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World record holder Mission Brief is considered to be a shoo-in for super-stardom by many; few would be surprised to see her win the Hambletonian. When she cruised to a ridiculous 1:50.3 world record in the International Stallion Stakes at The Red Mile trainer Ron Burke didn’t seem in the least bit nonplussed: he characterized her as being “super freaky.” Unlike ‘Ms Perfection’, JK She’salady, the daughter of Muscle Hill did go down to defeat in four of her 13 starts—all on breaks. Reminds one of the scary fast colt Arnie Almahurst, who won 14 of his 26 starts at three, back in the early 1970s, and broke stride in 8 of his losses. His son Arndon and grandson Pine Chip both retired as the fastest trotter ever. But we all know success doesn’t always beget success in this game—stuff happens, even to horses that carry all-time great potential. In 2012 Dan Patch winner To Dream On won 8 of her 9 starts, including the Breeders Crown, Merrie Annabelle and Bluegrass. The Credit Winner filly took her split of the ISS in 1:53.2, considerably slower than Mission Brief. Still, she was described as a “super-filly” and Jimmy Takter rated her up there with the best of her age and class he had trained. But while O’Brien winner Bee A Magician did progress and win Horse of the Year honors at three, To Dream On only won 2 of 14 starts. She was retired soon after capturing the Kentucky Filly Futurity. To Dream On didn’t possess Mission Brief’s blinding speed, but she was more reliable and was held in high regard coming out of her freshman campaign. Still, for one reason or another, she didn’t go on. Wheeling N Dealin, from that same class, is another who failed miserably in making the transition from stardom at two to success at three. The Cantab Hall colt, who won all of his freshman starts, including the Breeders Crown, Wellwood and Champlain, was winless in ten starts at three. As was the case with To Dream On, his fall from grace was shocking. Snow White won 11 of 13 at two and set a world record of 1:52.4 for freshmen trotters, of either sex, in the ISS, as well as an all-time earnings record for two-year-old trotters. The Self Possessed miss was already a super star when she entered the sophomore ranks, but health issues got the best of her, and she was ultimately euthanized, the following summer. On the other hand, Continentalvictory and CR Kay Suzie both came back to win Horse of the Year honors at three. Florican, the dam sire of Speedy Crown, was a world record holder at two, winning 7 of 8 starts for the Arden Homestead Stable. However, he was chronically lame and suffered from bouts of sickness at three, as he won once in 12 tries, earning less than $10,000. He did redeem himself with a successful campaign in the aged ranks. Broadway Hall was a very good freshman, winning all nine starts, including the Breeders Crown, and banking more than $435,000. Suspensory issues got the best of him, however, and he wasn’t able to compete at three. The fifteen-year-old son of Conway Hall, and sire of Broad Bahn, Action Broadway and Cooler Schooner, recently moved to Ohio. Dancer’s Crown, two-year-old division champ and Peter Haughton winner, in 1982, impressed Castleton Farms so much that they paid $3.75 million for a three-quarter share in him. The Dickerson Cup was his only noteworthy win at three. After freshman Donerail won his tenth in a row at two, Stanley Dancer eschewed his pet retort that Nevele Pride was the best trotter he ever had; he said Donerail was better. The elegant and handsome son of Valley Victory won 13 of 15 starts that year, including the Haughton, and he was awarded a Dan Patch. Owner Robert Suslow and Hanover Shoe Farms put together a syndication deal. But after banking $637,000 at two, he earned only $66,000 at three, winning 3 of 6 starts, after which he was forced into early retirement by injury. Royalty For Life, Pampered Princess, Dejarmbro, D Train, Broad Bahn and Big Rigs are all out of Donerail mares. Super Bowl’s son Express Ride earned $840,000 at two, back in 1985, as he won 9 of 14 starts and never failed to make the board. The division champ took the Breeders Crown and the Haughton. The following year Express Ride only managed to win twice in five starts and his earnings plummeted to less than $50,000. He was remanded to Castleton Farms where he proved to be sterile, but like several others who suffered from the sophomore blues, he went on to have a productive career in the aged ranks and also resuscitated his stallion career in Europe. Cumin was another precocious son of Super Bowl. He won the 8 races where he didn’t break at two, and lost the other 4. The product of the Super Bowl-Speedy Crown cross was stopped short by injury at three and didn’t race. Starlark Hanover won 21 of 22 heats as a freshman; she beat the boys from the 13 post at Yonkers Raceway in the Harriman. But David Wade’s Hickory Smoke filly regressed to journeyman status at three. Wesgate Crown became the sport’s all-time fastest two-year-old when he time trialed in 1:55.1 He won 7 of his 8 starts and was valued at a million dollars when 25% of him was purchased for $250,000. But, alas, the winner of the Breeders Crown and Valley Victory only won 3 of 12 the following year, none of them noteworthy. The son of Royal Prestige went on to have a successful aged career in North America and Europe, banking $2.5 million. Jodevin, a son of the mercurial speedball Dayan, managed to win 19 of his 21 starts at two in Midwest races like the Hayes and the Hoosier, to the point where he captured his division. Lameness took its toll at three. Noble Gesture, a certified nut job blessed with extreme speed, overcame his personal demons and won 8 of his 10 starts at two. He became the second fastest freshman trotter ever by virtue of a 1:59 win. But the demons won out at three, as the sire of Balanced Image and grandsire of Mack Lobell won only 3 of 13 starts, with the Matron serving as his premier victory. In his case there was no mystery to unpack regarding the factors that sabotaged his sophomore campaign. The majority of trotters that fail to graduate to greatness are waylaid by obvious injuries, while in other cases the fall from grace remains wrapped in mystery. By all accounts Mission Brief is healthy. One assumes Burke has done what he can to correct her fractious ways, but from Dayan and Marlu Pride, back in the day, to Manofmanymissions in the modern era, the puzzle of fire breathing trotters that lose their composure has never leant itself to easy solutions. (Joe FitzGerald has been an avid harness racing fan and historian for the last half-century. He writes a weekly blog for  http://viewfromthegrandstand.blogspot.com/. Joe’s commentary reflects his own views and not that of Harnesslink)

The Hambletonian Monte Series Final at the new Meadowlands and two Ontario pari-mutuel races at Grand River Raceway showcased North American monte activities this weekend. On Friday evening the $27,500 Hambletonian Monte Final took place (non-wagering) at the new Meadowlands. Sponsors were Jeff Gural, Valley High Stable, Back On Track, Ron Burke Stable, Arden Homestead Stable, Crawford Farm, Aldrich Properties, George Ducharme and Winners Circle Blueberries. The final followed two $10,000 legs the previous two weekends. This week, A Penny Earned (5g Conway Hall-Penny Dream-Dream Vacation) scored for Michelle Crawford and trainer George Ducharme in 1:57.2 (last quarter :28.2), just short of the north American speed race record set by Master Pine two years ago in 1:57.1. The winner was second in a July 18 leg behind Take My Picture that was second in the final for Therese Lindgren and trainer Nikolas Drennan. O U Gus (the July 25 winner) ended third for Stephanie Werder and trainer Whitney Richards. Master Pine finished fourth for Helene Gregory and trainer Julie Miller in the competitive (seven starters timed in 2:00.1 or better) ten horse field. In Ontario, Grand River Raceway hosted two pari-mutuel events on August 1st and 4th. The August 4th International Monte was part of the raceway's Industry Day and attracted riders from Canada, Belgium and Finland. The US rider-entrant Jennifer Connor was a scratch due to travel problems. Previous monte winner Radical Dreamer (Marit Valstad) made the fast pace, tracked and battled by eventual winner Tragically Shipp (Saara Jalasti aboard), that pulled away late for an comfortable win over Angies Lucky Star (Philippe Massachaele) in 2:02.4h over a rain soaked surface. Tragically Shipp (8g Shipps Speed-CH On Tour-Armbro Laser) is trained by Lee Watson for owners Lynne and David Magee. Jalasti and Massachaele regularly ride in monte races in Europe, where monte is very popular and part of most pari-mutuel racing cards at French and Scandinavian tracks. Race replay follows: The August 1 race at Grand River was billed as the Canada vs. Norway Challenge and it went to Callie Magoo (5g Magoo-Callie Alyssa-Wesgate Crown) with Norway's G. Berg up for trainer John Braid. This pair scored in 2:04.3h over King Tut (Sarah Town up for Canada) and Charlie Tuna. Both Grand River races were well received in the pari-mutuel wagering, as had been the case in previous Ontario pari-mutuel monte races. Standardbred Canada and Meadowlands files Thomas H. Hicks  

The Gran Premio Lotteria is Italy's greatest harness race, held every year since 1951 at Agnano in Naples, and will be held this year on Sunday May 4. The Lotteria is regarded as one of the four Grand Slam events of Europe and is a Group One Intnernational, eEligible to all horses 4YO and over, and raced in three elimination heats and a final later the same day, raced over 1,600 meters (0.99 mile) of Agnano's left handed 1000m track. The purse this year is 506 000 euros ($702,000 US), with heats worth 20,900e and the final carrying a purse of 443,300e. Three time winner of the race, Varenne is also the holder of the fastest winning time of 1:10.8, which he set in 2002. Here are some other facts on Italy's Grand Slam, Leading horses 3 - Birbone (1952, 1953, 1955) 3 - Tornese (1957, 1958, 1962) 3 - Une de Mai (1969, 1970, 1971) 3 - Varenne (2000, 2001, 2002) 2 - The Last Hurrah (1978, 1979) 2 - Mack Grace SM (2012,2013) Leading Sires. 3 - Nevele Pride (Contingent Fee, Evita Broline, Classy Rogue) 2 - Ayres (Top Hanover, The Last Hurrah) 2 - Pharaon (Tornese, Nievo) 2 - Quick Pay (The Onion, Victory Tilly) 2 - Speedy Crown (Evann C., Embassy Lobell) Fastest winning times. Auto start Varenne (2002)[3] 1.10.8 (km rate) Volt start (1951, 1952, 1956 Gelinotte (1956)[3] 1.17.8 (km rate) Leading Trainers 5 - Vivaldo Baldi (1952, 1953, 1955, 1978, 1979) 4 - Sergio Brighenti (1957, 1958, 1962, 1963) 4 - Jean-Rene Gougeon (1969, 1970, 1971, 1976) 4 - Stig H. Johansson (1984, 1991, 2003, 2005) 3 - Jori Turja (2000, 2001, 2002) Leading Drivers 5 - Vivaldo Baldi (1952, 1953, 1955, 1978, 1979) 5 - Jean-Rene Gougeon (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1976) 4 - Stig H. Johansson (1984, 1991, 2003, 2005) 3 - Sergio Brighenti (1958, 1962, 1963) 3 - Giampaolo Minnucci (2000, 2001, 2002) Gran Premio Lotteria Winners 2013 Mack Grace SM Roberto Andreghetti Lucio Colletti Italy 1.11.3 2012 Mack Grace SM Roberto Andreghetti Lucio Colletti Italy 1.11.8 2011 Libeccio Grif Marco Smorgon Marco Smorgon Italy 1.12.8 2010 Italiano Gaetano Di Nardo Enrico Bellei Italy 1.11.3 2009 Island Effe Pietro Gubellini Edoardo Gubellini Italy 1.12.9 2008 Gambling Bi Jean-Michel Bazire Fabrice Souloy Italy 1.11.3 2007 Exploit Caf Jean-Michel Bazire Fabrice Souloy Italy 1.12.0 2006 Malabar Circle Ãs  Andrea Guzzinati Jerry Riordan Sweden 1.12.1 2005 Digger Crown Stig H. Johansson Stig H. Johansson Sweden 1.13.0 2004 Legendary Lover K. Enrico Bellei Gunnar Christiansen United States 1.12.5 2003 Victory Tilly Stig H. Johansson Stig H. Johansson Sweden 1.12.7 2002 Varenne Giampaolo Minucci Jori Turja Italy 1.10.8 2001 Varenne Giampaolo Minucci Jori Turja Italy 1.12.6 2000 Varenne Giampaolo Minucci Jori Turja Italy 1.12.4 1999 Remington Crown Joseph Verbeeck Jan Kruithof Sweden 1.11.1 1998 Kramer Boy Johnny Takter Johnny Takter Sweden 1.14.1 1997 Wesgate Crown Enrico Bellei Raz Mackenzie United States 1.12.4 1996 Crowning Classic Mauro Baroncini Mauro Baroncini United States 1.12.4 1995 Ina Scot Helen A. Johansson Kjell P. Dahlström Sweden 1.13.1 1994 Uconn Don Andrea Baveresi Andrea Baveresi United States 1.13.7 1993 Embassy Lobell Wim Paal Wim Paal United States 1.12.8 1992 Bravur Sund Mauro Baroncini Mauro Baroncini Sweden 1.12.7 1991 Peace Corps Stig H. Johansson Stig H. Johansson United States 1.14.0 1990 Evann C. Björn Lindblom Björn Lindblom United States 1.12.9 1989 Hollyhurst Lorenzo Baldi Lorenzo Baldi United States 1.13.2 1988 Grades Singing Olle Goop Olle Goop United States 1.12.8 1987 Limbo Joe Vittorio Guzzinati Vittorio Guzzinati United States 1.13.9 1986 Classy Rogue William Casoli William Casoli United States 1.14.8 1985 Evita Broline Berndt Lindstedt Berndt Lindstedt Sweden 1.13.9 1984 The Onion Stig H. Johansson Stig H. Johansson Sweden 1.14.1 1983 Keystone Patriot Veijo Heiskanen Antti Savolainen United States 1.15.6 1982 Our Dream of Mite Eduardo Gubellini Eduardo Gubellini United States 1.14.7 1981 Contingent Fee Mario Rivara Mario Rivara United States 1.16.2 1980 Hillion Brillouard Philippe Allaire Philippe Allaire France 1.13.8 1979 The Last Hurrah Vivaldo Baldi Vivaldo Baldi United States 1.14.9 1978 The Last Hurrah Vivaldo Baldi Vivaldo Baldi United States 1.14.5 1977 Wayne Eden Anselmo Fontanesi Anselmo Fontanesi United States 1.14.7 1976 Bellino II Jean-Rene Gougeon Jean-Rene Gougeon France 1.15.2 1975 Dimitria Leopold Verroken Leopold Verroken France 1.16.1 1974 Top Hanover Gerhard Krüger Gerhard Krüger United States 1.17.7 1973 Lightning Larry Eduardo Gubellini Eduardo Gubellini United States 1.16.5 1972 Amyot Louis Sauvé Louis Sauvé France 1.16.8 1971 Une de Mai Jean-Rene Gougeon Jean-Rene Gougeon France 1.16.7 1970 Une de Mai Jean-Rene Gougeon Jean-Rene Gougeon France 1.16.6 1969 Une de Mai Jean-Rene Gougeon Jean-Rene Gougeon France 1.16.6 1968 Eileen Eden Johannes Frömming Johannes Frömming United States 1.16.5 1967 Roquepine Jean-Rene Gougeon Henri Levesque France 1.16.4 1966 Cheer Honey Gerhard Krüger Gerhard Krüger United States 1.16.7 1965 Elma Johannes Frömming Jonel Chyriacos France 1.16.5 1964 Hurst Hanover Giancarlo Baldi Giancarlo Baldi United States 1.16.7 1963 Behave Sergio Brighenti Sergio Brighenti United States 1.16.4 1962 Tornese Sergio Brighenti Sergio Brighenti Italy 1.16.8 1961 Kracovie Roger Vercruysse Roger Vercruysse France 1.17.0 1960 Nievo Ugo Bottoni Ugo Bottoni Italy 1.17.5 1959 Icare IV Walter Baroncini Walter Baroncini France 1.16.7 1958 Tornese Sergio Brighenti Sergio Brighenti Italy 1.17.9 1957 Tornese Mario Santi Sergio Brighenti Italy 1.18.5 1956 Gelinotte Charlie Mills Charlie Mills France 1.17.8 1955 Birbone Vivaldo Baldi Vivaldo Baldi Italy 1.18.6 1954 Saint Clair Oduardo Baldi Oduardo Baldi United States 1.19.4 1953 Birbone Vivaldo Baldi Vivaldo Baldi Italy 1.18.5 1952 Birbone Vivaldo Baldi Vivaldo Baldi Italy 1.18.6 1951 Bayard Ugo Bottoni Ugo Bottoni Italy 1.20.3 by David Sanders, for Harnesslink.com

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the opening night of harness racing at Pompano Park, named the "Winter Capital of Harness Racing" by its founder, innovator and leader Frederick Van Lennep and his original management team. Built on a large 300 acre plus parcel that today is occupied by Wal-Mart and a host of commercial enterprises (on what was the mile track and training center), and across Racetrack Rd. by the Isle Casino Racing Pompano Park, the structure and its storied past, are best recalled by remembering Van Lennep, who passed away in June 1987. The Sun-Sentinel's remarks about Van Lennep are shown below: "He was 100 percent class," said Hall of Fame driver Stanley Dancer. "It wasn`t just that he had a nice word for everybody. He always had time for you. And he was a generous man. There was nothing he wouldn`t do to help anyone." Dancer, though, remembered a time he helped Van Lennep after putting his friend though a little bit of worry. "I had a horse in 1975 named Bonefish that I wanted to sell for a stallion," said Dancer, who served with Van Lennep on the board of directors of the United States Trotting Association. "Mr. Van Lennep told me he wanted to buy it. I told him it would cost him $1 million. He said fine and the deal was completed that fast." "I came back and drove that horse for him later that year in the Hambletonian. It was a four-heat race, and we finished ninth in the first heat. In the second heat, we finished third. We finally won the last two heats to win the race, but not after we got everybody worried." Van Lennep, who headed Castleton Inc., one of the leading standardbred breeding operations in the country, was best known as an innovator in the harness industry. What many people did not realize was that Van Lennep, who was born in Philadelphia on July 6, 1911, was an innovator in other areas as well. "Few people knew that my father had a very impressive physics background," said Hector Van Lennep, a retired general manager at Pompano. "After he graduated from Princeton (1933), he invented a motor that became the basis for the Sperry gyroscope. He was a firm believer in solid fuel propellants long before there was a fuel shortage, and he developed a process to freeze-dry coffee and citrus juice for soldiers fighting in Korea. He was always an innovator." Van Lennep did not become involved in the horse industry until he married his first wife Celeste McNeal. "My mother was quite an equestrian; in fact, she was the first woman to get a thoroughbred trainer`s license," Hector Van Lennep said. "My father was more or less dragged into the business, but he quickly loved it. He became a `gentleman driver` for a lot of amateur races, and he became more in love with the industry." Van Lennep opened Pompano Park in 1964, and doggedly kept the track open though it lost money in its first few seasons. His efforts did not go unnoticed, as he was voted to the Hall of Fame of the Trotter in Goshen, N.Y., in 1975. "His death is a deep, deep loss to the racing industry," said William E. Simon, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, who was a partner of Van Lennep`s in Pompano Park and in the ownership of several horses. "I first met him in 1977, and I have never known a finer man. He brought so much class and integrity to the industry. There is no way to gauge how much he`ll be missed." One of Van Lennep`s major concerns was the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky. Last September, the university established a $1 million endowed professorship in Van Lennep`s name in hopes of luring top scientists to the center. Simon donated $250,000 toward the endowment. "My father had a lot of favorite horses," said Hector Van Lennep. ":He loved Speedy Scot because he won the Triple Crown. He watched that horse grow and win the Triple Crown and it was very special to him." "But there was another horse named Worthy Boy. Every time he saw my father, he would talk to him. It never failed. As soon as he saw father, this loud whinny would come out. He just had a special affinity toward my father. A lot of people did, too." Pompano Park, under the leadership of Van Lennep and later John Cashman, Jr., was at the forefront of harness racing's best competition. It hosted the Breeders' Crown, in whole or part, from 1984-1993, producing some of the series' best performances by its best equine stars. Pacing events that I recall vividly are Bay's Fella that won the 1990 Open Pace for Paul Macdonell in a huge upset, Call For Rain in 1987 for trainer/driver Clint Galbraith in the Three Year-Old Colt pace, Miss Easy in the 1991 Three Year-Old Filly pace and Bruce Nickells' four-timer in the Two Year-Old Filly pace with Central Park West, Miss Easy, Hazleton Kay and Immortality. Legendary Artsplace took the 1990 Two Year-Old Colt pace for the late great trainer Gene Riegle. On the trotting side, the Breeders' Crown got its Florida start in 1984 when Baltic Speed took the Three Year-Old Colt trot for Jan Nordin, starting off a European impact on the trotting divisions. Other three year-old winners at Pompano included legendary Chuck Sylvester trainees Mack Lobell and Pine Chip and not so legendary Esquire Spur, Embassy Lobell (trained by Jerry Riordan), Giant Victory (trained by Per Eriksson) and Baltic Striker. Mack Lobell also won the Two Year-Old Breeders' Crown at Pompano in 1986 and was followed by Valley Victory in 1988 and then Royal Troubador (trained and driven by Ocala's Carl Allen), Crysta's Best (trainer/driver Dick Richarson, Jr.), Eriksson's King Conch and Giant Chill and trainer Raz MacKenzie's Wesgate Crown in 1993. Two Year-Old filly winners at Pompano included the Tom Haughton trainer Peace Corps, Eriksson's Delphi's Lobell, Soren Nordin's Jean Bi, Chuck Sylvester trained Armbro Keepsake and Winky's Goal and Gleam, owned by Mal Burroughs who won the Hambletonian Oaks driving this filly. Peace Corp returned to Pompano to capture the Breeders' Crown at age three for trainer Tom Haughton and as an aged mare in 1990 for then trainer/driver Stig H. Johansson in 1:54.2f., a time mark that was not lowered until 2004 and that on a mile track. Other memorable Three Year-Old Filly Breeders' Crown winners at Pompano included Sylvester's Armbro Devona, Armbro Fling, Me Maggie (Jan Johnson trained, Berndt Lindstedt driven), Twelve Speed, Imperfection (1992 winner trained by Ron Gurfein) and Expressway Hanover. And in the Aged Open category, who can forget the 1990 score in 1:55f by No Sex Please, the son of Brisco Hanover bred by Earl Lennox, trained by Ron Waples, Jr. and reined by Ron Waples (he won the same event two years later at Mohawk). Pompano Park enjoyed a fine run at the top of standardbred racings' leaderboard and remains in-action today with its attractive 126 race-day fall-winter-spring meet, simulcasting and as host to the Florida Breeders' Stakes program. Many Grand Circuit two year-olds are developed annually on the five-eighths mile raceway and South Florida also attracts a host of well-bred hopefuls at the Sunshine Meadows and South Florida Trotting Center facilities with trainers including those who won the early Breeders' Crown events at Pompano. by Thomas H. Hicks for Harnesslink.com    

Today (Wednesday) at Axevalla (SWE) Breeders Crown eligible events took place for three and four year-old males and females, each contested over 2140 meters autostart with 75,000SEK to the winner. Summary results are shown below: Backfire (3f Offshore Dream-Fashion Brodda-SJs Caviar) won the three year-old filly contest in 1.14.7kr for Erik Adielsson, her third 2013 win in ten starts for seasonal earnings of 1,198,000SEK. Mellby Briolett (3f Going Kronos-Merit Lane-Lindy Lane) was second for trainer Roger Walmann and reinsman Orjan Kihlstrom Rica Neo (4f Juliano Star-Cristall Cashflow-Supergill) took the four year-old mares event in 1.14.7kr for trainer/driver Ake Svanstedt. This one scored her sixth 2013 win in 13 starts for 1,111,000SEK earned for the year. She narrowly defeated favored Fascination (4f Super Arnie-Elissa FZ-Lemon Dra) and driver Johnny Takter. Fascination shows 2013 earnings of 1,648,250SEK for her 5-2-1 slate in nine appearances Poochai (3m Make It Happen-In Vino Veritas-Express Ride) took the three year-old male event in 1.15kr for Erik Adielsson, his first seasonal win in six starts. He easily defeated Darren Boko (3g Going Kronos-Lovely Kemp-Express Ride) and trainer/driver Markus Svedberg Twin’s Fairytale (4m Orlando Vici-Mint Hornline-Lindy’s Crown) scored in the four year-old male trot in 1.15.1kr for driver/trainer Ake Svanstedt, over stablemate Charlie Palema (4g Gidde Palema-Frosts Dime-Tibur) with Ake Lindblom aboard The previous day Red Rose America (3f Varenne-Armbro Voice-Garland Lobell) won at Mantorp in the Sikta Mot Stjarnorna Final for 200,000SEK to the winner. She emerged from the pocket in mid-stretch to score in 1.14.2kr for driver Kenneth Haugstad and trainer Jeannette Hansen. Developed by Jerry Riordan, and bred by Guida Italia Srl, the filly won for the seventh time in 13 starts this year. The Riordan trained Rossella Ross (3f Self Possessed-Northern Jewel-Garland Lobell) was the pacesetter and ended a good second for driver Orjan Kihlstrom. This one shows a 6-2-3 slate in 11 starts for 2013 earnings of 862,504SEK. Rufoli Lung (3m Pine Chip-Charmante Lung-Park Avenue Joe) was third for Juhani Partanen. The Mantorp co-feature for 100,000SEK first money went to Flash Oak (4g Super Arnie-Cara Bobs Crown-Wesgate Crown) for trainer/driver Oskar Svanberg. He was timed in 1.12.7kr over the 1640 meter autostart distance, scoring for the fourth time in 11 starts this year. This past weekend the Hungarian Trotting Association hosted their annual yearling sale. 31 head went through the ring with the sale topper being the Kabela Menes Kft. bred and raised Trotting Boy (Maximus Lindy-Jeans Lady) for US$8,039. Kabela Menes also sold the next four highest priced yearlings by stallions Ata Star L, and Maximus Lindy, each from solid producing HU mares. On the racing front Kincsem Park hosted a fine Saturday card including the 1.9 million HUf Ketevesek Nagydija. Szimfonia (2f Medic Hanover-Dallam) took the victory over 1800 meters autostart for owner Her-Lo Racing Kft. The co-featured Oszi Hanca Dij for 1.5 million HUf went to Poetica Saf (4f Frullino Jet-Augusta Bi) in 1.17kr over 1960 meters. The winner overcame a 40 meter distance handicap, traveling 2000 meters from trainer Tibor Hajnal and owners Illetmeny Kft. and Dejan Bacic. Veteran classic winning mare Nana (by Tony Oaks) was third in her final start for trainer Imre Fazekas and amateur driver Andrea Nagyvary, timed in 1.16.9kr over 2020 meters. The weekly Open (Disco Dij) produced another win by Vic Attack (10g Hans Boshoeve-Iris Attack) in 1.18.3kr in the 500,000HUf purse event over 1960 meters. Landlord and Vamos Kemp finished next in line. by Thomas H. Hicks for Harnesslink.com  

The Pres is underway as a sire, having left four individual juvenile winners in America during the last month. Now based permanently in New Zealand, the popular stallion served one small book of mares in the States before he was imported here three seasons ago; these horses are now 2-year-olds by American standards, and they've wasted no time putting their sire on the map. The Pres has had only eight starters in the U.S. to date, but already half of them have won and two others have been placed – tipping their sire over the $50,000 mark in earnings. First to greet the judge was the Charles Taylor-trained and drivenSpartan Presence, a colt out of the Lindy Lane mare Vega Blue Chip whowon at Hastings in Michigan on July 14. Next to salute was Hetties Commander, a colt out of Hetties Dream (by Dream Of Glory) who is trained by Michel Rivest and driven by David Boughton; he won at Georgian Downs in Ontario at the end of July. Following in the footsteps of these two sons were two daughters, who incidentally are his fastest thus far – The Pres Child is a filly out of the Mr Lavec mare Crowchild, who Walter Haynes trained and drove to win in 2:00.4 at Hoosier Park in Indiana on August 14; then the very next day, filly Nickange Two won a $50,000 Leg of the Ontario Sires Stakes Series at Rideau Carleton in Ontario for trainer Wayne Lee and driver Trevor Ritchie. The latter is out of the Wesgate Crown mare Goingonby, and trotted to victory in 2:00.8.    

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