Search Results
1 to 16 of 85
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

Dr. Don Doc Mossbarger, founder of Midland Acres of Bloomingburg, Ohio, has been selected as the 30th Little Brown Jug Wall of Fame Honoree by the Delaware County Fair. Midland Acres was originally established in the 1960s to supplement Dr. Mossbargers veterinary practice. Midland Acres has stood some of Ohio's best stallions; Speed In Action, Final Score, Nobleland Sam. Today, Midland Acres stands 12 stallions, including the 2011 LBJ champion Big Bad John. The United States Trotting Association credits Mossbarger and Midland Acres as breeding more than 1,584 standardbreds with earnings of more than $47.5 million. Dr. Mossbarger was a tireless supporter of the efforts to bring the Video Lottery Terminals (VTLs) to Ohio's racetracks. Mossbarger is a member of the Little Brown Jug Society and a past president and former board member of the Ohio Harness Horsemans Association. In 1994 Dr. Mossbarger was elected into the Ohio Harness Racing Hall of Fame. by Jay Wolf, for the Little Brown Jug

MANALAPAN, NJ - August 21, 2014 - When Freehold Raceway re-opens for its 2014 Summer/Fall Meet on Thursday, August 28, there will be a return to condition racing and the introduction of automated morning lines. "In a mutual agreement with the SBOA [Standardbred Breeders & Owners Association of New Jersey], we are returning to conditioned races when we re-open August 28," said Freehold's General Manager Howard Bruno. "We had some success with the ABC classified system, however, the seasonal fluctuations in horse supply made it difficult to maximize its potential." The 48-day meet [August 28 through December 13] will occupy Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays each week along with a special Labor Day card on Monday, September 1. Post time is 12:30 p.m. Overnight purses will average $40,000 daily, according to Bruno. Automated morning lines, generated by TrackMaster, will debut this meet. "Several other tracks have begun using the system and the feedback has been positive," said Director of Racing and Racing Secretary Karen Fagliarone. "We feel the automation will lead to increased accuracy and be more timely than our current system." Opening weekend includes stakes action, an opening day t-shirt giveaway, and, on Labor Day, discounted food items, autograph session and a cap giveaway. The free t-shirt will be distributed with a paid Freehold live racing program [while supplies last] on Thursday, August 28. The opening day feature is the first round of New Jersey Sire Stakes Green Acres for two-year-old trotting colts. Friday, August 29 spotlights eliminations, if needed, for the Helen Smith Trot for three-year-old fillies which has a $55,000 estimated final on September 5. Saturday, August 30 will showcase three-year-old pacing colts in Green Acres action. Two-year-old pacers, both colts and fillies, face off in opening round Green Acres on Labor Day, September 1. Labor Day is also Back to the Track, a cooperative effort by the United States Trotting Association, its member racetracks, and horsemen from coast-to-coast that combines exciting harness racing and fan-friendly promotions. Freehold's Labor Day festivities include a free Back to the Track cap with paid Freehold live program [while supplies last], 50-cent hot dogs, 50-cent sodas, drawings for a season's parking pass and Back to the Track t-shirts. Additionally, there will be a drivers' autograph session. Saturday, September 20 marks the Third Annual Open Space Pace, which starts with a morning parade of horses on Main Street in Freehold Borough, ending at Freehold Raceway where additional events will be staged, including celebrity amateur races, demonstrations, educational exhibits, great food, live harness racing, family fun activities, petting zoo, a concert and fireworks. In addition to the Green Acres stakes for New Jersey-sired two and three-year-olds, the fall schedule includes the Lou Babic Paces [September 27] and the SBOANJ-sponsored Marion Dancer Trot [September 4], Helen Smith Trot [September 5], Charles Smith Trot [September 12], Harold Dancer Trot [September 25] and New Jersey Futurities [September 6, October 10, October 16 and October 25]. Qualifiers are on Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. with declarations due the prior day at 10 a.m. Fourteen baby races and qualifiers are carded for Thursday, August 21. The opening week draw schedule: Thursday, August 28 - Draw on Monday, August 25 [Declare in by 9 a.m.] Friday, August 29 - Draw on Tuesday, August 26 [Declare in by 9 a.m.] Saturday, August 30 - Draw on Wednesday, August 27 [Declare in by 9 a.m.] Monday, September 1 [Labor Day] - Draw on Thursday, August 28 [Declare in by 9 a.m.] The remainder of meet will follow Freehold's traditional draw schedule of Saturday for Thursday, Tuesday for Friday and Wednesday for Saturday. by Carol Hodes, for the SBOANJ

Trenton, NJ --- When the Career Day recruiters show up at Westfall High School in Ohio during the next two years, Hunter Myers probably won’t need to pay them a visit. He has had his future mapped out for quite a while now. Myers, a 16-year-old rising junior at Westfall, drove his first Standardbred horse at age 5 and immediately fell in love. The Williamsport, Ohio, native is busy on the Ohio fair circuit and got his first win July 11 at the Jackson County Fair in Wellston. He added two more victories later the same day. After going winless in his first seven starts, Hunter entered Monday with nine wins, 11 seconds and 10 thirds in 55 races. His horses have earned $21,313 in purses, and he hopes this is only the start of a nice, long driving career. “I started off driving my first horse at around 5 or 6,” he said. “As soon as I started to grow up I said ‘I’m going to start driving horses. That’s what I want to do.’ “I’ve grown up in it, my dad is in it, my grandpa is in it. My dad owns some horses and trains some horses for his brother, Mark. I’d like to have a couple horses of my own but as I’m growing up driving I want to stick with the driving for a while. But I’d like to have one or two horses to tinker around with.” Myers still remembers his first time behind a horse, which came while he was jogging a horse with his dad, Michael. “We had this one horse, she was a nice trotter and easy,” Hunter recalled. “He took me around until the last two laps and stopped her. He said ‘She’s yours.’ I drove the last two laps and ever since then I’ve been going up. I jogged that horse, he bumped me up to another horse, then another. “My first training trip was in a cart, a 2:40 mile. It was nothing extreme. My first bike training trip was a pacer when I was around 8. I was little nervous to get on the bike for the first time and get behind the horse. You’re sitting in a jog cart and jumping to a bike. There’s a big difference, but I kept my cool and as soon as I turned I said ‘This ain’t bad. It’s like a jog in the park.’” Myers played baseball until the fifth grade and then decided to focus completely on driving. He is smart enough to use each stepping stone as a learning experience, starting with the matinees. He is also humble enough to let a horse show the way when necessary. “The matinees gave me a lot of gate experience,” he said. “I had an old horse, (11-year-old) Singapore Gambler. He was my first matinee horse, he knew what he was doing. “So it gave me the experience of being with a horse down inside of me, grouped up. And my horse more or less trained me. The horse told me, ‘We’re staying right here, and then we’re going back here.’ I could let the horse go.” Once he got his qualifying/fair license, Myers could not wait to start racing at the fairs. And while he did not win in his first seven races, he finished second four times. That led to a mixture of frustration and optimism. “I had to say I’m right up there, and I need a half a second and I’ll be all right,” he said. “At the same time, it bugged me sometimes when I thought about it. I’m right there, a little bit more oomph and he or she should win it. But I was happy with where I was.” It finally came together while driving Uptown Dreamer, a horse his dad is leasing. In looking at the program, Myers thought he might finish second. The horse quickly got to the front and remained there, although a challenge emerged from the outside on the last turn. “I was chasing (Uptown Dreamer) and tapping her, I was yelling at her, trying to get her faster,” Myers said. “I was doing everything in my willpower to get her faster.” Once he got across the line, Hunter said “I was hootin’ and hollerin.’ I had a big old smile on my face. It took a while to get the smile off my face, I was so excited.” He managed to refocus in time to win two more races on the day. “I just knew I couldn’t have a big head when I went back out there,” he said. “I just said ‘Calm down, it’s a new horse, I don’t know what’s going to happen.’ That’s what I did, and sure enough I won again.” As his career starts to build steam, Hunter credits his dad and veteran driver Jack Dailey as two of his biggest influences. “Jack always told me ‘I can’t wait to get you on the track to race against you,’” Myers said. “He’s a big ball of fun out there when you’re racing against him. I always tell Jack if he sees something wrong to tell me. “My dad is the one pulling me up and down these fairs. He’s taking me all over and helping me out. If it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t be here where I’m at.” And he’s exactly where he wants to be -- taking dead aim on a career in harness racing. by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent Courtesy of the United States Trotting Association Web Newsroom

(August 18, 2014 - Wyomissing, PA) Three racetracks operated by Penn National Gaming, Inc. (PNGI), the largest operator of harness racetracks in North America, will be active participants in the United States Trotting Association's (USTA) "Back to the Track" program over the next month. The "Back to the Track" program is an initiative to encourage on-track attendance at harness racetracks across the country through promotions and interactive events. More information on the program can be found at http://backtothetrack.ustrotting.com/. "Back to the Track is a great way to bring new guests to our tracks and also say 'thank you' to our loyal customers as well," said PNGI Vice President of Racing Christopher McErlean. "Plainridge, Freehold and Rosecroft each have come up with some unique events and activities for their guests to enjoy," he added. Plainridge Racecourse in Plainville, MA, the newest member of the PNGI racing family, will be hosting a full weekend of events and live racing on August 23 and 24. On both days the Hambletonian Trophy, Harness Racing's most prestigious prize, will be on display. The trophy was won by the locally owned and trained Royalty for Life in 2013. On Saturday, barn tours will be conducted from 12 noon to 2 p.m. with all participants to be entered in drawings to announce a post parade on either day, ride in the starting gate car and participate in an exhibition race on Sunday with top Plainridge drivers. Plainridge drivers will participate in a meet and greet on both days and serving customers in a special cook out area during both afternoons. Drivers will also give out commemorative "Back to the Track" t-shirts following each race. A free scratch off ticket will be given to all guests Sunday with a $50,000 grand prize. The "$50,000 Match and Win" promotion is sponsored by Mom's Motorcycles of Foxboro, MA. Post time Saturday, August 23 is 4 p.m. Post time on Sunday, August 24 is 1 p.m. Admission and parking is free at Plainridge every live racing day. For more information go to www.prcharness.com. Freehold Raceway in Freehold, NJ will be hosting "Back to the Track" events on Labor Day, September 1 during its afternoon live racing program. All guests will receive a free "Back to the Track" baseball cap with the purchase of a Freehold live racing program (while supplies last.) Drawings throughout the day will be conducted for "Back to the Track" t-shirts and Season Parking passes. Fifty-cent ($.50) hot dog and soda specials will be offered as well as a driver autograph session. Post time Labor Day is 12:30 p.m. and admission is free. For more information go to www.freeholdraceway.com. Rosecroft Raceway in Fort Washington, MD will celebrate "Back to the Track" as part of its summer-fall meet opening night on Saturday, September 13. The first 400 guests after 6 p.m. will receive a free "Back to the Track" t-shirt and guests will have a chance to enter losing tickets all evening for "Second Chance" drawings after races 5, 7 and 9 for $50 betting vouchers. In addition, a popular Asian Festival will be held all day Saturday, September 13 in the Rosecroft parking lots. Post time on September 13 is 6:4 0 p.m. with free admission and parking. For more information go to www.rosecroft.com. Christopher McErlean

Indianapolis, IN --- Harfo Hanover brushed to the lead at the three-quarter pole and was never caught on his way to a 1:54.3 score in the $55,462 Fox Stake for harness racing 2-year-old open pacers on Wednesday (Aug. 13) at the Indiana State Fair. The Always A Virgin-Harlow Hall colt is owned by Randy Bendis, William Varney and Reed Broadway. Jeff Cullipher is the trainer and Tyler Smith was in the sulky. Harfo Hanover sat third for the opening half-mile of the race while Allstar Energy was in front at the :30.2 opening quarter and This Baby Rocks took over the lead at the :59.3 half-mile marker. But Smith pulled Harfo Hanover out to take over the lead by the 1:27.1 three-quarter pole and he paced a final panel in :27.2 in drawing off to a 3-1/4 length margin over This Baby Rocks. Cantescapemydesire rallied to be third. The win was the third in seven season's starts for Harfo Hanover, who has now banked $93,981 in his freshman campaign. Also on the all-stakes card was the $36,080 Ralph Wilfong Memorial Trot for freshman open trotters. In that event, William De Long and William Patrick De Long's Stickem Buck came first over at the three-quarter pole, grabbed the lead by the head of the stretch and went on to a 1:59.1 victory for driver Ed Hensley and trainer Roger Welch. The Big Stick Lindy-Aunt Lane gelding won for the third time in five lifetime starts, improving his 2014 bankroll to $70,540. Mance Hanover was second, 3-1/2 lengths behind the winner, while Cool Judgement finished third. Also on the card were eight divisions of the Hoosier Stakes for 2-year-olds of both sexes and gaits and four divisions of the Horseman Stake for 3-year-olds of both sexes and gaits. Complete charts for all these races can be found at this link. USTA Communications Department Courtesy of the United States Trotting Association Web Newsroom

Woodstock, Virginia-- It's that time of year again for the Shenandoah County Fair which kicks off on August 22. The age old tradition of Harness Racing returns to the Shenandoah half-mile oval on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 and runs through Saturday, August 30, 2014. Entries will be accepted by phone or in person and the entry box will close 2 day prior to the scheduled race day at 11:00 AM. As usual there will be charted lines for the races and the condition sheet is now available and is attached below. If you need a hard copy you can contact the race office at (540) 459-7203. For more information contact the fair at shencofair.com. Attached: Condition Sheet Shenandoah County Fair. Photo: Racing Returns to the Shenandoah County Fair on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Race Program Shenandoah County Fair Association, Inc. Woodstock, Virginia 22664 (540)-459-7303 (Race Office) TWO DAY BOX (closing @ 11:00 AM) August 27 - August 30, 2014 POST-TIME 1:00 PM RACES WILL BE CHARTED Wednesday, August 27 (Box closes Monday @ 11:00 am) Trot- Two-year olds VA Preferred Purse $700.00 Pace-Two-year olds Va. preferred Purse $700.00 Trot- Non-Winners $2,000 Last 5 Starts [in 2013] (AE Three-year olds) Purse $1,000.00 Non-Winners $5,000 Lifetime/ Maidens, Winners over $20,000.00 Life Not Eligible Pace-(Rocking Rose Pace) - Non-Winners $2,500 Last 5 Starts (in 2013), Maidens Purse $1,000.00 (AE) Three-year olds, Winner over $20,000 not eligible Thursday, AUGUST 28 (Box closes Tuesday @ 11:00 am) Pace-Non-Winners $10,000 Year Purse $1000.00 Ed Long Memorial Open Trot Purse $1,200.00 Pace- Aldine Jenkins Memorial Open Pace Purse $1,200.00 Sub. - Two Year Old Trot / Pace Friday AUGUST 29 (Box closes Wednesday @ 11:00 AM) Pace-Non-Winners $2,000 Last 5 Starts (Princess Rose Pace) Purse $1,000.00 (AE) Maidens Trot-Non-Winners $5,000 Year Purse $1,000.00 (AE) Non-Winners 2 P.M. races this year Pace-Non-Winners $5,000 Year (AE) Non-Winners 2 P.M. races this year (AE) Two- and Three-year olds/ Maidens Purse $1,000.00   Saturday, AuGUST 30 (BOX CLOSES Thursday @ 11:00 AM) Trot- Marvin G. Sigler - Free For All Trot (Preferred Virginia Bred or Owned) Purse $1,600.00 Pace C R Associates - Veterans Free For All Pace- (Preferred Virginia Bred or Owned) Purse $1,600.00 Trot- Non-Winners $3,000 Year Purse $1000.00 Pace-Non-Winners $3,000 last five starts Purse $1000.00   Conditions Rules of United States Trotting Association govern. RACES Will BE CHARTED. ­Entry fees $15.00, No Deductions. Money divided 45, 25, 15, 10, and 5 percent. Each class is to go two dashes, a distance of 1 mile each. Two or more horses under the same ownership may start in any race. Horses will start in classes in which they are eligible, (Must be VHHA Member) Rights reserved to decline an entry, or call off any event that does not fill satisfactory. If an event does not fill, a substitute event may be scheduled for available horses. Right reserved to cancel any race due to weather conditions, or other good or sufficient cause. Four or more horses must start each class. Right reserved to handicap any race. Horses must be declared in no later than 11:00 am two days prior to races and entrance fee paid. Right reserved to declare any race off at any time. All horses racing and stalled at Shenandoah County Fairgrounds are at risk of owner. The Shenandoah County Fair Association, Inc., will not be responsible or liable for any accident to any person or property or loss by fire, theft, storm, or from any other causes. All horses must have a current Coggins test and health papers. Driver Accident Insurance Is Not Provided. Entries Accepted On These Terms Only. Entries: Terry Lee Kibler, Cell 540-335-8768 / Beginning August, 24th call Race Office 540-459-7303 By Michael Carter, for Shenandoah County Fair      

Batavia, NY --- Batavia Downs will host its second Back to the Track night in seven days this Saturday (Aug. 9) after having been forced to cancel live racing last week. This is possibly the first time it has happened in the history of this United States Trotting Association (USTA) promotion. The original date of August 2 featured Harness Racing Bingo along with drawings for Back to the Track t-shirts and driver bobbleheads. A great crowd turned out to enjoy an evening at the races and the trackside drawings were about to start when Mother Nature had other ideas. Flood warnings we're posted throughout Upstate New York that day and America's oldest lighted track was unable to avoid the fray. A heavy down pour ensued that included lightening and it basically washed the racetrack away making the surface impossible to race over. After a half hour delay the decision was made to end the proceedings. Batavia Downs was looking forward to participating in the USTA's national promotion but the decision to pull the plug was an easy one. "We would never put our horsemen or equine athletes at risk in unsafe conditions" Todd Haight, Director/GM of Live racing said. "It was the first time we had to cancel a program once it got underway since 2002. Hopefully it will be another 12 years until we have to do so again." So because of the cancellation, Back to the Track will take place for the second time in a week. Customers that swipe their Players Club cards beginning at 5:00 p.m. at Players Club will receive a new Harness Racing Bingo card and be automatically entered into the drawings that take place after the third race. Patrons holding a bingo card from August 2 must pick up a new card; August 2 cards will not be eligible to win prizes. Harness Racing Bingo prizes include $100 wagering vouchers to the first five customers that get full card bingo and $10 gaming free play vouchers to the first 25 that get single bingo. If you have a racing form from last Saturday please bring it with you and exchange it for this week's program free of charge. Just stop by the program stand to make the switch. Also beginning at 5 p.m., Sahlen's hot dogs and sodas will be just 50-cents as part of the tracks annual old fashion night celebration. With great weather in the forecast, it's sure to be the busiest night of the season. For more information please visitwww.bataviadownsgaming.com. Tim Bojarski

ANDERSON, Ind.—August 5, 2014—A field of nine will be sent post-ward in the $250,000 Dan Patch Invitational at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino on Friday, August 8. In what may be the most accomplished field ever assembled, the 21st installment of Hoosier Park’s signature event will highlight the 14-race program that begins at 5:15 p.m.  The race will be part of a special weekend tagged as “Dan Patch Festival Weekend” and will feature extreme entertainment, giveaways, and racing. The evening will also be complimented by Indiana Sires Stakes finals, sending the purse money to be distributed throughout the evening over the $500,000 mark.  The 2014 Dan Patch field boasts combined career purse earnings over $10 million and includes four millionaires, three previous Dan Patch winning drivers, two Hall of Fame drivers, and one Hall of Fame trainer. Bettor’s Edge, Heston Blue Chip, Sweet Lou, and Thinking Out Loud will make their way to Indiana boasting career earnings over the $1 million mark. Ricky Macomber Jr., who visited the Dan Patch winner’s circle in 2000 and 2002, will drive Bettor’s Edge from post seven while Peter Wrenn, who won the 2012 installment of the Dan Patch, will start from post three behind Night Pro.  Hall of Fame driver Ron Pierce, who was victorious in the 2005 Dan Patch Invitational with Maltese Artist, has been enlisted to drive the 4-5 morning line favorite, Sweet Lou from post five for North America’s leading money-winning trainer, Ron Burke. With over $2.9 million in career earnings, the five-year-old horse is the richest horse in the field and is currently riding an eight race win streak, most recently victorious in 1:47.2 in the US Pacing Championship at the Meadowlands.  Harness racings’ all time leading money winning driver and Hall of Famer, John Campbell, will make his way to Hoosier Park to compete in his second Dan Patch Invitational and has been enlisted to drive Thinking Out Loud for Hall of Fame trainer, Robert McIntosh from post two. Throughout his career, Thinking Out Loud has amassed more than $1.5 million with a record of 44-14-7-10.  Also joining the stellar cast of entrants as a main contender for the 2014 Dan Patch title is State Treasurer, with Jody Jamieson at the lines from post eight. The Dr. Ian Moore trainee has been tabbed as the 4-1 morning line second choice. A winner of over $750,000 lifetime, the five-year-old horse recently set a 1:48.1 Canadian seasons record at Mohawk and is the 2014 Molson Pace Champion.  Night Pro will play the role of local favorite from three for trainer Dale Decker. Night Pro, a former Indiana Sires Stakes champion, enters Saturday’s race after posting seven consecutive wins in the Invitational pace at Hoosier Park. The four-year-old gelding has won 22 of 30 career starts and has amassed over $350,000 in career earnings.  The 2014 Dan Patch field, in post-position order with named driver and trainer includes: 1.      Dancin Yankee           Tr: Amber Buter         Dr: Tyler Buter     8-1 2.      Thinking Out Loud      Tr: Robert McIntosh  Dr: John Campbell   6-1                 3.      Night Pro                   Tr: Dale Decker        Dr: Peter Wrenn      20-1 4.      Carol’s Comet           Tr: Ron Potter          Dr: Aaron Merriman 15-1 5.      Sweet Lou                 Tr: Ron Burke          Dr: Ron Pierce    4-5        6.      Heston Blue Chip      Tr: Linda Toscano   Dr: Corey Callahan  15-1 7.      Bettor’s Edge           Tr: Ron Burke     Dr: Ricky Macomber Jr.  10-1 8.      State Treasurer        Tr: Ian Moore      Dr: Jody Jamieson        4-1 9.      Our Lucky Chip     Tr: Jason Miller     Dr: Trace Tetrick    30-1  Racing fans will have the opportunity to participate in two special wagers offered for the Dan Patch Invitational card. A $25,000 Guaranteed Dan Patch Superfecta pool will be available as part of the Strategic Wagering Program. The wager will have a minimum bet of 10 cents and is available through the cooperative efforts of the United States Trotting Association, Hoosier Park Racing & Casino and the Indiana Standardbred Association. Slated as the twelfth race on the card, estimated post time for Hoosier Park’s signature event is 9:30 p.m.  A $10,000 Guaranteed Pick-3 will also be made available to racing fans in races seven through nine as part of the East Meets Midwest Drivers’ Challenge. The East Meets Midwest Drivers’ Challenge will pit the top-five drivers at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino against five of the top drivers from the East in a three-race challenge with the winning team going home with their share of the $20,000 prize. The top five drivers from Hoosier Park will make-up “Team Midwest” with the top five drivers from the East driving for “Team East”.    In what is being called the “Dan Patch Festival Weekend”, Hoosier Park will showcase some of the most notable names in harness racing alongside special wagers, free fireworks, giveaways, and interactive family-friendly entertainment. Also, highlighting the weekend will be a concert by the Grammy-award winning group, Little Big Town on Saturday, August 9 as part of Hoosier Park’s summer concert series line-up.   Emily Gaskin Racing Commentator, Publicist and Marketing Specialist

DEL MAR, CA - North American racing regulators have decided to consider the results of two scientific research studies that have been commissioned to help detect the deliberate administration of cobalt in racehorses before making a formal recommendation of a regulatory testing limit to commission testing. At the RCI Model Rules Committee meeting last week, a proposed threshold was presented and later withdrawn by representatives of the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium (RMTC) pending further discussion by the RMTC Board of Directors. That threshold, which is based on an analysis of an RMTC-coordinated project that is funded by the Kentucky Equine Drug Research Council and conducted by Dr. Heather Knych, an Assistant Professor at the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, was advanced with the support of 8 of the 14 members of the RMTC Scientific Advisory Committee. A second research project, funded by the United States Trotting Association (USTA), is near completion according to remarks made at the meeting by Ivan Axelrod, Chairman of the USTA. That project is being conducted by George Maylin, DVM, PhD, at the New York Drug Testing and Research Program at Morrisville State College in New York. He is assisted by Karyn Malinowski, PhD, and Kenneth McKeever, MS, PhD, FACSM, the Director and Associate Director, respectively, of the Equine Science Center at Rutgers University in New Jersey. Racing regulators are concerned that cobalt treatments may be given to racehorses with an intent to affect performance by inducing red blood cell production similar to the prohibited use of erythropoietin (EPO). All horses have some degree of cobalt in their system as a result of diet and environmental factors. Excessive amounts may indicate a deliberate administration, above and beyond what would be considered appropriate or normal for vitamin or mineral supplements. Concerns have been raised about horses with extremely elevated levels of cobalt and regulators are eager to better understand if an equine welfare threat exists. In 2009, the Ontario Racing Commission issued a notice from then-Veterinary Supervisor, Dr. Bruce Duncan, who noted that "when administered in appropriate quantities, there is likely very little performance benefit. And when used in excess, this element can be toxic to horses." The California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) has issued the following notice to horsemen and veterinarians: "Cobalt toxicity has been associated with myocardial (heart muscle) and other organ pathology in humans and other animals. High cobalt levels have been associated with the parenteral or oral administration of cobalt salts. While there is no documented evidence of cobalt toxicity in racehorses, the CHRB considers the administration of cobalt salts a potential equine health and safety issue." But the New Jersey Agriculture Experiment Station at Rutgers University indicates on their website the following: "High blood cobalt probably would indicate high doses of B-12 being given (the trace mineral is easier to test than the actual vitamin). The calming effect would be undesirable in a racehorse. It is virtually non-toxic and rapidly excreted through the kidneys if given in large doses, so there is no negative consequence other than possibly a quieter horse. It is recommended to give B-12 to stressed horses at around 30 microgram/kg of feed. There are no requirements for cobalt established for horses so it is uncertain what normal or excessive blood concentrations of cobalt would be. The National Research Council (2007) has set the maximum tolerable intake for cobalt to be 25 mg/kg (ppm) in the total ration but admits they base that decision on data from other species. There is no indication that horses on normal rations need supplemental cobalt." In addition, Dr. Dionne Benson, Executive Director of the RMTC, reiterated statements at last week's meeting that she has previously made to the press indicating that it is unclear at what point cobalt can become toxic to a horse. The RCI Board of Directors discussed whether to handle findings of excessive levels of cobalt indicating a deliberate administration of cobalt absent a documented deficiency and veterinarian prescribed treatment as "horse tampering". "It's one thing for a horse to be treated for a condition by its veterinarian, but quite another to be tampered with prior to a race," RCI President Ed Martin said. "Tampering is bad enough, but if we find that the tampering endangers the horse, then it's time to throw the book at someone." Although the RMTC-proposed threshold was withdrawn, a number of regulators had lingering questions as to the extent that data from Standardbred horses was included in their recommendation. Duncan Patterson, Chairman of RCI's Drug Testing Standards and Practices Committee, recommended that the association consider the two studies before adopting a formal recommendation to commissions and laboratories. by Steve May for the Association of Racing Commissioners International  

ANDERSON, Ind.-August 2, 2014 - Hoosier Park Racing & Casino is proud to announce a renewed partnership with HRTV, The Network for Horse Sports, to provide exclusive coverage for the $250,000 Dan Patch Invitational at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino on Friday, August 8. Now in its' 21st edition, the Dan Patch Invitational pace sets the stage for the top rated pacers in North America to convene on Hoosier Park's seven-eighths mile oval seeking a lucrative $250,000 purse and a spot in Hoosier Park's history. HRTV will be on property throughout the weekend to provide racing fans with exclusive coverage of all the festivities happening on and off the race track. Racing fans can also catch exclusive interviews on the HRTV programming from drivers and trainers racing at Hoosier Park. HRTV's national on-air host, Peter Lurie, will return to Hoosier Park for the fifth consecutive year to cover another Hoosier Park signature event. For the last four years Lurie has not only covered the Dan Patch Invitational at Hoosier Park but also the Indiana Derby at Indiana Downs. Lurie will provide commentary and handicapping throughout the Friday program alongside Hoosier Park's Racing Commentator, Emily Gaskin. Hoosier Park's signature harness racing event has become a tradition that is close to the hearts of Hoosiers. The Dan Patch, an invitational race, not only highlights some of the best athletes in the sport of harness racing, but is deeply rooted throughout Indiana soil. Hoosier Park's headline event is part of a special weekend tagged "Dan Patch Festival Weekend". The entire weekend will be filled with extreme racing, extreme entertainment, extreme wagers, giveaways and fun throughout the Hoosier Park property. The 'extreme' theme will take center stage on the track as ten of North America's fastest Standardbreds go to post for the Dan Patch Invitational, slated as the twelfth race on the program with an estimated post time of 9:30 p.m. In what may be the most competitive field ever assembled, the 21st installment of Hoosier Park's featured event will highlight the 14-race program that will boast lofty purses. The 2014 installment has no shortage of talent as racing fans can expect to see not only the sport's top rated older pacers but the best drivers in the sport of harness racing. The weekend will also be complimented by The East Meets Midwest Drivers' Challenge which will pit the top-five drivers at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, against five of the top drivers from the East in a three-race challenge with the winning team going home with their share of the $20,000 prize. The top five drivers from Hoosier Park will make-up "Team Midwest" with the top five drivers from the East making up "Team East". Racing fans will have the opportunity to participate in two special wagers offered exclusively for the Dan Patch Festival weekend. A $25,000 Guaranteed Dan Patch Superfecta pool will be available as part of a special Strategic Wagering Program introduced through the United States Trotting Association. The wager will have a minimum bet of 10 cents, and is available through the cooperative efforts of the United States Trotting Association, Hoosier Park Racing & Casino and the Indiana Standardbred Association. A $10,000 Guaranteed Pick-3 pool will also be available to racing fans for the three races of the East Meets Midwest Drivers' Challenge. The Pick-3, which offers a 50-cent minimum wager, will begin in the seventh race and will continue through the ninth race. Post time for the first race on the 14 race card is 5:15 p.m. by Emily Gaskin, for Hoosier Park

WASHINGTON, PA, July 25, 2014 -- Just as the winner of Saturday's $400,000 final of the Delvin Miller Adios Pace for the Orchids presented by Coors Light will cash big time, harness racing bettors playing the Adios Day card at The Meadows will enjoy opportunities for a lucrative payday. For the Saturday card, The Meadows is offering four pool guarantees totaling $42,500 in association with the United States Trotting Association Strategic Wagering Initiative. Three of the multirace wagers include the Adios final, which goes as race 12. Here's the line-up: $20,000-guaranteed Pick 4, races 9-12; $10,000 guaranteed Pick 4, races 4-7; $7,500-guaranteed Pick 3, races 11-13; $5,000 guaranteed Pick 5, races 12-16. Minimum wager in each case is 50 cents. Since Pennsylvania law requires a minimum per-race wager of $2, a player wagering at the 50-cent level must bet at least four tickets. First post Saturday is 12:20 PM, with the Adios final set for approximately 4 PM. by Evan Pattak, for the Meadows

WASHINGTON, PA, July 14, 2014 -- On Tuesday, July 15, The Meadows Racetrack & Casino will offer a $35,000 guarantee -- largest since the track began offering pool guarantees -- for its Pick 5 wager as part of the United States Trotting Association's Strategic Wagering Initiative. The Meadows added the "instant" guarantee after Tuesday's Pick 5 was uncovered, resulting in a three-day carryover of $11,587.31. In addition, The Meadows will offer a $5,000-guaranteed pool for the Pick 4, a regular feature of the track's Monday and Tuesday cards. Minimum wager for the Pick 4 (Races 4-7) and Pick 5 (Races 12-16) is 50 cents. Since Pennsylvania law requires a minimum per-race wager of $2, a player wagering at the 50-cent level must bet at least four tickets. First post for Tuesday's program, which features a $236,210 Pennsylvania Sires Stake for 2-year-old colt and gelding trotters, is 12:55 PM. by Evan Pattak, for the Meadows

Batavia, NY --- Condition sheets for the first week of racing at Batavia Downs Gaming, America's oldest lighted harness track, located in Western New York, are now available online at... http://www.bataviadownsgaming.com/live-racing/racinginfo/condition/. Simply click on "Live Racing" and then the "Horsemen" tab. Batavia Downs is the latest racetrack to participate in the United States Trotting Association's Online Entry Program. Trainers will be able to enter their horses online, effective Wednesday July 16, 2014, according to Batavia's longtime racing secretary Joe Zambito. Even though the track remains under construction, purses will be increased by $200,000 this season. "Our purse account is in much better shape than in recent years and despite our ongoing construction project we're happy to be able to raise purses," said Todd Haight, Director/GM of live racing. "I wouldn't be surprised once we get back to normal and our front entrance reopens that we could be looking at another increase." The 2014 season gets underway on July 23. Horses may begin arriving on July 17. The 68th racing season at Batavia Downs features 72 race dates. There will be a total of eight matinees, six Sundays, (the last Sunday in July and all five in August) and the extremely popular Labor Day and Columbus Day matinees. Evening post time is 6:350 p.m. while afternoon post time is 1:15 p.m. New York Sire Stakes season, featuring the glamour division, the three-year-old colt pacers, kicks off the July 27. For more information please call the race office at 585-344-6161. From Batavia Downs Media Relations.

WASHINGTON, PA, July 14, 2014 -- Adios Week at The Meadows Racetrack & Casino, the annual festive celebration of harness racing highlighted by the 48th edition of the $600,000 (est.) Delvin Miller Adios Pace for the Orchids Presented by Coors Light, kicks off the evening of Saturday, July 19, with Adios eliminations. The final of this major test for 3-year-old colt and gelding pacers is set for Saturday afternoon, July 26 as the highlight of a card that features six Grand Circuit stakes. Purses that day are expected to top $1 million, making it one of the richest cards in the history of The Meadows. "We've gone all out to make this the most memorable Adios Week ever," said Kevin Decker, director of racing for The Meadows. "We deeply appreciate the support of our fans, and we've put together an exciting week to support our signature event." Among those exciting elements are four Adios Day (July 26) pool guarantees offered in association with the United States Trotting Association Strategic Wagering Initiative. The guarantees, which total $42,500, cover a Pick 3, a Pick 5 and a pair of Pick 4s. Other Adios Week activities -- many offered in association with the Meadows Standardbred Owners Association -- include: The finals of the ever-popular Miss Adios Contest, which actually launches Adios Week a day early on Friday, July 18; An Adios hat giveaway on track Saturday, July 19; A pair of handicapping contests at all Meadows locations on Monday, July 21 and Tuesday, July 22. The hat giveaway and handicapping contests are limited to Racing Player Rewards members. Friday, July 25 party for all on the track apron. The card that evening features a pair of Grand Circuit stakes. The draw for Adios eliminations post positions is set for the morning of Tuesday, July 15. by Evan Pattak, for the Meadows

HAMBURG, N.Y. --- There's plenty to see and do at Buffalo Raceway Sunday afternoon (July 13) when the popular 'Back To The Track' promotion takes place along with a 13-race program featuring the New York Sire Stakes for the 2-year-old pacing fillies. The action gets underway at 1:05 p.m.   The 'Back To The Track' day, in conjunction with the United States Trotting Association and Buffalo Raceway, features harness racing bingo, free programs, sno-cones, cotton candy, pony rides and t-shirts. It's a great day of activities for those of all ages.   There will be plenty of action on the Hamburg half-mile oval as well with three $36,566 divisions of the New York Sire Stakes, slated as the second, fourth and sixth races, along with three $12,700 legs of the Excelsior Class A series.   The young ladies will be gunning for the divisional track record of 1:56.3 set by Silk Purse (2011) and Summertime Lea (2012). A total of six track marks have been either broken or tied at Buffalo Raceway this season so hang onto your hats.   The first division of the Sire Stakes features Sheeztoughenough (Art Dealer-Sheezadiamondealer) who'll score from the two post with Jim Morrill Jr. Installed as the 5-2 morning line favorite, Sheeztoughenough's last outing was a beauty with a 1:55 win at Mohawk in a $11,280 conditioned pace.   The main threat should come from Ameritime (American Ideal-L'Charm) who enters with two straight victories. She scored in a Excelsior A Class race with a 1:58 mark at Monticello and captured a fillies and mares maiden conditioned race at Tioga in 1:58. Mark MacDonald will get the call on the 7-2 second choice.   The remainder of the field includes My Little Delight (Jeff Gregory), Mo Molly Blue Chip (Kevin Cummings), Our Hot Majorette (Mike Saftic) and Heavens Legacy (Brent Holland).   The inside posts are the place to look in the second division as favorites will start from there. Mosquito Blue Chip gets the two hole for Morrill Jr. and is the 2-1 favorite. She comes to town after finishing a solid second at Monticello on July 4 in a $27,750 Sires Stakes race.   Lurking on the rail is Bin N Heaven (Rock N Roll Heaven-Binions) with Doug McNair in the bike. She was won both her qualifiers including a 1:56.3 at Mohawk Raceway back on June 29 and is the 3-1 second pick.   Others in the division include Amazing Phrasing (Jim Mettinis), Float On By (Saftic), Fan Mail (MacDonald) and Devil Child (Jimmy Whittemore).   The final leg has Neverhaditsogood (Art Major-Indulge Me) who finished second behind Bettor N Bettor in the Sire Stakes at Monticello on July 4. She finished 2-3/4 lengths back. McNair will be at the controls for Neverhaditsogood, who'll score from the four post.   The main threat could come from the rail-sitting Bullville Maggie with MacDonald set to go in the sulky. Bullville Maggie finished third in a $27,250 at Monticello on July 4 and was 6-1/2 lengths. She was straddled with the seven post, however, so the inside draw here could make a huge difference.   Also in the race as Mydelight Bluechip (Chirs Lems), Crucial Moment (Whittemore), Bachata Hanover (Morrill Jr.), Bussers Joy (Holland) and Yes You Can (Saftic).   After Sunday, it will be closing week at Buffalo Raceway with just four cards remaining. The racing schedule shows a 5 p.m. post on Wednesday while Friday and Saturdays will start at 6:40 p.m. Next Sunday is closing day with a 1:05 p.m. matinee slated.   For more information including upcoming promotions, race replays, results and the latest news, go to www.buffaloraceway.com   by Brian J. Mazurek, for Buffalo Raceway

HAMBURG, N.Y. --- The 'Back To The Track' promotion returns to Buffalo Raceway on Sunday afternoon (July 13) with a 1:05 p.m. post time. It's a way to bring long-time horse players and newcomers to the track for a fun-filled day of activities for all ages. The day will include the harness racing bingo game, free t-shirts, pony rides, sno-cones and cotton candy along with some great racing including the New York Sire Stakes Series for 2-year-old pacing fillies.A total of 13 races are scheduled. The man in charge of the 'Back To The Track' event at Buffalo Raceway is Director of Operations Jon Cramer. He said of the upcoming promotion, "This was an idea by the United States Trotting Association and we've been involved since its inception. They've taken the lead role in the promotion of it. They've also done a great job with it along with the guaranteed pool promotions such as the $5,000 Pick-4 we've had." And while the USTA has been involved in getting people back to the track on a national level, it's Cramer who is spearheading the Buffalo Raceway campaign to increase business at the Hamburg half-mile oval. "I'm committed to Western New York and harness racing here," Cramer said. "My family and I are all from here and I can't see myself leaving." But harness racing was the furthest thing on Cramer's mind when he graduated from Keuka College with a marketing degree. He said, "The only thing a knew about harness racing was that there were horses involved. I wasn't involved in the industry at all. When I was growing up as a kid, I wasn't thinking I wanted to work at a race track. It never crossed my mind. "I think I saw harness racing once before I got the job here," Cramer added. "I worked for the Erie County Fair full-time and as an intern. For marketing, it's a sprint with the fair because it's just 12 days long. In harness racing, it's a marathon." Cramer, who also got his feet wet in marketing at Walt Disney World, with the Buffalo Bills and Buffalo Bisons, said, "When I took the job at Buffalo Raceway, I really didn't know the harness racing end at all." Chief Operating Officer of Buffalo Raceway Jim Mango said of getting Cramer, "Denny Lang (Chief Executive Officer of the Erie County Agricultural Society and Buffalo Raceway) told me about Jon when he was working on the Fairgrounds. Denny said Jon would be a good fit here on the racing side. I didn't know anything about Jon but we needed someone because we had long-time employees leaving back then. When we first met, Jon and I sat down and said this is what we have to do to succeed here." Well, it has become a perfect fit for Mango, Cramer and Buffalo Raceway. "Jon was a quick study. He picked up things quickly," Mango said. "His value has grown as I've gotten older." Cramer was the Marketing and Simulcasting Coordinator for five years and now has been in the role of Director of Operations for the past two seasons. "I am kind of like the jack of all trades at our track," Cramer said. "You have to be with a small staff like we have here. I've found the more you know, the better off you'll be. If I can't find the answer to a problem, I'll call in an expert." Mango said of Cramer, "Jon really knows a lot about marketing and simulcasting. He does everything I don't want to do and things I can't do," he added with a laugh. "He's in his 30's so he's a perfect fit for using social media," Mango continued on to say. "Social media is something that has long passed me by but Jon knows how to use it." The 34-year-old Cramer said, "I think social media is very important now. We are finding ways to keep the fans engaged with the track and the horsemen. It's the generation now. Using all the social media outlets is so important to keep everyone informed." Simulcasting continues to grow at Buffalo Raceway as the export signal is up 20 percent this season. Since the arrival of Cramer, Buffalo's export handle has grown from $7.1 in 2006 to what will exceed $14 million in 2014. "It was an area that I thought we were lacking in," Cramer said of the simulcasting numbers he saw at Buffalo Raceway when he first started. "I think we've made strides in getting into some key outlets. I attend the annual simulcast conference and put on my salesman's hat." What has also help drive up the export numbers was the new television graphics that the track added at the start of the 2013 season. "It made our simulcast product much better," Cramer said. "We added new cameras, new sound, new video presentations and graphics and improved lighting in the front stretch." Mango said, "I've think we have a pretty good relationship with our simulcast outlets now. We give some priorities to some like the time we race. I also think we've developed a pretty good relationship with TVG thanks to Jon and (former Buffalo Raceway announcer) Gabe Prewitt." Michael Carter, Buffalo Raceway's first year announcer said of Cramer, "Jon is very professional. He has great knowledge about the business side but equally cares about the harness racing side as well. I know he cares about the long-term stability of Buffalo Raceway. I also really appreciate him as well for taking a chance on me as an announcer." So for the guy who knew little about harness racing when he started, he is now completing his seventh season. "The fun part of my job is I learn something new every day. It's always a challenge. But we all have to continue to work together, the track and the horsemen," Cramer said. And with Cramer still learning, he's keeping all facets of Buffalo Raceway on the front burner. by Brian J. Mazurek, for Buffalo Raceway

1 to 16 of 85
1 2 3 4 5 Next »