Day At The Track
Search Results
17 to 32 of 72

This morning (April 28) the Honorable Sandra J. Feuerstein of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York issued an order staying the administrative hearing of the New York State Gaming Commission against Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott for alleged overages of therapeutic medication. Mr. Mott has sued Commission members, employees and the state's equine testing lab for violating his civil rights as a Commission licensee pursuant to what is commonly referred to as a federal "1983" action. In his suit, Mott raises the issue that the Commission and its predecessor, the New York State Racing & Wagering Board, routinely and consistently deny licensees accused of drug offenses and legitimate medication overages the right to split sample collection and independent referee testing. In fact, in just the last two years, blood samples were denied to numerous accused licensees under the premise that, after the state's own testing was completed, "not enough" blood was left over to send to one such referee lab. Mott was denied independent testing of the blood sample extracted from the subject horse. “The Judge had legitimate questions as it related to the Commission’s practices in its sample collection, and ordered the attorneys for all parties to brief the issue and be back in court in June,” said Andrew Mollica, Mott’s attorney. The Commission hearing, scheduled for May 6, has now been stayed indefinitely. The court issued a briefing schedule with a return to court date of June 29.    

Four veterinarians entered guilty pleas for their illegal doping of thoroughbred race horses at Penn National Race Track in Grantville, Pennsylvania. The United States Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania announced that Dr. Kevin Brophy, age 60, Florida, Dr. Fernando Motta, age 44, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Dr. Christopher Korte, age 43, Pueblo, Colorado, pleaded guilty today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan E. Schwab in Harrisburg. Dr. Renee Nodine, age 52, Annville, pleaded guilty yesterday afternoon. Each defendant is charged with allegedly administering drugs to horses within 24 hours of when the horse was entered to race. This conduct was in violation of the state law prohibiting the rigging of publicly exhibited contests and regulations prohibiting the administration of drugs to horses within 24 hours of when they are entered to race. Additionally, because the administering of the drugs was in violation of the state criminal laws, rules and regulations governing thoroughbred racing, they were not dispensed in the course of the defendants’ professional practice. At the guilty plea proceedings before Magistrate Judge Schwab, Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe explained that the drugs were not administered to treat the horses but to enhance the horses’ performance in the race or to give it an edge over other horses. According to Behe this constituted misbranding of the prescription animal drugs in violation of federal law. The alleged activity took place at various times beginning as early as 1986 and continuing up to August 2014. The Informations also allege that the defendants conspired with horse trainers, whose identities are “known to the United States”, to administer the drugs in violation of the laws, rules and regulations governing the conduct of thoroughbred racing. The guilty pleas this week were pursuant to plea agreements in which the defendants agreed to plead guilty and cooperate with the United States in the continuing investigation. At the guilty plea proceedings Behe informed the court that cooperation by the defendants was an essential part of the plea agreement and that the defendants had already identified for the United States the many trainers with whom the defendants conspired with to illegally administer drugs to the horses. Behe identified for the court the drugs that were administered to include, among others, Kentucky Red, Carolina Gold, Bute, Dexamethasone, Banamine, Stop2, Estrogen, L-Arginine, and ACTH. According to the charges, trainers allegedly placed orders for drugs and the defendants, after administering the drugs, backdated the billing records to avoid detection. The defendants allegedly submitted false veterinarian treatment reports to the State Horse Racing Commission, omitting from those reports any reference to the drugs administered to horses at the track on race day. The filing of these reports and the backdating of billing records were, allegedly, to further the conspiracy by concealing the illegal activity. These acts had the potential to defraud other owners and trainers whose horses were entered in the same race and defrauded the betting public as well. The matter is being investigated by the Harrisburg Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Pennsylvania State Horse Racing Commission, U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Criminal Investigations, and the Pennsylvania State Police. Assistant United States Attorney William A. Behe is prosecuting the cases for the United States. Indictments and criminal Informations are only allegations. All persons charged are presumed to be innocent unless and until found guilty in court. A sentence following a finding of guilty is imposed by the Judge after consideration of the applicable federal sentencing statutes and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. The maximum penalty in these cases under the federal statute is 2 years imprisonment, a term of supervised release following imprisonment, and a $200,000 fine. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the Judge is also required to consider and weigh a number of factors, including the nature, circumstances and seriousness of the offense; the history and characteristics of the defendant; and the need to punish the defendant, protect the public and provide for the defendant’s educational, vocational and medical needs. For these reasons, the statutory maximum penalty for the offense is not an accurate indicator of the potential sentence for a specific defendant. By Paul Smith Reprinted with permission of Fox43.com

RENO, (Wild Horse Education) – A federal court judge in Reno, NV has granted a coalition of wild horse advocacy and conservation groups a Temporary Restraining Order to block the sale of unbranded horses at a slaughter auction tomorrow in Fallon, Nevada. The groups sued to stop the sale of unbranded horses who were captured last weekend on public and tribal lands in northern Nevada, alleging that unbranded horses were likely federally-protected wild horses originating from the nearby Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Little Owyhee Herd Management Area. The order throws into question tomorrow’s auction at the Fallon Livestock Exchange, where nearly 500 horses are sitting in pens awaiting their fate. The horses in question were rounded up by the Fort McDermitt Paiute Shoshone tribe with approval of the U.S. Forest Service and the BLM. In response to the lawsuit filed by the public interest firm Meyer, Gltizenstein & Crystal with local counsel Gordon B. Cowan on behalf of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, its founding organization Return to Freedom, The Cloud Foundation, the Western Watersheds Project and advocate Laura Leigh, U.S. District Court Judge Miranda M. Du found: “Plaintiffs have shown serious questions …that wild horses were improperly rounded up during the gather from August 11-13, 2013. .. Plaintiffs have demonstrated an immediate threat of irreparable harm if the status quo is not maintained, that is the sale of wild horses and their possible slaughter. . . . The public interest is served when the Court maintains the status quo to ensure wild horses are not improperly removed and auctioned for sale to potentially be slaughtered because of an agency action.” Du’s TRO prohibits the sale of all unbranded horses at tomorrow’s slaughter auction until the hearing, scheduled for Wednesday, August 21, 2013. “Judge Du has stepped in to do what the federal government refused to do: act to prevent federally protected wild horses from being sold at a slaughter auction,” said Suzanne Roy, Director of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign. “We are grateful for this federal court decision, but remain outraged by the federal government’s complicity in this dirty operation that has sentenced hundreds of horses to horrific deaths at slaughter houses in Canada and Mexico.” “Like the nearly 170 horses that I rescued from this livestock auction three years ago, many of these horses are wild horses who were removed from federal lands. They were denied federal protection under the Wild Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act, and the judge has taken a stand for all those mares, foals, yearlings and mature stallions who are a day away from being sold to kill buyers and sent to slaughter,” said Ellie Phipps Price, AWHPC supporter and owner of the renowned Durell Vineyard in Sonoma, California. “The tribes and the U.S. government need to choose birth control for wild horses over roundup and slaughter.” “We want to get to the bottom of this and understand how wild horses may have been compromised through stealth negotiations between the federal government and the tribe,” said Neda DeMayo, President of Return to Freedom. “It is the legal responsibility of the Forest Service and the BLM to preserve and protect wild horses on our public lands. When wild horses roam outside of their designated Herd Management Areas, it should be the concern of these agencies to return them to their rangelands- not support covert horse trading deals sending wild horses to auction and slaughter.” “Sometimes the fight to protect our wild horses is difficult and complex. This decision shows that when we all work together and stay the course, we can achieve our mutual goals,” said Laura Leigh, founder of Wild Horse Education. “I am proud to be part of this effort. Together, we can turn this around to save America’s mustangs on our public lands in the West.” A total of 467 horses were captured by the tribe and delivered to the slaughter auction, where they await their fate. An undetermined number of these horses are unbranded and likely to be wild horses. The Forest Service has acknowledged thatmost of these horses will be purchased by kill buyers and trucked to slaughter plants in Canada or Mexico. Photographs of the horses show hundreds of mares and foals, along with yearlings and adults crammed into pens at the stockyard.  

Meatballs have been withdrawn from stores throughout Europe as the international horse meat scare, which could include former harness racing horses, takes another turn - but shops in Canada and the USA are apparently not affected.

The New Jersey Department of Agriculture has quarantined two farms, one in Franklinville, Gloucester County and one in Dennisville, Cape May County, after horses at each farm were exposed to a horse that developed the highly infectious equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM).

New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher today announced the 2012 Governor's Award for Horseperson of the Year and Secretary of Agriculture Awards for New Jersey Thoroughbred and Standardbred Horses of the Year.

The Garden State Preservation Trust (GSPT) today approved a request for $79.5 million to help counties, towns and nonprofit organizations preserve farmland across New Jersey and to further State-initiated farmland preservation efforts, Agriculture Secretary Douglas H. Fisher announced.

On Thursday (August 30) at 2 p.m. at the Windsor Fair, the Maine Harness Horsemen's Association, Maine Standardbred Breeders and Owners Association, Windsor Fair, Maine Association of Agricultural Fairs, Scarborough Downs and Ocean Properties will be hosting a legislative candidate's day at the Windsor Fair.

The directors of a state public authority dedicated to improving horse breeding have removed the former assemblyman serving as executive director for alleged mismanagement, including hiring friends.

The Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) commends Senator Kay Hagen (D-NC) and Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) for introducing S. 3448, the Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act.

Who eats horse meat in New Jersey? Maybe nobody does, but soon it could be illegal just in case somebody gets a craving for a pony burger or a Clydesdale sandwich. The General Assembly has approved bipartisan legislation that would ban the slaughter or sale of horses for human consumption.

Some politicians in Washington feel that restarting a horse slaughter industry on American soil is a good idea. We'd like to offer a small window into how the horse slaughter industry currently operates, as shady players make deals amongst themselves while duping innocent people into giving up their horses to be butchered. Read on...

New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher presented New Jersey Farm Bureau with the 2011 Governor's Trophy for Horseperson of the Year on Sunday, January 15 at the 55th Annual New Jersey Breeder's Luncheon in Eastampton. Harness racing recipients were also amongst the winners.

HARRISBURG, Pa., Nov. 16, 2011- A week-long Standardbred horse sale showcased Pennsylvania's strong equine harness racing industry, with Pennsylvania-sired horses earning top bids in the yearling sale, the largest component of the more than $55 million auction.

A 3-year-old horse from Gloucester County was euthanized on October 20 after contracting Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), a serious, mosquito-borne illness in horses.

An 11-year-old mare from Monmouth County has tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV), according to New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher. The mare was not vaccinated against the disease.

17 to 32 of 72