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The NZ Harness Racing Trainers and Drivers Association has just been advised that, following research by their Veterinary Consultant, HRNZ will be testing for the substance Cobalt Chloride from April 14 2014. Authorities in New South Wales have recently begun testing for this substance and their lead has now been followed by the Thoroughbred code in Victoria. The permitted level is 200mg per litre of urine. We understand that normal Vitamin B12 injections contain some measure of Cobalt Chloride, however according to the Chief Veterinarian in New South Wales, manufacturers of this product are mindful of keeping the levels low so as not to affect a horses performance. Further information will be forthcoming in due course. By Peter T Cook (Courtesy of  the NZ Trainers and Drivers Association)  

Over the past two days – April 9 and 10, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) have conducted a review hearing in the case involving Mr. Eric Anderson, Mr. Glenn Douglas and Dr. Sarah Jalim.  Below outlines an overview of the hearing. A final decision regarding penalty will be handed down  by His Honour Judge Nixon on Tuesday 15 April 2014. On 5 March 2014, the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board imposed a 6 month disqualification upon Mr Eric Anderson and Mr Glenn Douglas with regard to various offences found to have been committed against the Australian Rules of Harness Racing (ARHR).  Mr Anderson and Mr Douglas both applied to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) for review of the HRV RAD Board decisions on the grounds the penalty imposed upon them was excessive.  HRV Stewards also lodged cross-applications for review to the VCAT on the grounds the penalties imposed by the HRV RAD Board were inadequate. Prior to the VCAT review hearings Mr Glenn Douglas amended his application and indicated an intention to contest 3 of the 11 charges issued against him as well as apply for review of the penalty imposed. At the VCAT review hearings held on 9 and 10 April 2014, the VCAT heard evidence from Dr Sarah Jalim, Mr Glenn Douglas and Mr Eric Anderson.  The VCAT also received into evidence a statement from Dr Kathryn McIntosh tendered to the VCAT by the legal representative of Mr Douglas and Mr Anderson.   The VCAT also received into evidence the statements of HRV witnesses Mr Nicholas Murray (Deputy Chairman of Stewards), Mr Stephen Svanosio (Assistant Steward), Mr Andy Rogers (General Manager – Integrity), Mr Anthony Pearce (Investigative Steward), Dr Daniel Carmody (HRV veterinary consultant) and Mr Paul Zahra (Racing Analytical Services Limited Scientific Manager). At the conclusion of the evidence, Mr Douglas discontinued his contesting of one of the charges and the VCAT considered the remaining two charges being contested under ARHR 187(6) and 105(5) which provide: ARHR 187(6)  A person shall not frustrate or endeavour to frustrate an inquiry or investigation. ARHR 105(5) The owner or authorized agent or other person in charge of a horse whose death has been notified, or which should have been notified, under sub rule (1)(a) shall not dispose of the carcass without the permission of the Controlling Body or the Steward. The presiding member of the VCAT, His Honour Judge Nixon, determined that Mr Douglas was guilty of both charges and proceeded to hear submissions from all parties as to the appropriate penalty to be imposed upon Mr Anderson and Mr Douglas. To view the Glenn Douglas/ Talk To The Hand story click here. HRV Media

Early Bird Registration extended to April 7th A Guided Tour of Equine Anatomy is a dissection workshop offered to horse enthusiasts and professionals alike to help them understand equine anatomy first hand. Led by Ontario Veterinary College researcher and anatomy instructor, Dr. Jeff Thomason, this unique educational workshop is offered at the Ontario Veterinary College. Early bird sign up has been extended to April 7th for workshops offered on April 26 and 27, 2014. Well known for his ability to bring anatomy to life, Thomason guides participants through plenty of hands-on exploration of the anatomy of a horse in a way most do not get to experience. An overview of the large muscle groups of the neck, trunk and legs is followed by an exploration of the abdomen and chest. The latter part of the laboratory is designed to allow individual students to explore their areas of interest in further detail. This one day workshop can be followed by a second day of advanced exploration which would allow the participants to get even more specific in learning how different systems function. Some of the second day topics have included looking at the mechanics of the leg or the complexities of the respiratory system. Students leave with a much broader understanding of how form and function intertwine. Dr. Thomason, is not only an internationally recognized researcher but he also teaches anatomy to veterinary students at the OVC and is excellent at explaining basic to advanced anatomy topics. Registration is online at: http://tinyurl.com/anatomyworkshop. For more information about this workshop: http://www.equineguelph.ca/pdf/workshop/Equine%20Anatomy%20Workshop%20Flyer%20-%202014.pdf or contact Equine Guelph. 519-824-4120 ext 54205 email: horses@uoguelph.ca  

Racing Queensland stewards today inquired into a report received from the Queensland Government Racing Science Centre that Levamisole was present in a post-race urine sample collected from harness racing pacer REDDY FIRE subsequent to it competing and winning Race 4, the Get the Trot Tips Play Of The Day Pace at Redcliffe on the 15 January 2014. Today evidence was provided by trainer Mr Shane Sanderson who advised stewards he had treated REDDY FIRE with Levamisole in weeks prior to racing. This preparation was used as a worming medication and an immune stimulant, however stewards outlined that this product is not registered for use in horses. Stablehand Glen Greaves tendered evidence in relation to the post-race swabbing procedure, and evidence was also provided by Queensland Government Racing Science Centre Chief Veterinary Officer Dr. Bruce Young. After consideration, Mr Shane Sanderson was charged pursuant to AHR rule 190(1) which reads: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The particulars of the charge being that Mr Shane Sanderson did present REDDY FIRE to race at Redcliffe on the 15 January 2014 when a post race urine sample was found, upon analysis, to contain a prohibited substance, namely Levamisole. Mr Shane Sanderson pleaded not guilty to the charge, however after consideration stewards considered there was sufficient evidence to find Mr Sanderson guilty of the aforementioned charge. When assessing the matter of penalty, stewards took into account: The circumstances of the case The nature of the substance involved The licence history of Mr Shane Sanderson which indicated a previous offence under this rule in 2010. The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of Harness Racing. Mr Shane Sanderson was disqualified for 8 months. Stewards directed under Rule 195 that REDDY FIRE be disqualified from its 1st placing at Redcliffe on the 15 of January 2014 and the placings to be amended as follows : 1  LEFT IN COMMAND 2  ARK ELAINE 3  JUDAH BEN HUR 4  CARNIVAL PRIDE All other placegetters were amended accordingly. Panel:  D Farquharson, D Aurisch, K Wolsey

The Ontario Racing Commission (ORC) announced that there has been a report of EHV-1 in a Thoroughbred that is residing in Barn 10 at Woodbine Racetrack, but that Standardbred racing is not affected by the situation. Today (March 18) ) the ORC issued the announcement on behalf of Dr. Adam Chambers, who is manager of Veterinary Services at the ORC. The contents of the release appear below. EQUINE HERPES CASE Restrictions in place. Training at Woodbine to continue; Standardbred racing not affected. There has been a report of EHV-1 in a five-year-old thoroughbred filly residing in Barn 10 at Woodbine Racetrack. The horse showed neurological signs on Thursday, March 13 but did not have a fever. The horse was removed from Woodbine to isolation on Saturday, March 15. The horse’s condition is stable. Results from tests available today showed non-neurotropic EHV-1 in blood but not nasal secretions. This is an unusual testing result and the horse has been retested. The risk of transmission to other horses may be low, as the infection is spread by nasal secretions. There have been no reports of any other sick horses in barn 10. Sporadic incidents of infection occur not infrequently and can be isolated incidents. The non-neurotropic form of EHV-1 identified from this horse differs from the neurotropic form identified from thoroughbreds at Woodbine in June of last year. Although the both types of EHV-1 can cause neurological disease the non-neurotropic strain is thought to be less likely to do so. EHV-1 has an incubation period of approximately 3 to 8 days, and may in some cases be as long as 14 days. Given these facts, the following measures will be in place, effective immediately: All horses must have their temperatures taken twice daily. Trainers with horses that have clinical signs consistent with EHV-1 infection (including fever (101.5 F/38.5 C or above), respiratory signs (cough, nasal discharge and/or neurological signs) must report these findings to their veterinarian immediately; Horses from Barn 10 will be allowed to train at the end of training hours; Only ponies housed in Barn 10 will be allowed to pony horses in Barn 10; Horsepeople are reminded to remain vigilant and institute appropriate biosecurity measures and should consult their veterinarians for advice. Standardbred horses are not stabled at Woodbine Racetrack. As well, the standardbred racing meet at Woodbine will not be impacted by these measures. To ensure best practices are in place to contain the disease, the ORC received input from experts from the University of Guelph and University of California at Davis, the office of the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF). The ORC will also continue to work closely with Woodbine management, veterinarians and horse people. The ORC will monitor the situation and any further developments will be reported.

This is an excellent investigative report from Global TV's 16x9 team on tainted horsemeat from Canada. The majority of horses slaughtered in Canada are imported from the U.S., so this is an important American report as well. The Canadian Horse Defence Coalition hopes our American partners in our fight to end horse slaughter can use this in their efforts to bring the SAFE Act into law. Our Canadian partners are asked to also share this report far and wide.  The CHDC will be sending out an Action Alert early this week, to request supporters to ask the CFIA to answer to the proof of the fraudulent and weak traceability system in place that is supposed to protect consumers from eating tainted horsemeat. Banned veterinary drugs found in horse meat Shelley Grainger

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to various charges issued by HRV Stewards under the Australian Rules of Harness Racing (ARHR) against licensed trainer/driver Mr Glenn Douglas, licensed stablehand/registered owner Mr Eric Anderson and veterinarian Dr Sarah Jalim. The charges were issued in connection to the conduct of the relevant parties concerning the Glenn Douglas trained horse ‘Talk To The Hand’ which was scheduled to compete at the Bendigo harness racing meeting conducted on 21 August 2013.  After arriving at the racecourse, the horse became unwell and its health quickly deteriorated resulting in the horse being assisted onto a float by Mr Anderson, Mr Douglas and Dr Jalim before the horse was euthanized by Dr Jalim.  The fact that the horse was euthanized was not brought to the attention of the attending HRV Stewards on the night by Mr Douglas, Mr Anderson or Dr Jalim. Mr Eric Anderson Mr Eric Anderson pleaded guilty to 6 charges issued by HRV Stewards. Charge 1 – ARHR 187(6)               A person shall not frustrate or endeavour to frustrate an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 1 were that Mr Anderson frustrated the investigation of the Stewards by not ensuring the immediate notification of the death of the horse ‘Talk To The Hand’ and by arranging and conducting the burial of the horse in Boundary Bend, Victoria, with asbestos piping, actions which inhibited the extent of the post-mortem autopsy conducted upon the horse. Charge 2 – ARHR 187(2)           A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 2 were that Mr Anderson, when interviewed by HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013 regarding the circumstances surrounding the sudden death of ‘Talk To The Hand’, falsely advised that the horse had been alive when it was removed from the Bendigo racecourse and also alive when it arrived at the stables of Mr Glenn Douglas after being transported by Mr Anderson in a float. Charge 3 – ARHR 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 3 were that Mr Anderson, when interviewed by HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013, falsely advised that Mr Glenn Douglas whilst checking on the welfare of ‘Talk To The Hand’ in the night of 21 August 2013 had found the horse to be alive and that Mr Anderson had only discovered the horse to be deceased at the stables of Mr Douglas on the morning of 22 August 2013. Charge 4 – ARHR 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 4 were that Mr Anderson, in a secondary interview with HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013, gave false information by denying that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had been euthanized in the vicinity of the Bendigo racecourse on 21 August 2013. Charge 5 – ARHR 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 5 were that Mr Anderson, in a secondary interview with HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013, gave false information by advising that the carcass of ‘Talk To The Hand’ had been burned at Boundary Bend, Victoria, when the horse had in fact been buried at this location. Charge 6 – ARHR 105(5) The owner or authorized agent or other person in charge of a horse whose death has been notified, or which should have been notified, under sub rule (1)(a) shall not dispose of the carcass without the permission of the Controlling Body or the Stewards The particulars of Charge 6 were that Mr Anderson disposed of the carcass of ‘Talk To The Hand’ without the permission of the HRV Stewards. After hearing submissions regarding penalty, the HRV RAD Board imposed a 6 month disqualification upon Mr Anderson in relation to charges 1-6 and ordered such disqualification to commence immediately. Mr Glenn Douglas Mr Glenn Douglas pleaded guilty to 10 charges issued by HRV Stewards Charge 1 – ARHR 187(6)               A person shall not frustrate or endeavour to frustrate an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 1 were that Mr Douglas frustrated the investigation of the Stewards by not ensuring the immediate notification of the death of the horse ‘Talk To The Hand’, by arranging the removal of the horse from the course and by permitting the horse to be buried in Boundary Bend, Victoria, with asbestos piping, actions which inhibited the extent of the post-mortem autopsy conducted upon the horse. Charge 2 – ARHR 187(2)           A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 2 were that Mr Douglas, when interviewed by HRV Stewards on 21 August 2013 regarding the welfare and late scratching of ‘Talk To The Hand’, falsely advised that the horse had been treated and taken home to be monitored when Mr Douglas was aware the horse had been euthanized. Charge 3 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 3 were that Mr Douglas contacted the Stewards on 22 August 2013 and falsely advised a HRV Steward that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had returned alive to his property after being removed from the Bendigo racecourse when in fact the horse had been euthanized. Charge 4 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 4 were that Mr Douglas contacted the Stewards on 22 August 2013 and falsely advised that he had checked on the condition of ‘Talk To The Hand’ a number of times during the night of 21 August 2013 and found the horse’s condition to have improved when in fact Mr Douglas was aware the horse had been euthanized. Charge 5 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 5 were that Mr Douglas contacted the Stewards on 22 August 2013 and falsely advised that he discovered on the morning of 22 August 2013 that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had died during the night of 21 August 2013. Charge 6 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 6 were that Mr Douglas falsely advised a HRV Steward by telephone on 22 August 2013 that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had returned alive to his property from the Bendigo harness racing meeting on 21 August 2013. Charge 7 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 7 were that Mr Douglas falsely advised a HRV Steward by telephone on 22 August 2013 that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had ‘ate up’ and ‘drank up’ on the evening of 21 August 2013 when in fact the horse was deceased. Charge 8 – ARHR 209 A person employed, engaged or participating in the harness racing industry shall not knowingly or recklessly furnish false information to the Controlling Body, the stewards or anyone else. The particulars of Charge 8 were that Mr Douglas falsely advised a HRV Steward by telephone on 22 August 2013 that ‘Talk To The Hand’ had died sometime during the night of 21 August 2013. Charge 9 – ARHR 187(2)           A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 9 were that Mr Douglas, when interviewed by HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013 regarding the circumstances surrounding the sudden death of ‘Talk To The Hand’, falsely advised that the horse was seen eating and drinking after it had become unwell at the Bendigo racecourse and was alive at his property on the night of 21 August 2013 when Mr Douglas was aware that the horse had been euthanized. Charge 10 – ARHR 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of Charge 9 were that Mr Douglas, when interviewed by HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013 regarding the circumstances surrounding the sudden death of ‘Talk To The Hand’, falsely advised that he had checked on the horse’s welfare overnight at his stables before becoming aware on the morning of 22 August 2013 that the horse was deceased. Mr Douglas was found guilty of a further charge issued by HRV Stewards. Charge 11 – ARHR 105(5) The owner or authorized agent or other person in charge of a horse whose death has been notified, or which should have been notified, under sub rule (1)(a) shall not dispose of the carcass without the permission of the Controlling Body or the Stewards The particulars of Charge11 were that Mr Douglas permitted the disposal of the carcass of ‘Talk To The Hand’ to occur without the permission of the HRV Stewards. Mr Douglas was found not guilty of a further charge issued by HRV Stewards under ARHR 190B with regard to keeping and maintaining an appropriate log book. After hearing submissions regarding penalty, the HRV RAD Board imposed a 6 month disqualification upon Mr Douglas in relation to Charges 1-11 and ordered such disqualification to commence immediately. Dr Sarah Jalim Dr Jalim pleaded guilty to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under ARHR 239A. Charge 1 – ARHR 239A A person whose conduct or negligence has led or could lead to a breach of the rules is guilty of an offence. The particulars of this charge were that Dr Jalim, as the on-course veterinarian at the Bendigo harness racing meeting conducted on 21 August 2013, had remained silent when Mr Douglas falsely implied to the HRV Stewards that the horse ‘Talk To The Hand’ was still alive and that Dr Jalim’s negligence in failing to immediately notify the HRV Stewards of her actions in euthanizing the horse could have led to a breach of the ARHR. After hearing submissions regarding penalty, the HRV RAD Board imposed a severe reprimand upon Dr Jalim on the condition that Dr Jalim does not provide on-course veterinary services in the harness racing industry for a period of 12 months.  The HRV RAD Board noted that Dr Jalim had not provided on-course veterinary services since 21 August 2013 and that Dr Jalim may also be required to answer to the Veterinary Practitioners Registration Board of Victoria.  The HRV RAD Board also noted Dr Jalim’s forthright evidence and co-operation once approached by the HRV Stewards on 22 August 2013. In considering the various charges, the HRV RAD Board considered written statements from HRV Deputy Chairman of Stewards Nicholas Murray, HRV Assistant Steward Stephen Svanosio, General Manager-Integrity Andy Rogers, HRV Investigative Steward Anthony Pearce, HRV Consultant Veterinarian Dr Daniel Carmody and Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) Scientific Manager Mr Paul Zahra.  The RAD Board noted the tissue samples retrieved by the HRV vet when the horse was exhumed from its resting place in Boundary Bend on 26 August 2013 were not found, upon analysis by RASL, to contain any prohibited substances.  The HRV RAD Board also considered a written statement of Dr Sarah Jalim and the evidence provided by Mr Anderson and Mr Douglas along with submissions made by all parties with regard to penalty. HRV Stewards will consider seeking written reasons from the HRV RAD Board with respect to the various decisions outlined above. HRV RAD Board Panel - Brian Collis QC, John Kellett, Rod Osborne Harness Racing Victoria  

By Bill Liblick, re-printed with permission by www.sullivancountypost.com As EPR Properties and Empire Resorts prepares to present their resort destination plans next Thursday evening at a private presentation at Bethel Woods, and not at Empire’s operational facility, the harness racing horsemen at Monticello Raceway have declared war. The horsemen feel they have been betrayed and used as a pawn by Empire Resorts, the owner of Monticello Raceway, and are fearful that the Standardbred racetrack and the industry that has employed thousands of residents over the years in Sullivan County will be gone if the company receives a license to operate a full-fledged gaming hall. When racino’s were permitted in New York State it saved the horse racing industry from dying. The introduction of video slot terminals has seen racetracks such as Monticello, Tioga Downs, Saratoga, and Yonkers flourish thanks to a percentage of the take going into racing purses. Although attendance and actual pool totals from Monticello Raceway attendees is minimal, the racetrack has become a cash cow for Empire Resorts thanks to simulcasting and off-track betting wagering.  Monticello Raceway has in essence become a huge television studio. Under proposals from EPR and Empire Resorts they say they are going to construct a new harness track at the Concord no matter what happens – with or without table games – but will they? Horsemen claim Empire Resorts is capping purses at 2013 levels and if they are granted a table gaming license there will be no increases. They also say there are no guarantees the harness track will even remain open. The Monticello Harness Horsemen’s Association has declared a war against Empire Resorts. They argue track owners slammed the door on them once the resort destination amendment was approved in November and that they refuse to negotiate. Things are so bad, the horsemen have exercised their right to stop Monticello’s simulcast signal from being broadcast, preventing Empire Resorts and New York State from receiving millions in revenue. Empire has since slashed purses and cut back the number of races in a card. They have even shut down the horsemen’s lunch room. According to Alan Schwartz, President of Monticello’s Harness Association The dispute between management and the horsemen at Monticello Raceway is very easy to understand. “The parent company of the racetrack seeks to obtain a lucrative license to construct a Las Vegas style casino, complete with slot machines and table games. They would be one of just two, and possibly the only casino permitted in the Catskills. Despite the tremendous windfall such a license would bring to the parent company, it flatly refuses to allow the horsemen or breeders to share in any portion of the huge anticipated profits.” Schwartz claims that “in order to get the casino amendment passed, management both figuratively and literally called the horsemen their “partners.” The logo of their lobbying group prominently contains a horse. Their radio commercials ballyhooed their support for racing. Of course, once the amendment passed, management’s idea of “partnership” quickly degenerated.” Under the present video lottery gaming law, horsemen and breeders get a fixed percentage of the track’s net win. When a racino underperforms, the purse money generated is less, even though it isn’t the horsemen’s fault. When the racino does well, purses go up modestly – In essence a true economic partnership. Schwartz maintains Empire Resorts wants a firm cap on purses and breeding contributions at 2013 levels. He says if that happens, harness racing will become a near-zero or zero growth industry. “Nobody is going to buy or breed horses in this state when places like Ohio, Massachusetts, Delaware and Pennsylvania offer significantly more industry support.” Schwartz acknowledges that harness racing won’t die in the next several years, but “consider, however, that the price of feed, diesel fuel, veterinary services; literally anything you can think of, will be significantly higher in just a few years. Once you can’t pay to maintain racehorses, the sport will evaporate from sheer economics – And that’s exactly what our racetrack management “partners” would love to see happen.” Although Empire Resorts blames Albany for the horsemen’s plight, Schwartz asserts the law speaks only about minimum contributions. “No government can interfere with the private right of contract. Racetrack management hides behind Albany when, in reality, their own lobbyists pushed for and signed off on the legislation.” Schwartz says “The horsemen and breeders at Monticello and elsewhere refuse to be “silent” former partners. If management wishes to embrace us as economic partners, as mandated under the video lottery gaming law, gaming can move forward in a meaningful way in the Catskills, and the renaissance created by Albany through the VLT program can continue to flourish, for not only the six harness tracks owners but also for the state, education and the agriculture and racing industries. If that doesn’t occur, we really have nothing else to lose.” Schwartz professes he is trying to negotiate in good faith, but Empire Resorts is not, so with “few weapons in this fight” they had to pull the simulcasting signal. “We are also acutely aware of the loss of revenue to the track, the horsemen and the industry. Yet, we have pondered just how much money these track operators strive for while they jeopardize an entire industry for their own profit; a racing industry that worked hard to spawn the birth of VLTs at tracks in this and other states. We cannot just sit by and watch an industry get swallowed up by a handful of track operators professing to be concerned about our sport, whose ultimate goal is to kill it.” The right to withhold the export of signal from Monticello is a right granted to horsemen by Federal law. Schwartz explained, “That 1978 law very wisely recognizes that the horsemen at a host track are the real guardians of this sport. It armed the horsemen with the important tool to use only when they perceived a crisis threatening the very existence of the game. It has been used very sparingly and with the utmost of caution.” A mediator has been appointed by the New York State Gaming Commission in an attempt to resolve the situation. Charles Degliomini, executive vice president of Empire Resorts/Monticello Raceway issued the following statement in response the suspension of simulcasting. “Monticello Casino & Raceway (“MC&R”) continues to support the Upstate New York Gaming Economic Development Act (“Gaming Act”). When they authored the Gaming Act, the Senate, Assembly and the Executive protected the Monticello Harness Horsemen’s Association (“MHHA”), and the entire racing industry. As New York State moves toward approving four casinos in upstate New York, future revenue for the horsemen is governed by the Gaming Act, and current revenue is governed by the New York State Lottery for Education Law. Degliomini added, “It is sad and unfortunate that we are being attacked for legislation that actually protects harness horsemen’s interests. While MC&R continues in good faith, through negotiation and mediation, to attempt to secure an agreement with MHHA, the MHHA is now attempting to amend a law that they don’t like by unfairly punishing our business, our employees, our loyal customers and even their own members. We are simply track owners, not elected officials. The MHHA should stop this destructive behavior and turn the simulcasting signal back on.” With all the new resort destination proposals coming out of the woodwork this dispute is something Sullivan County does not need. Schwartz does raise many valid concerns that must be addressed if a racino operator is granted a full gaming license, Monticello Raceway, the horsemen, and the industry must be protected.  

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF) has received reports of several cases of equine Strangles (S. equi sp. equi infection) in the Waterloo-Wellington County area. Strangles is not a reportable disease in the province of Ontario, however, it is highly contagious to horses and other equids, and outbreaks are a concern to the equine industry. The reported cases have predominantly shown signs of high fever (40-41⁰C) and mucopurulent nasal discharge with only occasional horses developing enlarged lymph nodes with abscessation. Disease Facts: Strangles is a highly contagious infection of horses caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi. Clinical signs include fever, nasal discharge and, most typically, lymph node abscessation. Transmission occurs by direct nose-to-nose contact with infected horses or via contact with contaminated surfaces, objects or people (e.g. twitches, tack, buckets, feed troughs, stall walls, fences). The bacterium can survive indoors for weeks to months depending on temperature. The disease is diagnosed by detection of S. equi using bacterial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of nasal or lymph node discharge, nasopharyngeal (throat) swabs or nasal or guttural pouch washes. Treatment involves managing the fever and encouraging abscesses to burst. Antibiotics should only be used under veterinary supervision as they may prolong the maturation of abscesses and the disease process. Infection control Minimize all human and animal traffic in and out of the premises. No horses should leave the premises unless they are being taken to an isolation facility, as this increases the risk of spread to other horses. All owners, riders and other personnel in the barn should be made aware of the situation to ensure strict control measures are followed, and so they don’t inadvertently carry the bacterium to other equine facilities Isolate suspect horses as much as possible in a separate, low-traffic area or treat the stall as a quarantined area. Handle infected and suspect horses using gloves, designated coveralls and designated footwear/footbaths. Promote hand hygiene (using products such as alcohol-based hand sanitizers) even when gloves are worn. Take temperatures twice daily on all horses in the facility, including those not showing signs of disease. If a fever is detected (>38.5°C, >101.3°F), the horse should be considered infected and isolated/quarantined until diagnosed. Monitoring should continue for at least two weeks after the last case shows clinical signs. Clean all equipment and surfaces of visible organic material (e.g. dirt, hair, manure) before applying disinfectants. Most common disinfectants are effective. Test horses that have recovered from disease at least twice at one week intervals using throat swab or nasal wash samples to confirm they are negative. Identify those horses that are carriers and intermittently shedding S. equi by testing nasal or guttural pouch washes. Carriers can shed the bacterium for months or years. Prevention Isolate new horses coming on to the farm, or those returning from extended absences, for 2-3 weeks and test them to ensure that they are not shedding the bacterium. If isolation cannot be performed, barn managers should ask for proof of Strangles–free status (based on recent testing) prior to accepting new horses. Discuss with your veterinarian about vaccinating for Strangles. Vaccines can help minimize the severity of disease but may not be appropriate during outbreaks. It is recommended that horses that have been frequently vaccinated for Strangles or have had the disease itself should have a S. equi antibody titre performed prior to vaccination to avoid potential immune reactions. The best method of disease control is disease prevention. See the resources below for other basic biosecurity and infection control practices. RESOURCES OMAF: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/03-037.htm http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/prot_strangle... http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/prev-disease-... WORMS & GERMS BLOG: http://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/uploads/file/JSW-MA2%20Strangles.pdf EQUINE GUELPH: http://www.equineguelph.ca/Tools/biosecurity_calculator_2011-09-12/Biose... Submitted by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food

Harrisburg, PA --- The Pennsylvania Harness Racing Commission, in consultation with Dr. Mary Robinson, University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School of Medicine, New Bolton Center, has announced that effective March 1 the pre-race medication Amicar will no longer be permitted to be used in conjunction with Furosemide. The commission has made this determination after reviewing the scientific data and information regarding the efficacy of Amicar as a pre-race medication. Accordingly, any findings of Amicar after March 1 from samples collected during routine testing will result in a positive test which may result in a fine and/or suspension and loss of any earned purse. From the Pennsylvania Harness racing Commission

Dr. Frank Reilly, dmv,  has worked on Standardbreds in harness racing for over 25 years. He has worked at Pompano Park, Brandywine Raceway, and various training centers.  He graduated with three degrees from the University of Illinois. For the past twenty years he has been the Senior Doctor for Equine Medicine and Surgery in West Chester, Pennsylvania. During his tenure Dr. Reilly has worked with and helped numerous world champion performers, including the world champion trotter, Enough Talk, who in 2008 became the first trotter in harness racing history to break the 1:50 barrier at a mile. Over the year Dr. Reilly has seen problems with muscle soreness and tying up that are common problems in Standardbreds and that it can be helped with a high dose of Vitamin E.  In addition, he knew that high dose Vitamin E is shown to increase the immunity to dramatically cut down on respiratory infections which are the #1 cause of decreased performance and a big economic drain to owners. Thus came the development of Health-E, as the strongest Vitamin E supplement in the USA. “Horses do not make Vitamin E in their bodies, so they need daily supplementation,”  said Dr. Reilly.  “At 16,000+ IU/oz., only 1 tablespoon of Health-E provides 5800 IU/day for maximum health. You can go to our website at equinemedsurg.com and directly compare Health-E to other Vitamin E products.  We are four times stronger and the best economic choice. “We are the only one tested to show it raises Vitamin E blood levels in horses,” Dr. Reilly explained.  “We have the world record for the highest Vitamin E blood level ever recorded at New Bolton Center’s Veterinary Lab. “Health-E has no fillers, artificial preservatives, colors or flavors, Dr. Reilly said. It is the only Vitamin E certified safe for IR, Cushings and PSSM/EPSM horses due to low sugar, starch and fructans. Horses even love the taste. It is great for horses on dirt lots, that are not turned out or have little grass pasture.  It helps neurological horses (epm, edm, motor neuron), muscle sore, tie ups, PSSM/EPSM, liver problems, eye disorders, skin damage and it contains no selenium.” On top of it all, Dr. Reilly oversees the production of every container of Health-E. The cost is $65.95 per 1.32 pound container. This product is also available in Canada directly from Gourmet Animal, Inc., Website: gourmet-animal.com, By Steve Wolf for Harnesslink.com     

While many insurances agencies are happy to take your money in return for the insurance of your horse, not many are willing to pump some of the money that they do make back into racing. Well, that is apart from Crombie Lockwood Bloodstock of course. Crombie Lockwood Bloodstock, a specialised branch of Crombie Lockwood NZ Limited, supports the harness racing industry in many different ways. From  Sponsorships for award evenings in both the North Island and South Island, to race sponsorship at Alexandra Park on 14th Feb 2014.  Crombie Lockwood NZ also sponsors races throughout NZ under their own banner.  “Harness racing & standardbred breeders have always been a big part of Crombie Lockwood Bloodstock’s business,” said Manager Liz Smith “Crombie Lockwood Bloodstock provides excellent value insurance options to suit specific needs of the client with experienced brokers that understand horses and the problems that can arise,” she added. “From the fall of hammer at the sales to the broodmare paddock, foals & stallions. Crombie Lockwood also offers Short term transit cover worldwide.” Everything you need to know about Standardbred insurance... We have cover available for horses aged from 30 days up to and including 13 years of age. Cover can also be arranged on horses over 13 years of age upon application.   Basic Mortality Cover Risks of Mortality Death by accident, sickness or disease also including limited theft. This cover also includes Major Medical fees up to $10,000, with an excess of $1,000 in the event of a claim under the Major Medical Fees extension. Geographical Limits Geographical limits are within Australasia and transits within and between New Zealand and Australia. These limits can be extended to include other countries on application and agreement by the Underwriter. Extensions Available on Application Agreed Value   Automatic Additions and Deletions Colic Surgery Endorsement 12 Month Extension Clause Annual Aggregate Deductible Clause - (For those that have numerous horses to insure) Stable Discounts available - to be agreed Foetus Insurance Provides cover for the unborn foal from 42 days after last service date to 30 days after birth. A specific proposal form is required together with a veterinary certificate confirming the mare is pregnant on or after inception date. The certificate must also confirm that the mare is in good health, provide 3 scan dates and state that there are no obvious reasons why she would not carry the foetus full term. Confirmation that there is a singleton foetus is also required. Stallion Permanent Disability by Accident, Sickness or Disease If the Stallion becomes totally and permanently infertile due to an accident, sickness or disease, you will be indemnified 100% for the sum insured under the mortality cover in place, providing the sum insured reflects the fair market value at the time of loss. This cover can only be given on receipt of an acceptable veterinary certificate which makes specific reference to the genitalia and is an extension added to an annual Risks of Mortality policy. Foal Insurance Foals can be insured from 24 hours of age with acceptable vet certificate. From 30 days of age, foals can be insured with acceptable health declaration as long as the sum insured does not exceed $99,999 NZD. For further details please contact: liz.smith@crombielockwood.co.nz or Carlene.Jones@crombielockwood.co.nz To visit the Crombie Lockwood Bloodstock website click here By Mitchell Robertson

Virtually any nutrient you can name has an effect on function of the immune system, but one of the most important is protein. Diets low in protein tend to be low quality in terms of other deficiencies, as well. Because of interaction between all nutrients in the diet, it can be difficult to isolate the effects of protein malnutrition but multiple studies point to a specific role for protein. Protein is needed to manufacture and complement the enzymes used in the complement pathways, to generate antibodies and cytokines, and to support rapid division of immune system cells. Deficiency impacts every cell type and every function. Extensive information is now available on the effects of specific amino acids. Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid in humans, meaning it can be both synthesized and obtained from the diet but diet and/or synthesis may not always be enough to support normal development or disease states. Very little is known about arginine requirements in horses, but it is interesting to note that mare's milk is high in arginine and increases in the later stages of lactation, suggesting dietary arginine from grasses is likely not enough for horses under 1 year old. Arginine in hay averages in the neighborhood of 4.5% of the crude protein, so a horse eating a 10% protein hay would be getting 0.4% arginine in the diet overall. Grains and grain products contain 0.5 to 1% arginine. As far as we know, there are no overt arginine deficiency symptoms shown in horses, and it's unrealistic to think that all horses are on arginine deficient diets - at least not at maintenance levels.  However, it's not a far stretch to think that baseline dietary arginine intake may not be sufficient to support stressful states, and that arginine supplementation is reasonable to assist with fighting infections (and tissue healing). In the immune system, a key role of arginine is in the generation of large amounts of nitric oxide. This uses up the local arginine, depriving the cells lining the blood vessels and causing blood vessels in the area of injuries or infections to contract. With circulating organisms (e.g. bacteremia, bacteria in blood or toxemia, toxins in blood – aka “blood poisoning”), the reaction is bodywide and severe blood flow restriction occurs which can cause shock or laminitis.  Glutamine is another nonessential amino acid that becomes helpful in larger amounts during times of tissue injury or infection. Glutamine can improve the intestinal barrier, reduce inflammatory reaction, and promote immunity recovery In brief, glutamine functions include: l  Regulate T cell proliferation, cytokine production and sensitivity to cytokines l  Regulate B cell antibody production and secretion l  Influence the number of activated killer cells l  Support for Macrophage activity l  Serves as an important energy source for immune system cells because of its easy conversion back to Krebs cycle intermediates. l  Support levels of antioxidant glutathione An Example of More is Not Better As above, arginine is used by the immune system to produce large amounts of nitric oxide during nonspecific inflammatory responses. This is the sledge hammer approach to driving a picture nail, but is necessary to protect the body from invaders on a right here and right now basis, until antibodies and the cell-mediated immune system can kick in. This part of the inflammatory response is normally self-limiting and will begin to tame down in 3 days after arginine levels drop, but until then you definitely don't want to supplement arginine. Arginine supplementation to a horse battling a serious bodywide infection like purpura from Strangles can actually be harmful, if not fatal. Arginine in the face of some viral infections is also a bad idea. Viruses like Herpes have high requirements for arginine and you will be feeding the infection if you give it. In fact, lysine competes with arginine for cellular uptake and is used as a therapy with Herpes infections. Finally, cancers also have a very high requirement for arginine. A horse with a malignancy should never receive supplemental arginine. It will only fuel the tumor. Arginine depleting diets have been used as a therapy in cancer. As more details emerge about specific effects of individual amino acids, we will eventually be able to fine tune supplements to get very specific effects. For now, glutamine combined with a high biological quality protein is excellent immunity support. The protein source of choice is whey. Help for Your Horse's Immune Health, Part 2 The horse's immune system is on guard 24/7 all year, but winter poses some special challenges. Extremes of weather trigger hormonal reactions that influence the immune system. Breathing cold, dry air has been linked to higher rates of respiratory infections which may be because the barrier function of the mucosa lining the respiratory tract is compromised. Horses kept in closed up barns have high exposure to respiratory irritants (dust, molds, ammonia) and are exposed to high concentrations of airborne infectious organisms. The foundation for supporting a strong immune system is a solid diet with adequate calories, protein, vitamins and balanced minerals. You can also build on that base with targeted supplements. Allergic reactions, tissue responses to parasites, inflammatory responses and many of the white blood cell reactions that destroy organisms or damaged cells generate large amounts of free radicals. This friendly fire has to be controlled or damage to the immune system cells and other tissues will result. A well nourished body has several built in antioxidant defenses but there are also plant based antioxidants that can help. Plant polyphenols is a large class of natural compounds with strong antioxidant capacity. Grape seeds and skin have been extensively studied, in part because of the “French paradox” which is the observation that the French have very low levels of heart disease despite eating a diet that would be expected to cause it. The polyphenol content of red wine is believed to be the explanation. The skin and seeds of grapes, particularly red grapes, are rich in polyphenols of the anthocyanidin and proanthocyanidin class. The most well known of these is resveratrol. Another well studied class is the bioflavonoids, particularly bioflavonoids from citrus fruits which includes hesperidin, quercetin and rutin. All of these compounds are potent antioxidants. Grape polyphenols also have direct effects on the immune system. They stimulate a population of T lymphocytes called gamma delta T cells. These cells can contribute to both nonspecific immediate and delayed targeted immune responses to organisms and damaged cells. They also have the capacity to rein in inflammatory reactions. These cells are concentrated in the mucosal linings of the respiratory tract, gut and urinary/reproductive tract – the portals to the body. There is less detailed information available for the citrus bioflavonoids. Control of inflammatory reactions via their antioxidant activity has been clearly shown. There is also some evidence that they can improve responses of T and B lymphocytes. Vitamin C is definitely an important antioxidant in the immune system.  Whether it has direct effects on immune system cells remains to be seen. Horses can synthesize their own vitamin C so it is difficult to identify effects from suboptimal levels of vitamin C. However, it has been clearly shown that vitamin C levels in lung fluid from horses with chronic lung disease are low. A complicating factor with vitamin C is that it will worsen oxidative stress in horse that are iron overloaded, which may apply to many horses. To avoid making matters worse by supplementing vitamin C, levels should be kept low, e.g. 1000 mg/day. The B vitamins are required to support active division of immune system cells and some have specific immune system functions. Riboflavin is involved with both the destruction of organisms by primitive immune cells and in cellular immunity. Thiamine is also essential to normal functioning of T cells in the cellular immune system. Folic acid deficiency has been clearly linked to increased infection risk. While the chance of severe deficiency is low for most horses, supplementation is reasonable during stressful periods and in no way harmful. By Dr. Eleanor Kellon, VMD, Staff Veterinary Specialist for Uckele Health & Nutrition  

While the second of the B races on the road to the Prix d'Amerique, the Prix du Bourbonnais (Group 2, 120,000 euros) has brought the superstars of French harness racing out in force tonight, Sweden's biggest gun, Maharajah, may still get another shot at the World's greatest race despite a disappointing run in the Gavle Stora Pris three weeks ago. But Annika Lindblom, Projectleader of Travkompaniet, 'the Emperor's' owner said there was nothing amiss with the horse, who has been plagued with fetlock problems throughout his career, after the race. "The veterinary was pleased with him and he is ok in the training," Ms Linblom told Harnesslink. "Of course last race was a little bit of a disappointment but maybe he needs a couple of races before he is in shape again. Last race was only the third time he been at a racetrack since May!" As for a shot at the Prix d'Amerique, in which the great horse finished second in his first attempt in 2011, Ms Lindblom says Travompianet's connections have not made a final decision. "Well, the answer about the Prix D´Amerique is that we have not decides anything," she said. "We take one race at the time for Maharajah and We Will See after every race. "Next race for him will be in V75 in Gothenburg next Saturday , If he is okay in the training." Maharajah, who is trained by Stefan Hultman, has not previously entered the B races before the final race in January, the Prix de Bretagne, and it was a win in the 2011 renewal that earned him a place in that year's Grand Prix d'Amerique, where he finished a gallant second to Ready Cash, who like himself is an 8-year-old. The pair repeated the result the next week in the group one €400,000 Prix de France before Maharajah went on a week later to win the group one Prix de Paris (also €400,000), over the marathon 4175m trip around Vincennes with Ready Cash not fronting. But his old rival, who has won two Prix d'Amerique's and finished second last year will be making his first start at the Winter Series in this year's Prix de Bourbonnais, a race he has won two years in a row. Indeed Thierry Duvaldestin's son of Indy de Vive has a formidable record in B races. He has also won the Prix De Bourgogne (2100m) the last three times in a row, o won the Prix de Bretagne (2700m) at his second attempt in 2011 after galloping in his first ever B race in the 2010 renewal. In fact the only B race Ready Cash has not won is the Prix de Belgique (2850m), in which he finished third in his only attempt in 2012. He fronted up a fortnight later and won his first Prix d'Amerique. Last year's Prix d'Amerique winner Royal Dream has been patiently handled in his career by Jean-Etienne Dubois' Ecurie Victoria Dreams stable. Under the astute guidance of trainer Philippe Moulin, the son of Love You won seven on the trot when he began his career as a 4YO, all in provincial company and he did not make a start at Vincennes until late in his 5YO year. Even then he did not race in good company until he had fully matured as a 6YO in the Prix Tenor de Baune where he broke 50m from the line after he had drawn up alongside eventual winner Lana Del Rio and Ready Cash, who was subsequently disqualified. As a seven-year-old Royal Dream won the 2012 Prix de Belgique which gave him a ticket to that year's Prix dAmerique where he ran a promising sixth. He subsequently won his first group race, the Prix de France a fortnight later. Later that year he finished second in all three early B races, the Prix de Bretagne, Prix Du Bourbonnais and Prix de Bourgogne, before missing the Prix Belgique on his way to a stunning victory over Ready Cash in the Prix d'Amerique. He ran second in the Prix de France to Ready Cash and has been lightly raced the rest of the year with only six appearances, for a win and a second. He has had two warmup races in the provinces but he will be focussed on this, although not likely a favourite at this stage of his preparation. Rising star Timoko has had a stellar year with seven wins in 15 starts at the highest level and Richard Westerink's Imoko stallion might be nearing the level he needs to be to mount a serious challenge to Ready Cash, who was an easy victor in the UET Masters Series final, the last time they met. Ecurie Victoria Dreams and Moulin also have a second big gun in their arsenal with Texas Charm another from the impressive T generation, which is not far behind the quality of the much vaunted R crop. Texas Charm also has a victory over Timoko this year and has earned just under a million euros. The talented son of Cygnus d'Odyssee has won the Group one Prix Vincennes under saddle and group one Prix Rene Balliere in the bike and a clutch of group twos in both disciplines. There are plenty of other good horses in the field including world record breaking mare Save The Quick, recent Prix de Bretagne winner Uhland du Val and third placegettter Tiego d'Etang and former Italian Derby winner Pascia'Lest - who is in the same stable as Ready Cash. And with the big guns focusing on a bigger race in the last weekend of January, they could well provide an upset. Dave Sanders

Grant Payne may have co- trained over 500 winners and $14 million in stakes while in partnership with leading trainer Mark Purdon, but that didn’t make his first win since the pair split any less satisfying. The first win I refer to, was Miss Lisa at Geraldine on Saturday, who upset at odds of $37.10. Partnered by Payne’s nephew Nathan Purdon, Miss Lisa missed an early tangle which saw Arising Easton (Jeremy Markham) lock wheels with Steal A Grin (Matthew Anderson), and dislodge driver Robbie Close from the sulky of favourite Mossdale Connor.  Purdon then settled the daughter of McArdle towards the tail of the field before pulling her wide on the home bend and coming with a whirlwind finish to win by two lenghts over Lumos (Matt Purvis) and Clarisa (Sam Ottley). Meanwhile, Close was given a standing ovation for his efforts in holding on to the more than handy pacer Mossdale Connor despite being dragged over a fair proportion of landscape. “I knew I’d be in too much trouble with Ben (Hope) if I let go of his favourite horse,” Close later joked. The win was Payne’s first from eighteen starts since he split with Purdon, but not his first on his own account as he trained 22 winners, including a Kaikoura Cup and 3YO Sales Series Final, while Purdon was disqualified in 2006. As for Nathan, it was his second win from just five drives. His other three have resulted in two placings. Later on in the day at Geraldine, last season's three-year-old male trotter of the year Royal Aspirations resumed in tremendous style downing a strong field including The Fiery Ginga (2nd) by eight lenghts. He will now compete in the Green Mile at Methven next Sunday where he will go head-to-head with Dominion winner Master Lavros. Stipes Report Race 6 TEMUKA TRANSPORT MOBILE PACE MACH’S GLADIATOR underwent a pre-race veterinary examination after this gelding became agitated in the stabling area which resulted in it receiving a superficial wound to a hind leg. As a result MACH’S GLADIATOR was declared a late scratching on veterinary advice at 2.05pm. A veterinary clearance will be required prior to this horse resuming. INDEPENDENT ANVIL broke early in the score up but was able to regain its rightful position prior to dispatch. ARISING EASTON broke shortly after the start and shifted in abruptly locking wheels with and causing a considerable check to STEAL A GRIN. In consequence to this INDEPENDENT ANVIL was checked into a gallop and R Close as the driver of MOSSDALE CONNER was tipped from the sulky. Soon after this J Markham as the driver of ARISING EASTON was also tipped from his sulky, being dragged for some distance. Drivers J Markham and R Close were examined by St Johns ambulance staff and cleared of injury. ARISING EASTON and MOSSDALE CONNER were examined by the veterinarian subsequent to this incident and also cleared of any injury. CLARISA raced keenly in the middle stages. LUMOS was held up in the early stages of the run home. AJAYE and MUNDAKA were held up throughout the run home. Driver S Ottley reported that she was unable to activate the removable hood on CLARISA due to the cord breaking. This gear was inspected and found to be in good order. Stewards advised the connections of ARISING EASTON that their runner had now been declared ineligible to start from mobile races until such time that it can trial to a standard satisfactory to the Stipendiary Stewards. By Mitchell Robertson

The Ontario Racing Commission (ORC) has lifted the quarantine on Barn B at Rideau Carleton. According to ORC Manager of Veterinary Services Dr. Adam Chambers, testing has confirmed that the cause of death of horse D J STAMKOS was not of a contagious nature. As a result, horses from Barn B that were entered are now cleared to race on Sunday, December 1, 2013. The quarantine and other prudent biosecurity measures were introduced to protect the horses and limit the possible spread of disease. All racetracks are encouraged to follow such best practice. The ORC wishes to thank the management and horsepeople of Rideau Carleton for their cooperation. For more information - or to speak with Dr. Chambers or Dr. Duncan - please call:  416 213-0520    

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