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Northern Victorian harness racing is mourning the loss of one of its most dedicated and popular administrators and supporters, with the passing of Bob Watson at the weekend. The popular former Cobram club secretary manager lost his battle with cancer and died on Saturday, aged 80 - 12 months after stepping down from his role. Bob and his wife Marg were the lynchpins of the energetic little club. Bob, who was "local born and bred" and a life member of the club through his previous involvement as a local studmaster, clerk of course and owner, took up the role as secretary manager "when the club was going through a rough patch". He attended the very first Cobram trots meeting in the 1950s with his dad and spent a lifetime around horses. Always "horse mad", over the years Bob was involved in showing and playing polo cross. He was also a harness racing owner, a thoroughbred owner-breeder and held various equine management roles. Bob was stud master at Denison Farm (later Eliza Park Stud) for 28 years and he and his wife Margaret set up a thoroughbred agistment property, Rosewood Park at Tocumwal, which they sold only due to Bob's health concerns. When Bob took on the Cobram secretary's role he was ably supported by Marg, the "administrative powerhouse" of the team. It was a difficult time for the industry and the Cobram club had only a small member base, limited sponsors and some compelling financial challenges. The couple put their considerable energy to work, committing many volunteer hours themselves, cutting unnecessary expenses and finding new members and community sponsors. Bob always credited a dedicated committee for turning around the club's fortunes, getting support and grants to build a four-box trainer's facility on-course, upgrade water and power supplies, improve the drivers' and members' rooms and upgrade the amenities. He was twice recognised at HRV's Premier awards night for his expertise in managing the club - in 2011 as Secretary of the Year (part time) and in 2017-18 as Secretary of the Year. But more than that, Bob and Margaret are known throughout Victoria and southern New South Wales for their passionate support of the sport and its people, well beyond their Cobram harness racing community. The couple's proudest accomplishment, the iconic Cobram Pink Day (a hugely successful breast cancer fundraiser), is held each May, but has been rescheduled for Shepparton in June this year, due to COVID-19. Along the journey, the annual Pink Day has raised more than $158,000 for the McGrath Foundation, and one of its biggest supporters, trainer and reinswoman Donna Castles says this year's 10th anniversary will now take on even more poignancy. "We're all so sad about losing Bob. He was a wonderful man and wonderful for the sport. Nothing was too much trouble, whatever was needed, he and Marg would find a way to get it done," Donna said. "Pink Day was Bob's baby - it was his idea and his and Marg's energy turned it into the event it became. Pink Day was special for every one of the girls involved over the 10 years, and it'll be bigger and better than ever this year because we'll also be doing it for Bob. Bob Watson at 2019 Cobram Pink Day "He'll still be watching us, telling us what we're doing wrong! But we loved him so much and we'll all certainly be missing him." Harnesslink sends it’s condolences to Marg and the Watson family.   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

Talented trotting filly Pink Galas helped mark her trainer/driver's long-awaited return to Saturday night racing at Tabcorp Park Melton across the weekend. Matt Craven has been one of the notable absentees from Victorian harness racing headquarters since the region-based model was introduced due to COVID-19 and opened the night's seven-race card with an explosive victory behind the three-year-old squaregaiter. The win in the DNR Logistics Trot (1720m, NR 61-74) made it two on end this preparation for the daughter of Skyvalley, who won at Stawell on resumption earlier this month. Pink Galahs' co-owner Caleb Lewis is married to Laura (nee Healy), who is the daughter of Bryan and granddaughter of Ric. The Healy family bred Maori Miss, the mare who instigated arguably Australia's most famous trotting breeding line, which includes the famed Maori's Idol but also Maori Mia, the great-great granddam of Pink Galahs. "Bryan Healy, who is famous with all the Maori horses, it's great that he's been able to come in on the ownership and he's always looking forward to an update as to how she's going," Craven said. "Early days when we first produced her, he just loved her. It's great to have him on board and involved in the journey. Caleb and Laura are huge supporters of mine." Craven, who is based near Terang, said it was great to be back racing at Melton after such a long period away from the state's premier circuit. "It's good to see a few faces you haven't seen for a while and catch up," he said. "It's our headquarters and this is where we strive to be. Although we are not technically here at a metro meeting, it's Melton on a Saturday night, and going forward it will be good to get back to metro racing. I'm excited about what the summer is going to hold for harness racing. "It's been an unfortunate time, but it could even be a blessing in disguise with a lot of our really good races being pushed back." Pink Galahs has now won six of 11 starts and secured more than $40,000 in prizemoney for connections. Craven has been the talk of the industry during the lockdown period for some of the drone vision that he's been producing for owners. "We've been putting a little bit up on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter," Craven said. "For the owners to see actually what their horses are doing and when they are working in a bunch, working up and down the track or swimming in the pool... it gives them a highlight and it actually helps them be involved with what their horses are doing from day to day." Horses from the former "West" region of the state won the first three races on Saturday night's card before those from the old "Inner West" area claimed the remaining four. Saturday night was the first meeting at Melton since the sport moved to the three-region model across Victoria. Racing returns to Melton on Monday for an eight-event card, starting from 1.42pm. HEAR FROM ALL THE WINNING DRIVERS IN ALL CLEAR:   First-Starter Form Your guide to today’s trots debutants Tabcorp Park Melton today Race 1: Niota Bloodstock 2YO Trotters Handicap N3 Sangreal (2YO Father Patrick filly out of Solar Flash; trainer Paul Watson, driver Jordan Leedham): First foal out of five-time winning It Is I mare. Race 4: Schweppes Trot N5 Flick It (4YO Fling It mare out of Sli Trix, trainer Bill White, driver Ian White) Six-time winning Sundon mare's Great Great Granddam is Maori Miss, a dominant line in Victorian trotting.   HRV - Tim O'Connor

A 10-year-old that's been off the harness racing scene for nearly six years has notched up a victory that must surely rank as one of the greatest comebacks since Lazarus! All-but-forgotten bay gelding Von Ponder (Ponder-Heide Von Beltz (Bistro Lobell) apparently showed only modest capacity as a youngster, and was last despatched to the paddock as a four-year-old - where he remained until a little over four months ago. But he's certainly flourished under the careful attention of Bendigo trainer Shaun McNaulty, and his assistant Ben Pell. And after three handy performances, the big fellow scored a tidy win at his home track recently. "I think he was one of those horses that gets put out in a big paddock and sort of forgotten about," McNaulty said. "There may have been a few minor niggling problems, but the horse was pretty much retired," he said. "He was at a Marong property just down the road from me. Ben, who's one of the part-owners, helps me out and he was working another horse that got injured back in November. He wanted something else to work and he remembered Von Ponder was out running around in a paddock." After seven starts in Queensland as a three-year-old at his first race campaign (way back in 2012) Von Ponder was off the scene for nearly 18 months. He reappeared at a Victorian meeting at Maryborough in 2014 where he was unplaced-and was then banished for nearly six years before reappearing. To be precise, Von Ponder had a break of 2169 days or three weeks short of six years! "Ben owns the horse with a mate in Drew Gray," McNaulty explained. "They purchased him from Queensland back in late 2012," he said. After four months of jogging up, it was off to the trials and Von Ponder showed he hadn't forgotten what the racing caper was all about. "He went well at his first trial, and then we thought he went extra good at his next hit out," McNaulty said. "At his return race start on April 3, he finished down the track, as we expected, because of being away from racing for so long," he said. "He pulled up a little lame and we were all a bit disappointed, but it only proved to be a hoof abscess." A fortnight later Von Ponder ran a nice second placing at Bendigo and repeated the dose seven days later in a sub two-minute mile rate. Then a victory last Thursday repaid connections for their enduring patience and perseverance. After being eased off the gate by reinsman Rod Lakey, Von Ponder was caught three wide and then worked to the death seat. Shaken up on the home corner, the big lump of a horse responded nicely to post his unlikely comeback win in 1.57-2. To watch the video replay click here. And McNaulty has no doubts the old-timer can make his presence felt for some time to come. "He works nicely at home and he's been steadily getting better at each of his race outings. He hasn't got any issues, so I reckon the boys are going to have a bit of fun, that's for sure," he said. Prior to his latest success, Von Ponder was previously in the winner's circle at Brisbane's Albion Park on October 22, 2012. His lifetime summary now stands at 12 starts for two wins and three runner-up cheques for $8400 in stakes. Central Region (Bendigo) Trainer Statistics Trainer                   Starts      First       Placings       Average win S/P Glenn Douglas          82           16               20                  $5.35 Kate Hargreaves       45             7               13                  $7.38 Shaun McNaulty        19             5                5                 $13.26 Justin Brewin             17             5                1                   $5.72 Keith Cotchin              20            4                 5                  $2.50 Gary Donaldson          15            4                 3                  $7.53 Trevor Patching            7             3                 3                  $5.07 Anthony Crossland        5            3                 1                  $1.73 Ross Graham              26            2                 13                 $5.85 Ray Cross                   18            2                    4               $16.50 Terry Gange

Exciting pacer Eureka put the finishing touches to Kate Gath's magical return to Tabcorp Park Melton on Saturday night. Fresh from a driving-related suspension, Gath claimed the last leg of a winning treble with the former New Zealander, who scored a dominant victory in the VHRC Pace (1720m, NR 64-69). The son of Washington VC had to race in the death seat for much of the journey, but it proved no barrier as he let down at the top of the straight and charged clear to win comfortably in a mile rate of 1:55.3. It was the four-year-old's fourth win from five appearances in Australia, with the only blemish coming when he galloped and broke gear at Cranbourne in late March. "His last start at Ballarat and his trial since then, he has just given me a really good feel," Gath told SEN1116's Talking Trots on Track. "I've just come back and gone to (trainer/husband) Andy (Gath) 'I really like this horse'. And I don't say that about that many. "He just seems to be getting better and better and I'm really not surprised that he did what he did (Saturday night) on the feel he has given me on the last couple of starts." Gath scored earlier wins with Emma Stewart's Two Times Bettor and Arden Voyager, which like Eureka is trained by her husband Andy. The reappearance of Stewart's superstar pacer Poster Boy was billed as a major highlight of Saturday night's card and he didn't disappoint. Injury and illness had kept the multiple Group 1 winner sidelined for close to a year before the previous weekend's victory at Melton and he backed up seven days later with another scintillating performance. Racing in the TAB Long May We Play Pace (2240m, NR 90-120), Poster Boy was allowed to roll to the front by driver Greg Sugars and with minimal pressure, he covered his last 800m in 54.8sec to clock a mile rate of 1:55.7. "As you saw, he straightened up and did that all himself. To snap off a sub-27 quarter without even being asked for it - it takes a real good horse to do that," Sugars said. The win was the last of three on the night for the Myrniong-based Sugars, who also scored with Im No Outlaw and Cocosfella for trainer/wife Jess Tubbs. Sugars' sister Kylie was another to leave Melton with a big smile on her face after the performance of Sammy Showdown in the Alderbaran Park Trot (2240m, NR 75-120). The horse beat a quality field of squaregaiters to register his first success since his six-race streak ended in early February.   HRV - Tim O'Connor

It's not the most conventional of training methods, but regular runs and jogs through the bushland near Daylesford has become the norm for evergreen trotter Fear Not. Trained by Glenn Conroy at Musk Vale and raced by his daughter Lyndal, the seven-year-old mare is one of the more recognisable competitors on the Victorian harness racing circuit. Since making her debut in March of 2015, the daughter of Skyvalley has run another 178 times for seven wins and 57 minor placings. Essentially, she's raced week in, week out across that five-year period with great consistency. Lyndal, who operates a hairdressing salon in Daylesford and works closely with the horses, explained the secret to getting Fear Not to the track so often. "The only time she sets foot on the track is when she races," she said. "Every other day she jogs out the bush. We are very fortunate to live over the road from the bush so there's all sorts of fire trails for her to go and jog on. "During the start of the week, she does a power of work. She does a lot of hill work to make sure her fitness is at its peak and coming up to race day, it will taper back slowly and just some nice jog work to keep her ticking over. "That's what allows her to race weekly and so regularly, because she isn't having a lot of strain from fast work on the tracks. "We just use her fast work hit-out as her race and look after her during the week." Lyndal is well known for pampering her horses and Fear Not certainly gets the full treatment. "She has her own woolen dress rug with her name embroidered on the side of it," she said. "She has got a really nice bling brow band and I always braid her forelock and her main. "To me, I think presentation is part of it as well. I like knowing not only do my horses look good, they feel good and hopefully they reward us." Fear Not, who has contested 13 Group 1 races over her career with a fourth placing in February's Breed For Speed Gold final her best result, will step out in the Niota Bloodstock Trot (2240m) at Tabcorp Park Melton this Saturday night. She will be out to break a losing sequence that spans back to December last year, but is well suited to the small field according to Lyndal. "She's not very fast out, so drawing six, she definitely won't be leading. Dad always drives her for luck," she said. "He sits her in and we always hope for a bit of speed on, a bit of pace because she likes a good solid race. And then we just hope for the best." Anton Golino's Imsettogo looks the one to beat from the barrier one draw, but there's a host of chances in a small but quality seven-horse field. Another highlight on Saturday night's card will be the return of Emma Stewart-trained star Poster Boy, who made his return from injury and illness with a sizzling first-up win last weekend. The Alderbaran Park Trot (2240m) is another exciting event, which will see a mouthwatering clash between top squaregaiters I Am Pegasus, Sammy Showdown and Savannah Jay Jay.   HRV - Tim O'Connor

There's been plenty of win droughts broken since the move to regional-based harness racing in Victoria in early April. You can now add Frank Barac to the list. The Elmore hobby trainer notched his first winner since Anzac Day 2016, when Madam Reactor won the three-year-old maiden pace at Lord's Raceway on Thursday night. The filly's first win came at career start number 12 and followed a pair of previous placings, including a third at Bendigo the previous week. Barac said once back at home he celebrated with a glass of Wolf Blass Eaglehawk Shiraz. "It's been a long time (between wins), a couple of years," he said. "This filly has always had ability, but it's taken a long time to get her where she is. "She's a bit immature. I gave her a long break (after her eighth start) and gave her four months off and brought her back in slowly and suddenly she's turned the corner for me." Despite putting win number one on board, Barac said there was no rush to get Madam Reactor back to the track, albeit a crack at another three-year-old fillies pace next Thursday will surely prove tempting. "It helps when there is no long travelling involved, she's not the best traveller. Short trips to Bendigo probably suit her." he said.  Frank Barac and daughter Yvette with Madam Reactor and winning driver Rod Lakey.  CLAIRE WESTON PHOTOGRAPHY   Madam Reactor, by Auckland Reactor out of Madam Altissimo, is owned and bred by Barac and his wife Laura, with daughter Yvette charged with the strapping duties. She was driven to victory by comeback driver Rod Lakey. "He's come back with a vengeance, he's driving winners from the left and the right," Barac said. "The bloke who was stabled next to me last night said I reckon if we could put Rod on a broomstick we could win with that. "He did very well out in front, I was very happy with his drive."   To watch Madam Reactor win at Lord's Raceway click here   Before Thursday, Barac's last race win was with Shebetterwin in the Ray Woods Memorial Pace at the Kyabram Harness Racing Club meeting at Echuca on April 25, 2016. Night eight of regional racing was highlighted by a training double to Glenn Douglas with Ozzie Playboy and Torrid Saint, driving doubles to Lakey (including Nikita Adele) and Alex Ashwood (Keilah and Surbiton Pretender), and a second win on the trot for the trainer/driver combination of Darryl Pearce and Shannon O'Sullivan with Paying Your Way.   By Kieran Iles   Reprinted with permission of The Bendigo Advertiser

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) and the Victorian Harness Racing Club (VHRC) are pleased to announce a significant new media partnership. HRV’s live digital streaming service Trots Vision will broadcast The Parade Ring sponsored by the VHRC – Victorian harness racing’s preeminent club for trots owners – at every Tabcorp Park Melton Saturday night meeting. The VHRC also joins the RSN family through this HRV partnership with the long-time weekly trots show Gait Speed now sponsored by the VHRC. “The VHRC is firmly committed to working alongside HRV to add value to our industry and promote the great game wherever possible,” VHRC’s Rob Auber said. “Trots Vision is a wonderful media platform which provides great value for owners and participants who cannot be at the track and now they are able to see their horse in The Parade Ring brought to you by VHRC. “We are also thrilled to align our VHRC brand to RSN’s Gait Speed program, which can be heard every Monday on RSN Central with Gareth Hall. Dan Mielicki and I are regulars on that show and we’re looking forward to continuing to bring great stories to life for the benefit of the listeners and the industry. “We are honoured to partner with HRV and this will be the first of many exciting VHRC projects. We hope all owners and industry lovers will support our club with its membership initiatives for 2020-21 and we’re confident the harness industry will only grow if we are prepared to all support each other and pull in the one direction.” HRV General Manager of Marketing Andrew English welcomed the new partnership and spoke highly of the role VHRC has played over many years. “The VHRC has been an integral part of the Victorian trots industry for a long time and HRV is excited to extend this partnership to encompass two of our key media brands in The Parade Ring on Trots Vision and Gait Speed on RSN,” English said. “I congratulate the VHRC team, and Rob Auber in particular, not only for the exemplary work he does as one of our hosts on Trots Vision, but also for the way in which he is working so effectively in his role with the VHRC and for the greater good of our industry as a whole. “HRV is thrilled to be working so closely with the VHRC to develop our mutual vision, which will only strengthen the entire harness racing industry for many years to come.”   HRV - Cody Winnell

Long-time harness racing aficionado Ken Whelan was back in the winners’ stall yesterday at Ballarat trots. The astute horseman produced four-year-old trotter Charlie Walker to win the TAB, Long May We Play Trot. Driven by John Caldow, Charlie Walker (pictured) settled three back on the fence from the pole as a 50-1 shot in Well Deserved set the pace. Turning for home Caldow was angling for runs, and when Well Deserved galloped he was able to steer around that horse and manoeuvre into the gap for a narrow triumph. The victory was win No.1 for Charlie Walker at his 12th start, but there’s no doubting his ability, showing several glimpses of a breakthrough before yesterday. “When I broke him in, I thought he’d be really smart because he could skip over the ground pretty good without asking him to run and he’s never been a silly horse,” Whelan said. “He is a bit hesitant to do something new on the racetrack and he shies a bit, but I think he’ll make a nice racehorse.” And Whelan would know. The horsemanship history among his family goes back generations. His father’s parents and grandparents had the “cabs and coaches” business at Maryborough dating back to the goldrush days. “They would tell me that they often would carry 50 or 60 miners pulled by eight horses in hand and my father drove the cabs from the station as a boy and the hearse to the cemetery,” Whelan said. Whelan’s father, Bill Whelan, “WJ”, trained horses successfully over many years, picking up club premierships at tracks like Maryborough, St Arnaud, Charlton and Ouyen and having periods of dominance at the Showgrounds during the 1960s. “We had nice horses back then. I think we had about five horses go to free-for-all company. We had Doxa Joe too, who was the fastest Australian bred horse ever to go America at the time, named after the Doxa Youth Centre at Malmsbury and its founder Father Joe Giacobbe,” Whelan said. “Geoff McDonald was very friendly with him and he bred Doxa Joe and Robin Guy. We had them both. Doxa Joe was sold to American and went 1:53.0.” Ken and his father had an enormous setback in 1985 after the central Victorian bushfire, which started in Avoca, burnt out their property. “I shifted to Smeaton, which is now Lawrence, and started up,” Ken said. Some of his best winners along the way since have been Gerry Leigh, Kenfig Boy and Puhinui Jim “They were handy horses. Puhinui Jim was first class but he had a bad accident one night at Moonee Valley and only ever won one race after that. He won 18 or 19 races from about 24 starts and broke two minutes most times he went around,” he said. In September of 1995 Whelan broke his back in a race fall when at the peak of his powers, having won multiple club premierships in the weeks leading up to that accident. “I crushed vertebrae and was in lot of trouble for a long time. I still wear a brace. A horse fell on top of me upside down on the cart,” he said. Whelan also explained that long-time harness figure Len Baker and his father raced numerous horses with the family over the years. Asked about his best memories, Whelan said a win of Roman Chapel one night at Globe Derby was “pretty special” driving for Trevor Spry. But those wins such as Charlie Walker are the most satisfying. “When you break one in, get him going and then train him, it doesn’t matter what race it is, that is the greatest pleasure you get,” Whelan said. One of Charlie Walker’s owners, Geoff Walker, has a grandfather whose second name is Charlie, Ken explained, adding “he was going to call him something ridiculous and my wife, Merna, said, ‘Why don’t you just call him Charlie Walker?’ So that’s how he got his name.” Other winners at Ballarat were Indigo Dancer (A Rocknroll Dance-Tauto Jane) for Ricky Ryan and Caldow, Ofortuna (Majestic Son-Fortunate Phoenix) for Craig Demmler and Jodi Quinlan, Better Boppa (Betterthancheddar-C C Bopper) for Emmett and Richard Brosnan, Jobells Image (Always A Virgin-Arts Image) for Emma Stewart and Greg Sugars, Abouttime (Art Major-Limerick Star) for Stewart and Sugars, Im A Denny Too (Art Major-Pricillas Girl) for Dennis Grieve and Sugars, and Pradason (Shadow Play-Stylish Jasper) for trainer-driver Allan McDonough. At Shepparton last night the winners were Santa Casa Beach (Somebeachsomewhere-Lombo Sleek Street) for Russell Jack and David Moran, Hateitwhenyourrite (Lucky Chucky-Adhesive) for David Abrahams and Brent Thomson, Well Well (Well Said-Johnola Babe) for Rosemarie and Paul Weidenbach, Hanover Sunshine (All Speed Hanover-Beverley Button) for Mark Buckingham, Sofala (Safari-Sass And Bling) for Donna Castles, Blingittothemax (Art Major-Alldatglittersisgold) for David and Josh Aiken, Alta Mach (Mach Three-Alta Vista) for Shayne Eeles, and Golden Sand (Somebeachsomewhere-Fususi) for trainer-driver Laura Crossland. First-Starter Form A quick guide to today’s trots debutants Bendigo tonight Race 1 Keilah (3yo filly by Art Major out of Shakeilah, trained by Luke Stapleton and driven by Alex Ashwood) Out of a Bendigo debutant winning daughter of In The Pocket, who has already produced 13-time winner Thatswhatisaid (by Well Said) and I Will Rock You (by Rock N Roll Heaven). They went 1:51.4 and 1:52.5 respectively. The mare has a 100% strike rate for her foals to the races, so that suggests there’s a win in this girl at some stage. Roxy Royale (3yo filly by Pet Rock out of Baroda Bess, trained and driven by Ross Graham) This filly is out of an unraced Armbro Operative mare, who has so far produced Animated (1:53.6, 21 wins from 103 starts and still racing well) and Sports Bounty (eight wins, 1:55.5).   Race 2 Tellmesumthingirl (3yo filly by Julius Caesar out of Parisian Operative, trained and driven by Dylan Marshall) This filly is from a one-time winning daughter of Armbro Operative who has not yet produced a foal to the races.   HRV - Cody Winnell

Tonight could well prove the start of something special for trainer Luke Stapleton, who unveils the first of a fleet of well-bred fillies. Keilah steps out in the first at Bendigo tonight, the Bayswater Jayco 3YO Maiden pace on Trots Vision at 6.17pm, with Stapleton’s hopes high for the filly, who’s only the third horse he’s had run in his name since returning from an almost 18-year training absence. “She has taken a bit of time to get going,” Stapleton said of the New Zealand-bred Art Major three-year-old, who’s a half to ThatswhatIsaid ($116,477) and I Will Rock You ($80,726). “She was a bit rough with her pacing and now she is doing everything right.” That’s been evident in her two winning trials at Maryborough this month, her first since she trialled when in the hands of Mick Stanley almost 12 months prior. Owned by Stapleton’s uncle and aunty, Brendan and Anne James of BFJ Bloodstock, he said the filly was returned to him for a spell and “I have ended up training her”. It’s been fortuitous, because she’s taken well to the neighbour’s unique training track. “I live next door to Kate Hargreaves and Alex Ashwood and use their track, which has an ascent from 800 to 600 metres and that seems to be agreeing with her.” More will be learned when she debuts tomorrow night, but she hasn’t been missed by analysts, with Good Form’s Blake Redden marking her a $2 chance and “after showing some good dash in a couple of Maryborough trials” he noted “she’s out of a good producing mare and she should be hard to beat”. And she’s not the only promising filly in Stapleton’s care. He’s also preparing unraced pair Yankee Angel and Angel Of Heaven, half-sisters who were bred by BFJ Bloodstock to their mare Arty Alice. The latter has a terrific record, not only producing Beach Shack ($148,702) and Angel Of Arts ($100,600) but Rockstar Angel, who’s building on her $406,258 in Australian earnings with success in the US. Yankee Angel is their three-year-old half-sister by American Ideal and Stapleton said she was “a nice filly”. “She is pretty small, but predominantly the family haven’t gone early, so we won’t rush her,” he said. “She is about a month away from trialling.” Similarly, two-year-old Angel Of Heaven, by Rock N Roll Heaven, will be worked up slowly. Stapleton also trains there big half-brother Tracer Bullet, who has spelled since last July but is nearing a return. “I had a win with Tracer Bullet (last campaign), he is back in work and about a month away from trialling,” he said. The quartet make up the stable of Stapleton, who drove from 1998 through to 2003, steering 37 winners across 544 starts amid stints working with Andrew Peace, Gavin Lang, Noel Alexander, David Murphy and time in the US. “I out drove my claim and it got pretty hard and so I went working for Dad,” he said. Some 15 years on the itch has returned, he’s re-established at Shelbourne and again has his hands full. “It’s good to be back training a couple and mucking around with a few,” he said. “Four is a lot, probably too much, when you are working full-time, but when they are quality like this it is pretty motivating.” TALKING TROTS ON SENTRACK: Hosts Jason Bonnington and Blake Redden have another big line-up for today's Talking Trots on SENTrack, which runs weekdays from 11am-1pm on 1377AM in Melbourne, 657AM in Perth and 1575AM in Wollongong. 11am: Mike Reed 11.15am: Maddie Ray 11.35am: Peter Tonkin on Gavin Lang After noon: Mick Guerin 12.20pm: Tim Butt Click here to listen live and for links to download the SEN app.     The good oil from the Vic trials circuit BLACKBOOKER: Bendigo, R1 N2, Keilah Settled five back on the markers before moving into a one out and one back trail at the 800m and came out three horses wide at the 600m when she won nicely. REPORT BLACKBOOKER: Bendigo, R4 N4, Angski Settled four back on the markers, moved around the field and was able to slot in behind the leader at the bell before giving chase at the 300m. She finished second (behind Just Oscar). REPORT     HRV - Michael Howard

As trainer of over 40 years, John Meade doesn't easily get carried away about the prospects of his harness racing charges - but he can be excused for having a wry smile on his face at the moment. Meade, based at Cudgee which is halfway between Terang and Hamilton in Victoria's Western District, is certainly seeing deserved reward for effort come his way with his team of square gaiters. "I'm having some fun-and getting a bit of my hard earnt back," Meade laughed. "I think a few of them are blessed with good ability. And along with that, they just don't like losing," he said. But Meade has been around long enough to know when his enthusiasm is warranted, and that moment came recently at Terang when he produced a five-year-old trotter on debut. Bay gelding I Stand Alone (Danny Bouchea-Diamond Insitu (Cr Commando USA) is the younger half-brother to Meade's Great Southern Star champion Sparkling Success, and understandably, the debutant created plenty of buzz in the lead-up. "He's a lovely big type of horse and so easy to train. But it has been a long haul with him because he's had some serious issues," Meade said. "There's been many people go over him and I've spent a lot of money with bone scans trying to track down the problem and one vet suggested I turn him out for four months," he said. "I found a muscle man who had a bit of a go and did seem to do some good. He's still not quite right and goes rough now and again, but the muscle issues seem to have been the problem." Sent out as a cautious 5/1 chance in the Cobden AB Trot, I Stand Alone wasn't bustled out of the gate and after taking time to balance up, Meade had no hesitation in driving him to outside the leader Down Under Earl (Jackie Barker). I Stand Alone's more-fancied stablemate Wisp Of Smoke (Jason Lee) worked around at the bell, and when the leader kicked on the home corner, there didn't appear to be any threats-that was until Meade revved up I Stand Alone, who put in big strides to grab an eye-catching victory on the line. "I saw that Wisp Of Smoke wasn't going all that good, so pulled out and gave my bloke a few taps to put pressure on the leader. With a trotter you just don't go 'whack' because it's the easiest way to bust them up," Meade said. "I think there may be a card game where you win by going backwards. But there's only one way to win out on the track in my opinion, and that's by going forward. I believe when you are up there, if you sit quietly the others have to go around. They have to use petrol to do that." I Stand Alone won officially by a head over Down Under Earl, with a similar margin back to Namoscar (Ashley Ainsworth). Watch the replay here. Meade said I Stand Alone was the third foal he'd bred from Diamond Insitu and he was now the third winner-the other two being Sparkling Success ($423,000) and Diamond Wes ($22,700). "It's pretty exciting that they have now all won races. And we have four more from the mare. There's a three-year-old filly and a two-year-old colt, both of which go along nicely. We also have a yearling colt and a foal on her, and she's in foal again," he said. "Not many trotters win first-up. I've perhaps had only one other over the years so, yes, that was a special victory by I Stand Alone." Meade said he was thrilled to receive many congratulatory messages and especially a call from Father Brian Glasheen, known as the Pacing Priest, due to his love of the sport. "He told me he didn't think I was going to get away with them at the start with the horse going a little rough. But he said I'd kept him in his gear and got the win. He was delighted." Meade said his star trotter Sparkling Success (winner of 17 races from 39 starts) would be nominated for a race at Terang in seven days. Sparkling Success has impressed in his two race starts since a 17-month lay-off and is bound to further improve with racing. The gelding, bred by Meade and his wife Mary, was ready to show USA fans his style in October 2018, with a run in the $US 1M Yonkers International Trot in New York being pencilled in. However, on the eve of flying out, the champion suffered a near front suspensory ligament injury and didn't make it. "His legs are fine now, and he seems to be working well. If the standing start Terang race goes on he will be 40 metres behind. He mightn't be 'Mickey mouse', but he won't be far off," Meade said.   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

Easy-going Bendigo harness racing trainer Shaun McNaulty still pinches himself when he recalls the day he received a telephone call "out of the blue". McNaulty said he didn't recognize the number at all, but when the caller started chatting about a horse named Hashtag he immediately took notice. "I used to watch Hashtag probably from when he first of all started racing for (Shepparton trainer) Laura Crossland," McNaulty said. "He'd do a few things wrong, but there was always plenty of bottom to him," he said. Crossland won 10 races with the pacer before he was transferred to the Sydney stables of Craig Cross, who won three. Hashtag then headed to Queensland for a stint with Grant Dixon which produced one victory. Then connections-the Charantoss Racing Syndicate-decided it was time for Hashtag to return to Victoria. "That was my lucky day when I took the call from Charles Merola, who was ringing on behalf of the syndicate made up of 10 mates. The horse is undoubtedly the best I've ever had," McNaulty said. And Hashtag (Shadyshark Hanover-Elvira Bromac (Badlands Hanover) showed just why he's so highly-rated by McNaulty with a brilliant performance at Bendigo on Wednesday night. The brown gelding stopped the clock in winning the $12,000 Garrards Horse and Hound Pace in a time of 1.51-9, equalling the track record set back in February by the Maree Campbell-trained gelding Belittled. "We really had the best run in the race, sitting on the fence behind the two leaders, and they kept the pace on. The track is on fire at the moment, but the front ones didn't back off," McNaulty said. Streitkid (Shannon O'Sullivan) led with Form Analyst (Tayla French) up on the outside. Both horses were stirred up and pulling hard with the first quarter a blistering 26.2secs, followed with splits of 28.0, 28.2 and 29.4. Recent comeback driver Rod Lakey shot Hashtag up the sprint lane to record an easy win over Courageous Saint and Animated, the latter certainly being one to follow after charging home from the clouds. Driver Rod Lakey with Hashtag McNaulty said his pacer had a perfect attitude, with an unbelievable desire to win. "He just tries his heart out every time and loves getting out there. He's an absolute ripper. I'd compare him to one of those blokes that you always want to go to the pub with!" McNaulty laughed. Hashtag joined the Marong stable of McNaulty last August and has since won four races-the others being at Melton (twice) and Mildura. "I had planned on taking him up the highway to Mildura again for the Pacing Cup Carnival. But that got scrubbed with the coronavirus pandemic," he said. "With the regionalisation racing restrictions we haven't any option but to keep racing him at Bendigo, but that's okay because there are going to be some interesting battles ahead with Animated because he's certainly one of the best in the area at the moment." Gifted reinsman Rod Lakey, who recently returned to race driving after an absence of more than a decade, went home with a double. Apart from Hashtag, he was also successful with the Lynne Mercieca prepared pacer Art Finest (Art Official-Finest (D M Dillinger).   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

Former Canadian 2YO Colt of the Year Warrawee Needy, now based at Yirribee Pacing Stud, Wagga (NSW), was credited with his fifth harness racing winner from his first Australian crop when the two-year-old Menames Needy emerged successful at Wagga on Easter Day. Having only his fourth start, the gelding was second last on the home turn and disappointed for racing room but gained a needle eye opening and finished full of running to claim the thick end of the prize. Tintin In America, a studmate of Warrawee Needy at Yirribee, left a couple of very smart three-year-old winners on either side of the continent last weekend. Wotdidusaaay took full advantage of a perfect trip to outsprint his rivals at Melton in 1:58 over 2240 metres. It was his sixth win and sent his stake tally over the $30,000 mark. He looks a really good youngster. While Middlepage, a three-year-old colt, finished strongly after enjoying a box seat trail to post his first win at Gloucester Park. He rated 1:59.6 over 2130 metres. To complete a successful week Timely Sovereign, a son of Lombo Pocket Watch, notched win No. 9 and increased his earnings to almost $80,000 at Penrith.   By Peter Wharton

There are few harness racing people more passionate about their sport than Sunraysia trainer Noel "Lucky" Cameron and his wife Midge. In more than 50 years in the sport, only once has the couple from Gol Gol, near Mildura, missed being on track to race their horses. So, you can imagine the tension was high when COVID-19 restrictions meant they had to watch their nine-year-old mare, Bella Cullen (P Forty Seven-Victoria Bound (Christian Cullen) make history at Mildura recently. To watch the video replay click here The durable veteran pacer cracked the $100,000 mark in stakes - but what made the milestone unique is that she's the only pacer ever to have achieved it without venturing outside Victoria's Northern Region. In her 167 starts, Bella Cullen has raced only at Mildura, Ouyen and Swan Hill, winning 13 races and stacking up more than 50 placings. "It wasn't that she was a bad traveller or anything. We just never got around to taking her to race anywhere else," Cameron said. "We just love the horses and love racing and Bella's been a bit special because she's just been so honest and with us so long," he said. "All our horses we just raced ourselves and the only other time we've missed being on track was one night a few years back when I was taken off to hospital! "So I have to say it was absolutely terrible watching at home! We were so thrilled she won but watching on the TV, once it was over, it was all over red rover - we just sat there like stunned mullets!" When Victoria introduced Regional Racing as part of coronavirus management measures, the Camerons were locked out and no longer able to race, because their stable is on their fruit growing property on the NSW side of Sunraysia (less than four kilometres, as the crow flies, from the Mildura track). But with Bella Cullen only $1100 short of $100,000 career earnings her regular driver Dwayne Locke, and his partner Andrew Stenhouse couldn't stand to see "Bella" potentially retire without a chance to reach the milestone. "She's been racing well, her last four or five starts had been good runs without winning, so we were just so happy that Andrew and Dwayne took her on to give her a chance to get to that milestone," Cameron said. "It's not usually her thing, but she was able to lead from barrier two and Dwayne was able to get away with I think the slowest ever lead time at Mildura for the 1720 trip - so she actually broke two records!" he laughed. Cameron said Bella Cullen arrived at their stable as a foal at foot when Midge purchased her dam, Victoria Bound. "She would get around the paddock okay, but she was just a scruffy little club-footed thing when she was weaned and as a yearling. You would never have dreamed she would be anything at all, but she did grow into quite a nice-looking mare in the end," he said. "She was a bit of a hard case to break in. She'd kick pretty viciously and at the races she'd double-barrel the back of the stables and hated being put in the cart. "But after four or five starts she seemed to settle down, and from then on, she has just been a lovely horse to have and to race." Lucky and Midge have been involved in harness racing together for 52 years. Lucky's dad was a gallops jockey, but when Lucky was a teenager, he became more interested in harness racing, working with former Sunraysia trainer, the late Vic Berryman. "But it was Midge who really pushed me over the line into the sport, I suppose. Her dad had pacers, and before we were even married, without telling me, she leased a horse for us," he said. "I think we gave him three starts and he ran last in every one, but we were hooked and it became the thing we loved to do. So since then, we've always had one or two in work, and these days we breed a few as well." Cameron said Bella Cullen was not the most capable horse the couple had raced - naming Kidlin and Grand Hand as their best ability wise, but who had their racing careers cut short by injury. "But Bella's definitely been the most successful and she's the most docile lovely horse you could ever want, so she's probably our favorite," he said. "We've got her booked into Sweet Lou this season, but Dwayne looks after her in her races, and we'll just keep watching from the couch for a bit longer yet, because she's probably, in all honesty, racing as well as she ever has!" Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

Kate Hargreaves and Alex Ashwood will make the trip from Shelbourne to Bendigo confident their second night of region-based racing will bring further success. Having produced a win and a third from two starts when the Central region kicked off last Friday, the stable is optimistic promising two-year-old Lay The Smackdown and trotter Well Defined can put their best feet forward tonight. Hargreaves told Trots Talk her two-year-old Rock N Roll Heaven gelding, who will contest the Southern Cross Office Equipment 2YO Pace at 7.21pm on Trots Vision, was well placed to build on his third place on debut at Echuca, where he galloped when leading but recovered to run third. “I’ve got a pretty big opinion of him,” she said. “He’s got his fair share of ability, he can just get a bit rocky in his gate. “At Echuca he did gallop, he actually hit a wheel and just put himself off stride. We are just putting him a bit further out in the cart now so that doesn’t happen. “The bigger track at Bendigo will definitely help him. I’m excited to have him at the races, he’s an exciting horse. I think he’s a really great chance, if he does everything right he will be very hard to beat.” As will Well Defined, says Hargreaves, when the five-year-old trotter steps out at 8.51pm in the Race Services Trot. He returns to a mobile start for the first time since June 1 last year, having run off a standing start penalty in every race since. “I think he’s got a really great chance,” she said. “The field he’s in against, he has been racing a few better ones than what he’s racing against, and he doesn’t have to give them a start, because he’s been in starts and been off 20 and 30 metres. “I think his form doesn’t really show just how well he’s going. He’s another one I’m confident on if he can have a little bit of luck, he always needs a little bit of luck.” Lay The Smackdown is a $1.45 favourite with TAB.com.au, while Well Defined is $6. A big day of racing awaits on Trots Vision, with the eight-race card at Tabcorp Park Melton kicking off at 1.07pm before the focus moves to Ballarat for the first at 6.20pm. CLICK BELOW TO LISTEN IN TO TROTS TALK:   HRV Trots Media - Michael Howard

The Bendigo Harness Racing Club is delighted to announce that Aldebaran Park, Australia’s home of the straightout trotter, will be the new sponsor of the Bendigo Trotters Cup.   The announcement further strengthens Aldebaran Park’s commitment to promoting square-gaiters races in Victoria, particularly at Bendigo where it has sponsored the Club’s signature race for trotting mares, the Group 1 $50,000 Aldebaran Park Maori Mile, since its inception in 2010.   The Group 3 Aldebaran Park Bendigo Trotters Cup will be held on Friday, June 26 over 2650 metres from a standing start with discretionary handicapping.   The race carries basic prizemoney of $25,000 with Aldebaran Park providing a service voucher of $2,000 to the winning owner to be used for a service to one of the Aldebaran Park stallion roster in the 2020/21 season.   The Aldebaran Park stud lineup is spearheaded by former champion Skyvalley NZ, the current leading Australian-bred trotting stallion and sire of the mighty Tornado Valley, and the royally-bred, well-performed Muscle Hill horse Aldebaran Eagle, whose first crop are yearlings.   The Bendigo Trotters Cup was inaugurated in 1972 and has been won by many of the greats of the Australian trotting turf including Scotch Notch, True Roman, Knight Pistol, Lenin, Stormy Morn and Just Money.   Aldebaran Park principal Duncan McPherson OAM said: “Aldebaran Park is delighted to extend its relationship with Bendigo HRC and coupled with our existing sponsorship of the Maori Mile it again strengthens our resolve to ensure that we promote trotting in Australia.   “There is little doubt that as an Industry we are internationalising and globalising the trotting gait in the Southern Hemisphere thus ensuring that we are a significant market of interest for Northern Hemisphere investors.”   Eric Hendrix, the general manager of the Bendigo Harness Racing Club, said:   “Already being involved at Bendigo with our Group 1 Aldebaran Park Maori Mile, I felt this was a great opportunity to once again help grow the exposure and compliment the hard work Duncan McPherson has already done for trotting.   “The BHRC has a fantastic relationship with Aldebaran Park and we look forward to growing both the Trotters Cup and Maori Mile in the years to come.”     Peter Wharton

The old saying 'make hay while the sun shines' has never been more applicable to Bendigo region harness racing participants than it was on Wednesday. With the sport in Victoria moving to a new region-based operating model from today, yesterday provided the last opportunity for trainers and drivers to notch up wins at venues outside of their own designated area. Plenty rose to the challenge. At Stawell, young reinsman Jayden Brewin scored a driving double aboard Fowsands and Wingate Guy, while the exciting young training combination of Maddie Ray and Haydon Gray picked up their third victory this year with Rigondeaux. A prolific run continued Wednesday night at Shepparton, where Inglewood trainer Grant Innes struck with the in-form trotter Vincent Kai, and Elmore's Matthew Higgins notched up a victory with the five-year-old mare Lilnova. For the foreseeable future, trainers and drivers from the Bendigo region (encompassing the Greater Bendigo, Buloke, Central Goldfields, Loddon and Mount Alexander local government areas) will be restricted to solely competing at Lord's Raceway, starting this Friday night. In the sulky for Rigondeaux's impressive 3.3m win, co-trainer Maddie Ray said she was glad to see 'the locals' make the most of their last chance to race at tracks outside this region. Race 3 won by number 10 Rigondeaux. Driven and trained by Maddi Ray. Mile rate 2:04.9.    To watch the race click here She felt only time would tell whether it would be any harder or easier for trainers such as themselves to find a winner under the revised format. "If you look at the two trot races this Friday night (the Aldebaran Park Trot and Vale Colin Redwood Trot), there were more nominations than horses that could get a run," she said. "We'll just have to see how the racing and the programming goes. "Hopefully there are a few races where we can get another winner, we will just see what happens. "We've got five horses in work, three two-year-olds and two older trotters, which keeps us plenty busy. "We have got a few in the paddock we are trying to think what we do with, but we are happy to keep the numbers down a little bit." Ray could not hide her delight at the progress of Rigondeaux, a four-year-old, whose three wins, from 15 starts, have all been this year, starting at Kilmore on January 2 and quickly followed by another 14 days later at the same venue. The Majestic Sun/Galleons Bliss gelding had not raced for nearly six months before his breakthrough Kilmore win, but has since developed into a remarkably consistent trotter with seemingly plenty of upside. A steady and productive first three months of the year for Rigondeaux has reaped three wins and four placings from eight starts, his only real blemish a seventh at Charlton in mid-March. "Hayden and I couldn't be happier that he's so consistent, he tries his guts out every time he goes around," Ray said. "I guess the main thing is he is getting more confident with each run. "Charlton was only his bad run, but we can't really hold that against him. He galloped at the start and had a few excuses with a false start, it was just one of those days. "He's pretty sensitive if something goes wrong, but he has been unreal this time in. "Hopefully he keeps it going." By Kieran Iles  Reprinted with permission of The Bendigo Advertiser

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