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TORONTO, April 14 - After failing to find the winner's circle in both preliminary legs, Reasonable Force found his best stride when it counted the most as he captured this year's edition of the $36,200 Youthful Series final Monday at Woodbine. In doing so, the Doug McNair-driven sophomore returned $33.00 to his backers. McNair and Reasonable Force were in no hurry off the gate as Account Rollover (Randy Waples) cleared to the lead past the opening station in :27.1. Account Rollover, who found the wire in the first leg of the series, continued to lead his nine rivals past the half in :56 and three-quarters in 1:24.4. McNair began the first-over attack around the final turn and was within striking distance of the tempo-setter turning for home. Down the stretch, McNair asked his charge for more pace and the three-time winner responded with a two length win. Post time favourite Andreios Kardia (Steve Byron) finished second, with Dragon Seelster (Paul Macdonell) finishing third. Trained by Tony Montini for owners Doug Dunbar and Steve LeBlanc, Reasonable Force lifted his career earnings to $44,840. The son of Shadow Play now has a 2-2-1 record from eight starts this season. Also on Monday's program, the second round of the Lifetime Dream series continued with two $18,000 divisions. Rose Run Oriana (Randy Waples) kicked-off the 10-race programme with a 1:54.2 score in the first division. The daughter of Trainforthefuture enjoyed a new career best in the debut for trainer Corey Johnson. Waples led gate-to-wire with the 15-time winner through panels of :28, :57 and 1:25.3, before fending off 3/5 favourite Rockin With Dewey (Mario Baillargeon) in deep stretch to win by one and a half lengths. Samira Hanover (Paul Macdonell) finished third. Owned by Rolling Hills Racing Stables, Rose Run Oriana will look for the series sweep next week as her bankroll increased to $134,717. She paid $4.90 to win. One race later, Her Name Is Lola (Phil Hudon) enjoyed her fifth career score at odds of 3-1. The daughter of Majestic Son laid parked on the outside at the quarter in :28.2, before clearing to the lead before the half in :57.2. From there, the trotting miss led her five rivals past in 1:26.1 before fending off a late challenge from Frisky Magic (Randy Waples) to win by a nose. Standing My Ground (Sylvain Filion) finished third. Trained by Russell Bax for Baxmar Holsteins Ltd, Her Name Is Lola increased her bankroll to $85,560. She paid $8.70 to win. by Greg Gangle, for WEG

Last week the ring-around produced six winners, including my bet of the week and my two each-way bets of the week. Others to tip out winners were Jonny Cox, Steve Richardson, and Ken Barron. Let’s see if some of the trainers and drivers can hold up their end of the bargain this week! Forbury – Thursday Dexter Dunn: Has surprisingly opted for Phat Freddy’s Drop, who will look to break maidens in the first race on the card. Jonny Cox: Rates Mako Banner as a very good each-way chance in race three. Quinella with Katy Perry perhaps? Craig Thornley: Was pleased with U Can I Can at the recent Motukarara workouts - race four Mark Jones: Expects Ultimate CC to prove very hard to beat in the ninth race on the card Terry Chmiel: Is expecting a bold performance from Angus T Jones in the ninth race. Alexandra Park - Friday Scott Phelan: Expects Cheers Kathy to be very hard to roll in the first race on the card. Simon Lawson: Has opted for impressive last start winner Destination Moon - race six Todd Mitchell: Is a very big fan of Mach's Gladiator, and expects him to be hard to roll in the ninth race on the card. Addington - Friday   Blair Orange: Is bullish about the chances of Paramount Queen, who looks very well placed in race two. Anthony Butt: Thinks Thebestlove is a big chance in the NZ Trotting Derby - race four David Butt: Warns punters not to drop One Over Da Moon, who also competes in the NZ Trotting Derby - race four Steve Richardson (T.A.B): Expects Locharburn to prove to strong in the NZ Derby - race nine Ken Barron:  Rates the chances of capable two-year-old filly Livura, who has drawn well for Friday’s assignment - race twelve Gavin Smith: Thinks Dana Duke could be well over the odds in the same event - race twelve Invercargill - Sunday Matthew Williamson: Has opted for the capable yet enigmatic Bet's Sun, who would only need to trot to win the first race on the card. Tim Williams: Thinks Just A Delight, who has finished second in her last three outings, is overdue a winning turn - race ten Andrew Armour Thinks Blanco, who has raced well since joining the barn of Tom Kilkelly, is a good each-way chance in race eleven. Motukarara – Sunday Ricky May: Believes Franco Salisbury will take all sorts of beating from his ace draw – race seven. Mitchell Robertson (Harnesslink): Best Bet: Char Do Neigh – Invercargill, race five Each-way: Dream Gal – Forbury Park, race five Emmanuel – Addington, race three Value: Ranfurly Rulz – Addington, race one  

TORONTO , April 7 - Sophomore pacing colts and geldings were showcased Monday evening at Woodbine in the second round of the Youthful Series. Andreios Kardia, driven by Steve Byron, captured the first of two divisions in 1:55.4 over a 'Good' track. Byron was in no hurry at the start as Regal Son (Randy Waples) made his way to the front to lead the field of six past the first quarter in :27.2. As the talented pacers headed towards the half, Paul Macdonell elected to send second-choice Dragon Seelster to the front before the half in :58. Kuchar (Jody Jamieson) began the first-over attack around the final turn, giving live cover to 4-5 favourite Andreios Kardia. Kuchar and Dragon Seelster matched strides past three-quarters in 1:27.3, but down the lane Byron showed Andreios Kardia open racetrack and the son of Badlands Hanover exploded in deep stretch to capture his third career victory. Trained by James Madill for owner Ina Madill, Andreios Kardia increased his bankroll to $28,480. With the track down-graded to 'Sloppy,' Highland Tartan and James MacDonald captured the second division as the favourite in 1:56.2. MacDonald elected to sit in the two-hole in the early going as Reasonable Force (Jody Jamieson) made their way to the front past the opening quarter in :27.1. Highland Tartan was then angled to the outside and crossed over to command to lead past the middle-half in :59.1 and 1:29.1. As the field turned for home, Reasonable Force angled out of the pocket, but could only reach the leaders saddle pad as Highland Tartan prevailed in deep stretch to score the narrow win. Little Ben (Luc Ouellette) enjoyed a ground saving trip to finish third. Trained and co-owned by Marty Fine along with Mary Clark, Highland Tartan enjoyed his second career victory as his lifetime earnings now sits at $15,200. The son of Major In Art paid $4.90 to win. The Youthful Series is for three-year-old colt and gelding pacers, who are non-winners of three races of $15,000 in 2013. by Greg Gangle, for WEG

Trainer Mike Deters is uncertain of Prairie Jaguar's future, in part because he didn't expect the present. Prairie Jaguar, a 6-year-old gelding pacer, has won five of six races this season - and nine of his last 10 dating back to December - as he prepares for Saturday's start of the Whata Baron Series at Meadowlands Racetrack. Prairie Jaguar is in the second of two $22,500 divisions, with Jim Morrill Jr. listed to drive. A son of the stallion Spy Hard, Prairie Jaguar raced a total of only four times at ages 2 and 3 because of sickness and physical maturity issues. When he reached the races on a full-time basis as 4-year-old, he was green but flashed speed in a 1:51.2 triumph at Pompano Park. Deters sent the horse to race in Canada because he better fit the conditions there than at Pompano. Prairie Jaguar apparently didn't care for the move, winning only twice in 43 starts north of the border. When he returned to Florida in December, he got hot. "It's a who-knew type of deal," Deters said. "We thought he was a pretty nice horse when he won in (1):51.2 here, but he had no luck in Canada. I don't know what it was, but it just didn't work out. He came back and got back on our program and the next thing you know, here he comes. "Some of it is probably maturity. You just never know. I just try to make the horses happy." Prairie Jaguar had a nine-race win streak snapped last Saturday by a fifth-place finish at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Prairie Jaguar, driven by George Napolitano Jr., was beaten by 2-3/4 lengths by Sparky Mark in 1:51.2 over a sloppy track. "He raced OK," Deters said. "He went from very nice weather to very poor weather and the (race) bike was a little too small for him. George said it was long enough, but it was a little too tight and he couldn't really drive the horse. But he still paced (1):52 on a bad night." Deters, who since October has shared ownership of Prairie Jaguar with original owner Laurie Lee Poulin, is hopeful his horse will bounce back in the Whata Baron Series. Prairie Jaguar, who earlier this year became the first horse in Pompano Park history to win at least four races in 1:50 or less, will start from post two in his division. Joining Prairie Jaguar in the second division are K-lees Shakenbake, Scott Rocks, Mindset, Summer Smackdown, Captive Audience, Kg Dragonator, He Rocks The Moon, Burkentine Hanover, and Jeremes General. The first division is Wake Up Peter, Sky Is The Limit, Fateful Choice, Ima Giggity Fool, Santanna One, Dew N Doughnuts, River Run For Ryan, Alexa's Jackpot, and Americhi. The second leg of the Whata Baron Series is April 12 and the $75,000 estimated final is April 19. "My fingers are crossed," Deters said. "I hope he shows up. I think he will. There are some nice horses in there, but I think he's a nice horse too. I think he's got a chance to be very competitive." As for the future beyond the Whata Baron Series, nothing is set. "He's not penciled in for anything," Deters said. "We'll race him around and if he turns out to be good we'll find some things for him. "He's just been a pleasure," the trainer added. "He's a big, strong horse, but he's a gentle giant. A child could take care of him. But when you turn to the (starting) gate, he knows it's time for business." by Ken Weingartner, for Harness Racing Communications

Harness driver Randy Waples is just one victory away from scoring his 6,000th career victory. Also of note is that Stephane Bouchard is just 15 wins away from his 8,000th career win. Driver Wins First Middle Last Name Suffix LTD Wins LTD Earnings Last Track Last Start Stephane L Bouchard   7,985 $70,837,095 Stga 3/30/2014 Randall W Waples   5,999 $104,309,052 Wdb 3/29/2014 Norman Chris Boring   3,979 $19,828,659 RP 7/6/2013 Gene G Vallandingham   2,987 $13,408,006 CalX 3/29/2014 Timothy W Curtin   2,985 $20,936,317 May 6/6/2013 David Floyd Carey   2,978 $2,438,403 Truro 12/8/2013 Lemoyne D Svendsen   2,974 $9,469,252 CalX 3/29/2014 Rodney J Bolon   1,995 $9,408,721 Mea 3/25/2014 Ron Paul Wrenn   1,995 $6,069,816 SpCk 10/2/2013 Todd G Trites   1,993 $2,824,943 EPR 12/8/2013 Jerry G E Landess   1,980 $2,037,837 Green 8/23/2013 Kelly R Sheppard   1,971 $9,409,954 FlmD 11/20/2013 DANIEL R                             OBRIAN        997 $2,165,944 Wdb 3/17/2014 Darren R Crowe   992 $1,477,417 Chrtn 2/7/2014 John J De Long   990 $5,155,722 BmlP 3/30/2014 RONALD I MATHESON   988 $1,054,352 Chrtn 2/7/2014 Stephen K O'Toole   986 $2,423,974 PRc 9/3/2012 GORDEN A MCKNIGHT   984 $2,907,989 FlmD 3/29/2014 Clayton   Faurot Jr 981 $2,458,705 Mea 3/5/2014 Joseph   Ricco Jr 978 $3,728,352 MR 10/31/2013 Trent P Stohler   976 $5,584,413 HoP 3/29/2014 John D Finn   975 $3,616,740 BmlP 2/19/2014 anthony P Haughan   974 $6,885,076 FlmD 3/29/2014 Rocky Joe Loney   973 $2,411,599 HoP 3/29/2014 Nick Royce Roland   972 $3,086,220 Whtn 9/22/2013 Yves   Gauthier   972 $3,959,060 RidC 2/23/2014 Jeffrey A Smith   971 $2,731,809 MVR 3/12/2014 Steven B Norris   970 $2,548,332 RidC 9/19/2013                 Driver earnings First Middle Last Name Suffix LTD Wins LTD Earnings Last Track Last Start Michel   Lachance   10,387 $189,836,627 BmlP 11/9/2013 Luc R Ouellette   8,548 $129,687,731 Wdb 3/29/2014 David R Magee   11,736 $99,725,900 BmlP 3/30/2014 Raymond W Schnittker   2,643 $39,945,723 M 3/29/2014 PHILLIP Alan HUDON   3,794 $39,706,278 Wdb 3/29/2014 Trevor S Henry   5,210 $29,978,678 FlmD 3/29/2014 Michael A Forte   3,279 $19,998,367 MR 3/26/2014 Jonathan W Roberts   2,467 $19,955,492 DD 3/30/2014 Norman Chris Boring   3,979 $19,828,659 RP 7/6/2013 Thomas D Strauss   2,552 $19,687,609 Wdb 3/29/2014 Darrell L Coville   6,581 $19,635,066 RidC 3/27/2014 Randy T Tharps   4,643 $19,618,610 MVR 3/30/2014 Jay L Randall   3,696 $19,563,860 Stga 3/29/2014 Allan W Davis   1,036 $9,976,990 DD 3/30/2014 Richard Lee Farrington   1,250 $9,971,066 HoP 11/7/2013 Below that are trainers who may be approaching win milestones. USTA started tracking trainer statistics in 1991, so the trainers listed in green may have had training starts and wins prior to 1991, so the Life Wins column for those trainers may not be accurate. Trainers Milestones First Middle Last Name suffix Life Wins Life Earnings Last Track Last Start DOB Roger R Hammer   1980 $17,027,784 PcD 3/30/2014 2/18/1946 Edgar R Clarke   999 $5,418,525 PPk 3/30/2014 12/6/1955 Dirk   Simpson   976 $10,688,518 May 2/7/2014 8/2/1957 Leo   Tourigny   974 $8,178,091 RidC 11/28/2013 6/5/1939 Trond   Smedshammer   971 $41,599,710 YR 3/28/2014 3/22/1967 Gabriel   Boily   971 $2,628,603 RidC 3/27/2014 4/26/1949  Statistics from Anne Chunko at USTA

TORONTO, March 26 - Kyle Reibeling's Missevil has certainly made her impact this season while racing at Woodbine Racetrack - and the talented filly could be in for a prosperous payday in the coming weeks. The swift pacer has banked $30,100 this season from five starts, including three wins and a second-place finish for owners Mike Timpano and Frank Cirillo. The daughter of Armbro Deuce-Impudent will begin from post six in the second of two $15,000 Blossom Series divisions, Friday at Woodbine. The rich $30,000 (added) final will take place on Monday, April 11. "We have the six-hole in a six horse race, so that doesn't bother me and we won't be sitting 21-lengths back like last week," Reibeling said. "It's a good series and a nice fit for her. The filly that beat her last week is in there, which makes for another great race." Missevil qualified just once last year as a rookie before calling it a season and Reibeling took over conditioning the bay this past winter. "I got her when she was training back this winter when I returned from Sudbury," he said. "I don't think it was a surprise to anyone that worked with her in the past that she has the speed and desire." So far this season, Missevil has developed an off-the-pace racing style, which is by the design of her veteran conditioner. "She can get real hot," Reibeling said. "When we first schooled her, she was a little erratic so we made some changes to calm her down, but whether she had the speed or not was something I wasn't worried about. "It just seems like the plan is to race her from behind and teach her," Reibeling continued. "We're obviously thinking long term with her and we are going to do right by her." Reibeling, who is approaching $2 million in purse earnings as a conditioner, admires one key attribute about his stable star. "Her will", he said. "She just has that tremendous will to win. She's not the biggest horse and probably not the fastest horse out there, but I don't think there's any other horse around that I've ever worked with - maybe L H Stryker- that has that killer instinct and will to win like she does. She's small but has that little engine that could." Driver James MacDonald has been aboard Missevil in each of her five starts this season and Reibeling sees that as a perfect fit. "James has done an excellent job with her and I couldn't ask for more," he said. "He's listened and done right by the filly and he's drove her with a lot of respect. James deserves a lot of credit." As for the future of the Missevil, Reibeling remains optimistic about a successful summer with his speedy pacer. "We're going to stick to the OSS and just race around here. We're confident that she can be a Gold filly this season and there is enough money in the province for us to tackle. We're going to take it week-by-week, but hopefully we have a lot of fun this summer." The Blossom Series is for three-year-old fillies, who are non-winners of three races or $15,000 in 2013. The pair of divisions will kick off the 11-race programme on Friday in races one and two. They will line up as follows: Race 1 1. Rock N Roll Xample 2. Deuces For Charity 3. Outtathewheelhouse 4. Polk Dot Hanover 5. Noble Jilly 6. An Angel Shes Not 7. Mach Some Noise Race 2 1. Premio Loco 2. Wildcat Magic 3. Somebaysomwhere 4. Gushing Royalty 5. Violet Bayama 6. Missevil By Greg Gangle, for WEG

Harness driver Tony Hall has a pretty prestigious win column. Earlier this year, Tony notched his 4,000th career victory. The way he is racking up so many wins is quite remarkable but to achieve that level of wins, it sure takes a lot of time and Tony being a family man, he always manages to create a fine balance within the daily grind of work and family. "My wife (Ashlee) has a few horses she trains and I work with her" Tony explains. "Right now we are based at the Meadows in Pennsylvania and we are stabled off track. So that's where I am 90% of the time. I help her in the morning with the horses." For the winter season, with Tony driving at the Meadows, he hasn't had to do much traveling thanks to good planning. "Through the week, I work with her horses and as far as my son, when he is done school he comes and stays with me in the summer." Tony says. As for quality time with family, on off days, Tony always ensures they go out for an activity that is not horse related. "I have a 14 year old son, so I try to be involved with him as much as possible.... Try and take tropical vacations whenever possible." Tony says he never went to college and he hopes his son will go to college and find a career he truly enjoys. "I've always tried to lead him to something that is more stable, more consistent. In our business it's very up and down, I've had years where I've made close to $300,000 and years where I make less than $100,000. (The business) fluctuates so much... I'd like him to have the opportunity where (business) can only go up and not worry about things going down." The sense of security Tony wants to provide his family is touching, doing all he can so his son can focus on the positives and not heed the negatives. Away from the track, Tony enjoys the outdoors becoming one with nature. "I like to fish and deer hunt. I mostly get to do that in the fall, mainly deer but sometimes turkey but mainly white tail deer." Tony hasn't gotten his trophy kill yet, as he's been limited on time, but does admit he's had some close encounters. This coming Saturday, Tony will be venturing to the Meadowlands for a driver's series. The series is six Saturday nights. When at the Meadowlands, Tony predominantly drives for trainer Ron Burke's stable and if possible, try and catch on where possible. "Once I confirm with Ron that I'm going to go (to the Meadowlands), word spreads around that I'm going to be there. So truthfully, it's all word of mouth and when you commit to one guy, word spreads around." Tony explains. "One good thing about New Jersey is they have a good publicity office. Once they get the word, they spread it." Since Tony will be driving Saturday nights at the Meadowlands, he's is planning on driving at Pocono Downs on Sundays. "I'll do that for a while, so long as the opportunity is there. Pretty much, I will go wherever I am needed." Horse racing and the purses for that matter are built on gambling and the revenue from gambling patrons. Everyone has their opinion on gambling, the pros and cons and everything in between. For Tony, simply put he is not a gambler, with the exception of putting himself at risk every time he gets on to the racetrack. "Honestly, I hate gambling of any sort." Tony openly says. "If I go to a casino, it's to eat at a restaurant or go to a bar at a casino with a group of friends. I've never been one to gamble, you hear people talk about it, but I just ignore it." Tony doesn't condemn anyone nor does he look down on anyone who gambles, it's just not his cup of tea. "The way I look at it" Tony says, "to each their own and just because I don't do it, there's a million other people that do." "I understand that keeps us going but I am being honest from my standpoint as an individual. I don't consider (gambling) a disgrace." Reflecting on the idea of Tony's risk when racing doesn't really play on his mind, "I've been doing this my whole life so I don't even think about it." Tony admits. "I've been in accidents where I come back 24 hours later and drive a full card. It doesn't register, it's a part of the business that something can happen." With over 4,000 wins under Tony's belt, he says "I want to keep getting better, do the best I can do in the career I chose... and find ways to better my stats and in other ways that strengthen my weak points and I can only do that by driving more races." In all of Tony's trips, one memorable race he recalls in particular was when he was driving in a stakes race at the Meadows in 2006. "It was in the Adios, I got beat by a nose in the opening race of the Asioa in the eliminations and missed the finals. To be that close to a race of that stature was definitely it, a big moment for me." (The 2006 Adios was won by 20-1 shot, Cactus Creek, driven by Mike Lachance and trained by Erv Miller.) If Tony had a choice between driving pacers or trotters, hands down Tony would choose to drive trotters. "The trotter was the first of the Standardbreds, back in the day; the trotter was more of the natural gait. They can be more of a challenge, with a trotter you really have to watch how you handle them compared to a pacer." "A good bred trotter, when the breeding is there and it's with a good barn, it's an unbelievable feeling." Tony explains. "Just a natural that's quick on its feet is hard to find. When you do (find one), it's unbelievable and a great feeling." One trotter Tony mentions that he liked was Deweycheatumnhowe, but there isn't one currently that he can pick out and feel the same about. The race Tony hopes to win most is the highly regarded Hambletonian. Tony's other milestone he'd like to achieve is 5,000 wins. "I've always said to myself, if I could have 5,000 wins that would be a huge milestone for me and whatever happens after that would be a bonus. I never expected to be at this number (of wins) at this age when I was young." Tony continues, "I would love to win one prestigious race on the grand circuit and if I could pick, it would be the Hambletonian. It would be a great achievement." It would be tremendous if Tony won the Hambletonian as his 5,000th win. Tony expresses he is not a cold weather person and when it's time to step away from racing, he'd like to relocate somewhere warm, like Florida where his biggest decision would be where to fish. By: Roderick Balgobin www.supernovasportsclub.com Twitter: ScSupernova  

Just when we thought it was going to get a little easier to get a handle on formlines, so the V75 shows you just why this is the best multi-race betting system in the world. While we got 2 legs home, we sat by as favourite after favourite got rolled as Sanity didn’t prevail and outsiders including a $50/1 longshot and two paying in the high teens came in. And the lucky punter who  chose the seven winning horses correctly walked off with 613,588.60 EUR ($845,437). And just to make it a little tougher, this week the V75 shifts to Norway for one of those occasional joint V75s, this one coinciding with a Norway versus Sweden apprentice drivers challenge. The Norwegian breeding programme is nowhere near as strong as Sweden’s and so the racing in one of Europe’s richest nations is heavily influenced by imports from not only its bigger neighbour but also Italy and the United States. Several prominent Danish trainers such as Bo Westerdaard, Flemming Jensen and Jeppe Juel  also make a living racing their second-string  horses  between Denmark and Norway while the top ones foot it in Sweden. And like Finland, coldblood trotters make up nearly half of the racing stock, which adds another bit of spice into the handicapping stew – although there is only one coldblood race in the V75. So what is the strategy? Does the horses for courses theory favour local runners or  do, Swedish raiders have the tougher racing so are basically dropping back in grade here? They certainly cleaned up in France which should be much tougher.  Or shall we go with the early tote, which to be frank hasn’t been that reliable lately as a guide to the “smart” money. Decisions, decisions. At least the French racing has a bit more familiarity to it, we've been following most of these horses over winter. Anyhoo here goes.   V75-1 Silver division   2140m: The Swedish-breds  Your Highness (12), Jaguar Broline (1), Stormysky (3) and Burning Line Gral (6) are the logical picks. Looking for an outsider, and there is a US-bred locally trained runner with three wins in her last five starts who might figure, so I’ve taken Cantabharmony (5).  Selection  12-1-3-6-5 V75-2 Klass I   1640m:  Ulf Ohlen’s  Pedro Bi (1) has had three Sovalla wins in his last five starts while Flemming Jensen’s Roxy Hill (2) won at Aby last start. From these draws, they look the two to beat. As Elvis had it,  1 for the money and 2 for the show. Selection  1 (2) V75-3 Dack Partner Bil-Vulkan loppet (mares)  2140m: Italian-bred Nalda Nof (5) has won group two races in Italy and Norway and been placed in the same class in France where she was trained for a while. Now with Marcus Lindgren in Halmstad, she looks a class above these, this is her second start back from a decent spell and has the brilliant Swedish driver Bjorn Goop in the cart. That makes her an anchor.   Selection  5 V75-4 Östfoldpokalen    2140m: Coldblood race where Gylden Balder (13)  and Timian Scott (15) are the heavy early favourites. They’ll do me in the dartboard selection of the mix. Selection  13 (15) V75-5 Klass II  2640m: A lot of recent winners in this, so it’s a matter of sifting through who they beat and where. Flemming Jensen has another consistent performer here in Solo Nolo (12)  off the wide second draw, Reims Gasti (5) has three recent Solvalla wins,  while Spirit (2) has won three races in a row, at Aby, Sweden  and two in Denmark. This is wide open, with many chances but we’ll stick with these three.  Selection  12-5-2 V75-6 Steinlagers Hederslopp (Gold)  1640m: This has been a tough meeting to find bankers, but I was really impressed with  Francais du Gull   (1) last time out. He might not be in the class of Mr Picolet or Beanie MM, the last two winners of this race, but from this draw he should get to the front, and he is definitely good enough to win from there.  Selection:   1 V75-7 Bronze division  2140m: Another toughie with More Than Enough (1), KLM Buymethemoon (6), Huge Star (10) who all have strong Swedish form looking the strongest suspects. We need an outsider somewhere and Vacqueryas (8) is due a change of form, and this might be an easier race than he has been in for a while.   Selection   1-6-10-8 R4    Prix Louis Forcinal (Group 2) monte 2700m: This looks a match race between the two best monte horses of their generations, Ulysse (8) and Vision Intense (9). Normally I would choose the older horse over the younger and the stallion over the mare, which in both cases favour Ulysse, but Vision Intense is something special and mares hold their own under saddle more than in the bike. So it’s Vision Intense for me. R8    Prix Robert Auvray (Group 2) 2850m: A very competitive race with plenty of form to consider. Jean Etienne Dubois’ Villeroi (8) has won his last two starts,  but is trailing the early favouritism to Viking de Val (9) while the Jean-Michel Bazire factor is behind  the 4 horse Varade d’Hermine’s short price (5/2). Jean Phillippe Dubois has three entries but I’m leaning towards Voltigeur de Myrt (10), the Criterium des 4 Ans winner who was a gallant sixth in the Prix de Selection in a joint equal fastest time  under handicap, (1.11.1 or 1.54.2MR/2200m) which was his new record. That indicates to me a horse at the top of his game, and there are no others in this field that fronted in that prestigious  group one.  So Voltigeur de Myrt for me. TOTAL COMBINATIONS 60 – Cost $5, +1 alternate $10, + 2 alternate $20 Also here are my win wagers from Momarken and Vincennes. SINGLE WAGERS  $2 MOMARKEN Race 5  Your Highness (12), Race 6  Pedro Bi (1) Race 7  Nalda Nof (5) Race 8  Gylden Balder (13)   Race 9  Solo Nolo (12)   Race 10  Francais du Gull   (1)  Race 11 Vacqueryas (8) VINCENNES Race 4 Vision Intense (9) Race 8 Voltigeur de Myrt (10)

What Makes News? For some time now I have given up watching mainstream television, mainly because I can't handle the countless mind-numbing reality shows, and the news is full of petty bickering and points scoring between politicians who should know better (Election year hasn't helped that!). My spies tell me that the potentially horrific smash at Westport last week was shown on the News (not sure which channel) making it obvious that the general media is only interested in harness racing when there is a crash, or some form of drug related sensation. Thankfully that doesn't happen very often so that coverage is minimal. The only other recent positive coverage was Zac Butchers' wonderful display of showmanship on beating his dad in the Drivers' premiership eighteen months ago. Got me thinking though, if the mainstream channels want sensationalism, why not give it to them. A reality show featuring nasty harness racing crashes? Obviously permission would need to be granted by the people involved in the incidents, but it would surely rate higher than "Outer Mongolias' Ugliest Bodies" or "What I found In My Great Uncles Garage", or some of the other drivel currently on offer! You know the old saying, any publicity etc., etc. Maybe sponsorship could be gained from a manufacturer of safety gear? While on the subject of Westport, it is slightly sad to see that the Club, renowned for being both forward thinking and extremely hospitable, refuses to acknowledge the need for a passing lane at Patterson Park. Using the Stipes' Report from last Friday as a guide, there were a total of 26 horses who were ‘denied clear racing room' in the straight. When I broached this with a Club official, I received a similar response that I probably would have given myself about 10 years ago - that there is still (usually) only one winner in each race. While that is difficult to argue with, one of the suggestions put forward was that punters needed to back drivers who didn't drive for luck, and moaned when they were unlucky. That argument tends to collapse when the drivers on some of those denied a run the other day included Jim Curtin, Robbie Holmes, Pete Davis and Gavin Smith, all of whom are virtual stalwarts of West Coast harness racing. The problem is that for every one of those 26 horses denied a run, there are dozens of disgruntled punters (aka customers) with a nasty taste in their mouth. Yes I admit, I had that taste four times during the day! Come on Westport, move with the times on this one, and move a few marker pegs. Northern Branch February 2014 The Associations' Northern Branch recently met to discuss the latest issues facing that area, and began by giving a vote of support to Northern starter Frank Phelan. Those present acknowledged, however, that all starters should come under scrutiny as part of the job and, on occasions could do things better. (As an aside to this topic, the Association received a communication from Mr Brian Macey, the owner of Prime Power, who was singled out for criticism in a recent article on standing starts. Brian agreed with Paul Nairns' comments concerning poorly behaved horses from standing starts, and reported that his horse had recently been given intensive standing start practice. The happy outcome was Prime Power stood perfectly last week, began beautifully, and duly won. Congratulations to the connections on making the effort - it goes to prove that it can be done for most horses) Matters arising from the Canterbury minutes were covered, including online nominations, the bulls-eye barrier draw, and the introduction of photo licences, all of which were supported. Concern was expressed at inconsistencies shown by the RIU in penalising the connections of horses that were late scratched due to being sold. Some received no penalty, while fines tended to vary from $200 to $350, and no bearing seemed to be given to whether or not another horse on the ballot had been denied a start. A letter has been drafted, and the matter was to be referred to the National Council for consideration. The state of Northern all-weather tracks was discussed, with the Cambridge and Manawatu surfaces being praised thanks to the use of conditioners etc., however there was concern over the consistency of Alexandra Park, partly due to the material containing a large amount of shell. It was decided to invite ATC officials to the next Branch meeting to discuss this and other matters. Chairman Peter Ferguson reported that horses that are claimed are still not being swabbed as a matter of course. The Committee felt that this should take place to ensure the integrity and safety of all concerned. (This opinion was subsequently supported at National Council level and a letter has been forward to the RIU). The matter of the payment of driving fees for those engaged for horses that are subsequently scratched was discussed. It is understood that jockeys receive half of their fee if this occurs, and the feeling is that drivers should receive the same, instead of the full amount being retained by the Club. The main point to this argument is that for most drivers, it does not take many of these to mean breaking even or losing money after expenses on a nights racing. Also, after drivers are declared, the chances of gaining another drive after a scratching were virtually non-existent. This matter will be referred to the up-coming National Council meeting for consideration. By Dave Neal/Peter Cook (NZ Trainers and Drivers Association)

The Ontario Racing Commission (ORC) announced that there has been a report of EHV-1 in a Thoroughbred that is residing in Barn 10 at Woodbine Racetrack, but that Standardbred racing is not affected by the situation. Today (March 18) ) the ORC issued the announcement on behalf of Dr. Adam Chambers, who is manager of Veterinary Services at the ORC. The contents of the release appear below. EQUINE HERPES CASE Restrictions in place. Training at Woodbine to continue; Standardbred racing not affected. There has been a report of EHV-1 in a five-year-old thoroughbred filly residing in Barn 10 at Woodbine Racetrack. The horse showed neurological signs on Thursday, March 13 but did not have a fever. The horse was removed from Woodbine to isolation on Saturday, March 15. The horse’s condition is stable. Results from tests available today showed non-neurotropic EHV-1 in blood but not nasal secretions. This is an unusual testing result and the horse has been retested. The risk of transmission to other horses may be low, as the infection is spread by nasal secretions. There have been no reports of any other sick horses in barn 10. Sporadic incidents of infection occur not infrequently and can be isolated incidents. The non-neurotropic form of EHV-1 identified from this horse differs from the neurotropic form identified from thoroughbreds at Woodbine in June of last year. Although the both types of EHV-1 can cause neurological disease the non-neurotropic strain is thought to be less likely to do so. EHV-1 has an incubation period of approximately 3 to 8 days, and may in some cases be as long as 14 days. Given these facts, the following measures will be in place, effective immediately: All horses must have their temperatures taken twice daily. Trainers with horses that have clinical signs consistent with EHV-1 infection (including fever (101.5 F/38.5 C or above), respiratory signs (cough, nasal discharge and/or neurological signs) must report these findings to their veterinarian immediately; Horses from Barn 10 will be allowed to train at the end of training hours; Only ponies housed in Barn 10 will be allowed to pony horses in Barn 10; Horsepeople are reminded to remain vigilant and institute appropriate biosecurity measures and should consult their veterinarians for advice. Standardbred horses are not stabled at Woodbine Racetrack. As well, the standardbred racing meet at Woodbine will not be impacted by these measures. To ensure best practices are in place to contain the disease, the ORC received input from experts from the University of Guelph and University of California at Davis, the office of the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF). The ORC will also continue to work closely with Woodbine management, veterinarians and horse people. The ORC will monitor the situation and any further developments will be reported.

DOVER, Del. ---- Bestofthebunch and Thetruthaboutdavid, both were beaten favorites last time out, head separate Delaware $9,500 3,4&5-Year-Old Male pace divisions on Sunday, March 16 at Dover Downs. After winning two of three 2014 starts, Bestofthebunch, who was beaten by a neck last week and in both of his recent starts, must overcome starting for post 8 in the nine-horse field of younger horses. Ron Pierce will drive for trainer Trish Foulk and owner Foulk Stables. Two of the gelding's rivals won last time out; Jeff Franklin and LeBlanc Racing's Reindance with Ross Wolfenden, the only other three-year-old in the lineup, and Brenda Teague's Sink The McBismark, handled by Montrell Teague. Trainer Lauren Allen's Public Enemy, reined by Vic Kirby, heads the opposition. In the other 3,4&5-year-old section, George Teague's Thetruthaboutdavid (M.Teague), a two-time winner this year and beaten favorite last start, drew the rail, with his expected stiffest opponents starting alongside; Louis Catana's Pantheon Seelster (Jonathan Roberts), Lauren Allen's On The Horizon (Wolfenden) and William Moffett Inc.'s Leyden (Allan Davis), from posts 2,3 and 4 respectively. Driver Jack Parker and Carol Parker's Suits and Arty Foster Jr.'s Champion's Club (Trace Tetrick) have upset credentials. by Marv Bachrad, for Dover Downs

The New York Gaming Commission on Wednesday unanimously approved a rule requiring horsemen to notify track personnel within 72 hours of a horse being gelded ontrack, during a meeting in which the commission also approved a rule allowing Standardbred horses to be administered clenbuterol up to 96 hours before a race. The rule requiring notification of a first-time gelding builds on an existing Jockey Club rule that requires horsemen to “promptly” report the information to the industry’s registry, which maintains records that are on file in racing offices. New York Gaming Commission officials said similar rules had been put in place in Nebraska, Texas, and Oklahoma, and that the rule would “protect New York horseplayers.” Although no specific penalties are attached to violations of the regulation, the New York rule would require trainers to notify the racing secretary at the track where the procedure is performed within 72 hours of the operation. If the procedure is performed offtrack, the rule requires the owner or trainer of the horse “to report the alteration at or before the time the horse is entered to race.” Many horses are gelded to improve performance. The commission approved the 96-hour rule for administration of the bronchodilator clenbuterol as a concession to Standardbred interests who had argued that a proposal to prohibit the administration of the drug within 14 days of a race would be a de facto ban. The commission had already approved the 14-day rule for Thoroughbreds as part of an overhaul of the state’s drug rules aligned with an effort by other states to adopt uniform regulations. Racing commissions in the United States have sought to tighten clenbuterol rules over the past several years because of the drug’s potential to build muscle mass when used regularly. Dr. Scott Palmer, the gambling commission’s equine medical director, said at th The New York Gaming Commission on Wednesday unanimously approved a rule requiring horsemen to notify track personnel within 72 hours of a horse being gelded ontrack, during a meeting in which the commission also approved a rule allowing Standardbred horses to be administered clenbuterol up to 96 hours before a race. The rule requiring notification of a first-time gelding builds on an existing Jockey Club rule that requires horsemen to “promptly” report the information to the industry’s registry, which maintains records that are on file in racing offices. New York Gaming Commission officials said similar rules had been put in place in Nebraska, Texas, and Oklahoma, and that the rule would “protect New York horseplayers.” Although no specific penalties are attached to violations of the regulation, the New York rule would require trainers to notify the racing secretary at the track where the procedure is performed within 72 hours of the operation. If the procedure is performed offtrack, the rule requires the owner or trainer of the horse “to report the alteration at or before the time the horse is entered to race.” Many horses are gelded to improve performance. The commission approved the 96-hour rule for administration of the bronchodilator clenbuterol as a concession to Standardbred interests who had argued that a proposal to prohibit the administration of the drug within 14 days of a race would be a de facto ban. The commission had already approved the 14-day rule for Thoroughbreds as part of an overhaul of the state’s drug rules aligned with an effort by other states to adopt uniform regulations. Racing commissions in the United States have sought to tighten clenbuterol rules over the past several years because of the drug’s potential to build muscle mass when used regularly. Dr. Scott Palmer, the gambling commission’s equine medical director, said at the commission meeting that the 96-hour rule will still prevent Standardbred horsemen from using the drug for this so-called “repartitioning effect” because most harness horses run once per week, and because any Standardbred horse who has not raced for 30 days will be prohibited from being administered the drug within 14 days prior to its first race back. alled “repartitioning effect” because most harness horses run once per week, and because any Standardbred horse who has not raced for 30 days will be prohibited from being administered the drug within 14 days prior to its first race back. To read the rest of the story click here.

Harness driver Tim Tetrick needs just two wins to reach the 8,000 win mark in his already exciting career. Driver Wins First Middle Last Name Suffix LTD Wins LTD Earnings Last Track Last Start Tim A Tetrick   7,998 $141,173,613 M 3/8/2014 Stephane L Bouchard   7,974 $70,744,000 Stga 3/9/2014 Randall W Waples   5,992 $104,195,978 Wdb 3/3/2014 Norman Chris Boring   3,979 $19,828,659 RP 7/6/2013 Gene G Vallandingham   2,985 $13,400,823 CalX 3/8/2014 Timothy W Curtin   2,985 $20,936,317 May 6/6/2013 David Floyd Carey   2,978 $2,438,403 Truro 12/8/2013 Lemoyne D Svendsen   2,970 $9,448,948 CalX 3/8/2014 Ron Paul Wrenn   1,995 $6,069,816 SpCk 10/2/2013 Rodney J Bolon   1,995 $9,404,071 Mea 3/4/2014 Todd G Trites   1,993 $2,824,943 EPR 12/8/2013 Jerry G E Landess   1,980 $2,037,837 Green 8/23/2013 Kelly R Sheppard   1,973 $9,414,915 FlmD 11/20/2013 Kody Ray Massey   999 $3,060,649 Nor 3/8/2014 DANIEL R                             OBRIAN        996 $2,161,984 FlmD 3/6/2014 Darren R Crowe   992 $1,477,417 Chrtn 2/7/2014 Alfred G Carroll   991 $5,727,082 FlmD 3/8/2014 RONALD I MATHESON   988 $1,054,352 Chrtn 2/7/2014 Stephen K O'Toole   986 $2,423,974 PRc 9/3/2012 GORDEN A MCKNIGHT   984 $2,907,264 FlmD 3/5/2014 John J De Long   982 $5,083,079 BmlP 2/26/2014 Clayton   Faurot Jr 981 $2,458,705 Mea 3/5/2014 Joseph   Ricco Jr 978 $3,728,352 MR 10/31/2013 Trent P Stohler   976 $5,581,230 HoP 11/9/2013 John D Finn   975 $3,616,740 BmlP 2/19/2014 Rocky Joe Loney   973 $2,411,599 Leb 11/23/2013 Nick Royce Roland   972 $3,086,220 Whtn 9/22/2013 Yves   Gauthier   972 $3,959,060 RidC 2/23/2014 Jeffrey A Smith   971 $2,731,809 MVR 2/20/2014 anthony P Haughan   971 $6,870,682 FlmD 3/8/2014 Steven B Norris   970 $2,548,332 RidC 9/19/2013                 Driver earnings First Middle Last Name Suffix LTD Wins LTD Earnings Last Track Last Start Michel   Lachance   10,387 $189,836,627 BmlP 11/9/2013 Luc R Ouellette   8,546 $129,653,359 Wdb 3/7/2014 Paul J MacDonell   5,139 $99,976,932 Wdb 3/8/2014 David R Magee   11,730 $99,692,391 BmlP 3/6/2014 Raymond W Schnittker   2,642 $39,938,493 YR 3/8/2014 PHILLIP Alan HUDON   3,777 $39,577,125 Wdb 3/8/2014 Trevor S Henry   5,179 $29,861,161 FlmD 3/8/2014 Michael A Forte   3,277 $19,992,756 MR 3/6/2014 Norman Chris Boring   3,979 $19,828,659 RP 7/6/2013 Jonathan W Roberts   2,442 $19,779,347 DD 3/9/2014 Thomas D Strauss   2,552 $19,687,609 Lon 11/25/2013 Darrell L Coville   6,580 $19,627,570 RidC 3/2/2014 Randy T Tharps   4,625 $19,540,003 MVR 3/9/2014 Jay L Randall   3,694 $19,535,295 Stga 3/9/2014 Richard Lee Farrington   1,250 $9,971,066 HoP 11/7/2013 Below that are trainers who may be approaching win milestones. USTA started tracking trainer statistics in 1991, so the trainers listed in green may have had training starts and wins prior to 1991, so the Life Wins column for those trainers may not be accurate. First Middle Last Name suffix Life Wins Life Earnings Last Track Last Start DOB Gilberto   Garcia-Herrera   1994 $13,009,657 YR 3/8/2014 8/2/1962 Roger R Hammer   1980 $17,024,284 Mea 3/5/2014 2/18/1946 Edgar R Clarke   998 $5,409,632 PPk 3/9/2014 12/6/1955 Dirk   Simpson   976 $10,688,518 May 2/7/2014 8/2/1957 Leo   Tourigny   974 $8,178,091 RidC 11/28/2013 6/5/1939 Gabriel   Boily   971 $2,623,591 RidC 3/2/2014 4/26/1949 by Anne Chunko, for USTA

After looking back at the results from last month’s Yearling Sales, it’s not surprising to see that Mark Purdon and Robert Dunn are the country’s leading trainers. Purdon, along with his formidable band of owners, purchased approximately 22 yearlings for costs of around $1,066,000 at the New Zealand Sales, while Dunn and clients acquired roughly 12 yearlings spending around $500,000. Purdon and Dalgety were also active at the Australian APG Sales. Which raises the question, how can the small compete? Don’t get me wrong, Purdon, Dunn, and all of their brilliant owners are great for this industry and deserve and earn all the success that they get. But in a few years is it going to be Purdon, Dunn, and Dalgety racing each other? Now that is something that wouldn’t be good for the industry at all. Mark Jones, who is in no way, shape, or form, a “small trainer” says that if he wasn’t a ‘seller’ he would struggle to survive, which makes you think.  How does everyone else fear? “I don’t have the numbers of Purdon or Dunn so I survive by selling, but I am worried that the majority of the people in the game won’t be able to survive as it is simply getting too tough,” said Jones. “I’m one of the lucky ones, but it’s becoming increasingly hard for young and small trainers to compete and unless stakes go up their chances of staying in this industry are very grim which is very bad for the future of the sport.” “I believe it is up to clubs, especially Addington, to up stakes as owners need to race for more money.” Jones also believes that HRNZ could cut a lot of costs and direct that money into the stakes. “And we need more races for the poorer horses, so they have a chance to earn,” he added. “I also think we need training centres to give young enthusiast somewhere to start from as no young trainer can afford their own property,” Jones suggested. “It’s very hard for young people to get backers, as owners are a dying breed, especially in the Auckland region.” “The way things are going it won’t be long before the big stables are racing each other,” he concluded. So, “How can the small compete?” – It’s something worth pondering over anyway. Perhaps it could be ‘The Big Question’ on The Box Seat? Or would that mean that they were just trying to ‘Keep Up With The Joneses’? By Mitchell Robertson

On Monday night at Woodbine Racetrack, a racing rarity took place when a dead-heat for win happened. Even more rare is that both horses are homebreds, and owned by their trainers. In the evening's sixth race, a conditioned race for Ontario-sired three and four-year-olds, So Bad Im Good (Joe Hudon) tried to cut all the fractions but couldn't hold off the backfield heading into the stretch. Kuchar (Jody Jamieson) and Sanattle Slew (Billy Davis, Jr.) were both poised to pounce on the pacesetter from the outer flow and both powered past, hitting the wire simultaneously. To read entire story click here.

Westfield, IN --- The Harness Horse Youth Foundation is seeking qualified trainers to condition its stable of Trottingbreds in preparation for the organization's 2014 summer program schedule. Volunteer trainers are expected to jog or exercise the horse on a daily basis to build stamina, but no actual training miles are required. Trainer is responsible for all care, feed, hay, bedding and shoeing. Upon request, gifts-in-kind receipts for services can be issued. Horses will be delivered on or about April 15 and picked up in late June. Each horse comes with its own harness (and hopples if needed). For more information, contact HHYF Executive Director Ellen Taylor at 317.867.5877 or by e-mail at ellen@hhyf.org. For more information on opportunities through HHYF, or to support its mission, go to www.hhyf.org.

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