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Vincennes, France – The maiden visit to the Hippodrome Paris-Vincennes was an amazing experience to this first-time visiting American. And I never saw a horse on the track. There was no live racing today because the entire grandstand area was jammed packed with exhibits for the Prix d’Amerique Horse Expo plus outside was the annual ARQANA Trot horse sale. Just about anything you could imagine for your horse was there and so were the people, hundreds of people, visiting the booths, socializing with friends and business acquaintances, making deals for stallion breeding’s. They had just about everything that you could want for your horse and then some. And there was champagne, not just bottles, cases and more. Of the 100 or so exhibits I think 70% of them offered perspective business associates’ champagne. And we all drank some. Well, more than just some. I also saw tons of empty bottles stacked or being tossed out. “When you are in France, you drink champagne,” said Filip Van Hauwermeiren, a top breeder and trainer from Belgium who owns Star Breeding. “It is actually less expensive than bottled water or coke.” Hauwermeiren was promoting his stud farm where he not only has local stallions, but can provide breeders with frozen semen from world champion stallions Father Patrick, Trixton, Southwind Frank, Propulsion and Paster Stephen. There were plenty of stud farms there, along with a huge display from Finn Tack of all the equipment you can imagine from harnesses to jogging and race sulkies. There were horse shoes, feed, track surface materials, even a small backhoe just perfect for the smaller farms. Out of the racetrack, on the apron area you could check out the latest horse vans and trailers. There was even a big display of newest Hippocenter that sells swimming treadmills and water therapy units for horses. They even had the newest portable washing machine called My Groom that is able to clean all horse equipment. Not just a winter blanket that a horse has been rolling in the mud with. But you can even throw in the harness and bridle with the bit and this machine will clean it right up and in many cases all you need is the cleaning soap and a little water. It was just amazing. And, for those of you that are hungry, and we all need some food after drinking all that champagne, then just stop by one of the many concession stands that sold hamburgers and fries or perhaps a two pound lobster, some colossal shrimp, oysters and clams for $100 per person. They had it all there.   Check out the photos as they can tell the story of what this major Expo was all about. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Grosbois, France – Growing up in New Jersey in the USA and getting into the harness racing industry, I was around when they broke ground and built exquisite training facilities at Showplace and Gaitway Farms. But they are not that exquisite when compared to Grosbois, just outside of Paris, France. In fact, there may not be another harness racing training facility in world that could be compared to Grosbois. Upon entering the grounds, the entrance way features wrought-iron 20-foot gates attached to 12-foot walls that encompass the entire facility, which is just over 1,000 acres in size. In the far distance you can see a huge Manor House and green grass and dirt roads, also paths that lead to wooded areas with harness racing trotters galore jogging about. We were greeted at the horsemen’s entrance by Damien Beau, who is with the International Department of LeTROT, that oversees all of trotting in France. He was our guide for the private tour. We first went to the home of renowned Swedish and French trainer Anders Lindqvst, who was so kind to show us his home, his office, and his attached courtyard with maybe 40 stalls filled with trotters. There are no pacers in Europe except for Ireland and England. Linqvist first became interested in harness racing at the age of 14. “I wanted to be a professional soccer player,” Linqvist said. “But someone took me on a jog with a horse and I really liked that. My father wanted me in the family business,” Lindqvist added. “but after I worked with the horses a little, I trained a fast mile and that feeling convinced me to go into harness racing. “My first good horse I got I was age 22,” Lindqvist recalled. “And it was at that point that I said goodbye to working for my father part-time and took up harness racing full time. This horse, which gave me many wins, was at the time, sadly named Mr. Nixon. But despite his name he was my foundation horse. Mr. Nixon raced for me 431 times. That is the all-time record still in Sweden. “Then I was once racing in the Elitloppet in 1985,” Lindqvist said. “And after the race with Viroid (finished 5th) I was contacted by Mr. Lew Barash in the USA, asking me to come and race in the International Trot at Roosevelt Raceway and then I was hooked on international racing. “From there I was on my own for ten years,” Lindqvist explained. Until the great trainer/driver Jean-Pierre Dubois asked me to work for him in France. It was like being invited to be part of the Dream Team in basketball and I have been here ever since.” Lindqvist has driven in 19 countries, even twice in Russia. “When I won my first race in Russia,” Lindqvist said. “I got towards the winner’s enclosure, they stopped me and said they had to take my whip away. This was some security people and I did not understand why. Then I saw that the trophy was going to be presented to me by President Valdimir Putin and realized security would not let anyone get near him with a whip. That was something very special in my life.” Anders home has four bedrooms in addition to the attached 40 horse stalls and he said he pays around $8,000 per month rent for everything. That might seem a lot, but he also rents his spare bedrooms and most of his stalls to other trainers for their horses. He said it is like that throughout Grosbois, although some of the beautiful homes and barn areas are leased by horse owners, who turn around and rent or trade rooms/stalls for trainers and grooms to take care of their horses. Lindqvist also has a coffee vending machine in his office. Why one might ask and Anders jokingly said because during the winter season he has so many visitors he gives away around 4,000 cups of coffee. There are over five miles of just jogging tracks at Grosbois. It also has two tracks that horses can fast work on, a five-eighths mile track and a 15th/16th mile track, where horses can qualify to race at nearby Vincennes Racetrack. They also have an equine hospital on the grounds that is used by some 15 veterinarians. That many vets are needed for the 1,500 racehorses that call Grosbois home throughout the winter season. There are also numerous blacksmith shops on the grounds. At Grosbois, there are about 60 people that work in track maintenance to keep the large grounds clean and the track surfaces in prime shape. They use three different materials that are used on the jogging tracks and horseman use certain courses depending if they want a deep cushion, harder or softer surfaces for the horse’s hooves. You will also see many trotters being ridden at Grosbois as in France they have many trotting races under saddle. This past weekend the richest monte race (monte means under saddle) in the world took place at the Vincennes track with 15 horses racing for a purse of 650,000 euros. There is also a very nice horseman’s cafeteria and a party room on the grounds, tennis courts and soccer fields. The jogging trails also cut through the massive wooded area of Grosbois where people jogging horses have come across wild boar, reindeer, foxes and many birds of prey. The entire area was purchased and developed into the training facility in 1962 and continues to grow. It is 11 miles from the outskirts of Paris and only six miles away from the Vincennes Racetrack. And what if the weather is raining but you still need to work your horse. Then you just head over to the covered training track or perhaps lunge-line your horse at the indoor arena. It’s all at Grosbois. Coming up on Thursday, it’s back to Grosbois we go, this time to visit the special Manor House that is home to the French Trotting Museum and more. by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Paris, France – Not a lot of people can really say in Paris that they know nothing about the Prix d’Amerique race this Sunday at the Hippodrome Paris-Vincennes. It’s on nearly every major street pole intersection throughout this wonderful city. Big, bold and beautiful, a harness racing horse draped in the colors of the American flag. Every year the Prix d’Amerique is the richest race in the world for old trotters, only this year the prestigious event is even bigger as it is the 100th anniversary of this spectacular day of racing. The Grand Prix d’Amerique was created to pay homage to the Americans for the help which they gave to France during the First World War. And every year the French go all out in this special day as a tribute to America. The race card will have 11 races, most of them held in early on. Then it’s parade time with perhaps the greatest display of tribute to America taking place on the track. The drivers are brought in on Harley-Davidson antique motorcycles, stilt-walkers dressed in the Stars and Stripes, the prestigious French Lancers Brigade on horseback and much more will take place. And then there is the actual Prix d’Amerique race. There will be 18 of the world’s top older trotters and sadly no representation from North America this year. These horses will go from a standing start and race 2,700 meters (1.67 miles), up and down a slight hill on the course at breakneck speeds. And, they will be racing for total prize money of 900,000€ euros ($1 million dollars US depending on exchange rate). On the betting side, around $40 million euros ($44.3 million US) will be wagered on Sunday. There will be 40,000 plus people coming out to the racetrack to view the race and all the special festivities that day and approximately 36 countries will broadcast the race on four different continents. It’s a big deal to say the least. And what about the horses that have entered the race. The return winner from last year, Belina Josselyn, is back. She is one of only a handful of mares who will be taking on their male counterparts in the Prix d’Amerique. Jean-Michel Bazire trains and drives Belina Josselyn, who comes into the race off a very impressive triumph two weeks ago in the Grand Prix of Belgium at Paris-Vincennes. The nine-year-old mare by Love You is a career winner of 2,335,470€. Other world class champion trotters in the race include two-time Prix d’Amerique winner, Bold Eagle, who back in October 2019 traveled to Canada and won the Breeders Crown at Mohawk Park; 3.1 million euro winner Propulsion is shipping in from Sweden; 2018 Elitloppet winner Ringostarr Treb will be in the race for trainer Jerry Riordan, Face Time Bourbon, Beillie de Montford and a host of other top flight trotters will be in the race. Also, this week Harnesslink will be reporting from the world class training facility, Grosbois, plus coverage of the horse sale Thursday and Friday, the Standardbred Expo Friday and the superb race cards this Saturday and Sunday at the Hippodrome Paris-Vincennes. It’s been sunny and around 40 in Paris as we toured the wonderful city a bit after landing this morning. There is a possible forecast of rain showers on Sunday and it is hopeful that will change later this week. Our hotel, the Pullman in Bercy Centre, is sold out this weekend as are other hotels in the area as the hype begins to build for the big race day on Sunday. Here are the leading 25 horses for the Prix d'Amerique. This number will get reduced to 18, By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Delray Beach, FL - A great unofficial opening day was had by all who attended the Saturday morning On The Deck viewing of two and three-year-old trotters and pacers in training at Sunshine Meadows Equestrian Village.   More than 50 people came out to On The Deck with some bringing their own lawn chairs to sit under the big tree at the finish wire and watch the training sessions. It was a sunny morning with a warm breeze at around 84 degrees.   For those with an appetite, there were bagels and flagels and cream cheese, butter, coffee and fruit salad, all compliments of Myron and Stephanie Bell.   And for those with a eye for horseflesh marveled as they saw Maverick out on the track. The $1.1 million Father Patrick yearling, now a magnificent looking two-year-old, continues to impress everyone that sees him. He is being trained by Tony Alagna. There was also talk about how Maverick's full brother, Greenshoe, who was voted Three-Year-Old Trotting Colt of the Year by the U.S. Harness Writers Association that was announced last night and has a great chance to be named Trotter of the Year.   Hall of Famer Jimmy Takter was out on the racetrack jogging some of the two-year-old's. Prominent local horseman Tom Merriman, talked about how he has just retired from training horse after 60 plus years. Tom is one of the few remaining horsemen who was at Pompano Park when it first opened in 1964.   Missing from the lineup of regulars was Murray Brown. Jeffrey Bell said that the 2020 Roster Book will be back from the printers this week, so they will be available come Saturday. Also there was Mike Saunders, who was a New York Knicks trainer for 25 years.   Other that were at On The Deck included Ted Smith, Robert Goldstein, Bob Marks, Jerry Glance, Ron Gurfein, Christina Takter, Eric and Lisa Cherry, Vicki Howard, Nick Salvi, Steve Oldford, Joe Pennacchio, and many others.   by Steve Wolf, for On The Deck  

Former world champion and Harness Horse of the Year (2015), Wiggle It Jiggleit, returned to the winner's circle after over a three-year absense due to injuries. Driven by Montrell Teague, victory came in his third start back to the races, capturing the 12th race $30,000 Invitational Pace at Dover Downs in Dover, Delaware. It was back on October 15, 2016 when Wiggle It Jiggleit last won at harness racing. It was the $250,000 Invitational Pace at Yonkers Raceway. On this Thursday evening with regular driver Montrell Teague back in the sulky, Wiggle It Jiggleit started from post two in the eight-horse field. For Teague, it was his return to the races after suffering a broken wrist over two months ago and it was also his 29th birthday Thursday. The race started with 38-1 long shot, Larry Karr (Mike Cole) leaving like a rocket from the far outside post 8 and took command of the field with Wiggle It Jiggleit settling into second place. They paced by the opening quarter mile in :27. Slick Tony (Ross Wolfenden) was stuck on the outside in seventh and started to move up as the field past the half mile marker in :55.3. Then, as Larry Karr was reaching the three-quarters, Teague pulled the pocket with Wiggle It Jittleit and came after the race leader as they past the three-quarters in 1:23.3. Wiggle It Jiggleit went right by Larry Karr and with Slick Tony on his back, cleared to a two-length lead at the top of the stretch and held command on the field through the wire, winning by one and one-half lengths in 1:51. Slick Tony was second with Bo Mach (Corey Callahan) third.   Trained by Clyde Francis for owners George Teague, Jr. and the Teague Racing Partnership, it was the first start of the yeawr for the eight-year-old gelded son of Mr Wiggle. Wiggle It Jiggleit has lifetime earnings of $3.9 million. His lifetime record is 1:47.2. Wiggle It Jiggleit paid $7.60 to win. by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Wiggle It Jiggleit had another tough mile in his harness racing comeback trail, finishing sixth in the $30,000 Open Handicap Pace Thursday at Dover Downs. The 12th race feature was won by New Zealander Billy Badger N in an upset score. Wiggle It Jiggleit and driver Jim Morand were able to get to the lead by the opening quarter mile in :26 over Bo Mach (Corey Callahan). Stuck on the outside from the start was the race favorite, Dealt A Winner (George Napolitano, Jr.), who started coming after Wiggle It Jiggleit with Larry Karr (Mike Cole) second-over. Then in the backstretch, Cole came three-wide with Larry Karr as Quality Bud (Victor Kirby) followed their cover and Larry Karr cleared to challenge Wiggle It Jiggleit at the three-quarters in 1:21.4. Wiggle It Jiggleit began to fade, Larry Karr took the lead and there was Billy Badger N tipping three-wide and coming on. Quality Bud overtook Larry Karr in the stretch but could not hold off Billy Badger N, who won by a slim nose over Quality Bud with Larry Karr third. The time of the mile was 1:50.   It was a lifetime mark for New Zealand import Billy Badger N, a six-year-old gelding by Art Major, who is not only driven by but is also owned by Dexter Dunn. He is trained by Nifty Norman and paid $23.00 to win. Wakizashi Hanover was reunited with trainer Jim King, Jr and driver Tim Tetrick as they captured the fourth race $15,000 pace in a photo finish. The seven-year-old gelded son of Dragon Again had been “off-the-shelf” for six months and then qualified and raced in of all place, Truro Raceway in Nova Scotia, Canada (His owners live there). He won his first start and then was off for five months until returning to the King Stable. Wakizashi Hanover was given a perfect drive by Tetrick. As Bro Hanover (Dexter Dunn) cut the mile, Lyons King (Mike Cole) had the pocket seat through early fractions of :26.4 and :55.1. Then the action heated up as Abner The Great (George Napolitano, Jr.) came first-up with Wakizashi Hanover second-over past the three-quarters in 1:23.4. On the final turn Wakizashi Hanover tipped three-wide and then it was a five-horse dash to the wire with Wakizashi Hanover winning by a nose over Lyons King with 99-1 long shot Quick Shot (Jonathan Roberts) photo bombing the photo finish for show. The fifth place horse was a half length off the winner.   Undefeated in two starts in 2019, Wakizashi Hanover is owned by Bruce Kennedy, Percy Bonnell, Wayne Burley and Jennifer Weeks, all of Nova Scotia. He paid $8.20 to win. Slick Tony ($4.80) swept three-wide on the backstretch for driver Dexter Dunn, collared pacesetter Late Mail N (George Napolitano, Jr.) and then held off a late charge by Little Ben (Tim Tetrick) by a nose to win the $27,500 Blue Hen Open Pace.   It was the 16th win this year for the four-year-old son of No Spin Zone. He covered the one-mile race in 1:50.3 for owner and trainer George Leager of Sudlersville, MD. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Auckland, NZ - John Curtin, founder and CEO of Harnesslink has announced that a team of harness racing journalists from North America and Europe will be in Paris, France the last week of January, 2020, to provide coverage of the prestigious Prix d’Amerique trotting classic.  With a purse of 900,000€ ($1 million US), the Prix d’Amerique is one of the richest Standardbred races in the world and is held annually at the Hippodrome Paris-Vincennes. The race was first held in 1920 and it was developed as a tribute to America for its aid to France in World War I. Heading the Harnesslink team going to Paris is harness racing Hall of Fame Communicator, Steve Wolf. Wolf, who resides in Florida, has been Harnesslink’s Director of Operations for the past seven years and prior was the head of racing operations and publicity at Pompano Park and head of publicity at Freehold Raceway. “I have been fortunate in my career to have covered all the major harness races held in North America and also the Elitloppet in Sweden,” Wolf said. “But I have never covered the Prix d’Amerique in person and I think this will be one of the greatest weeks of my life. We have a top team assembled and promise to provide race fans around the world with full coverage of the events leading to and on Prix d’Amerique race day, January 26.” Providing the Social Media coverage will be the world-renowned Heather Vitale from Delaware.  Whether it is Facebook, Instagram, tweeting or any other social media platform, when you look up harness racing, there is Heather Vitale. Vitale will be covering the Prix d’Amerique for the first time and is over the top excited to be going to Paris. “When Steve Wolf called and asked if I would come to France and cover the Prix d’Amerique,” Vitale exclaimed. “I was in total shock. Then I asked him what the dates were and when he told me (and there were no conflicts), I said Yeah Baby, I’m going to Paris! “I have covered harness racing around the world,” Vitale said. “But this is Paris, the superb food, flowing champagne, the night life, the museums, the shopping….oh yes, and the great harness racing too. This won’t be work for me.” Plans call for trips to the world-renowned training center, Grosbois, just outside of Paris, where most of the horses racing in the Prix d’Amerique will be headquartered. Grosbois is also the home of the Trotting Museum in France. Coverage will also include Thursday and Friday evening at the Grand Prix Horse Auction and also, on Friday, the Standardbred Expo featuring trotting professionals, stud farms, equipment suppliers, associations and foreign trotting federations. Taking photographs for Team Harnesslink will be Scotland’s Sarah Thomas. Thomas, a consummate horsewoman, who first started out as a reporter for Harnesslink, will be covering all the events of the big weekend with her camera and video. This past year she won the World Trotting Conference Media Award for best Film/Video. “I have been to Vincennes twice,” Thomas said. “But never in a working capacity nor for the Prix d’Amerique. This will be very exciting and knowing both Steve Wolf and Heather Vitale, it will be a pleasure to be able to work with them again.” The final member of the Harnesslink Team lives right in Paris and is none other than renowned trainer Anders Lindqvist. The Swedish-born, French trainer has his stable at Grosbois Training Center. Linquest speaks fluent English, French and Swedish and will assist the Harnesslink Team with any translations needed as Wolf, Vitale and Thomas do not speak a word of French. “I first met Steve Wolf via Facebook and then at the Elitloppet in Sweden years ago and we became instant friends,” said Lindqvist. “I look forward to helping these young professionals to bring the Prix d’Amerique race coverage world-wide from France.” “The Prix d’Amerique is so prestigious,” Said Harnesslink’s John Curtin. “it really has no equal in the harness racing world and deserves the best coverage possible. Not only does the race draw over 40,000 race fans, but they wager on average, 31 million euros ($34.5 million US) on the afternoon program. Plus, there is all the pageantry and parades before the start of the race card. It really is a premier event with week-long activities.” Updates for the Team Harnesslink Prix d’Amerique 2020 coverage will be forthcoming. From Harnesslink Media

A lot of harness racing fans were glued to Dover Downs Thursday as their 12th race $25,000 Open Pace featured the once again return of 2015 Harness Horse of the Year, Wiggle It Jiggleit. Most fans would be very disappointed. As Bo Mach (Corey Callahan) and Larry Karr (Mike Cole) left out of the starting gait along with Wiggle It Jiggleit (Jim Morand in the bike as Montrell Teague was away) trying to leave some and then Morand snatched him up into fourth place. Larry Karr took the lead away from Bo Mach by the opening quarter mile in :26.4. Then they raced to the half mile in :55.3 and just as you would think that Morand would come first-over with Wiggle It Jiggleit, they sat in as Rock Lights (George Napolitano, Jr.) came first-over with Billy Badger N (Dexter Dunn) second-over. As they raced down the backstretch it looked as if Wiggle It Jiggleit almost went off-stride as they backed to the back of the pack. Meanwhile, Larry Karr was strong on the lead with Bo Mach in the pocket at the three-quarters in 1:23.4. Off the final turn, Callahan moved to the outside with Bo Mach and gunned down Larry Karr coming to the wire, winning by a long neck in 1:51.1. Billy Badger N was third.   As for Wiggle It Jiggleit, he finished seventh, race timed in 1:52.3. Sent off at odds of 38-1, Bo Mach scored a lifetime mark and his eighth win of the year. The four-year-old gelding by Mach Three is trained by Dylan Davis and owned by Howard Taylor and Thomas Lazzaro. He paid $79.00 to win. In the 10th race $27,500 Blue Hen Open Handicap, Late Mail N and driver George Napolitano, Jr. sat the pocket trip as Sicily (Victor Kirby) cut fractions of :26.2, :55.3 and 1:23 to the three-quarters. Race favorite, Slick Tony (Dexter Dunn) had come up first-over at the half but could not really gain ground on the leaders. Blazing Bobby Sox (Art Stafford, Jr.) was second-over and then fanned out three-wide on the final turn.   As soon as they could, Napolitano sent Late Mail N into the passing lane and in deep stretch collared Sicily and went on to win by a half-length in 1:50.4. Sicily was second with Slick Tony nosing out Blazing Bobby Sox for third place. It was a lifetime mark for Late Mail N. The six-year-old gelded son of Bettor’s Delight is trained by Michael Hall for the Claim To Fame Stable of Dagsboro, DE. Sent off at 28-1 odds, Late Mail N paid $59.20 to win. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

JK First Lady and driver Yannick GIngras used outside cover and came on in the stretch to best Rocknificent at the wire in the $411,000 Three Diamonds Final for two-year-old harness racing pacing fillies. The daughter of Western Ideal, the first foal from the Harness Horse of the Year mare, JK She's A Lady, who also won this race in 2014, covered the one mile race in a lifetime best record of 1:49.2, which was also the track and stakes record. She is trained by Nancy Takter and owned and was bred by the 3 Brothers Stable of New York, NY. She paid $8.20 to win. Rocknificent was second with Lyons Sentinel third. by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink  

Always A Prince and driver Yannick Gingras stole the show in the $350,000 TVG Open Pace Final Saturday at the Meadowlands. Starting from post eight, Yannick sent the four-year-old gelding by Always A Virgin right to the front and never looked back. The duo held the field at bay and then pulled away in the stretch for a 1:48.2 triumph. He is trained by Tyler George and is owned by Carl and Melanie Atley of Xenia, Ohio. He paid $12.00 to win. Bettor's Wish was second with American History third. "It was the first time I ever drove him was tonight," said Yannick Gingras. "He was really nice to drive." by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink  

Papi Rob Hanover and driver Dave Miller posted their fifth straight harness racing win with a three and one-half length triumph in the $401,850 Governor's Cup Final for two-year-old pacing colts at the Meadowlands Saturday. The son of Somebeachsomewhere is trained by Brett Pelling and owned by David McDuffee of Delray Beach, FL. He paid $2.20 to win.  Father Nuno was second with Cattlewash third. "It was pretty easy tonight," said David Miller. by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink  

From excavating and building ponds to running a feed mill, raising chickens, selling eggs and now breeding and raising top Standardbred harness racing trotters and pacers, the Hagemeyer Family is going strong in Ohio. Their farm, located in Clarksville, OH, now boasts three top harness racing stallions and their breeding operation is second to none in Ohio. Currently the Hagemeyer Farm stands world champion and million-dollar winner, Break The Bank K, the highest money winning pacer in Ohio, Western Terror, and the super-well bred and million dollar winner, Nob Hill High.   “We are a full-service Equine Boarding, Breeding and Foal Care Facility,” said farm manager Scott Hagemeyer. “We are a four generation, family owned and operated, Standardbred horse farm located in Southwest Ohio. “Our farm offers a 1/2-mile training track as an added amenity. Although,” Hagemeyer adds. “Standardbreds are our specialty; we board a variety of breeds. We take great pride in offering personalized attention to every horse. We care for every horse, as if they were our own. We offer impeccable service at a fair value to our client. That is our number one goal.” The current pride and joy on the farm is the pacing stallion Nob Hill High. The Hagemeyer’s have five yearlings in the upcoming Blooded Horse Sale (November 19th), all sired by Nob Hill High. Their pedigrees can be viewed on the farm website, www.hagemeyerfarms.com. “From just two seasons of limited foals,” Scott Hagemeyer said. “Nob Hill High has done fantastic. His foals look great and now have made their marks on the racetrack.” Giggles In Dreams is the top foal from Nob Hill High. She is a three-year-old this season that earned $265,000 with a record of 1:50.1. And there is the colt High On Paydaze, a $235,000 winner who won at age 2 in 1:53.1 and now at age three has a record of 1:51.3. Also, doing well is Snobbytown, who has a record of 1:51 and earnings of $160,000 and the list continues from just two small crops. “Hagemeyer Farms was very proud of High On Paydaze (son of Nob Hill High),” Scott said. “He was the 2018 OHHA Two-Year-Old Pacing Colt of the Year and Lane of Stone (Sired by Wishing Stone) was the 2018 OHHA Two-Year-Old Trotting colt of the year. Both colts were bred, born and raised here at our farm.  “Additionally, Scott added. “Stanford Court, 2019 winner of Ohio Sire Stakes Consolation (son of Nob Hill High) was bred, born and raised here at our farm too. We take a lot of pride in the success of our foals.” The Hagemeyer Farm is conveniently located minutes off I-71 approximately 35 minutes North of Cincinnati and 70 miles South of Columbus. Hagemeyer Farms is less than 20 minutes from the Warren County, Clinton County and Greene County Fairgrounds and the new Miami Valley Gaming Racino. Maynard Hagemeyer bought into the family farm with his dad in 1947. With his Dad's death in 1948, it was up to Maynard and his wife Stella to keep the farm going. They tried their hand at Excavating and Pond building, Anhydrous Ammonia and Fertilizer, running a feed mill, and raising 6,000 chickens and selling eggs. In 1957, Maynard traded a few burros for a stud pony and eventually for a Standard bred Mare, Miss Windale. Miss Windale foaled some nice colts that propelled him further into harness racing. Eventually, Maynard built the farm racetrack and started training and driving. At his peak, there were between 68 and 98 horses in training annually, including 30+ yearlings. Finally, he began breeding with his first stud, Billy Jo Byrd. Stella, in addition to helping manage the farm business, served 28 years as race secretary for the OCRA fair stakes. Maynard and Stella's 4 kids grew up helping with the farm and horses. Mel, Fred, Della and Ted were all involved in harness racing as grooms, trainers or drivers. Mel recently retired as Program Director and General Manager of Lebanon Raceway after 45 years. Mel also represents Harness Racing on the Warren County Fair Board and owns several broodmares. Scott Hagemeyer, Mel's oldest son, is the current farm manager. Scott has been a groom, trainer, owner and breeder for over 20 years. He takes great pride in continuing the family business with the same strong ethics and hard work approach that has proven successful for all these years. Scott has been a Director of the OHHA Board Breeders section since 2015.  The Hagemeyer’s are very proud of their high conception rate for mares boarded at and bred by Hagemeyer Farms. Lyndsay Hagemeyer, Scott's daughter,is a great help with the farm operations.  From stallion collection, inseminations, foaling assistance and daily care, she is an asset that is second to none.  They are very excited that Lyndsay was accepted to The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

With the late scratches of both McWicked and This Is The Plan, all eyes were on harness racing favorite American History in the $100,000 Potomac Pace at Rosecroft Raceway Sunday night. Racing fans were treated to an exciting upset finish as the starting gate pulled away for the start of the ninth race feature. It was Dorsoduro Hanover (Matt Kakaley) first to show with Dealt A Winner (David Miller) grabbing the pocket spot and American History (Joe Bongiorno) moving up on the outside to the opening quarter mile in :27.1. American History cleared to the front and led the field to the half mile in :54.2. Then in the backstretch, Endeavor and driver Tim Tetrick) came first-over and starting grinding his way towards the leaders at the three-quarters in 1:21.2. At the top of the stretch, American History still had a one length lead with Endeavor coming on. Then in a classic stretch drive, Endeavor and Tetrick got by American History and then held off Dealt A Winner to win by a neck in 1:49.4. American History was third by a half length in the three-horse dash to the wire. Sent off at odds of 11-1, Endeavor posted his sixth win of the season. The six-year-old gelded son of American Ideal is trained by Jeff Cullipher, who co-owns him with Pollack Racing, LLC. He paid $24.60 to win. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Two of the top harness racing horses scheduled to race tonight in the $100,000 Potomac Pace at Rosecroft Raceway have been scratched. McWicked was scratched due to a fever reported trainer Casie Coleman-Hearty. "I wanna apologize to the fans who were hoping to see Mcwicked at Rosecroft tonight. He has been in Jersey over a week and been great, he was great this am. His caretaker went to go get him a bit ago to ship for tonight and he hadn't ate his lunch (very unusual for wicked he eats everything). He felt warm so he checked his temp and he was high, even used a second thermometer both read the same. "Sadly we do gotta do what’s right for him and scratch him tonight. The vet came in on a Sunday pulled blood and treating his temp and I’m sure he will hopefully get over this quick and be able to still go to the TVG."   Also scratched from the same race is Ron Burke's This Is The Plan. Top four-year-old this year became the fastest horse ever in Canada on a half mile track with a 1:49.1 record in the $200,000 Prix d'Ete at Trois-Rivieres.    by Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink

Harrisburg, PA — The Standardbred Horse Sale got off to a record start Monday (Nov. 4) at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex as the opening session set a record for average price and saw its gross increase by more than $3 million compared to 2018. Trotting filly Gangsta Rat (#45) was the day’s top seller, as the Muscle Hill daughter went for $550,000 to Ake Svanstedt on behalf of S R F Stable, and a total of 12 yearlings reached at least $300,000. The sale grossed $19.2 million for 169 horses, an increase of 20.7 percent from last year’s $15.9 million for 170 horses, and averaged $113,976, an increase of 21.8 percent compared to last year’s $93,541. Other top sellers Monday were trotting colt Take This Society for $475,000 to Diamond Creek Farm, trotting colt Glacier Hanover for $470,000 to Jeffrey Snyder, and trotting colt Spy Booth for $460,000 to agent Bryan Montgomery on behalf of a group of owners and trainer Per Engblom. Filly pacer Panda Hanover, purchased by Dana Parham, and filly trotter The Ice Countess, purchased by Tony Alagna, both sold for $400,000. The big numbers in Harrisburg follow a record-breaking Lexington Selected Sale in October, which included the sport’s first million-dollar yearlings. “It’s a fantastic sale so far,” Standardbred Horse Sale President and CEO Pete Spears said. “I’m sure this (average) is an all-time record for us. “Lexington was fantastic, the economy hasn’t changed, people are feeling good. There’s a lot of good news in harness racing. There’s money in New Jersey, the Ohio program is coming up, there are new developments in Illinois and even in Nevada. Everything is good right now. “I had hoped we would do equally well, and we have.” Trotting fillies, trotting colts, and pacing colts all posted six-figure averages Monday. Trotting fillies led the way with a $154,848 average for 33 followed by trotting colts at $124,851 for 47 and pacing colts at $100,939 for 49. “People were here doing their homework on Saturday,” Spears said. “All the big-money people were looking very closely at horses. It wasn’t just a lot of last-minute lookers today. I got a lot of feedback all day about how much underbidders regretted not getting the horse of their choice in many cases today. “The trotters (were strong). If it was a nice trotter, it sold wonderfully. It’s been such a good thing here in America that the Swedes have become so interested in breeding over here, selling over here, buying and racing over here. “I think (Tuesday) will be very strong. There are a lot more horses on Tuesday that would have been Monday horses last year, so there are going to be some really nice yearlings available.” Gangsta Rat, by Muscle Hill out of Order By Wish, is a full sister to this season’s Earl Beal Jr. Memorial winner Marseille, also trained by Svanstedt. Gangsta Rat was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Stefan Balazsi’s Order By Stable. “He is a very nice horse,” said Svanstedt, who noted it was the highest-priced yearling he ever purchased. “His pedigree is very good, a good family on the mother’s side, and Muscle Hill. He had good conformation; everything was good. He had everything I like with a horse.”  Take This Society, by Muscle Hill out of Thatsnotmyname, is a half-brother to stakes-winner Basquiat from the family of 2010 Hambletonian winner Muscle Massive. Like Gangsta Rat, he was consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Order By Stable. “I love the fact the breeder was a big fan of the horse,” Diamond Creek’s Adam Bowden said. “I think when the breeder is behind a horse like this, it makes buying a horse that much easier. Stefan is a great guy; he’s had great success and his families are hot. It’s hard not to think that this is the next big thing. “We want to take more prominent pieces in some of these horses before they become multi-million-dollar horses.” Glacier Hanover, by Father Patrick out of Global Desire, was the day’s penultimate horse to pass through the auction ring. The colt is from the family of 2006 U.S. Horse of the Year Glidemaster. He was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. Jim Campbell will train the trotter for Snyder.  “I had him for 400, we got carried away, but let’s hope for the best,” Snyder said. “He’s a beautiful horse. The mare is a full sister to Glidemaster. Hopefully we’ll have luck. We got one other trotter (No Ball Games Rat for $300,000). This one and the other were our two favorite ones.” Spy Booth, the third of the top-four sellers consigned by Concord Stud Farm and bred by Order By Stable, is by Muscle Hill out of Amour Heiress. He is a full brother to stakes-winner King Alphonso out of the family of 2014 Hambletonian winner Trixton. “He was big and strong, well built,” Engblom said. “We trained the mom with Jimmy (Takter) and the pedigree is great. His full brother is one of the best 2-year-olds out there. What’s not to like. “It was a little bit more than we wanted to pay but sometimes you’ve got to stretch a little bit to get the ones (you want). We did good in Lexington. This is the first one we’re getting today. We’ve been bidding on a couple other ones. You’ve got to get the ones you like; get quality horses, not just a lot of horses. We’ve been keeping our eye on him. He’s a nice colt.” Panda Hanover, by Somebeachsomewhere out of Panera Hanover, is a full sister to stakes-winner Papi Rob Hanover. She was consigned and bred by Hanover Shoe Farms. Parham will turn over the training duties to Alagna. Alagna also will train The Ice Countess, by Muscle Hill out of The Ice Queen for a group of owners. The filly is a full sister to stakes-winners Ice Attraction and The Ice Dutchess and her family includes Southwind Serena, the dam of Dan Patch Award-winner Mission Brief and stakes-winner Tactical Landing. The Ice Countess was consigned by Preferred Equine and bred by Stephen Dey III and David Reid. “Dana is trying to buy top-end pacing fillies,” Alagna said. “He bought Panda Hanover and he bought the sister to Tall Drink Hanover (Takeway Hanover for $225,000), so that’s kind of what he’s doing. “(The Ice Countess) is a beautiful filly. She’s got so much residual (value) as a broodmare based on the fact she’s got Mission Brief on the second dam plus the two fillies that have already hit. There is so much upside for this filly either way. If she just does a little bit of something on the track her value is going to stay where it’s at. “I’ve been blessed every year. I’ve got great support; we buy great horses. But we work hard at it to try to find them too. We spend a lot of time looking, going to the farms. I’m very lucky to have people that support what we want to do.” The yearling portion of the sale resumes Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. The final day for yearlings is Wednesday, also beginning at 10. To view the full results of the Monday session or the upcoming catalogue, please click here. For a video recap of the opening session, click here. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Delray Beach, FL - The International Equine Network has launched a unique video/podcast network, featuring live and taped broadcast of domestic and international equestrian events of all breeds. The International Equine Network (IEN) will feature up to ten different equine programs weekly on its website, www.ientv.org and will also be available for listening on www.Iheartradio.com. Scott Miller, who works at Sunshine Meadows Equestrian Village in Delray Beach, is the founder of IEN, a project he has worked on for years. "I was always amazed that there were so many aspects of working with horses," Miller explained. "And I was fortunate to have worked during my career in many different equine disciplines. I wanted to create a network where anyone could watch, listen and learn about all the different types of horse events. There are so many great and wonderful stories about horses and what they can do. There was no single way to watch and learn about them. That's how IEN was conceived." Miller produces the programing for IEN in his studio at Sunshine Meadows, which is home, during the snowbird season, to more than 1,000 horses at its three facilities. Thoroughbred, Standardbred, Show, Dressage, Jumping, and Pleasure Horse training are all conducted at Sunshine Meadows. Once recorded, the shows are edited and distributed via www.bbsradio.com in California. The different programs that will be offered include INTERNATIONAL EQUINE REPORT (world equine news), CHUCKKER (Polo), AT THE WIRE (Thoroughbred racing), QUEST FOR GOLD (Equestrian World), FLYING TURNS (Standardbred harness racing), QUARTER TIME (Quarter horse racing), ZERO TO TEN (Dressage), LAST CALL (Auctions/sales), and CHUCK WAGON (what do the top horses and their trainers eat?). There will also be a FARM OF THE WEEK and EQUESTRIAN OF THE WEEK features, plus the MOVIE OF THE WEEK which will be a different horse-based full-length feature film available to view. The host for the IEN shows is Les Saltzman, who has been a successful Thoroughbred and Standardbred owner and trainer, Radio Talk Show host, Equisport reporter and national broadcaster. Also, on the IEN Team is Steve Wolf, internationally known harness racing publicist and marketing guru, former Standardbred breeder, owner, caretaker and currently editor of Harnesslink.com. He is an inductee of the Harness Racing Hall of Fame as a Communicator. Wolf will be handling the FLYING TURNS show along with doing publicity and marketing for IEN. "Between the three of us," said Scott Miller, "we have around 120 years of experience in the horse industry. We all started out cleaning stalls and rubbing horses and know the business inside and out. We are excited to see the IEN program take off and plan on providing plenty of equine programing for both the professional and novice horse lovers of all breeds." From the International Equine Network

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