stable colt, who was forced to race at the rear from his wide front row draw, flashed home in an eye-catching effort.   NZB Standardbred

Harness Racing Australia (HRA’s) recent announcements to reform the Australian harness racing industry for the long-term sustainability of the sport continue to gain support. John Campbell, from Loddon Valley Standardbred Stud, has added his voice to the growing chorus, saying, “As a second generation studmaster and breeder for over 50 years, I’ve supported 150 limits right through the consultative period.  The benefits may not be immediate, but this decision is critical to futureproof our industry, create competition and promote diversity. Campbell also sees advantages for the industry with the announcement to permanently change the Racing Season to start 1 January from next year.  “Southern Hemisphere mares are in the peak of their fertility during the December to February period, so the change in Racing Season is more great news for breeders as it will relieve pressure to push for early foals.  “There will be nothing wrong with December, January or even February foals under this scenario, so breeders can continue to serve beyond the current “artificial cut-off” of mid to late December”, Campbell said. Statistics support this argument, with very little difference between the “average number of starts” or the “winners to starters percentages” for 2yo, 3yo and 4yo’s over the past three racing seasons (2016/17 to 2018/19). Average Starts Sept – Nov:             8.81 Dec – Feb:               8.58 Winners : Starters Sept – Nov:             46.79% Dec – Feb:               43.63% With even more opportunities for 2yo’s from 1 January 2020, these trends looks set to continue. For further information please contact: ANDREW KELLY | CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER p:  +61 3 9227 3000    e:  akelly@hra.com.au    HRA

Harness Racing Australia has gone ahead and put Rules in place just weeks before the breeding season and failed to consult properly with stakeholders. More mares are bred in Victoria than any other state yet the Harness Racing Breeders Association of Victoria executive were waiting for answers when Harness Racing Australia announced the limits. How many stallions does this affect? Based on the 2019 figures five stallions served over 150 mares; Art Major, American Ideal, Always B Miki, Sweet Lou and the deceased Alta Christiano.   After contacting the Harness Racing Breeders Association of each state it is clear they do not accept that a proper consultative process has taken place. Based on the number of outraged breeders contacting Alabar Australia and Woodlands Stud it appears the majority of commercial broodmare owners are against the HRA proposal as it is written.  There is no one that is against limiting books but it needs to be properly worked out with consideration of free returns and other economic considerations. Below is the outline of the letter written to Andrew Kelly. A reply from the HRA board is expected this week. 1. Phase limits in:   There should be no limit for 2020 season, 180 plus returns for 2021 season,150 plus returns for 2022 and beyond:   Reasons why?    a) Implementing changes at this late stage of the season simply makes it all too hard to implement without creating upheaval and ill feeling between HRA and both broodmare owners and Studs.   b) there will be cases when travel and delivery of semen due to  Covid -19 will not reach a mare when needed and having flexibility has never been more important than this 2020 season.   c)  the follow-on economic effects of Covid-19 means 2021 will have its challenges. By 2022 we hope to see some sense of normality.   d) HRA should follow the example of other countries. The implementation of stallion limits would  normally be done over several years seasons as what happened with USTA. The overseas experience of limiting books has always provided a lead-in time to allow corrections to the worth of stallions being purchased or syndicated. The latest example was the Jockey Club (USA) where limits were introduced this year.   The conditions were that a limit of 140 but starts for those stallions born in the 2020 foal crop. All stallions born 2019 and before  are not affected as they were valued for syndication differently . There is no mention of free returns in the Jockey Club Rules because there are no live foal guarantees to consider as it is “pay on live foal” (POLF). Attached Jockey Club rule below.   2. Remove the limit of 20 on free returns:  There should be no limit or other conditions imposed on a genuine free return: a) There have been instances in NZ and Australia over the years where through no fault of the stud or stallion more than 20 free returns have occurred in any one season. These can be the accumulation of returns over previous seasons or unexpected losses from climatic changes or infection. For instance an abortion outbreak can cause significant unforeseen losses well in excess of 20 per stallion, as happened in 2001 with Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome (MRLS) in the U.S. state of Kentucky when some farms had between 20% to 30% of pregnant mares aborting.How can a stud be expected to carry the uncertainty of such a loss of income with no recourse of providing free returns to all losses if required? b) the broodmare owner should be able to transfer a free return and use another mare. The first mare may no longer be a viable breeding proposition,or a substitute maybe a more fertile option, or the mare died and needs replacing are examples why this makes sense.  c) I see a big difference on how free returns are adopted in future by studs if there is a limit imposed. In the T’Bred a standard free return is only provided for the first 24 hours of the foal’s life and thereafter it is the mare owner who takes the risk or insures the foal. In S’Bred's studs more often than not they provide free returns for foals that die much later than 24 hours, in some cases months later. That eases the burden of the broodmare owner carrying insurance from 24 hours. Under the current proposed HRA 20 free return criteria stallion owners could not allow this leniency to continue towards the breeder. d) Free returns are easy enough to police with the studbook registrations checking each free return is valid, and the registered stallion owner would have to justify the free return number yearly with HRA. I declare my conflict of interest as co owner in Woodlands Stud and the stallions Sweet Lou and American Ideal. Andrew Grierson Woodlands Stud .................................................................................................................................................. Thursday, May 07, 2020 The Jockey Club Adopts Rule Regarding Thoroughbred Stallion Breedings The Jockey Club board of stewards today announced that it has adopted a final rule limiting the annual breeding of individual stallions. The rule reflects The Jockey Club’s goal to preserve the health of the Thoroughbred breed for the long term and will apply prospectively to stallions born in 2020 or later. Effective today, The Jockey Club’s Principal Rules and Requirements of the American Studbook are amended by adding the following italicized language to the text of Rule 14C: C. Based on the information on a completed Report of Mares Bred form, The Jockey Club will forward to the stallion owner, lessee or authorized agent a preprinted Service Certificate for each broodmare bred, including the name of the stallion, the name of the broodmare, the name of the dam of the broodmare, and the date of the last cover. The total number of broodmares bred per individual stallion whose year of birth is 2020 or thereafter shall not exceed 140 per calendar year in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. The Jockey Club shall limit the number of Stallion Service Certificates for such stallions to a maximum of 140 per calendar year. When the stallion owner, lessee or authorized agent receives the preprinted Service Certificate, it should be examined for accuracy, signed by the stallion owner, lessee or authorized agent and forwarded to the breeder of the foal or submitted to The Jockey Club through Interactive Registration™ at www.registry.jockeyclub.com. The Service Certificate is required to register a foal. Service Certificates will not be issued unless a completed Report of Mares Bred form is on file at The Jockey Club and until genetic or re-DNA typing of the stallion has been completed (see Rule 5). In an effort to illustrate the operation of the new rule, The Jockey Club offers the following examples of how it will be applied: (1) For stallions born in 2019 and earlier, there will be no limit to the number of mares reported bred in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. The Jockey Club will issue stallion certificates for all mares bred by such stallions within the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico during a calendar year. (2) For stallions born in 2020 and later, the maximum number of mares covered within the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico in a calendar year will be 140. It would be a violation of Rule 14C for such a stallion to cover more than 140 mares within the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico during a calendar year. The aforementioned limit will apply to all mares bred during a calendar year regardless of when The Jockey Club receives a Report of Mares bred (or any amendments or supplements thereto). The Jockey Club will modify its Report of Mares Bred form and other related forms in recognition of the amendment to Rule 14. Stallion Service Certificates will be issued on the basis of first cover date in the order of mares listed on the Report of Mares Bred. The Jockey Club is grateful for the many thoughtful comments in response to its September rule proposal. The stewards carefully considered those comments in formulating a rule that will promote diversity of the Thoroughbred gene pool and protect the long-term health of the breed. The Jockey Club will continue to maintain the Principal Rules and Requirements of the American Studbook in keeping with its mission to ensure the health of the Thoroughbred breed. The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.  

Here is the latest harness racing two-year-old money winning Sires list in North America and at Harnesslink we will keep you up to date every Friday, New Zealand and Australian time with the actual statistics. Again this week we include the list of average earnings of the top 20 stallions that show an interesting comparison. For breeders down under this is an important time for deciding on what stallion they need to breed their mare to this coming season. The new first season sires are well on their way to giving some indication of what chance they have of competing with the established sires. From a breeders point of view they need the facts rather than the bluster from the Stallion Owners as to what they breed to this coming season is going to impact their financial situation in three years time. These statistics are freely available on the Standardbred Canada site daily. Captaintreacherous continues to lead the list with two winners of over $100,000. They are his top filly Marsala Hanover 1:52f at $192,435 and his top gelding Chase H Hanover 1:52f at $109,332. First season sire Always B Miki has increased his standing jumping to 9th on the top twenty list. Champion sire Bettors Delight already has three $100,000 plus winners, all fillies to boot. They are Bet On Becky 1:50.4 ($150,333, Scarlett Hanover ($125,924) and Best Head West ($108,637). There is a lot of money up for grabs this week in North America for the two-year-olds with Sire Stake Finals in both Pennsylvania and Ohio. This coming Saturday at Pocono Downs will feature the Pennsylvania Sires Stakes Championships that go for $253,000 and the Consolations that go for $50,000 so this week will give these stallions a chance to hit the big time against Captaintreacherous, Somebeachsomewhere and Sweet Lou. In the Fillies Final for $253,000 there are 3 by Captaintreacherous, 3 by Somebeachsomewhere, 1 by Sweet Lou, 1 by Betting Line and 1 by Always B Miki. In the $50,000 Consolation there are 3 by Captaintreacherous, 2 by Somebeachsomewhere and 1 by Sweet Lou and Western Ideal each. Just the 7 starters. In the Colts Final for $253,000 there are 3 by Somebeachsomewhere, 2 by Captaintreacherous, 2 by Always B Miki and 2 by Sweet Lou. In the $50,000 Consolation there are 3 by Sweet Lou, 2 by Somebeachsomewhere and 1 by Captaintreacherous, Artspeak and A Rocknroll Dance. To see the complete program for the Pennsylvania Sires Stakes Championships click here. On Sunday at Scioto Downs the Ohio Sire Stakes Championships go for $300,000 each with stallions Well Said, Racing Hill and McArdle well represented.. To see the complete program for the Ohio Sire Stakes Championships click here. Leading Money Winning Sires - 2 Year Old Pace (2020) - 4th September 2020 SIRE                                                   Starters      Foals       Winners     Money won CAPTAINTREACHEROUS 64 110 30 $1,121,860 SOMEBEACHSOMEWHERE 80 116 36 $1,105,424 AMERICAN IDEAL 60 113 27 $839,093 BETTING LINE 74 119 26 $758,521 SHADOW PLAY 38 91 16 $711,768 BETTORS DELIGHT 47 121 14 $708,524 ART MAJOR 40 69 12 $615,643 WELL SAID 47 71 21 $613,547 ALWAYS B MIKI 46 112 15 $602,511 SWEET LOU 41 84 13 $542,592 RACING HILL 53 93 21 $524,262 SPORTSWRITER 66 137 23 $524,246 SUNSHINE BEACH 49 143 14 $513,387 ROLL WITH JOE 47 71 19 $475,201 JK ENDOFANERA 50 88 21 $409,074 ALWAYS A VIRGIN 54 102 27 $385,083 MCARDLE 29 48 9 $378,788 BETTERTHANCHEDDAR 46 102 9 $368,907 PET ROCK 51 83 24 $352,379 ROCKIN IMAGE 60 96 22 $266,084 It is important to note that five of the stallions listed in bold type stand in the state of Pennsylvania, probably the toughest of all competing states standing stallions in North America. The stallions in italics above are stallions standing in Canada where they have no stallion limits. Leading Sires by Average Earnings - 2 Year Old Pace (2020) 4th September 2018 Starters Average Sire Foals in 2020 Money per Starter ==== ===== ======== ===== =========== SHADOW PLAY 91 38 $711,768 $18,730 CAPTAINTREACHEROUS 110 64 $1,121,860 $17,529 ART MAJOR 69 40 $615,643 $15,391 BETTORS DELIGHT 121 47 $708,524 $15,074 BIG JIM 47 11 $164,094 $14,917 AMERICAN IDEAL 113 60 $839,093 $13,984 SOMEBEACHSOMEWHERE 116 80 $1,105,424 $13,817 SWEET LOU 84 41 $542,592 $13,233 ALWAYS B MIKI 112 46 $602,511 $13,098 MCARDLE 48 29 $378,788 $13,061 WELL SAID 71 47 $613,547 $13,054 MR APPLES 19 13 $163,913 $12,608 BRING ON THE BEACH 15 8 $97,751 $12,218 CONTROL THE MOMENT 44 22 $231,604 $10,527 SUNSHINE BEACH 144 49 $513,387 $10,477 BETTING LINE 119 74 $758,521 $10,250 ROLL WITH JOE 71 47 $475,201 $10,110 RACING HILL 93 53 $524,262 $9,891 WESTERN VINTAGE 17 9 $88,107 $9,789 PANTHER HANOVER 23 7 $65,086 $9,298 Harnesslink Media

The Western Australian Standardbred Breeders Association is conducting our annual Stallion Service Tender in conjunction with Allwood Stud Farm (WA and Vic), Burwood Stud (QLD), Cobbitty Equine Farm (NSW), Global Breeding Farms (WA), Highlight Lodge (WA), KTC Bloodstock (WA), Northern Rivers Equine (Vic), Soho Standardbreds (Vic), Woodlands Stud (Vic and NZ), Yirribee Stud (NSW), Alabar Bloodstock (Vic) and Pinjarra Harness Racing Club. This is a great opportunity for breeders EVERYWHERE to get an exceptionally well-credentialed stallion at a reasonable price. Tender is for the 2020/21 season. The 14 fantastic stallions available are: Bling It On 1:50.2 - $1,833,597. Australasia’s richest and fastest son of American Ideal USA o/o dual Aus. Broodmare of the Year Alldatglittersisgold. Australian 2yo and 3yo Pacer of the Year. 48 wins incl. 18 Group wins - 6 Group 1 wins incl Hunter Cup, Victoria Cup etc. Half brother to Miracle Mile winner Baby Bling. Oldest progeny are 2YOs in 20/21. Standing in NSW. Caribbean Blaster 1:52.6 - $1,113,677. Multiple Group 1 winning son of champion Bettors Delight USA. Won Chariots of Fire, 4YO Breeders Crown, Victoria Cup. Raced and beat Smoken Up, Im Themightyquinn, Washakie, Melpark Major etc. First two crops racing produced 36 individual winners. Standing in WA. Control The Moment USA 1.48.2 - US$1,227,832. Canadian 2yo Pacing Colt of the Year, winning 8 out of 9. Won Metro Pace, Meadowlands Pace, Cane Pace. Richest and fastest son of 2yo and 3yo Pacer of the Year Well Said 1:47.3 US$2.6M. First crop racing in 2020 with 12 winners and 50% starters to foals already. FROZEN SEMEN. Downbytheseaside USA 1:48.3 - US$2,179,558. Champion racehorse and son of mighty Somebeachsomewhere USA. 22 wins at 2 and 3, equal fastest 2YO in history. 3YO Pacing Colt of the Year beating Huntsville, Fear The Dragon etc. Race timed 1:50 on half mile track. Oldest foals are yearlings in 20/21. Standing in NZ. Follow The Stars 1:53.8 - $707,237. By super sire Art Major from a Cams Card Shark mare. Multiple Group 1 winner. 19 wins, 9 places from only 29 starts. Won 10 of 11 as a 2yo. 2014 Australian and New Zealand 2YO of the Year. Second on Australian first season sire list in 2018/19. Sire of sensational filly Black Jack Baby. Standing in Vic. Foreclosure NZ 1:48.4 - $807,746. By champion Rocknroll Hanover out of a Fake Left mare. Bred in NZ, raced entirely in US for 15 wins. Competed against and beat the best including Foiled Again. 16 winners from only US crop of 21 foals, 14 in 1:55, 1 in 1:50. $93,000 ave. earnings per starter. Oldest Aus crop are weanlings. FROZEN SEMEN. Franco Nelson NZ 1:50.3 - $872,493. By champion racehorse and sire Christian Cullen from a Falcon Seelster dam. Multiple Group 1 and Harness Jewels winner, defeating some of the greats incl. Christian Me, Have Faith In Me, Lazarus, Tiger Tara, Smolda. Family of NZ 2Y0 Filly of Year Nevermore, champion NZ mare Spanish Armada, Chancellor Cullen and Cardigan Bay. First public season. Standing in Qld. Lather Up USA 1:46.0 - US$1,735,623. World Champion. Broke seven track records racing from 2yo to 4yo. By a son of Bettors Delight from a daughter of champion NZ sire In The Pocket. 23 wins. Fastest 4yo in history World record 1:46.0 set as a 4yo. Dam has produced 2 in 1:50, 5 in 1:52 and is a full sister to a millionaire. First season at stud. Standing in Vic. Mel Mara USA 1:47 – US$1,028,350. By Lis Mara, the fastest and richest son of still speed champion Cambest (set 1:46.1 World Record 27 yrs ago). Dam-sire and Grand-dam sire were the fastest of their time. Won 28 races, millionaire and champion performer in his own right, beating Sweet Lou, Always B Miki, McWicked etc. From maternal family of No Nukes and Rock N Roll Heaven. Second season. Standing in Vic. My Hard Copy NZ 1:51.6 - $1,270,660. Multiple Group 1 winning son of American Ideal USA. From the family of Adios Vic, Manifold Bay, Run Oneover, etc. Won 27 races from 2yo to 8yo over all distances. Wicked finish. Won 2018 Fremantle Cup defeating Lazarus, Chicago Bull and Soho Tribeca. Dual WA Pacing Cup winner. Inter Dominion Heat winner. Standing in WA. Renaissance Man 1:53.1 - $297,904 Multiple Group 1 winner. By champion racehorse and sire Art Major out of dam of 7 individual winners incl. Group 1 winners Louvre 1:54.5 $402,665, and Miss Hazel. Sire of 17 winners from first two small crops including Group 1 winner Longreach Bay, Group 3 winner My Prayer, and Fifty Five Reborn. Standing first season in NSW. Rock N Roll World USA 1:48.3 - US$712,737. By world champion Rocknroll Hanover 1:48.3 US$2,754,038 out of champion US 2YO/3YO Pacing Filly of the Year. Dam a full sister to the dam of Captaintreacherous. Granddam a full sister to the dam of Art Major. Raced successfully from 2yo to 5yo at the highest level. Set season record Hoosier Park Invitational defeating Freaky Fete Pete. Second season. Standing in Vic. Soho Tribeca 1:53.8 - $1,103,854. Outstanding son of super sire American Ideal USA. Art Major dam was the Australian Broodmare of the Year and dam of 5 in 1:55 incl. 3 Group 1 winners. Multiple Group 1 winner incl. Golden Nugget, Vicbred Super Series and multiple Inter Dominion Heat winner. Just beaten into 3rd in Miracle Mile in 1:46.9 Raced against and beat Lazarus, Tiger Tara, Chicago Bull, Lennytheshark etc. First season at stud. Standing in Vic. Sportswriter 1:48.6 - US$1,566,460. By World Champion racehorse and sire Artsplace USA. 22 wins at 2 and 3. USA and Canadian 2YO Pacing Colt of the Year. Family of Whats Next USA, Downbytheseaside USA, Custard The Dragon USA. Three quarter brother to the dam of current leading US 3yo colt Tall Dark Stranger USA p3 1:47.1. Noted sire of juveniles, with 2yo Group 1 winners Mitch Maguire, Niki No No, Shezallapples, Lumineer. Standing in Vic. The relevant state Breeding Scheme applies to each stallion. Funds raised from the Stallion Tender go towards stakes, subsidies and other incentives, including rehoming. WASBA strongly supports rehoming initiatives and provides funds annually for this purpose. All proceeds from Sportswriter USA go to Pinjarra Harness Racing Club on behalf of Alabar Bloodstock. WASBA would like to sincerely thank all the studs concerned for their generosity and support. For the Full flyer with all the details and the Tender form, use this link, http://www.wasba.com.au/images/2020/WASBA_2020_Stallion_tender.pdf  or go to www.wasba.com.au  or call/SMS 0447 053 040 to get more information or a Tender Form.The Western Australian Standardbred Breeders Association is conducting our annual Stallion Service Tender in conjunction with Allwood Stud Farm (WA and Vic), Burwood Stud (QLD), Cobbitty Equine Farm (NSW), Global Breeding Farms (WA), Highlight Lodge (WA), KTC Bloodstock (WA), Northern Rivers Equine (Vic), Soho Standardbreds (Vic), Woodlands Stud (Vic and NZ), Yirribee Stud (NSW), Alabar Bloodstock (Vic) and Pinjarra Harness Racing Club. This is a great opportunity for breeders EVERYWHERE to get an exceptionally well-credentialed stallion at a reasonable price. Tender is for the 2020/21 season. The 14 fantastic stallions available are: Bling It On 1:50.2 - $1,833,597. Australasia’s richest and fastest son of American Ideal USA o/o dual Aus. Broodmare of the Year Alldatglittersisgold. Australian 2yo and 3yo Pacer of the Year. 48 wins incl. 18 Group wins - 6 Group 1 wins incl Hunter Cup, Victoria Cup etc. Half brother to Miracle Mile winner Baby Bling. Oldest progeny are 2YOs in 20/21. Standing in NSW. Caribbean Blaster 1:52.6 - $1,113,677. Multiple Group 1 winning son of champion Bettors Delight USA. Won Chariots of Fire, 4YO Breeders Crown, Victoria Cup. Raced and beat Smoken Up, Im Themightyquinn, Washakie, Melpark Major etc. First two crops racing produced 36 individual winners. Standing in WA. Control The Moment USA 1.48.2 - US$1,227,832. Canadian 2yo Pacing Colt of the Year, winning 8 out of 9. Won Metro Pace, Meadowlands Pace, Cane Pace. Richest and fastest son of 2yo and 3yo Pacer of the Year Well Said 1:47.3 US$2.6M. First crop racing in 2020 with 12 winners and 50% starters to foals already. FROZEN SEMEN. Downbytheseaside USA 1:48.3 - US$2,179,558. Champion racehorse and son of mighty Somebeachsomewhere USA. 22 wins at 2 and 3, equal fastest 2YO in history. 3YO Pacing Colt of the Year beating Huntsville, Fear The Dragon etc. Race timed 1:50 on half mile track. Oldest foals are yearlings in 20/21. Standing in NZ. Follow The Stars 1:53.8 - $707,237. By super sire Art Major from a Cams Card Shark mare. Multiple Group 1 winner. 19 wins, 9 places from only 29 starts. Won 10 of 11 as a 2yo. 2014 Australian and New Zealand 2YO of the Year. Second on Australian first season sire list in 2018/19. Sire of sensational filly Black Jack Baby. Standing in Vic. Foreclosure NZ 1:48.4 - $807,746. By champion Rocknroll Hanover out of a Fake Left mare. Bred in NZ, raced entirely in US for 15 wins. Competed against and beat the best including Foiled Again. 16 winners from only US crop of 21 foals, 14 in 1:55, 1 in 1:50. $93,000 ave. earnings per starter. Oldest Aus crop are weanlings. FROZEN SEMEN. Franco Nelson NZ 1:50.3 - $872,493. By champion racehorse and sire Christian Cullen from a Falcon Seelster dam. Multiple Group 1 and Harness Jewels winner, defeating some of the greats incl. Christian Me, Have Faith In Me, Lazarus, Tiger Tara, Smolda. Family of NZ 2Y0 Filly of Year Nevermore, champion NZ mare Spanish Armada, Chancellor Cullen and Cardigan Bay. First public season. Standing in Qld. Lather Up USA 1:46.0 - US$1,735,623. World Champion. Broke seven track records racing from 2yo to 4yo. By a son of Bettors Delight from a daughter of champion NZ sire In The Pocket. 23 wins. Fastest 4yo in history World record 1:46.0 set as a 4yo. Dam has produced 2 in 1:50, 5 in 1:52 and is a full sister to a millionaire. First season at stud. Standing in Vic. Mel Mara USA 1:47 – US$1,028,350. By Lis Mara, the fastest and richest son of still speed champion Cambest (set 1:46.1 World Record 27 yrs ago). Dam-sire and Grand-dam sire were the fastest of their time. Won 28 races, millionaire and champion performer in his own right, beating Sweet Lou, Always B Miki, McWicked etc. From maternal family of No Nukes and Rock N Roll Heaven. Second season. Standing in Vic. My Hard Copy NZ 1:51.6 - $1,270,660. Multiple Group 1 winning son of American Ideal USA. From the family of Adios Vic, Manifold Bay, Run Oneover, etc. Won 27 races from 2yo to 8yo over all distances. Wicked finish. Won 2018 Fremantle Cup defeating Lazarus, Chicago Bull and Soho Tribeca. Dual WA Pacing Cup winner. Inter Dominion Heat winner. Standing in WA. Renaissance Man 1:53.1 - $297,904 Multiple Group 1 winner. By champion racehorse and sire Art Major out of dam of 7 individual winners incl. Group 1 winners Louvre 1:54.5 $402,665, and Miss Hazel. Sire of 17 winners from first two small crops including Group 1 winner Longreach Bay, Group 3 winner My Prayer, and Fifty Five Reborn. Standing first season in NSW. Rock N Roll World USA 1:48.3 - US$712,737. By world champion Rocknroll Hanover 1:48.3 US$2,754,038 out of champion US 2YO/3YO Pacing Filly of the Year. Dam a full sister to the dam of Captaintreacherous. Granddam a full sister to the dam of Art Major. Raced successfully from 2yo to 5yo at the highest level. Set season record Hoosier Park Invitational defeating Freaky Fete Pete. Second season. Standing in Vic. Soho Tribeca 1:53.8 - $1,103,854. Outstanding son of super sire American Ideal USA. Art Major dam was the Australian Broodmare of the Year and dam of 5 in 1:55 incl. 3 Group 1 winners. Multiple Group 1 winner incl. Golden Nugget, Vicbred Super Series and multiple Inter Dominion Heat winner. Just beaten into 3rd in Miracle Mile in 1:46.9 Raced against and beat Lazarus, Tiger Tara, Chicago Bull, Lennytheshark etc. First season at stud. Standing in Vic. Sportswriter 1:48.6 - US$1,566,460. By World Champion racehorse and sire Artsplace USA. 22 wins at 2 and 3. USA and Canadian 2YO Pacing Colt of the Year. Family of Whats Next USA, Downbytheseaside USA, Custard The Dragon USA. Three quarter brother to the dam of current leading US 3yo colt Tall Dark Stranger USA p3 1:47.1. Noted sire of juveniles, with 2yo Group 1 winners Mitch Maguire, Niki No No, Shezallapples, Lumineer. Standing in Vic. The relevant state Breeding Scheme applies to each stallion. Funds raised from the Stallion Tender go towards stakes, subsidies and other incentives, including rehoming. WASBA strongly supports rehoming initiatives and provides funds annually for this purpose. All proceeds from Sportswriter USA go to Pinjarra Harness Racing Club on behalf of Alabar Bloodstock. WASBA would like to sincerely thank all the studs concerned for their generosity and support. For the Full flyer with all the details and the Tender form, use this link, http://www.wasba.com.au/images/2020/WASBA_2020_Stallion_tender.pdf  or go to www.wasba.com.au  or call/SMS 0447 053 040 to get more information or a Tender Form.    

At a scheduled meeting of the HRA Executive last week, a decision was made to provide a concession to studs and stallion owners regarding Free Returns in the 2020/21 Breeding Season. In light of COVID-19, this was already going to be a year like no other, but as 1 September approaches the Executive understands the difficulty’s breeders will face with transporting semen not only between countries, but also across borders within Australia for the foreseeable future.  Sporadic and necessary shutdowns at airports and borders along with reduced airline schedules and cargo space will cause issues with freight and distribution, likely requiring either private charter or road courier.  Further, the compounding impacts of the Avian Influenza (AI) outbreak/declaration in Victoria also put agriculture, primary industry and reproductive material transports under more scrutiny - which in turn will apply time pressures for semen distribution. While ultimately decision for each State and organisations therein, HRA will continue to work cooperatively with interested stakeholders on border entry and transport permit issues, but today a concession of 20 free return services above the 150 mare limits (stallion services) for the 2020/21 season is being announced in an effort to assist studs and stallion owners with their planning given the various circumstances at play. These free returns will be regulated with studs applying to HRA for approval for each free service.  This process will be designed to ensure that the semen from the same stallion can only be used for the same mare within this additional 20 free return service cap. Free returns aside, there has been widespread support for the 150-mare limit, and it is important to note that this announcement does not alter that proposition into the future.  It does, however, illustrate that the HRA Executive are monitoring, listening and have an appreciation for the range of difficulties and impacts faced by breeders in the coming season – a year like no other. For further information, please contact Andrew Kelly on akelly@hra.com.au or 03 9227 3000.   Andrew Kelly

At a meeting of the Harness Racing Australia (HRA) Executive on 12 June 2020, two important amendments to the Breeding Rules were finalised and unanimously approved. Subsequently, the Members of HRA have provided the requisite support for their formal approval, and as such, notice is now being given to the industry that these changes will be implemented from 1 September 2020 and therefore effect the coming breeding season. These changes, which relate to limiting the services of Stallions in any one season and the treatment of dead or disappeared Stallions, or geldings, harmonise Australia’s (breeding) Rules and Studbook with the major jurisdictions across the world on these issues. The changes are set out below: 1.  Stallion Limits The total mares bred to a stallion registered in Australia, regardless of method used, in any given breeding season shall not exceed 150, including free returns from previous seasons. No foal will be registered from a service performed beyond this limit. A person who fails to comply with this rule is guilty of an offence. 2.  Dead, Disappeared or Gelded Stallions The use of semen from a dead or disappeared stallion, or one that has been gelded, is forbidden beyond the end of breeding season following his death or disappearance or date of gelding. A provision will be allowed to “grandfather” a Registered Standardbred that is dead or disappeared, or one that has been gelded prior to 1 September 2020. No foal may be registered for an insemination performed beyond this time limit with the exception of a free return to the same broodmare in the second breeding season after death. A person who fails to comply with this rule is guilty of an offence. At this stage of the process, the industry is being notified of the amendments, their clear intent, the implementation date (1 September 2020) and fact that action can be taken if not observed.  Actual wording within the Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR’s) will be formalised by the National Rules Committee and published following its next meeting. For further information, please contact Andrew Kelly, Chief Executive, on +61 3 9227 3004.   Harness Racing Australia

Do you want the good news, or the bad news first? I was told to start with the bad news first so we could end on a high note. There isn’t a lot of good harness racing news in this and I won’t sugar coat it. The number of individual mares served in New Zealand has taken another hit this season and for the first time dips below 2,300 mares bred, with the number now resting at 2,171 individual mares served. Down from 2,333 the previous year. It’s a 35% decline over 10 years when we had 3365 individual mares bred in 2011. Before we go any further on the matter, let’s get one thing straight. We as standardbred breeders in New Zealand are not unique in the sense of a declining participation. Every jurisdiction globally that races standardbreds (and thoroughbreds) is facing the same challenges. Australian breeding declined 42 percent in the 10 years to 2018/19 and have even bigger challenges when it comes to wastage (more on that on Tuesday) Rising costs, stagnant returns and a dwindling social acceptance of racing are factors with apathy to harness racing growing demonstrated through a decline in TAB turnover. Similarly, this problem is not unique to the equine racing codes. All major sports are struggling to remain relevant in today’s society and some of our greatest pastimes are facing significant challenges also.  I draw a parallel with rugby because it too is suffering at the grass roots to non-traditional sports in terms of participation to codes like basketball having once been the only ticket in town. Sound familiar? Basketball now represents almost a third of the TAB’s sports turnover. Harness racing is now around 22-24%. Our greatest strengths are also our greatest weakness in the sense that we breed and develop the best athletes in our respective codes, creating demand for product offshore at the expense of the domestic product. To keep people coming through the gate and interested, we need to retain our best athletes and that is a challenge we both face. You can’t blame a young rugby player, or the owner of a fringe open class pacer or a promising young filly for chasing a solid return when the opportunity presents itself. It’s encouraging to hear that in the challenging climate we now face, as we head into racing post Covid-19, that the TAB, RITA and the codes will focus on maximising turnover, but given the lack of funding that will be available we all need to be realistic about what racing will look like when it returns. The breeding industry is our focus however so I’ll stick to my knitting. The ramifications of this seasons breeding’s won’t be felt for five years, but is something our racing people need to be conscious of and prepare for in their forecasting. The number of registered foals has gone well below 2000 and will only get worse if we continue to get bad information regarding stallion fertility. The increasing use of frozen semen comes with its own limitations and costs. A breeding industry already struggling for investment will no doubt take a hit as participants look at their expenditure. The NZSBA has very little control over so much of the above on its current funding which is going to get worse before it gets better. We will be tightening our belts but looking to continue serving breeders. The current challenge for me and the executive of the NZSBA is continuing to be vigilant, strategic and tactical as to its contribution to an industry that has to radically changing how it does business. There is no silver bullet to solve breeding numbers and we have about as much chance of Lord Module winning this year’s New Zealand Cup. Victoria provides an example we perhaps should study. Victoria went from 3893 mares bred to 4073 and last breeding season tapered off again to 3928. This season’s statistics have yet to come through, but it does have the widely applauded VicBred scheme to promote racing the local product. The bonuses from HRV haven’t been merely funded by their own code, they had an enormous government contribution also. Four million was spent initially by HRV when announcing their initiatives in 2012. The state government injection, $2.4m came in 2016 with a further $3 million from HRV causing a slight spike in numbers. So all in all, HRV has spent close to $10 million to see their breeding numbers stay almost exactly as they were seven breeding seasons ago which is a hell of a lot better than here and the rest of Australia. That is the level of investment required, and is it sustainable? Governments here have never shown an inclination to support racing under economic development allocations. Perhaps we should be advocating for this post-Covid-19? A decade ago Winnie threw $1 million at the Cup.  His bloodstock breeding tax concessions at that time did steady the decline for a short while. The first win bonus recently came with the best of intentions, but it was never sustainable either. The stallion service records (and yearling sales) paint a pretty accurate picture of the current climate. The top four pacing stallions on average at this year’s Yearling Sales: Bettor’s Delight, Art Major, Sweet Lou & Captaintreacherous served only 18 less mares between them season on season. Those in the $7000 or less bracket were down nearly 300 mares and that was with Always B Miki doing 72 more mares than last season. In my opinion we need to do more to cater to this demographic of horse and can do so simply with our programming. It doesn’t cost a pinch of salt to programme a race for horses sired by the middle to lower tier stallions regularly. I say regularly because the Sires 7000 is a nice concept but a one off race we need more of, and they don’t need to carry the $30,000 stake. But why not a series? Data shows that in Canterbury alone, there are over 500 four year old and older pacers registered with trainers that fall into this bracket of being sired by stallions at prices of $7,000 or less. Is it going to solve the worlds problems? No. But if you’re serious about providing opportunities for those at the bottom end, start with programming. It isn’t a numbers problem, and it couldn’t hurt to try. Why couldn’t an extended Sires 7000 type series be part of a bigger carrot? Last year only 17% of horses sired by New Zealand-bred stallions paid up for the Sires Stakes scheme with foal payments. Their progeny struggle to beat the better bred horses on the track or and because of this are not in demand at the sales so what incentive is there for anyone to breed to them? The one and two mare hobby breeders are disappearing and we need to give them hope. They need to be able to either race or sell horses bred to stallions other than the expensive top four! It can’t be a case of commercial or nothing which it is becoming. Going back to Government contributions, there is potential for a policy change with the IRD. The current ‘Stand Out Yearling’ policy has unofficially yielded minimal applications in either code. The policy which has finding of close to $4 million in ‘incentives’ attached over four years, but every year it goes unutilised it is dead money. No refunds sorry! It would appear that the IRD and Winston are cottoning on to the fact that for stimulus in the breeding industry, perhaps another approach is needed. Hence a review that is being finalised now. Is the purchase of a standardbred yearling on price alone the best indication of someone looking to start a breeding business? John Aubrey the well-known bloodstock tax accountant hits the nail on the had in my opinion with his summation of the scheme; existing breeders in business are not faced with any of these time-consuming information requirements (the paperwork and documentation involved to apply); a standout yearling is best based on pedigree and type, not sale price; the threshold proposals should be abandoned and a simple amendment made to the existing bloodstock sections of the act that new investors should be subject to the same legislative rules as existing breeders and that their new breeding business should commence at time of purchase of their potential breeding bloodstock; and in lieu of endeavouring to promote standout yearlings the best course of action by far is to promote standout broodmares. The NZSBA is closely involved in working with the IRD, RITA and the thoroughbred code in urging government to reform bloodstock taxation as suggested by John Aubrey. In addition to John’s fourth point, why couldn’t both codes be tasked with coming up with some race bonus’ or credit schemes of their own to further sustain the sectors? But I would like to believe that we could work together to come up with something that is of long term value to breeding. Next week we will discuss with the NZ Sires Stakes Board and their vision for a possible return to racing and how they endeavour to best utilise the resources they hold on behalf of breeders, owners and studs who pay handsomely to participate in these series. It will be interesting to get their thoughts. I said I would finish with good news and that is what I will do. For the fourth year in a row, New Zealand’s trotting renaissance has continued. Over the same period as the VicBred scheme (seven years), trot mares bred have managed to maintain their numbers. There were 642 services in 2012/13, and this year there were 643. It took a dip in the 2015/16 season at 545, but the bounce back is a reflection of the improved genetics and a greater parity when it comes to racing. That’s not a dig, it’s a fact. It’s imperative we look to invest in our growth areas like this, and it’s about time the trotters got more respect when it came to Group Race races and stakes. Now, now. Let’s not finish on a sour note. As always, I welcome your views and would love to hear your ideas and suggestions. We can and will come out of this malaise not helped by Mr Covid-19. We can’t pretend the challenge is not immense, but let’s not shirk the task either. A collaborative approach will be needed to ensure the sustainability and viability of harness racing if we hope to be anything more than an export market. Again, that sounds scarily like the challenge before New Zealand Rugby. By Brad Reid To read more articles like this in the Breeders Update, click here.

Stone named the promising filly Maud S after his eldest daughter, Maud Stone. Maud S made her professional debut at the Carthage Fair track in 1877. Harness racing is a different sport than horse racing. Horses trot rather than gallop and a driver rides behind in a sulky, a cart on two bicycle-like wheels. During her first race, Maud S came to a stop and tried to go through the gate to the stables. Once the driver got her back on track, she took off. Then she … showed that she was a trotter, and a rare trotter, too,” Stone recalled. “She threw up her head, got down to business and went through that back stretch like a cyclone, reaching the bunch in front, overhauling them one by one, and finishing at the wire a winner of the heat.” Maud S drew the attention of railroad tycoon William H. Vanderbilt, who offered $20,000 to buy her if she could run a mile under two minutes, 20 seconds. Stone then promised his trainer Bair $1,000 if Maud could beat 2:19. “She finished in 2:17 ¾, and the country went wild,” Stone said. “It was the fastest mile up to that time that had ever been trotted by a four-year-old.” Vanderbilt agreed to pay $20,000 plus the $1,000 to Bair. But he wanted Maud S as a road horse, and she didn’t play along. So, Vanderbilt agreed to allow Stone to manage her racing career and Bair to train her. Maud S was some horse. “Queen of the turf,” celebrated from coast to coast, she was a record-breaking trotter, the fastest in the world in the 1880s. And she was ours, trained and quartered at Chester Park, once a great racetrack on Spring Grove Avenue in what is now Spring Grove Village. That’s where she came to the attention of Capt. George N. Stone. Stone had earned his rank in the Civil War and settled in Cincinnati, where he was president of the Cincinnati Bell Telephone Co. (then called the City and Suburban Telegraph Association). But his passion was horse racing. In 1875, Stone started the Chester Park Driving Association, named for his favorite horse, Lady Chester. To show confidence in his trainer, W.W. Bair, he let him pick any horse for sale at the park to train. Bair chose an unbroken 2-year-old filly that cost $350, considered a fair price because of her lineage. The standardbred filly, born in 1874 in Woodburn Farm, Kentucky, didn’t even have a name yet, and was resistant to training. “She showed very little speed, and I was not congratulating myself at all,” Stone told The Enquirer in 1900. “She was inclined to mix gaits and rack, and would do most anything but trot.” He suggested that Bair run her through the rye growing on the edge of the track. She floundered and stumbled and fought all the way, but found her trotting gait. She got faster and faster. Over a five-year period, Maud S lowered the world trot record seven times. When the horse Jay-Eye-See bested her time at 2:10 on Aug. 1, 1884, the next day Maud S set a new record at 2:09 ¾. “It was the most graceful performance by any horse, before or since,” Stone said, “and while she made still faster time subsequently, on the same Cleveland track, it was not the graceful effort that marked her regaining her crown after Jay-Eye-See had enjoyed the title of king for exactly 24 hours.” Vanderbilt then surprised the racing world by selling Maud S to Robert Bonner for $40,000. An oft-told story, likely untrue, was that Vanderbilt was jealous that folks would say, “There goes Maud S with Vanderbilt!” rather than the other way around. In 1885, Maud S set the world record again with her fastest time of 2:08 ¾, nearly 28 mph, then retired. She died in 1900. Stone passed away in 1901 and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, a few blocks from where Chester Park once stood. The racetrack where the legendary Maud S ran was replaced by a man-made lake as Chester Park was made into an amusement park. By Jeff Suess, Cincinnati Enquirer Reprinted with permission of The Enquirer

Prompted by recent rumors concerning NZ Bloodstock's likely purchase of PGG Wrightson's harness racing auction business, and in light of our diminishing equine population (breeding down another 250 mares this year, rapidly approaching only 2,000 mares bred annually) and general lack of enticing prize money at offer, it is time for our Industry to take over ownership of its yearling and related auctions! Even in this depressed environment, yearling/weanling/broodmare Auction Sales exceed $11 million dollars annually, generating in excess of $1.1 million of gross income to PGG Wrightson. Think of how wonderful it would be if that money were made available to lift both overnight and stake purses! Why utilize an outside Auction house to do - and make money from - what we can do just as well ourselves? With a little creative use of existing facilities both Alexandra Park and Addington could hold the sales at their racetracks! Obviously, temporary stalls would need to be rented, some overheads incurred, vendor payouts and cataloging to be managed, and auctioneers to be rented for the sales - but it is hard to imagine that the financial windfall to harness racing would be far from $1 million annually! Additionally, if the sales were well handled, food and drink income for the sales days would be substantial! It would also tie in well with special race nights created to take advantage of the crowds that would already be on track for the sales! While PGG and NZ Bloodstock would have us believe that their expertise is vital, there is really very little to that bravado! The sales are self drawing, our industry can handle the operation, personnel overheads need not be high (there is certainly no need to inspect yearlings as foal numbers no longer require culling for the sales), and - while Karaka is a lovely venue - it is an unnecessary extravagance considering how nicely the $1million dollars at hand would benefit our racing product! Given Alexandra Park's bright economic future, they, alone, if necessary, could put on these sales. And combined with support from major Breeders/stud farms/consigned like Woodlands, Breckon, and Alabar, they could create an innovative new series and stakes benefiting 2 and 3 year olds! In this time of general doom and gloom in harness racing, this proactive approach would provide a breath of fresh air, utilize common sense, and give the Industry we love some forward momentum!!! Come on Alexandra Park and Addington, come on NZ Breeders, and let's MAKE this happen. Let's take our own horse by the reins! Harnesslink Media

Standardbreds are a rising star of the equestrian world. They were once mostly destined for the slaughterhouse after their time on the harness racing track, but now their potential as a show and sport horse is being realised. At this year's Horse of the Year Show in Hastings, the standardbred show ring was a popular attraction and the breed succeeded in other disciplines as well. The breed originated in the United States and got the name Standardbred because a horse had to better a standard trotting time before being allowed to enter the harness-racing stud book. Kylie Carston travelled from Christchurch for the Show with Petite Ebony - AKA Tony the Pony Carston. "She's actually a retired racehorse that was sadly going to be sent on the dog-tucker truck, so she's a rescue really," Ms Carston said. "They are anything but standard and have the best nature in the world." Zoe Cobb travelled from Cambridge with her steed O'Sheas – AKA Rusty. "I used to work with him," she said. "He raced until he was twelve-and-a-half and then he retired five years ago and became my show hack." Helping to realise the potential of the athletic breed, that is anything but standard physically, is Standardbred Rehoming New Zealand. It re-educates the horses to accept saddles and teaches them it's okay to canter. Standardbred Rehoming spokesperson Diane Wansbrough said they were often used as stock horses but "now people have wised up" to their sport-horse potential. ; Made with funding from By: Patrick O'Sullivan Video Journalist Hawke's Bay/Wairarapa, NZH Local Focus   Reprinted with permission of Hawkes Bay Today

Breedings to Donato Hanover, Art Major, Well Said, Creatine, Pet Rock, McArdle, Guccio, GooGoo GaaGaa, Triumphant Caviar, Sunshine Beach and Artspeak are among the 75+ seasons donated to New Vocations 19th Annual Stallion. Harness Racing Breedings are still being sought and can be added until the auction begins. The auction runs Tues Feb 7th through 2:00 pm Friday Feb 10th at www.ongait.com. The auction is conducted in an Open Ended format that allows for bidding slightly beyond the 2:00 p.m. deadline if less than five minutes have elapsed since the last bid on a particular breeding. Participants are asked to be considerate and not bid for mares over 20 years old, ones that have been barren two or more consecutive years, any that are due after May 15, and those that are already booked. View a list of breedings here New Vocations is the largest racehorse adoption program in North America accepting over 400 retired racehorses each year. Proceeds from this stallion auction go toward the rehabilitation, retraining, and placement of retired Standardbreds. "We would like to thank all the stallion donors for their generous support," said Executive Director Dot Morgan. "They enable us to provide rehabilitative care for these horses and equip them with crucial skills prior to placing them in qualified homes. Every horse we adopt becomes an ambassador for the breed." FMI contact dot@horseadoption.com or call (937) 947-4020. Dot Morgan  

An exciting new series dedicated to Standardbred Breeding is coming to Trackside next week. It has been named 'Standard Bred'. Sheldon Murtha, a member of the Canterbury Standardbred Breeders Association and well-known broadcaster, approached The Breeders with the idea of a TV series as a possible gap in the market, and something that could give our breeding industry a much needed push in terms of mainstream coverage. What has materialised is incredibly exciting, with two seasons of six 30 minute episodes about standardbred breeding to be produced by Sheldon this year with the first season airing on Trackside 1 October 4th (Tuesday) at 7:30pm. It will continue every Tuesday at 7:30pm thereafter. “Being on the Canterbury Standardbred Breeders Association they were looking to allocate some money to marketing such as websites and magazines. I stuck my oar in and said well why don’t we try and fund or make a standardbred breeding show to at least put us alongside the thoroughbreds in terms of mainstream representation.” “I bumped into Mary Anne Twentyman at the thoroughbred sales and ran it past her to gauge Trackside’s interest. What they were after being strapped for time was for somebody to come up with a concept and the money to push it through. So what started as an idea for getting Trackside to produce a show turned into let’s get Sheldon to do it!” Sheldon Murtha is no stranger to trackside and the racing public having held various broadcasting roles over the years. “The shows are being supported by the breeding industry to start with, and the show is a world first which is exciting. There’s no standardbred breeding show anywhere. It’s got plenty of legs and it can go where it likes and potentially go a long way to globalizing the sport. The breeding side of the industry has gone a long way in terms of globalizing the product in the last ten years. “Places like North America and more recently the trotting in Europe have become more intertwined with down under with the transported semen and access to their top stallions. “We have become increasingly connected so there is an aim to reflect that and put New Zealand harness racing up there as world class product that is equal to anything anywhere.” For those who have seen the thoroughbred model of Bred to Win, you can rest assured in the fact you won’t be put to sleep with boring advertorials from our major studs. “We’ve gone with an approach of making the series more of a Country Calendar style affair, to tell the human interest stories of breeders around the country who often wouldn’t get their time in the sun and allow them to tell their story. It’s a great way of capturing the enthusiasm and passion that is abundant in the breeding industry.” Doing anything mainstream requires cash in the bank, and without the support of numerous industry participants, HRNZ and the four breeders associations, none of the above would have been possible. With the show being able to be disseminated through our online channels, and also the likelihood of being picked up in Australia for their Sky Racing channels, we are immensely excited at the prospect of showcasing our product in the modern and professional sphere of television. A massive thanks must go to the following for their financial support of the series; Alabar Stud Breckon Farms Canterbury Standardbred Breeders Assn Dancingonmoonlight Farm Harness Racing New Zealand Lincoln Farms Nevele R Stud North Island Standardbred Breeders Assn Southland Standardbred Breeders Assn Stallions Australasia Woodlands Stud HRNZ News

According to HRNZ, New Zealanders are breeding better quality horses. While breeding numbers are slightly down, from around 2690 last year to 2520 this year, the breeding industry isn't in dire straits like many think. The slight decline can be attributed to a major shift from breeders to produce a higher quality product, with a significant commercial value.  With sire fees going up, many breeders are cutting back their broodmare numbers to focus on better bred mares, who have shown ability on the track. Leading sire Bettor's Delight served 289 mares this season, while Christian Cullen has dropped to just he 45 mares this season.  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ The Shane Tritton trained 2yo High Rolling will not make the Harness Jewels trip.  While stablemate Arms Of An Angel ,Kevin Pizzuto trained Heza Bromac and the Craig Demmler trained My Kiwi Mate are the only confirmed Australian invites to the Cambridge Harness Jewels. The focus has shifted to the trotting sections with HRNZ's Racing Manager Darrin Williams working on several runners and awaiting responses. The David Aiken trained 3yo trotter Princess Phoenix will not make the trip, although her stablemate Eljaykay Phoenix is still a chance of making the trip to complete against Monbet and Sunny Ruby in the 4yo Ruby.  Connections will sit down with the Aiken’s this afternoon to make a decision on their first jewels trip. Andrew Fitzgerald

An auction of more than 70 breedings is scheduled for onGait.com from 8:00 am on Tuesday, January 26th through 8:00 pm on Thursday, January 28th. The process is simple and easy, and bids will also be gladly accepted by contacting SRF at 732-446-4422 during that time. Winning bidders will be required to make a 10% deposit with the balance due at live foal.   A Rocknroll Dance Allamerican Native Angus Hall Art Official Artiscape Badlands Hanover Badlands Nitro Beatitude Big Jim Calchips Brute Cash Hall Chapter Seven Class Included Classic Card Shark Conway Hall Cr Excalibur Dejarmbro Delmarvelous Detour Hanover Deweycheatumnhowe Diamond Goal Dream Away Feelin Friskie Four Starz Rombro Fred & Ginger Glidemaster He's Watching Holiday Road Hypnotic Blue Chip I Can Only Imagine Lisa Mara Lucky Chucky Mach Three McArdle Mister Big Net Ten Eom Nuclear Breeze Philos Hanover Ponder Possess The Will Powerful Toy RockNRoll Heaven Rusty's For Real Shark Gesture So Surreal Sports Writer Stormin Normand Straight Shooting Sweet Lou Tarver Hanover The Fraternity Plan Thinking Out Loud Three Olives Trixton Toughofthetoughest We Will See Well Said Western Hero Western Shore Western Vintage Wishing Stone World of Rocknroll Yankee Cruiser For 26 years the most important annual fundraiser for the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) has been the donation and sale of breedings. Dedicated to Standardbreds exclusively, SRF has 208 trotters and pacers in need of homes, nearly 200% more than any other organization.   Breeding donations are appreciated throughout the season and will be available for sale if received after the auction closes. To gift or purchase breedings or for other inquires on the auction process, please contact Tammy at 732 446-4422, or email Admin@srfmail.com. Donations of breedings are tax-deductible and help rehabilitate, rescue, retrain, adopt, and follow-up every adoption for life, as well as support SRF's Youth Programs. Support of this vital fundraiser is greatly appreciated.   Standardbred Retirement Foundation | 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101 | Millstone Twp. | NJ | 08535

An auction of more than 70 breedings is scheduled for onGait.com from 8:00 am on Tuesday, January 26th through 8:00 pm on Thursday, January 28th. The process is simple and easy and bids will also be gladly accepted by contacting SRF at 732-446-4422 during that time. Winning bidders will be required to make a 10% deposit with the balance due at live foal. Below is the preliminary list.   All American Native Angus Hall Art Official Artiscape Badlands Hanover Badlands Nitro Big Jim Calchips Brute Cash Hall Chapter Seven Class Included Dejarmbro Conway Hall Classic Card Shark CR Excalibur Delmarvalous Detour Hanover Deweycheatumnhow Diamond Goal Dream Away Four Starz Robro Fred and Ginger Glide Master He's Watching Holiday Road Hypnotic Blue Chip I Can Only Imagine Lis Mara Lucky Chucky Mach Three McArdle Mister Big Net Ten Eom Nuclear Breeze Philos Hanover Powerful Toy Possess the will Rock N Roll Heaven Rusty's for Real Shark Gesture So Surreal Sportswriter Stormin Normand Three Olives Tarver Hanover Straight Shooting The Fraternity Pan Trixton Thinking Out Loud Tuffofthetoughest We Will See Well Said Western Hero Western Shore Western Vintage Wishing Stone World of RocknRoll Yankee Cruiser   For 26 years the most important annual fundraiser for the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) has been the donation and sale of breedings. Dedicated to Standardbreds exclusively, SRF has 208 trotters and pacers in need of homes, nearly 200% more than any other organization.   Breeding donations are appreciated throughout the season and will be available for sale if received after the auction closes. To gift or purchase breedings or for other inquires on the auction process, please contact Tammy at 732 446-4422, or email Admin@srfmail.com. Donations of breedings are tax-deductible and help rehabilitate, rescue, retrain, adopt, and follow-up every adoption for life, as well as support SRF's Youth Programs. Support of this vital fundraiser is greatly appreciated.     Standardbred Retirement Foundation | 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101 | Millstone Twp. | NJ | 08535

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